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Influence of cost less nanoparticles on electric and dielectric characteristics
 

Influence of cost less nanoparticles on electric and dielectric characteristics

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    Influence of cost less nanoparticles on electric and dielectric characteristics Influence of cost less nanoparticles on electric and dielectric characteristics Document Transcript

    • INTERNATIONAL JOURNALand Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN International Journal of Electrical Engineering OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME & TECHNOLOGY (IJEET)ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print)ISSN 0976 – 6553(Online)Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), pp. 58-67 IJEET© IAEME: www.iaeme.com/ijeet.aspJournal Impact Factor (2012): 3.2031 (Calculated by GISI)www.jifactor.com ©IAEME INFLUENCE OF COST-LESS NANOPARTICLES ON ELECTRIC AND DIELECTRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYETHYLENE INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS Ahmed Thabet Nano-Technology Research Centre, Faculty of Energy Engineering, Aswan University, Aswan, Egypt athm@hotmail.com ABSTRACT Nanoparticles have attracted wide interest for enhancing electrical properties of polymer industrial materials as form nanocomposites, therefore, preparation new Polyethylene nanocomposites will be helpful both the manufacturers and users for enhancing electrical performance of Polyethylene applications. This paper has been enhancedelectricand dielectric characterizations of polyethylene with adding costless nanoparticlesto low density polyethylene (LDPE), and high density polyethylene (HDPE) as a base matrix. Polyethylene trapping properties are highly modified by the presence of costless nanofillers(clay, and fumed silica) nanoparticles. Also, it has been studiedexperimentally the influence of costless nanofillers(clay, and fumed silica)and their concentrations on electric and dielectric properties of polyethylene materials.Experimental comparative study has been discussed about Polyethylene nanocomposites with respect to commercial polyethylene materials to explain the effect of types and concentrations of nano-fillers for enhancing electric and dielectric Polyethylenecharacteristics. Keywords: Dielectric properties, Low density polyethylene, High density polyethylene, Nano-composite, Nanoparticles, Polymers 1. INTRODUCTION Nanotechnologies are present in a lot of domain since they are a great source of innovation. They may have a powerful impact on development of advanced electrical and electronic device. In the case of nanocomposite, it has been reported that a few percent of functional nanofiller can improve mechanical characteristic permeability characteristic and 58
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEMEelectrical properties. The way to disperse nanofillers layer in polymer matrix at a nanometric level isstill under optimization, hut good results in terms of orientation, control of interaction between hostmaterial and nanograin (intercalation, exfoliation) have been achieved already. The use ofnanoadditives in dielectric materials has made great progress in the last few years. Many papersdiscussing the general overview, theory and the functionality of nanocomposite dielectrics have beenpublished [1-6]. Polymeric nanocomposites have gained importance in the manufacture of products ofhigh performance properties like light weight, material transparency, enhanced stiffness andtoughness, increased barrier properties, decreased thermal expansion, decreased flammability andenhancement in dielectric properties for different industries such as automobiles, electrical andelectronics, packaging, coatings etc [7-14].The addition of inorganic nanoparticles into polymer (polymer nanocomposite) has been studied andapplied to engineering materials for industrial products to improve various properties of material. Ithas been reported that the polymer nanocomposite has abilities to improve the dielectric properties ofbase material. The characteristics of polymer