Childhood Obesity Info

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Childhood Obesity Info: The Posative Impact of Parks and Recreation has of issues of Health.

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  • Childhood Obesity Info

    1. 1. <ul><li>Less Active Lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>Info From Mr. Idris Jassim Al-Oboudi </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] or [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Chair of the NAYS/CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>Recreation Manager / City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department </li></ul><ul><li>On Childhood obesity Data and Photos provided By: Mr. Richard J. Jackson, MD, MPH Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces & Mr. Glen Schmidt [email_address] Thank you </li></ul>
    2. 2. Less Active Lifestyles
    3. 3. Televisions are on more than 71/2 hours a day in the typical home   The average American spends over 4 hours per day watching TV Nielsen Media Research 2000
    4. 4. Technology Indoor activities, highly stimulating Entertainment
    5. 7. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    6. 8. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    7. 9. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    8. 10. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    9. 11. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    10. 12. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    11. 13. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
    12. 14. Prevalence (%) of overweight among children and adolescents ages 6-19 years Source: 1999-2000 NHANES Average 11 y.o. boy today is 11 pounds heavier than in 1973
    13. 16. Distribution of Modifiable Risk Factors and Relative Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among 84,941 Women in the Nurses’ Health Study, 1980 to 1996 Body-mass index <23.0 23.0-24.9 25.0-29.9 30.0-34.9 > 35.0 121 202 884 885 759 1.00 2.67 7.59 20.10 38.80 No. of Cases Relative Risk Source: The New England Journal of Medicine, Sept. 13, 2001
    14. 17. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1993-94 Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, et al. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA 2003 Jan 1;289(1). No Data <4% 4%-6% 6%-8% 8%-10% >10%
    15. 18. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1995-96 Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, et al. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA 2003 Jan 1;289(1). No Data <4% 4%-6% 6%-8% 8%-10% >10%
    16. 19. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1997-98 Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, et al. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA 2003 Jan 1;289(1). No Data <4% 4%-6% 6%-8% 8%-10% >10%
    17. 20. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1999 Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, et al. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA 2003 Jan 1;289(1). No Data <4% 4%-6% 6%-8% 8%-10% >10%
    18. 21. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 2001 Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, et al. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA 2003 Jan 1;289(1). No Data <4% 4%-6% 6%-8% 8%-10% >10%
    19. 22. <ul><li>Conclusions:  </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Increased body weight was associated with increased death rates for all cancers combined and for cancers at multiple specific sites.&quot; </li></ul>
    20. 23. Technology / Urban Environments = Stress Disconnect from Nature
    21. 24. Depression <ul><li>Depressive Disorders </li></ul><ul><li>19 million American adults </li></ul><ul><li>Leading cause of disability in the U.S. and worldwide </li></ul>Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 2001
    22. 25. Surgeon General’s Report <ul><li>21 percent of U.S. children ages nine to 17 have a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder associated with at least minimum impairment </li></ul>US DHHS 1999
    23. 26. Antidepressant Rx in US
    24. 27. Parks and open space counter these trends in two equally important ways
    25. 28. Parks and Open Space Provide a place for activities and exercise Lure people outdoors and in contact with nature
    26. 29. Parks and Open Space Providing a place for activities and exercise
    27. 30. Physical Activity Decreases Cancer Risk <ul><li>Regular Physical Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Decreases the risk of </li></ul><ul><li>colon (~50%) and </li></ul><ul><li>breast cancer (~25%) </li></ul><ul><li>Probably decreases the risk of prostate cancer </li></ul><ul><li>May reduce the risk of lung and endometrial cancer </li></ul><ul><li>Friedenreich CM, J Nutr 2002 Hardman AE, Proc Nutr Soc 2001 </li></ul>
    28. 31. Daylight <ul><li>Melatonin </li></ul><ul><li>Lower levels in Daylight and when alert. Higher levels with darkness and sleepiness. </li></ul>
    29. 32. Exercise <ul><li>Serotonin —Higher levels with exercise. Low levels associated with depression. </li></ul><ul><li>Prevention and treatment of depression </li></ul>
    30. 34. Americans Would Prefer to Walk More Walk More Drive N.A. Source: Belden, Russonello & Stewart national telephone survey, Oct. 30, 2002
    31. 35. Parks and Open Space Lure people outdoors and in contact with nature
    32. 36. Fredrick Law Olmsted “ The beauty of rural scenery is a restorative antidote to the artificiality and oppression of urban conditions”
    33. 37. Restorative Benefits of Nature <ul><li>Following gallbladder surgery, patients with views of nature recovered quicker, required less pain medication, had less complaints about their care and more…. </li></ul>Ulrich, R.S. 1984. View through a window may influence recovery from surgery. Science 224:420-421.
    34. 38. Children’s Contact with Nature <ul><li>School age children with ADHD who had higher contact with nature showed better concentration, task completion, and following of directions. </li></ul>Coping with ADD: The Surprising Connection to Green Play Settings” Environment and Behavior, 33 (1), 54-77 AF Taylor, FE Kuo, WC Sullivan, 2001
    35. 39. Public park facilities need to provide a balance of both…. ACTIVE (Physical) and PASSIVE (Restorative) … recreational opportunities
    36. 40. Regional Open Space Parks <ul><li>Retain large amounts of high value habitat </li></ul><ul><li>Can provide opportunities to immerse visitors in a natural setting (nature) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide important buffers from development </li></ul>Elfin Forest Open Space Preserve, Escondido, CA
    37. 41. Sports Parks <ul><li>Exercise through highly programmed athletic activities </li></ul><ul><li>Large geographic draw </li></ul><ul><li>Highly represented with large organizations, pressure to expand </li></ul><ul><li>Space intensive, large flat open space </li></ul>

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