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Technology Innovation Management Framework for Industrial Research              Part-2         Dr. Iain Sanders          J...
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THE STRATEGIC PLAN                         Platform 1:                      (Stages II, Part 3)Integrating Technology Inno...
WHAT PROBLEMS CAN BE ADDRESSED?                           Platform 1:                        (Stages II, Part 4)  Integrat...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)   What Problems can be Addressed?     Technology Problems        Identify generic scientific and engi...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)            Improving Products & Processes       39 Generic Engineering Parameters to Improve:1. Weight ...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)    Miscellaneous Characteristics to    be Improved     Technique-Independent           Common Physica...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)    Classification of Generic    Engineering Parameters     Group1: Common Physical & Generic Parameter...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)   Gp1: Common Physical & Geometric        Parameters (e.g. mass, size, energy) 1&2: Weight     The ma...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)   Gp1: Common Physical & Geometric        Parameters (e.g. mass, size, energy) 10: Force     Any inte...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp2: Technique-Independent Negative     Parameters (e.g. waste of substance or time,                    ...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp2: Technique-Independent Negative     Parameters (e.g. waste of substance or time,                    ...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp3: Technique-Independent Positive     Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability) 13: Stability...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp3: Technique-Independent Positive     Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability) 33: Convenien...
PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp3: Technique-Independent Positive     Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability) 38: Level of ...
WHAT RESOURCES CAN HELP?                         Platform 1:                      (Stages II, Part 5)Integrating Technolog...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    What Solutions are Available?     Technology Solutions        Provide proven techniques for overco...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    What Resources can Help?     Analytic and Knowledge-based Tools (Examples)        Innovation Situa...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Our Model For Innovation:    Mowing The Lawn            Innovation by normal, random process        ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Our Model For Innovation:    Mowing The Lawn  Give it a “kick” to get “out of the box” innovation   ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)  BASICS OF TYPICAL INNOVATION TOOLS     Psychology more than technology         DeBono, Lateral Think...
ANOTHER TOOL: TRIZPLATFORM 1: II (5)             WHAT IS “TRIZ” ?                   A Russian acronym:       Theoria Reshe...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Our Model For Innovation:    Mowing The Lawn  TRIZ is innovation by a rapid, systematic process     ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    TRIZ IS…..     The Russian acronym for the “Solving Problems      Inventively” (pronounced “trees” ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)             WHAT IS “TRIZ” ?       A set of problem solving and forecasting tools      based on the stu...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    WHAT TO USE TRIZ FOR     Level 2-4 problems        1--straightforward engineering design        2...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    THE OUTPUT OF THE PROCESS     Generates solution paths and concepts of      solution, NOT engineeri...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    THE HISTORY OF TRIZ    A discovery of a talented patent examiner for the Russian     navy, Genrich ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    BASIC CONCEPTS     Systems evolve toward IDEALITY irreversibly     Using RESOURCES within the syst...
THINKING OUTSIDE YOUR PARADIGMPLATFORM 1: II (5)    SPACE                             IMPOSSIBLE               POSSIBLE   ...
THE SOLUTION SPACEPLATFORM 1: II (5)                          Mechanical                           Effects &              ...
TAPPING OUR KNOWLEDGE  PLATFORM 1: II (5)        Is                       All Science                       INDUSTRY      ...
PATTERNS OF INVENTIONPLATFORM 1: II (5)I HAVE TO REMOVE CORES FROM AMILLION GREEN PEPPERS….      Processing Sweet Peppers ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    WHAT IS THE OPERATOR?    “Slowly raise pressure and suddenly reduce it” OR      “accumulate energy a...
PATTERNS OF INVENTIONPLATFORM 1: II (5)  • Removing stems from bell peppers  • Removing shells form sunflower seeds  • Cle...