nanocomposite for electrical and dielectric propertieswere also studied to ensure the high reliability of the insulating system. The effective properties ofdielectric mixtures have been investigated mathematically and experimentally for prediction ofeffective dielectric properties [15-18]. The use of polymers as electrical insulating materials has beengrowing rapidly in recent decades. The base polymer properties have been developed by adding smallamounts of different fillers but they are expensive to the polymer material. Recently, greatexpectations have focused on costless nanofillers. However, there are few papers concerning theeffect of types of costless nanofillers on electrical properties of polymeric nanocomposite. With acontinual progress in polymer nanocomposites, this research depicts the effects of types andconcentration of costless nanoparticles in electrical properties of industrial polymer material.Thisresearch has been investigatedexperimentally the results that detect the effects of nanoparticles (clayand fumed silica)on electric and dielectric properties of polyethylene nanocomposites; low densitypolyethylene (LDPE), high density polyethylene (HDPE).2. EXPERIMENTAL SETUP AND MATERIAL PREPARATION CHARACTERIZATIONNanoparticles: Nano-clay is Spherical particle shape and it is the most important characteristic ofnanoclay for polymer applications. Cost less of clay catalyst to be the best filler among nano-fillersindustrial materials. Nano-fumed silica is widely used as a rheology modifier, imparting highlythixotropic properties at relatively low percentages. Fumed silica powders used in paints and coatings,silicone rubber and silicone sealants, adhesives, cable compounds and gels, printing inks and toner,and plant protection.Polyethylene Materials: Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is a thermoplastic made from petroleumand it is defined by a density range of (0.910 - 0.940) g/cm³. LDPE contains the chemicalelementscarbon and hydrogen. High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) is a polyethylenethermoplasticmade from petroleum. HDPE has little branching, giving it stronger intermolecular forces and tensilestrength than lower-density polyethylene.Additives of nanoparticles to the base industrial polymers have been fabricated by using mixing,ultrasonic, and heating processes. HIOKI 3522-50 LCR Hi-tester device is measuring device forcharacterization of nanocomposite insulation industrial materials.HIOKI 3522-50 LCR Hi-testerdevice as shown in Figure (1) has been measured electrical parameters of nano-metric solid dielectricinsulation specimens at various frequencies. Specification of LCR is Power supply: 100, 120, 220 or240 V(±10%) AC (selectable), 50/60 Hz, Frequency: DC, 1 mHz to 100 kHz, Display Screen: LCDwith backlight / 99999 (full 5 digits), Basic Accuracy: Z : ± 0.08% rdg. θ : ± 0.05˚, and External DCbias ± 40 V max.(option) (3522-50 used alone ± 10 V max./ using 9268 ± 40 V max.). 59
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME Fig. 1 HIOKI 3522-50 LCR Hi-tester deviceFinally, It can be measured all dielectric properties for pure and nanocomposite industrialmaterials by using HIOKI 3522-50 LCR Hi-tester device and have been detected. The studiedindustrial materials in this research have been formulated utilizing nano particulates. Electricand dielectric properties of the studied materials are detailed in table (1). Table (1) Dielectric Properties of Pure and Nano-Composite Materials Materials Dielectri Resistivit Materials Dielectric Resistivit c y Constant at y Constant ( .m) 1kHz ( .m) at 1kHz Pure LDPE 2.3 1014 Pure HDPE 2.3 1015 15 LDPE + 1%wt 2.23 10 HDPE + 1%wt 2.23 1016 Clay Clay LDPE + 5%wt 1.99 1015-1018 HDPE + 5%wt 1.99 1016-1019 Clay Clay LDPE + 10%wt 1.76 1018-1020 HDPE + 10%wt 1.76 1019-1021 Clay Clay LDPE + 1%wt 2.32 1013 HDPE + 1%wt 2.32 1014 Fumed Silica Fumed Silica LDPE + 5%wt 2.39 1013-1011 HDPE + 5%wt 2.39 1014-1012 Fumed Silica Fumed Silica LDPE + 10%wt 2.49 1011-109 HDPE + 10%wt 2.49 1012-1010 Fumed Silica Fumed Silica 60
