Research Skills For Management Consultants
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Research Skills For Management Consultants

on

  • 2,227 views

Presentation by Iain Matheson to Institute of Management Consultants NZ - Wellington Branch 22 September 2010

Presentation by Iain Matheson to Institute of Management Consultants NZ - Wellington Branch 22 September 2010

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,227
Views on SlideShare
2,226
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
43
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Research Skills For Management Consultants Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Research skills for management consultants: Sharpening the tools
    • Institute of Management Consultants NZ Wellington Branch 22 September 2010
    • Iain Matheson CMC
    • http://www.mathesonassociates.co.nz
  • 2. Overview
    • Management consultancy and research/data collection
    • Interviews
    • Focus groups
    • Surveys
  • 3. A Famous Researcher?
  • 4. F.W. Taylor
    • Systematizing Shop Management and Manufacturing Costs a Specialty
    • (F.W. Taylor’s business card, 1893).
  • 5. Other Management Gurus/ Researchers
    • John Adair
    • Chris Argyris
    • Meredith Belbin
    • Edward de Bono
    • Rensis Likert
    • Douglas McGregor
    • Abraham Maslow
    • Henry Minzberg
  • 6. Presentation Sources Researchers Business researchers Management Consultants Lorrelle Frazer & Meredith Lawley Richard Krueger Jane Richie & Jane Lewis Michael Q Patton Statistics New Zealand Gordon Willis Evert Gummesson David Maister Peter Block Michael Boricki CMC-Canada Gerald Weinberg Alan Weiss
  • 7. Some Familiar Books
  • 8. Opening the Toolbox
    • Hand tools
    • Cutting and abrasive tools
    • Garden tools
    • Machine tools
    • Power tools
    • Measuring and alignment tools
  • 9. Hand Tools
    • Methods for gathering...data are varied and include:
    • retrieval and study of records
    • observing events and conditions
    • ...questionnaires
    • interviewing
    • data gathering meetings
    • employee attitude surveys
    • estimating (CMC-Canada, 2010, p.22).
  • 10. Other Diagnostical Considerations
    • Breadth of 6 CBK functional areas
    • Culture
    • Strengths and opportunities
    • Methods of analysis
  • 11. Interviews
    • What’s to know? I’ve been talking to people for 50 years! (anon).
  • 12. Types of Hammer
  • 13. The Long Pedigree of the Interview
  • 14. Type of Interviews
  • 15. Early Considerations
    • What data do you need?
    • Are interviews best way to gather this data?
    • Which type and why?
    • Qualitative data only?
    • Generalising
    • Who to interview
  • 16. Other Issues
    • Intervening
    • Use of self
    • Authenticity
    • Rapport-building and neutrality
    • Listening
    • Recording
    • Confidentiality
  • 17. Advantages of Interviews
    • Core area of management consultancy competency
    • Get rich (detailed) information
    • Short time frames
    • Flexible
  • 18. Disadvantages of Interviews
    • Can be expensive/time-consuming
    • Can be difficult to organise
    • Usually generate more data that you can use
    • Variability in the quality of the information that you get
  • 19. Focus Groups
    • A definition:
    • A focus group is a carefully planned discussion designed to obtain perceptions on a defined area of interest in a permissive non-threatening environment. It is conducted with approximately 7 to 10 participants by a skilled interviewer. The discussion is comfortable and often enjoyable for participants as they share their ideas and perceptions. Group members influence each other by responding to ideas and comments (Krueger, 1997, p.6).
  • 20. Types of Focus Groups
    • Focus group, group interview, discussion group or workshop?
    • One-off?
    • Heterogeneity or homogeneity groups?
    • Face-to-face or telephone/videoconferencing-based?
  • 21. Considerations
    • Krueger’s (1997) 9 focus group facilitator roles:
      • S eeker of wisdom Enlightened novice
      • Expert consultant Challenger
      • Referee Writer
      • Team member Therapist
      • Serial interviewer.
    • Comfortable environment
    • Whether a co-facilitator is needed
  • 22. Focus Group Advantages
    • Good alignment with management consultants;
    • Useful for gaining reactions, opinions, information and advice;
    • Equally good for employees, customers or vendors;
    • Participation inter-action enhances data quality;
    • May generate useful new information;
    • Can be cost-effective;
    • Data can be produced quite quickly;
    • Flexible .
  • 23. Focus Group Disadvantages
    • Limited number of questions;
    • One or two people can dominate;
    • Those with minority views may not fully participate;
    • A skilled moderator/facilitator is required;
    • There may be reactive effects;
    • Can produce more data than needed;
    • Not good for controversial or subtle subjects;
    • Participant attending as scheduled may be an issue;
    • Participant confidentiality cannot be assured .
  • 24. Surveys
    • A definition:
    • A survey involves the collection of information from some (or all) units of a population using well-designed concepts, methods and procedures, and the compilation of such information in a useful summary form (Statistics New Zealand, 1995, p.9).
  • 25. Types of Surveys
    • Self completion questionnaire
    • Telephone questionnaire
    • Survey interview
    • Internet survey
    • Polls (eg linkedin, website, tv, radio)
    • Omnibus surveys
  • 26. Early Considerations
    • Is suitable information already available?
    • What are the objectives?
    • What are you trying to measure?
    • Co-operation likely?
    • Sufficient timeframe and budget?
    • How will the results be used?
  • 27. Other Issues
    • Selecting type of survey
    • Simple/short or complex/comprehensive?
    • Sample or census
    • Probability or non-probability sample
    • Units of population and sampling frame
    • Sample size
    • Testing
  • 28. Survey Advantages
    • Objectivity
    • Potential to generalise
    • Management consultants ‘bigger picture’.
    • Can gather data from lots of people
    • Internet specific:
      • Accessible and increasingly easy to use
      • Low cost – several with free (limited) versions
      • Fast and convenient
      • Basic analysis built-in
  • 29. Survey Disadvantages
    • Requires some technical knowledge and skill
    • Inflexible
    • Survey fatigue
    • Complex surveys are time-consuming/
    • Expensive
    • Generalisability claims often don’t water
    • Internet specific:
      • Firewalls and organisational email security
      • Variable experiences on response rates?
      • The seduction of technology
  • 30. Comparison (Frazer & Lawley, 2000) Mail Face-to-face Telephone Internet Cost Low High Moderate Very low Speed of data collection Slow Immediate Immediate Fast Ability to reach geographically dispersed segments High Very low Medium Very high Length of questionnaire Long (4-12 pages) Long (30-60 minutes) Medium (10-30 minutes) Long (4-12 pages) Questionnaire complexity Simple only Simple to complex Simple only Simple only Question complexity Simple to moderate Simple to complex Simple only Simple to moderate
  • 31. Comparison...cont Mail Face-to-face Telephone Internet Question complexity Simple to moderate Simple to complex Simple only Simple to moderate Hard-to-recall data obtainable Good Poor Moderate Good Response anonymity Possible Not possible Not possible Possible Rapport with respondents None High Moderate None Interviewer bias None High Medium None Need for interviewer supervision No Yes Yes No Response rate Low Very high Moderate Moderate
  • 32. Survey QA framework (Willis, 2005)
  • 33. Conclusion
    • Select from your toolkit carefully
    • Use an appropriate size and type
    • Look after your tools
    • Feel free to borrow from others but...
  • 34.  
  • 35. Thank you
    • Please contact me for references or more information:
    • iain@mathesonassociates.co.nz