PATTERNS OF INVENTIONPLATFORM 1: II (5)   • Removing stems from bell peppers   • Removing shells form sunflower seeds   • ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)                                                Many Typical                Many                        ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)      WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE TO RECOGNIZE      TO BE ABLE TO TRANSFER THE PEPPER     TECHNOLOLGY TO INDUSTR...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)                     “DEFALCATION”         “The purpose is to reduce/eliminate      defalcation when cri...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    GENERICIZING OUR LANGUAGE          Defalcation             Fraud                Substitution of one...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    THE BOTTOM LINE...     MOST PROBLEMS THAT WE SOLVE AND MOST PATHS OF       EVOLUTION OF TECHNICAL SY...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)     TRIZ IS BOTH A MENTAL PROCESS AND A      SCIENCE, AS WELL AS A SELECTION OF               TOOLS IN ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)         THE PROBLEM SOLVING         PROCESS (ALGORITHM)     Envision and state ideality or the ideal f...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    THE TOOLS IN THE TOOL KIT     Ideal Final Result/Ideality (IFR)     Resources     Contradictions,...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    AN OPERATOR    Operator Example    Specific problem   Specialized solution    3x2+5x+2 = 0       x =...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    AN OPERATOR    Operator Example    Specific problem   Specialized solution    3x2+5x+2 = 0       x= ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    WHAT IS AN OPERATOR?  Operator Example in Math  Abstract problem                               Abstr...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    THINKING ANALOGICALLY    (WITHOUT AN EGO)        THE WORLD’S     THE WORLD’S         PROBLEMS       ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    WHAT IS AN OPERATOR?    “Slowly raise pressure and    suddenly reduce it”       A path to a solutio...
PATTERNS OF INVENTION PLATFORM 1: II (5)• Altshuller recognized that the same fundamental  problem (contradiction) had bee...
TRIZ IS BASED ON PATTERNS IN         THE PATENT DATABASE  PLATFORM 1: II (5) Patents *(Worldwide)            Key Findings ...
Innovation SituationQuestionnaire – ISQ Tool       Platform 1:    (Stages II, Part 5)
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    What Resources can Help?     Analytic and Knowledge-based Tools (Examples)        Innovation Situa...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Innovation Situation    Questionnaire - ISQ       May be broken down into a distinct number of     ...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem     Try to describe you...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem     Try using these met...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem     Change your point o...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem Play with the scale:  ...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem Play the game "Good-Bad...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem Use Problem Inversion: ...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    1. Brief Description of the Problem Method of Feature Trans...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    2. Information about the System     Name the system in whic...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    3. Information about the Problem       Situation     Descri...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    4. Ideal Vision of Solution     Describe the ideal solution...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)     5. Available Resources   Resources are substances, fields ...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)  6. Allowable Changes to the System     Describe the degree of...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)     7. Criteria for Selecting Solution        Concepts   Any p...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)     7. Criteria for Selecting Solution        Concepts   While...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)   8. Company Business Environment     Describe the companys pr...
Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5)    9. Project Data     Document information about the project ...
Problem Formulation Tool       Platform 1:    (Stages II, Part 5)
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    What Resources can Help?     Analytic and Knowledge-based Tools (Examples)        Problem Formulat...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Useful Function              Useful             Function     Has useful output (although it may als...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Harmful Function              Harmful              Function     Leads to a harmful result. No usefu...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Links         Links describe the relationship between functions.                   Link      Functio...
Link Examples:Carpet Cleaning Service   PLATFORM 1: II (5)     Steam                Clean                Enjoy   extractio...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Basic Directions    Improving a Useful System        Useful Function                  Useful Functio...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Basic Directions    Improving a Harmful System            Harmful                    Harmful        ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Directions - Harmful Functions      Stop the        Stop the        Reduce the       source         ...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Refined Directions - Operators     After selecting a basic direction to explore, we get      more d...
PLATFORM 1: II (5)    Basic Directions    Improving a Useful System        Useful Function                  Useful Functio...