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Dielectric Spectroscopy is a powerful experimental method to investigate thedynamical behavior of a sample through the analysis of its frequency dependent dielectricresponse. The measurements were made using high resolution dielectric spectroscopy andthis technique is based on the measurement of the capacitance as a function of frequency of asample sandwiched between two electrodes. Dielectric loss (tan δ), and capacitance (C) weremeasured as a function of frequency up to 100 kHz at 25 °C for all test samples.3.1 Effect of Nanoparticles on Low Density Polyethylene LDPE Characterization:Figure 2.a shows loss tangent as a function of frequency for Clay/ Low-densitypolyethylenenanocomposites at room temperature (25oC). The measured loss tangentcontrasts on loss tangent with increasing frequency. The loss tangent increases with increasesthe percentage of clay nanoparticles percentage up to 5%wt, specially, at low frequencies butdecreases with increasing clay nanoparticles percentage up to 10%wt, specially, at highfrequencies. Figure 2.bcontrasts on loss tangent as a function of frequency for fumed silica/Low-density polyethylenenanocomposites at room temperature (25oC). The measured losstangent decreases with rising percentage of fumed silica nanofillers in the nanocomposite upto 5wt% specially, at low frequencies but increases with increasing fumed silica nanoparticlespercentage up to 10%wt, specially, at high frequencies. 0.02 0.02 Pure LDPE Pure LDPE LDPE+1%Fumed Silica LDPE+1%Clay 0.015 0.015 LDPE+5%Fumed Silica LDPE+5%Clay LDPE+10%Fumed Silica LDPE+10%Clay Tan Delta Tan Delta 0.01 0.01 0.005 0.005 0 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 Frequency (Hz) Frequency (Hz) (a)Clay/LDPE nanocomposites (b)Fumed Silica/LDPE nanocomposites Fig. 2 Measured loss tangent of Low Density Polyethylene nanocompositesat room temperature (25oC)Figure 3.a contrasts on capacitance of Clay/ Low-density polyethylenenanocompositesas afunction of frequency at room temperature (25oC). The measured capacitance decreases withrising percentage of clay nanofillers in the nanocomposite up to 5%wt but it increases withincreasing clay percentage nanofillers up to percentage10%wt. Figure 3.b shows capacitance 61
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN 0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME as a function of frequency for fumed silica/ Low-density polyethylenenanocomposites at room temperature (25oC). The measured capacitance shows that decreasing in capacitance with rising percentage of fumed silica nanofillers in fumed silica/ Low- density polyethylene nanocomposite up to 1wt% but it increases with increasing fumed silica percentage nanofillers at 5-10wt%. 1.4E-09 1.6E-09 Pure LDPE Pure LDPE 1.2E-09 1.4E-09 LDPE+1%Fumed Silica LDPE+1%Clay 1.2E-09 LDPE+5%Fumed Silica 1E-09 LDPE+5%Clay LDPE+10%Fumed Silica Capacitance (F) 1E-09Capacitance (F) LDPE+10%Clay 8E-10 8E-10 6E-10 6E-10 4E-10 4E-10 2E-10 2E-10 0 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 Frequency (Hz) (a)Clay/LDPE nanocomposites (b)Fumed Silica/LDPE nanocomposites Fig 3 Measured capacitance of Low Density Polyethylenenanocomposites at room temperature (25oC) 3.2 Effect of Nanoparticles on High Density Polyethylene HDPE Characterization: Figure 4.a shows loss tangent as a function of frequency for Clay/HDPE nanocomposites at room temperature (25oC). The loss tangent of Clay/High Density Polyethylenenanocomposite decreases with increasing clay percentage nanofillers up to 1%wt Clay but, it increases with increasing clay percentage nanofillers from 5%wt up to 10%wt. Figure 4.b shows loss tangent as a function of frequency for Fumed Silica/ HDPE nanocomposites at room temperature (25oC). The measured loss tangent of Fumed Silica/High Density Polyethylene decreases with increasing fumed silica percentage nanofillers up to 1%wt fumed silica but, it increases with increasing fumed silica percentage nanofillers up to 10%wt fumed silica nanoparticles. 62
