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Studies on recycled aggregate concrete by using local
Studies on recycled aggregate concrete by using local
Studies on recycled aggregate concrete by using local
Studies on recycled aggregate concrete by using local
Studies on recycled aggregate concrete by using local
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Studies on recycled aggregate concrete by using local

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  • 1. International Journal of Civil JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING AND INTERNATIONAL Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 3, Issue 2, July- December (2012), © IAEME TECHNOLOGY (IJCIET)ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print)ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online)Volume 3, Issue 2, July- December (2012), pp. 322-326 IJCIET© IAEME: www.iaeme.com/ijciet.aspJournal Impact Factor (2012): 3.1861 (Calculated by GISI) IAEMEwww.jifactor.com STUDIES ON RECYCLED AGGREGATE CONCRETE BY USING LOCAL QUARRY DUST AND RECYCLED AGGREGATES Madan Mohan Reddy. K1*, Sivaramulu Naidu. D2, Sanjeeva Rayudu. E3 1 Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Srikalahasteeswara Institute of Technology, Srikalahasti, AP, India-517640, Email : madankreddy@gmail.com. 2 Senior Research Scholar, Department of Civil Engineering, SVUCE, Tirupati, AP. 3 Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, GPRCE, Kurnool, AP. * Corresponding Author ABSTRACT In this paper the use of Quarry Dust (QD) and Recycled Aggregates (RA) use as an aggregate in the production of new concrete was investigated. The performance of compressive strength produced by Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC) and results are compared with the Natural Coarse Aggregate Concrete (NAC). The QD is collected from the local stone quarry site and RA is collected from local demolished structure. The studies were conducted with an M20 mix with the selected w/c ratio: 0.5 and the development of compressive strength of the RAC and NAC at the age of 7 & 28 days were studied. The result shows the compressive strength of RAC is on average 86% of the NAC. This study, however, shows that the RAC specimen makes good quality concrete. Keywords: Quarry Dust (QD), Recycled Aggregates (RA), Natural Coarse Aggregates (NA), Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC), Natural Coarse Aggregate Concrete (NAC). INTRODUCTION Currently India has taken a major initiative in developing the infrastructures such as express highways, power projects and industrial structures etc., to meet the requirements of globalization, in the construction of buildings and other structures concrete plays the rightful role and a large quantum of concrete is being utilized. River sand, which is one of the constituents used in the production of conventional concrete, has become highly expensive and also scarce. In the backdrop of such a bleak atmosphere, there is large demand for alternative materials from industrial waste [1]. 322
  • 2. International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print),ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 3, Issue 2, July- December (2012), © IAEMEResearches have been conducted in different parts of the world, to study the effects ofincorporation QD into concrete. [2] Studied the influence of the varying replacement proportionof sand with QD (20, 30 and 40%) on the properties of concrete in both fresh and hardened state[3].When concrete pavements, structures, sidewalks, curbs, and gutters are removed, they becomewaste or can be processed for reuse. The resulting concrete must either be disposed of inlandfills, or crushed for subsequent use as aggregate base material or as aggregate in newconcrete. Crushing the material and using it as NA in new concrete makes sense because itreduces waste and reduces the need for NA [4].The use of aggregates from construction and demolition waste in pavement beds is the mostusual way of reusing this material. Even though considered as a valid reuse technique, it is notthe best economic valorization of this resource and it is considered by many researchers to be adown-cycling process that depreciates the capacities of the material. But the production ofstructural concrete with RA, however, offers great potential and recycles the materials viably andeffectively. [5]Etxeberria et al. [6] found concrete made with RA is less workable than conventional concrete.This is a result of the absorption capacity of recycled aggregate. This study found concrete madewith RA and NA typically needs 5% more water than conventional concrete to obtain the sameworkability. Additional cement is needed for concrete made with 100% RA to achieve similarworkability and compressive strength as NAC.The main aim of this research work is to utilise local QD and RA in for the production of newconcrete as a RAC. It is essential to know whether the replacement of QD and RA are inconcrete is inappropriate or acceptable.2. MATERIALS2.1 CementOrdinary Portland Cement (OPC) of 53 grade UltraTech conforming to IS:12269-1987 [7] wasused. The physical properties of cement used were given in Table 1. Table 1. Physical Properties of Cement. Normal Setting Time Compressive Strength in Type of Specific in minutes MPa Consistency cement Gravity (%) Initial Final 3 days 7 days 28 days UltraTech 3.09 33 48 240 25.5 36 53.5 OPC 53 323