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Innovation Benefits Realization for Industrial Research (Part-2)

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Transcript of "Innovation Benefits Realization for Industrial Research (Part-2)"

  1. 1. Technology Innovation Management Framework for Industrial Research Part-2 Dr. Iain Sanders January 2005
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  5. 5. THE STRATEGIC PLAN Platform 1: (Stages II, Part 3)Integrating Technology Innovation with Business Function – Part I: Laying the Foundation
  6. 6. WHAT PROBLEMS CAN BE ADDRESSED? Platform 1: (Stages II, Part 4) Integrating Technology Innovation with Business Function – Part I: Laying the Foundation
  7. 7. PLATFORM 1: II (4) What Problems can be Addressed?  Technology Problems  Identify generic scientific and engineering parameters to improve products and processes. 7
  8. 8. PLATFORM 1: II (4) Improving Products & Processes 39 Generic Engineering Parameters to Improve:1. Weight of a mobile object 14. Strength 27. Reliability2. Weight of a stationary object 15. Time of action of a moving object 28. Accuracy of measurement3. Length of a mobile object 16. Time of action of a stationary object 29. Accuracy of manufacturing4. Length of a stationary object 17. Temperature 30. Harmful factors acting on an object from outside5. Area of a mobile object 18. Brightness 31. Harmful factors developed by an object6. Area of a stationary object 19. Energy spent by a moving object 32. Manufacturability7. Volume of a mobile object 20. Energy spent by a stationary object 33. Convenience of use8. Volume of a stationary object 21. Power 34. Repairability9. Speed 22. Loss of energy 35. Adaptability10. Force 23. Loss of a substance 36. Complexity of a device11. Tension / Pressure 24. Loss of an information 37. Complexity of control12. Shape 25. Loss of time 38. Level of automation13. Stability of composition 26. Amount of substance 39. Capacity / Productivity 8
  9. 9. PLATFORM 1: II (4) Miscellaneous Characteristics to be Improved  Technique-Independent  Common Physical Parameters Parameters  Safety  Electrical impedance  Stability of parameters  Optical transparency  Accuracy of operation  Viscosity  Information  Corrosion resistance  Tolerances  Noise  Susceptibility  Transient processes in  Ergonomics condensed matter  Aesthetics  Others 9
  10. 10. PLATFORM 1: II (4) Classification of Generic Engineering Parameters  Group1: Common Physical & Generic Parameters (e.g. mass, size, energy etc.)  Group2: Technique-Independent Negative Parameters (e.g. waste of substance or time, loss of information, harm, etc.)  Group3: Technique-Independent Positive Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability, etc.) 10
  11. 11. PLATFORM 1: II (4) Gp1: Common Physical & Geometric Parameters (e.g. mass, size, energy) 1&2: Weight  The mass of the subsystem, element, or technique in a gravitational field. The force that the body exerts on its support or suspension, or on the surface on which it rests 3&4: Length  A geometric characteristic described by the part of a line (straight or curved and not necessarily the longest) that can be measured by any unit of linear dimension, such as meter, inch, etc. 5&6: Area  A geometric characteristic described by the part of a plane enclosed by a finite continuous line that can be measured in a square unit of dimension. The part of a surface occupied by the subsystem 7&8: Volume  A geometric characteristic described by the part of a space that can be measured in a cubic unit of dimension. The part of a space, either internal or external, occupied by the subsystem 9: Speed  The velocity of the subsystem. The rate of a process or action in time that can be measured by any linear unit of length divided by a time unit 11
  12. 12. PLATFORM 1: II (4) Gp1: Common Physical & Geometric Parameters (e.g. mass, size, energy) 10: Force  Any interaction that can change the subsystems condition due to the interaction between subsystems 11: Stress or Pressure  Tension on or inside the subsystem 12: Shape  The external contours, boundaries, that separate the subsystem from the environment or other subsystems. The appearance of the subsystem in the space 17: Temperature  The thermal condition of the subsystem. Liberally includes other thermal parameters, such as heat capacity, that affect the rate of temperature change 18: Brightness  Light flux per unit area. Also any other illumination characteristics of the subsystem, such as light intensity, degree of illumination 21: Power  The time rate of energy usage due to which the subsystems functions are performed Also 13-16 & 26: 13. Stability of composition, 14. Strength, 15. Time of action of a moving object, 16. Time of action of a stationary object, 26. Amount of substance 12
  13. 13. PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp2: Technique-Independent Negative Parameters (e.g. waste of substance or time, loss of information, harm) 15&16: Duration of action  The time during which the subsystem can perform useful and / or neutral functions (durability). It can be estimated as the average period between failures, the service life 19&20: Energy spent by the subsystem  The subsystems requirement (such as electricity or rotation) to perform a particular function. Often energy is provided by the technique or super-system 22: Waste of energy  Use of energy (such as heat) that does not contribute to the job being done (compare with 19 & 20). Reducing energy loss sometimes requires heuristics that are different from the heuristics for improving energy usage. Consequently, energy waste is a separate Parameter 23: Waste of substance  Partial or complete, permanent or temporary loss of some of the subsystems materials or elements 24: Loss of information  Partial or complete, permanent or temporary loss of data or access to data in or by the subsystem. Frequently includes sensory data such as aroma, texture, etc. 13