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN 0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME 0.2 0.2 Pure HDPE Pure HDPE HDPE+1%Clay HDPE+1%Fumed Silica 0.15 HDPE+5%Clay 0.15 HDPE+5%Fumed Silica HDPE+10%Clay HDPE+10%Fumed Silica Tan Delta Tan Delta 0.1 0.1 0.05 0.05 0 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 Frequency (Hz) Frequency (Hz) (a)Clay/HDPE nanocomposites (b)Fumed Silica/HDPE nanocomposites Fig. 4 Measured loss tangent of High Density Polyethylene nanocompositesat room temperature (25oC) 1.4E-09 1.6E-09 Pure HDPE Pure HDPE 1.2E-09 1.4E-09 HDPE+1%Fumed Silica HDPE+1%Clay 1.2E-09 1E-09 HDPE+5%Fumed Silica HDPE+5%Clay HDPE+10%Fumed Silica Capacitance (F)Capacitance (F) 1E-09 HDPE+10%Clay 8E-10 8E-10 6E-10 6E-10 4E-10 4E-10 2E-10 2E-10 0 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 Frequency (Hz) Frequency (Hz) (a)Clay/HDPE nanocomposites (b)Fumed Silica/HDPE nanocomposites Fig. 5 Measured capacitance of High Density Polyethylene nanocompositesat room temperature (25oC) 63
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEMEFigure 5.a shows capacitance as a function of frequency for Clay/HDPE nanocomposites atroom temperature (25oC). The measured capacitance of Clay/High Density Polyethyleneincreases with increasing clay percentage nanofillers up to 10%wt. Figure 5.b showscapacitance as a function of frequency for Fumed silica/HDPE nanocomposites at roomtemperature (25oC). Also, this figure illustrates that the capacitance of Fumed silica /HighDensity Polyethylene increases with increasing fumed silica percentage nanofillers up to10%wt. Noting that, Clay nanofillers increases capacitance of High Density Polyethylenemore than increasing fumed silica nanofillers in High Density Polyethylene at the samepercentages.4. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERIZATIONS OF COMMERCIAL ANDNANOCOMPOSITE POLYETHYLENE INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS In the beginning, adding fumed silica has increased permittivity of the newnanocomposite materials whatever, adding clay has decreased permittivity of the newnanocomposite materials as shown in in table (1).With comparing results for depicting the effect of raising concentration of clay and fumedsilica nanofillerswhich are pointed out in Figures (2,3) where loss tangent and capacitance ofnew Low-density polyethylenenanocomposite materials are reported for different weightconcentrations of modified nanofillers concentration at room temperature (T=25oC). i.e theloss tangent increases with increases the percentage of clay nanoparticles percentage up to5%wt, specially, at low frequencies but decreases with increasing clay nanoparticlespercentage up to 10%wt, specially, at high frequencies. Whatever, the measured loss tangentdecreases with rising percentage of fumed silica nanofillers in the nanocomposite up to 5wt%specially, at low frequencies but increases with increasing fumed silica nanoparticlespercentage up to 10%wt, specially, at high frequencies. With respect to the measuredcapacitance of new Low-density polyethylenenanocomposites, it is cleared that, the measuredcapacitance decreases with rising percentage of clay nanofillers in the nanocomposite up to5%wt but the measured the capacitance of Low-densitypolyethylenenanocompositesincreases with increasing clay percentage of nanofillers up to10%wt. Whatever, The measured capacitance decreases with rising percentage of fumedsilica nanofillers in the Low-density polyethylenenanocomposite up to 1wt% but it increaseswith increasing fumed silica percentage nanofillers at 5%wt - 10%wt.Also, the effect of raising concentration of clay nanofillers is pointed out in Figures (4,5)where loss tangent and capacitance of new High Density Polyethylenenanocompositematerials are reported for different weight concentrations of modified nanofillersconcentration. i.e. the loss tangent of Clay/ High Density Polyethylenenanocompositedecreases with increasing clay percentage nanofillers up to 1%wt Clay but, it increases withincreasing clay nanofillers from 5%wt up to 10%wt. Also, The measured loss tangent ofFumed Silica/High Density Polyethylene nanocompositesdecreases with increasing fumedsilica percentage nanofillers up to 1%wt fumed silica but, it increases with increasing fumedsilica percentage nanofillers up to 10%wt fumed silica nanoparticles. Whatever, the measuredcapacitance of High Density Polyethylene nanocomposites increases with increasing Clayand Fumed silica nanoparticles percentage up to 10%wt. 64