  • 3. International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print),ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 3, Issue 2, July- December (2012), © IAEME2.2 WaterPotable water conforming to IS: 3025-1964 [8] is used for mixing.2.3 AggregatesFine Aggregate (FA) material passing through an IS sieve that is less than 4.75mm gauge beyondwhich they are known as NA. According to IS 383:1970 [9] the FA is being classified into fourdifferent zones, that is Zone-I, Zone-II, Zone-III, Zone-IV. Also in the case of NAC maximum20 mm NA is suitable for concrete work.The QD is collected from the local stone quarry site and RA was collected from localConstruction and Demolition site in Srikalahasti town and collected RA were manually crushedup to the NA size (i.e. 20 mm). The Srikalahasti is a town on the banks of River Swarnamukhi,which is one of the holy centers in Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh and its geographicalcoordinates are 13°4524.21504" North, 79°42 14.73804" East. The township is close to Tirupatiand is a part of the Tirupati Urban Development Authority (TUDA), AP, India.3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONTests on physical properties are carried out on aggregates to determine the Specific Gravity,Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Moisture Content and Aggregate Crushing Value. The physicalproperties of FA, NA, QD and RA were presented in Table 2. Table 2. Physical Properties of FA, NA, QD and RA. S.No. Aggregate properties FA NA QD RA 1 Specific Gravity 2.65 2.72 2.56 2.45 2 Water Absorption (%) 1.00 0.50 1.50 4.30 3 Bulk Density (kg/m3) 1460 1475 1365 1398 4 Moisture Content (%) 1.50 1.80 5.40 3.50 5 Aggregate Impact Value (%) - 16.25 - 25.3 6 Fineness Modulus (%) 3.53 4.50 3.81 4.50From the above test result, the bulk density of QD and RA were lower than that of the FA andNA respectively. The specific gravity of QD and RA is lower than those of FA and NA becauseof the lower density and higher water absorption. The absorption and moisture content of RA arehigher than those of NA because of the cement paste which adhered to the recycled aggregate ishigh in porosity.After testing, a mix design (M20) is designed with the Indian Standard Code guidelines IS:10262:2009 [10]. The tests are carried out with the water-cement ratio of 0.5. A referencespecimen with FA and NA and mix specimen with replacement of QD and RA were casted andcured for testing. Table 3 shows the mix proportions of reference specimen and mix specimen. 324
  • 4. International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print),ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 3, Issue 2, July- December (2012), © IAEME Table 3. The mix design (M20) proportions of reference specimen and mix specimen. Specimen Type W/c ratio Cement FA NA QD RA Reference specimen (%) 0.5 1.0 1.77 3.38 - - Mix specimen (%) 0.5 1.0 - - 1.72 3.23Tests conducted on RAC and NAC concretes include the, dry density and compressive strengthof hardened concrete. Compressive strength testing was performed in general accordance withASTM C39, Standard Test Method for Compressive Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens[11]. For the compressive strength, tests were conducted at the ages of 7 and 28 days and theresults at each testing age are reported as an average.Table 4. Shows the test results of referencespecimen and mix specimen. Table 4. The test results of test results of reference specimen and mix specimen. Specimen Type Dry density Compressive strength (MPa) (Kg/m3) 7 days 28 days Reference specimen 2385.8 18.20 25.50 Mix specimen 2216.4 13.20 21.95Dry density of mix specimen is low because of QD and RA contains saturated surface and itabsorbs moisture. The development of compressive strength of the Reference specimen and Mixspecimen at the age of 7 days were 18.20Mpa and 13.20 MPa & 28 days were 25.5 Mpa and21.95 Mpa respectively. The result shows the compressive strength of the mix specimen(Replacement of QD and RA) is on average 86% of the Reference specimen i.e NAC at an ageof 28 days.4. CONCLUSIONSThe present study reveals that concrete can be successfully produced using QD and RA that havebeen produced from quarry site and demolition and construction waste respectively. Concreteproduced by QD and RA does not perform as well as concretes produced by the FA and NA interms of strength. However, the concrete still has a strength that would make it suitable for someapplications.REFERENCES[1] R. Ilangovana, N. Mahendrana and K. Nagamanib (2008), Strength and Durability Properties of Concrete Containing Quarry Rock Dust as Fine Aggregate, ARPN Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Vol. 3(5), pp.20-26.[2] Galetakis M, Raka S (2004), Utilization of limestone dust for artificial stone production: an experimental approach. Miner. Eng., 17:355–357. 325
  • 5. International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print),ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 3, Issue 2, July- December (2012), © IAEME[3] Nevillie AM (2002), Properties of Concrete –Fourth and Final Edition, Pearson Education Limited, Essex[4] Aggregates for Concrete, Developed by American Concrete Institute (ACI) Committee E- 701, First Printing August 2007.[5] Jorge de Brito & Ricardo Robles (2010), Recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) methodology for estimating its long-term properties, INDIAN J. ENG. MATER. SCI., pp.449-462.[6] M. Etxeberria, E. Vázquez, A. Marí and M. Barra (2007), “Influence of amount of recycled coarse aggregates and production process on properties of recycled aggregate concrete.” Cement and Concrete Research, Vol.37(5), pp.735–742.[7] IS 12269:1987, Specification for 53 grade Ordinary Portland Cement, Bureau of Indian Standard, New Delhi.[8] IS 3025:1964, Methods of sampling and test (physical and chemical) for water used in industry.[9] IS 383:1970, “Specification for Coarse aggregate and Fine aggregate from Natural Sources for Concrete”, Bureau of Indian Standard, New Delhi.[10] IS 10262:2009, “Concrete Mix Proportioning – Guidelines”, First Revision, July, 2009.[11] ASTM C39 (2003), “Standard Test Method for Compressive Strength of Cylindrical 4 Concrete Specimens.” Annual Book of ASTM Standards 4.02. West Conshohocken, PA: 5 ASTM International. 326

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