  14. 14. PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp2: Technique-Independent Negative Parameters (e.g. waste of substance or time, loss of information, harm) 25: Waste of time  Time is the duration of an activity. Improving the loss of time means reducing the time taken out of the activity. "Cycle time reduction" is a common term 26: Amount of substance  The number of the subsystems materials or elements that might be changed fully or partially, permanently or temporarily 30: Harmful factors acting on subsystem  Susceptibility of the subsystem to externally generated harmful effects 31: Harmful side effects  A harmful effect that is generated by the subsystem as part of its operation within the technique, and that reduces the efficiency or quality of the functioning of the subsystem or whole technique Also 14, 36, 37: 14. Strength, 36. Complexity of a device, 37. Complexity of control 14
  15. 15. PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp3: Technique-Independent Positive Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability) 13: Stability of the subsystem  The ability of the subsystem to keep its integrity (wholeness). Steadiness of the subsystems elements in time. Wear, chemical decomposition, disassembly, the growth of entropy are all decreases in stability 14: Strength  The ability of the subsystem to resist a change in response to force. Resistance to breaking 27: Reliability  The subsystems ability to perform its intended functions in predictable ways & conditions 28: Accuracy of measurement  The closeness of the measured value to the actual value of the subsystem parameter 29: Accuracy of manufacturing  The closeness of the actual characteristics of the subsystem to the specified or required characteristics that can be achieved during the subsystem production. (Note that manufacturing precision is often connected with quality of the subsystem) 32: Manufacturability  The degree of facility, comfort, ease, or effortlessness in manufacturing or fabricating of the subsystem 15
  16. 16. PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp3: Technique-Independent Positive Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability) 33: Convenience of use  Simplicity & ease of operation. The technique is not convenient if it requires many steps to operate or needs special tools, many highly skilled workers, etc. Often a convenient process has high yield due to the possibility to do it right 34: Repairability  Quality characteristics such as convenience, comfort, simplicity, & time to repair faults, failures, or defects in the subsystem 35: Adaptability  The ability of the subsystem to respond positively to external changes, and the versatility of the subsystem that can be used in multiple ways under a variety of circumstances 36: Complexity  The number & diversity of elements & element interrelationships within the subsystem. The user may be an element of the subsystem that increases the complexity. The difficulty of mastering the subsystem is a measure of its complexity 37: Complexity of control  Measuring or monitoring the subsystems that are difficult, costly, & require much time & labour to set up & use, that have fuzzy relationships between components, or that have components that interfere with each other, demonstrating "difficult to detect & measure" 16
  17. 17. PLATFORM 1: II (4)Gp3: Technique-Independent Positive Parameters (e.g. productivity, manufacturability) 38: Level of automation  The ability of the subsystem to perform its functions without human interface. The lowest level of automation is the use of a manually operated tool. For intermediate levels, humans program the tool, observe its operation, & interrupt or reprogram as needed. For the highest level, the machine senses the operation needed, programs itself, & monitors its own operations 39: Productivity  The number of functions or operations performed by the subsystem or whole technique per unit of time. The time for a unit function or operation. The output per unit time or the cost per unit of output Also 19-21: 19. Energy spent by a moving object, 20. Energy spent by a stationary object, 21. Power 17
  18. 18. WHAT RESOURCES CAN HELP? Platform 1: (Stages II, Part 5)Integrating Technology Innovation with Business Function – Part I: Laying the Foundation
  19. 19. PLATFORM 1: II (5) What Solutions are Available?  Technology Solutions  Provide proven techniques for overcoming technological constraints and functional limitations in systems. 19
  20. 20. PLATFORM 1: II (5) What Resources can Help?  Analytic and Knowledge-based Tools (Examples)  Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQ (Analytic Tool)  Problem Formulation (Analytic Tool)  Technical Contradiction Analysis (Knowledge-based Tool)  Ideal Design (Analytic Tool)  Su-Field Analysis (Analytic Tool)  Patterns of Evolution (Knowledge-based Tool) 20