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME5. CONCLUSIONS Adding clay is decreasing the permittivity of new nanocomposite materials and the effects of adding small amount of clay nanoparticles percentage to Low density polyethylene decreases capacitance and loss tangent. Whatever, adding small amount of clay nanoparticles percentage to High density polyethylene increases capacitance and loss tangent, specially, at low frequencies. Adding clay nanofillers increases capacitance of High Density Polyethylene more than increasing fumed silica nanofillers in High Density Polyethylene at the same percentages. Adding fumed silica is increasing the permittivity of new nanocomposite materials, small amount of fumed silica nanoparticles on Low density polyethylene increases capacitance and loss tangent, specially, at low frequencies. Whatever, small amount of fumed silica nanoparticles on High density polyethylene increases capacitance but decreases loss tangent, specially, at low frequencies. Adding large amounts of clay or fumed silica nanoparticles to polyethylene will be reverse dielectric behavior characteristics gradually which depends on nature of nanoparticles structure in polymer matrix.ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The present work was supported by the Science and Technology Development Fund(STDF), Egypt, Grant No: Project ID 505.REFERENCES[1] J. I. Hong, L.S. Schadler, R. W. Siegel, E. Martensson, “Rescaled electrical properties of ZnO/low density polyethylene nanocomposites” Applied Physics Letters, Volume: 82 Issue: 12, pp. 1956 – 1958, Mar 2003.[2] G. C. Montanari, D. Fabiani, F. Palmieri, D. Kaempfer, R. Thomann and R. M¨ulhaupt, “Modification ofElectrical Properties and Performance of EVA and PP Insulation through Nanostructure by Organophilic Silicates” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 11, No. 5; pp. 754-762, October 2004.[3] T. Tanaka, “Dielectric Nanocomposites with Insulating Properties” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 12, No. 5; pp. 914-928, October 2005.[4] N. Shi and R. Ramprasad, “Local Properties at Interfaces in Nanodielectrics: An ab initio Computational Study” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 15, No. 1; pp. 170-177, February 2008.[5] X. Y. Huang, P. K. Jiang, C. U. Kim,“Electrical properties of polyethylene/aluminum nanocomposites” Journal of Applied Physics, Volume: 102 Issue: 12, pp. 124103 - 124103-8, Dec 2007.[6] Z. Dang, B. Xia, Sh. Yao, M. Jiang, H. Song, L. Zhang, D. Xie, “High-dielectric- permittivity high-elasticity three-component nanocomposites with low percolation threshold and low dielectric loss” Journal of Applied Physics Letters, Volume: 94 Issue: 4, pp. 042902 - 042902-3, Jan 2009. 65
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN 0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEME [7] X. Huang, Ch. Kim, P. Jiang, Y. Yin, Z. Li, “Influence of aluminum nanoparticle surface treatment on the electrical properties of polyethylene composites” Journal of Applied Physics, Volume: 105 Issue: 1, pp. 014105 - 014105-10, Jan 2009. [8] M. Roy, J.K. Nelson, R.K. MacCrone, L.S. Schadler, C.W. Reed, R. Keefe, “Polymer nanocomposite dielectrics-the role of the interface” IEEE Transactions onDielectrics and Electrical Insulation, Volume: 12 Issue: 4, pp. 629 – 643, Aug. 2005.[9] V. Tomer, G. Polizos, C. A. Randall, E. Manias, “Polyethylene nanocomposite dielectrics: Implications of nanofiller orientation on high field properties and energy storage” Journal of Applied Physics, Volume: 109 Issue: 7, pp. 074113 - 074113-11, Apr 2011.[10] Y. Murakami, M. Nemoto, S. Okuzumi, S. Masuda, M. Nagao, N. Hozumi, Y. Sekiguchi, “DC conduction and electrical breakdown of MgO/LDPE nanocomposite” IEEE Transaction on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation, Volume: 15 Issue: 1, pp. 33 – 39, February 2008.