  21. 21. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Our Model For Innovation: Mowing The Lawn Innovation by normal, random process 21
  22. 22. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Our Model For Innovation: Mowing The Lawn Give it a “kick” to get “out of the box” innovation 22
  23. 23. PLATFORM 1: II (5) BASICS OF TYPICAL INNOVATION TOOLS  Psychology more than technology  DeBono, Lateral Thinking/Six Hats™, CPS  Can discuss integration if interested  Randomness  Brainstorming, picture, etc. stimulation  Can review how to integrate if interested  Highly dependent upon facilitation skills  Fine for simple problems  Can be easily learned  Limited by knowledge in the room--TRIZ is the only innovation tool which uses the patterns of invention OUTSIDE the room as well 23
  24. 24. ANOTHER TOOL: TRIZPLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT IS “TRIZ” ? A Russian acronym: Theoria Resheneyva Isobretatelskehuh Zadach (Theory of Solving Problems Inventively) 24
  25. 25. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Our Model For Innovation: Mowing The Lawn TRIZ is innovation by a rapid, systematic process 25
  26. 26. PLATFORM 1: II (5) TRIZ IS…..  The Russian acronym for the “Solving Problems Inventively” (pronounced “trees” )  Based on observable patterns found in patents and literature of how people solve problems  A system of:  patterns of how people solve problems  tools to define problems in ways that allow us to utilize the patterns for solving new problems. 26
  27. 27. PLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT IS “TRIZ” ? A set of problem solving and forecasting tools based on the study of the world’s most inventive patents and the inventive principles used in them There are only so many and we keep reusing! 27
  28. 28. PLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT TO USE TRIZ FOR  Level 2-4 problems  1--straightforward engineering design  2--simple contradictions  3--difficult design and manufacturing contradictions  4--extremely difficult system design problems (“intestine problems”)  5--invention of new science  Level 4 can require looking at hundreds of thousands of potential solutions and take many years of effort within an organization 28
  29. 29. PLATFORM 1: II (5) THE OUTPUT OF THE PROCESS  Generates solution paths and concepts of solution, NOT engineering drawings and detail  A better, more clearly defined problem and project  New and nearly exhaustive set of solution concepts 29
  30. 30. PLATFORM 1: II (5) THE HISTORY OF TRIZ  A discovery of a talented patent examiner for the Russian navy, Genrich Altshuller, 1950’s  Originated from the study of several hundred thousand of the world’s most inventive patents--now in the millions  He recognized that the development of technological systems follows predictable patterns that cut across ALL areas of technology--the speed of technical evolution can be accelerated  Also recognized that problem solving principles are also predictable and repeatable--anyone can invent!  Established schools to teach after a Stalin 7 yr. prison term-- deceased in 1999 at age 71 30
  31. 31. PLATFORM 1: II (5) BASIC CONCEPTS  Systems evolve toward IDEALITY irreversibly  Using RESOURCES within the system or easily convertible  Resolving CONTRADICTIONS as they evolve  PATTERNS OF INVENTIONS/OPERATORS are constantly recognized and used 31
  32. 32. THINKING OUTSIDE YOUR PARADIGMPLATFORM 1: II (5) SPACE IMPOSSIBLE POSSIBLE TIME EVENTS AND EXPERIENCES SHAPE OUR BELIEF SYSTEM!!! 32
  33. 33. THE SOLUTION SPACEPLATFORM 1: II (5) Mechanical Effects & Technology P roblem Chemical Effects Electrical & & Technology Magnetic Effects S olution & Technology 33
  34. 34. TAPPING OUR KNOWLEDGE PLATFORM 1: II (5) Is All Science INDUSTRY COMPANY PERSONAL 1 2 3 4 5 NOTE: BRAINSTORMING, ETC. FOCUS ONLY ON USING THE INNER AREA MORE EFFECTIVELY 34
  35. 35. PATTERNS OF INVENTIONPLATFORM 1: II (5)I HAVE TO REMOVE CORES FROM AMILLION GREEN PEPPERS…. Processing Sweet Peppers 35
  36. 36. PLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT IS THE OPERATOR? “Slowly raise pressure and suddenly reduce it” OR “accumulate energy and release it”  A path to a solution  An approach to solving a problem  A direction towards an answer 36
  37. 37. PATTERNS OF INVENTIONPLATFORM 1: II (5) • Removing stems from bell peppers • Removing shells form sunflower seeds • Cleaning filters • Unpacking parts wrapped in protective paper • Splitting diamonds along micro-cracks • Producing sugar powder from sugar crystals • Explosive depulping 37
  38. 38. PATTERNS OF INVENTIONPLATFORM 1: II (5) • Removing stems from bell peppers • Removing shells form sunflower seeds • Cleaning filters • Unpacking parts wrapped in protective paper • Splitting diamonds along micro-cracks (+27 years after pepper patent) • Producing sugar powder from sugar crystals • Explosive depulping 38
  39. 39. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Many Typical Many Recommendations Typical for 1 1 Solutions A large problemsof number Problems 2 typical are 2 (Knowledge base) available for 3 3 consideration 4 To Prism Corresponding 4 TRIZ help to marrow of TRIZ - 5 the search to a Analytical Solutions 5 manageable range of tools 6 6 typical problems 7 7 For each typical 8 8 problem, there are one 9 or more potential 9 solutions n n 39
  40. 40. PLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE TO RECOGNIZE TO BE ABLE TO TRANSFER THE PEPPER TECHNOLOLGY TO INDUSTRIAL GRINDING DIAMONDS? 40
  41. 41. PLATFORM 1: II (5) “DEFALCATION” “The purpose is to reduce/eliminate defalcation when criminals use false ID to impersonate real customers” What is Defalcation? 41
  42. 42. PLATFORM 1: II (5) GENERICIZING OUR LANGUAGE  Defalcation Fraud Substitution of one thing for another Useful in internal communication, but a barrier to problem solving! 42
  43. 43. PLATFORM 1: II (5) THE BOTTOM LINE... MOST PROBLEMS THAT WE SOLVE AND MOST PATHS OF EVOLUTION OF TECHNICAL SYSTEMS ARE ALREADY KNOWN----THIS IS A MAJOR PSYCHOLOGICAL BARRIER WHAT WE HAVE TO DO IS TO RECOGNIZE OTHERS’ PROBLEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES IN GENERIC FORM (IN DISGUISE?) SOME PEOPLE MAKE A CAREER OUT OF MAKING THEIR PROBLEM SEEM TRULY UNIQUE 43
  44. 44. PLATFORM 1: II (5) TRIZ IS BOTH A MENTAL PROCESS AND A SCIENCE, AS WELL AS A SELECTION OF TOOLS IN A TOOL KIT 44
  45. 45. PLATFORM 1: II (5) THE PROBLEM SOLVING PROCESS (ALGORITHM)  Envision and state ideality or the ideal final result  What are the barriers and contradictions?  What are the resources that can be used?  Develop a model of achieving ideality 45
  46. 46. PLATFORM 1: II (5) THE TOOLS IN THE TOOL KIT  Ideal Final Result/Ideality (IFR)  Resources  Contradictions, contradiction table, and separation principles  Lines and patterns of evolution  Reverse TRIZ  ARIZ  Software 46
  47. 47. PLATFORM 1: II (5) AN OPERATOR Operator Example Specific problem Specialized solution 3x2+5x+2 = 0 x = ???? 47
  48. 48. PLATFORM 1: II (5) AN OPERATOR Operator Example Specific problem Specialized solution 3x2+5x+2 = 0 x= -1, -2/3 48
  49. 49. PLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT IS AN OPERATOR? Operator Example in Math Abstract problem Abstract solution ax2+bx+c = 0 x=(-b+/-/b24ac)/2a Specific problem Specialized solution 3x2+5x+2 = 0 x= -1, -2/3 Trial and error THINK ABOUT THE REVERSE OF THIS!! 49
  50. 50. PLATFORM 1: II (5) THINKING ANALOGICALLY (WITHOUT AN EGO) THE WORLD’S THE WORLD’S PROBLEMS SOLUTIONS MY PROBLEM MY SOLUTION 50
  51. 51. PLATFORM 1: II (5) WHAT IS AN OPERATOR? “Slowly raise pressure and suddenly reduce it”  A path to a solution  An approach to solving a problem  A direction towards an answer  A recommendation on how to change a system  Derived from patterns of invention and patterns of product evolution 51
  52. 52. PATTERNS OF INVENTION PLATFORM 1: II (5)• Altshuller recognized that the same fundamental problem (contradiction) had been addressed by a number of inventions in different areas of technology• He also observed that the same fundamental solutions were used over and over again, often separated by many years• He reasoned that if the latter inventor had had knowledge of the earlier solution, their task would have been straightforward• He sought to extract, compile, and organize such information 52
  53. 53. TRIZ IS BASED ON PATTERNS IN THE PATENT DATABASE PLATFORM 1: II (5) Patents *(Worldwide) Key Findings •Definition of inventive problems •Levels of invention •Patterns of evolution •Patterns of invention * Today over 2,000,000 patents have been investigated. 53
  54. 54. Innovation SituationQuestionnaire – ISQ Tool Platform 1: (Stages II, Part 5)
  55. 55. PLATFORM 1: II (5) What Resources can Help?  Analytic and Knowledge-based Tools (Examples)  Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQ (Analytic Tool): Design or inventive problems are not always clearly defined and all relevant information is not known by the team members. The ISQ makes explicit all the needed information for the individuals working with innovative problems. The ISQ provides the much needed structure for gathering information necessary to reformulate a problem and then break it down into many smaller problems. 55
  56. 56. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQ  May be broken down into a distinct number of steps, for example: 1. Brief description of the problem 2. Information about the system 3. Information about the problem situation 4. Ideal vision of solution 5. Available resources 6. Allowable resources 7. Criteria for selecting solution concepts 8. Company business environment 9. Project data 56
  57. 57. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem  Try to describe your problem in a single, simple phrase. Avoid using professional terminology – instead, use the "everyday" language you would use to speak to a high-school science student. Although professional language is very useful for communication between experts, it can hide the more basic information required to solve tough problems. By expressing your problem in non- professional terms it becomes more "generalized," giving you the opportunity to apply more approaches in your search for solutions. 57
  58. 58. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem  Try using these methods to reduce psychological inertia:  Change your point of view  Play with the scale  Play the game "Good-Bad"  Use Problem Inversion  Use the Method of Feature Transfer (MFT) 58
  59. 59. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem  Change your point of view:  Try to explain your problem to a teenager. Use general words rather than professional terminology.  Imagine how your problem would be presented by:  someone who knows nothing about your system  a barbarian  a lunatic  a Martian 59