[11] G. D. Liang and S. C. Tjong, “Electrical Properties of Percolative Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Composites” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 15, No. 1; pp. 214-220, February 2008.[12] M.G. Veena, N.M. Renukappa, S. Seetharamu, P. Sampathkumararr, “Effect of Nanofiller at Low Frequency behavior of Dielectric Insulator” IEEE, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Properties and Applications of Dielectric Materials July 19- 23, Harbin, China, 2009.[13] K. Ishimoto, E. Kanegae, Y. Ohki, T. Tanaka, Y. Sekiguchi, Y. Murata and C. C. Reddy, “Superiority of Dielectric Properties of LDPE/MgONanocomposites over Microcomposites” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 16, No. 6; pp. 1735-1742, December 2009.[14] K.S. Shah, R.C. Jain, V. Shrinet, A.K. Singh, D.P. Bharambe, “High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) Clay Nanocomposite for Dielectric Applications” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 16, No. 3;pp 853 - 861, 2009.[15] L.A. Utracki, “Clay-containing polymeric nanocomposites and their properties” IEEE, Electrical Insulation Magazine, Volume : 26 , Issue:4 , Pages (8), July 2010.[16] N. Fuse, Y. Ohki, and T. Tanaka, “Comparison of Nano-structuration Effects in Polypropylene among Four Typical Dielectric Properties” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 17, No. 3;pp. 671-677, June 2010.[17] M. Takala, H. Ranta, P. Nevalainen, P. Pakonen, J. Pelto, M. Karttunen, S. Virtanen, V. Koivu, M. Pettersson, B. Sonerud and K. Kannus, “Dielectric Properties and Partial Discharge Endurance of Polypropylene-Silica Nanocomposite” IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Vol. 17, No. 4; pp. 1259-1267, August 2010.[18] M. Amhid, D. Mary, G. TeyssedreI, C. Laurent , G. C. Montanari, D. Kaempfer, R. Miilhaupt, “Effect of Filler Concentration on Dielectric Behaviour and on Charge Trapping in PP/clay Nanocomposite” IEEE, Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena, 2004.[19] L. Bois, F.Chassagneux, S.Parola, F.Bessueille. “Growth of ordered silver nanoparticles in silica film mesostructured with a triblock copolymer PEO–PPO–PEO” Journal of Solid State Chemistry Vol. 182 2009, pp. 1700–1707.[20] Ahmed Thabet and Youssef A. Mobarak, “Experimental Study For Dielectric Strength Of New Nanocomposite Polyethylene Industrial Materials” International Journal of Electrical Engineering & Technology (IJEET), Volume 3, Issue 1, 2012, pp. 353-364, Published by IAEME 66
    • International Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (IJEET), ISSN 0976 – 6545(Print), ISSN0976 – 6553(Online) Volume 4, Issue 1, January- February (2013), © IAEMEAUTHORS’ INFORMATION Ahmed Thabetwas born in Aswan, Egypt in 1974. He received the BSc (FEE) Electrical Engineering degree in 1997 and MSc (FEE) Electrical Engineering degree in 2002 both from Faculty of Energy Engineering, Aswan, Egypt. PhD degree had been received in Electrical Engineering in 2006 from El-Minia University, Minia, Egypt. He joined with Electrical Power Engineering Group of Faculty of Energy Engineering in Aswan University as a Demonstrator at July 1999, until; he held AssociateProfessor Position at October 2011 up to date. His research interests lie in the areas ofanalysis and developing electrical engineering models and applications, investigating novelnano-technology materials via addition nano-scale particles and additives for usage inindustrial branch, electromagnetic materials, electroluminescence and the relationship withelectrical and thermal ageing of industrial polymers. Many of mobility’s have investigated forsupporting his research experience in UK, Finland, Italy, and USA …etc. On 2009, he hadbeen a Principle Investigator of a funded project from Science and Technology developmentFund “STDF” for developing industrial materials of ac and dc applications by nano-technology techniques. He has been established first Nano-Technology Research Centre inthe Upper Egypt (http://www.aswan.svu.edu.eg/nano/index.htm). He has many ofpublications which have been published and under published in national, internationaljournals and conferences and held in Nano-Technology Research Centre website. 67