  60. 60. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem Play with the scale:  How would your problem change if one or more system parameters were increased or decreased by a factor of 2, 5, 10, 50, 500, or 10000? What if a parameter had a negative value?  As you think about this, consider changes to:  dimension  speed of action  the cost of problem solving, for example: – What could you do with one dollar? – What could you do with one million dollars?  Also consider the parameters associated with the main system functions, such as temperature, power, efficiency, accuracy, etc. 60
  61. 61. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem Play the game "Good-Bad":  Write down the following sequence of statements:  Having the main system drawback <describe> is BAD for the following reason: <describe Reason 1>  Having Reason 1 <describe> is GOOD for the following reason: <describe Reason 2>  Having Reason 2 <describe> is BAD for the following reason: <describe Reason 3>  Having Reason 3 <describe> is GOOD for the following reason: <describe Reason 4>  Try to create at least 4 or 5 statements. Dont be concerned if a reason seems ridiculous or unacceptable – the purpose of this exercise is to get you thinking "out of the box." 61
  62. 62. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem Use Problem Inversion:  Consider the following options:  Replace an action with an opposing action – for example, instead of heating, use cooling. In particular, consider replacing a sequence of operations with the reverse sequence.  Make movable parts immovable, making immovable parts movable and change the nature of the movement from reciprocating motion to rotary or oscillatory motion and vice versa  Turn the object, system or process inside-out or upside-down. In particular, consider substituting an inside action for an outside action, or vice-versa. 62
  63. 63. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 1. Brief Description of the Problem Method of Feature Transfer (MFT):  The Method of Feature Transfer (MFT) entails transferring the features of randomly-picked objects to the system (usually a product) that you are trying to improve. To do this, follow these steps:  Step 1. Identify the system to be improved  Step 2. Select 3 to 5 objects at random – for example, open a book or magazine and pick 3 - 5 different nouns  Step 3. List the features for each object you selected  Step 4. Transfer the features to the product you wish to improve. In particular:  Apply each feature of the selected object, one at a time, to the product  Try to formulate problems for improving the product in the direction prompted by the random feature 63
  64. 64. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 2. Information about the System  Name the system in which the problem occurs.  Describe the purpose of the system.  Describe the structure and functioning of the system.  Describe the system environment  Formulate your answers with as much detail as possible – err on the side of providing too much, rather than too little information. 64
  65. 65. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 3. Information about the Problem Situation  Describe the problem, the reasons for resolving it, and the mechanism (s) responsible for its occurrence. 65
  66. 66. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 4. Ideal Vision of Solution  Describe the ideal solution using the following templates:  An element <name/description of element> that produces a required useful effect <describe the useful effect> is no longer necessary.  An element <name/description of element> that causes a harmful effect < describe the harmful effect> is removed from the system.  A harmful effect <name/description of element> withdraws itself. 66
  67. 67. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 5. Available Resources  Resources are substances, fields (energy), the properties of a substance/field, functional characteristics, and other attributes existing in a system and its surroundings, which can be utilized for system improvement.  Readily-available resources are resources that can be used as they are. Consider the following types of readily-available resources:  Substance resources  Field resources  Space resources  Time resources  Informational resources  Functional resources  Derived resources are resources that can be used after undergoing some kind of transformation. To utilize an available resource after transformation, consider the appropriate recommendation for that type of resource:  Derived substance resources  Derived field resources  Derived time resources  Derived functional resources  Derived resource accumulation  Derived resource concentration 67
  68. 68. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 6. Allowable Changes to the System  Describe the degree of allowable change to the system: 1. Completely changing the system is allowed. 2. Drastic changes to the system are allowed. 3. Small changes are allowed. 4. Only minimal changes are allowed.  Describe the limitations for changing the system: 1. Indicate what cannot be changed in the system – i.e., which technical, economic or other characteristics should:  remain constant  not decrease  not increase 2. Explain the reasons for the imposed restrictions. 3. If possible, indicate the conditions under which these restrictions can be removed. 4. If removing the restrictions causes new (secondary) problems, evaluate if it is better to try to solve these problems rather than solve the original problem. 68
  69. 69. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 7. Criteria for Selecting Solution Concepts  Any process must have a measure for success. Some criteria are so obvious that they are not even mentioned until they are violated by a developed Concept. To avoid wasting time and effort developing useless Concepts, it is better to document the “success" criteria beforehand. For this purpose, refer to Typical criteria for success:  Indicate the desired technical characteristics compared to the existing characteristics.  Indicate the desired economic characteristics compared to the existing characteristics. In particular, specify an acceptable cost of each prospective change, an acceptable amount of investment for implementing each change, etc.  Indicate the desired timetables for each stage of work; i.e., concept development, evaluation of potential solutions, and implementation of the solution(s).  Indicate the expected degree of novelty of the solutions (i.e., is it desirable to patent new concepts?).  Consider additional criteria, such as: – product appearance – convenience and low cost of maintenance and service – other 69
  70. 70. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 7. Criteria for Selecting Solution Concepts  While selecting your success criteria, make sure that the limitations are reasonable. Also, try to avoid criteria that "push" the problem-solving process in a particular direction (for example, declaring beforehand that the solution must be hydraulic-based).  Often, analyzing the success criteria produces critical changes in how the problem is understood, which are in turn helpful toward finding a solution. To analyze the criteria, consider the following questions:  Are certain criteria too high or even excessive, and thus only hinder the problem-solving effort?  Are certain criteria unclear and therefore capable of hindering the search for a solution?  Are important criteria missing?  Should certain criteria be stronger to satisfy long-term requirements? 70
  71. 71. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 8. Company Business Environment  Describe the companys products, markets, competition, clients, suppliers, facilities, process systems, etc. Regard all of these things as sources of different resources.  Financial resources  Human resources  Technical resources  Other business assets as resources 71
  72. 72. Innovation Situation Questionnaire - ISQPLATFORM 1: II (5) 9. Project Data  Document information about the project that encompasses the solving of your problem:  Project name  Project objectives  Project timeline  Project team  Contact information (phone, E-mail, etc.) 72
  73. 73. Problem Formulation Tool Platform 1: (Stages II, Part 5)
  74. 74. PLATFORM 1: II (5) What Resources can Help?  Analytic and Knowledge-based Tools (Examples)  Problem Formulation (Analytic Tool): A flow chart is made linking everything in the system to the “Primary Useful Function” and the “Primary Harmful Function”. Secondary functions are included, going to the level of detail required by the particular need that created the project. The links between nodes in the flow chart represent causal relationships. The output is a comprehensive set of problem statements defining the problem space. 74
  75. 75. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Useful Function Useful Function  Has useful output (although it may also have harmful output as well)  Is a useful result 75
  76. 76. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Harmful Function Harmful Function  Leads to a harmful result. No useful results are produced.  A harmful result because it hinders some useful function. 76
  77. 77. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Links Links describe the relationship between functions. Link Function Function A B Produce Makes good happen Produce Makes bad happen Counteract Stops good from happening Counteract Stops bad from happening 77
  78. 78. Link Examples:Carpet Cleaning Service PLATFORM 1: II (5) Steam Clean Enjoy extraction carpet home System to Fear of damage to furniture protect furniture 78
  79. 79. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Basic Directions Improving a Useful System Useful Function Useful Function A B  Make it better  Make it differently  Make B without A 79
  80. 80. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Basic Directions Improving a Harmful System Harmful Harmful Function Function A B  Stop the source  Stop the action  Reduce the consequences 80
  81. 81. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Directions - Harmful Functions Stop the Stop the Reduce the source action consequences Stop the Pad the Make collision components replacement easy 81
  82. 82. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Refined Directions - Operators  After selecting a basic direction to explore, we get more detailed suggestions for solutions. We call these suggestions operators. 82
  83. 83. PLATFORM 1: II (5) Basic Directions Improving a Useful System Useful Function Useful Function A B  Make it better  Make it differently  Make B without A 83
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