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  • International Journal of Civil Engineering OF CIVIL ENGINEERING AND INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME TECHNOLOGY (IJCIET) ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print) ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), pp. 47-60 © IAEME: www.iaeme.com/ijciet.asp Journal Impact Factor (2013): 5.3277 (Calculated by GISI) www.jifactor.com IJCIET ©IAEME FLEXURAL BEHAVIOR OF FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE I- BEAMS STRENGTHENED WITH (CFRP) Adnan Ibrahim Abdullah, 1 Dr. Muyasser M. Jomaa'h, Dr. Alya'a Abbas Al-Attar Department of Civil, Engineering, university of Tikrit / College of Engineering. Department of Civil Engineering, university of Tikrit / College of Engineering 3 Technical College of Kirkuk 2 ABSTRACT Experimental investigations of the behavior of reinforced concrete I- beams, strengthened or repaired by carbon fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) for flexural case have been presented in this paper. The current study includes a practical program considers the effect of adding steel and nylon fibers to structural behavior of I- section high strength concrete such as compressive and tensile strength and flexural behavior represent by load-deflection curves also rehabilitate the I- beams after failure in bending by strengthened it with (CFRP) Sheets, variables that studied was the volumetric ratios of fibers which used (0.5, 1 and 1.5) % ratios for steel and nylon and hybrid fiber. Were taken into consideration to be All beams in this study were similarly in dimension and reinforcement and they were designed to fail in flexural , they arranged in (10) group each group includes (3) beams for flexural strength test. The practical results of the current study indicated that when add steel fiber to the (HSC) we have a good effect of the increase in compressive , tensile and flexural strength also it has effect of reducing deflections value, this effect increasing with increase of the volumetric ratio of steel fiber. while the add of nylon fibers lead to a slight increase in compressive strength and this effect decrease with fiber content increasing and the addition of these fibers led to a small increase in the tensile and bending strength also adding hybrids fiber in all ratios led to an improvement in hardened properties of (HSC). The results of experiments show that the use of (CFRP) as external strengthening has significant enhancement on ultimate load, crack pattern and deflection. It is observed that the use of external CFRP in strengthening or repairing beams increasing the ultimate load capacity load in all beams and the increase in beams strength was noticed at a rate range (11.58% - 33.36%). 47
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME Keywords: I-Beam, Fibers, HSC, CFRP, Epoxy. INTRODUCTION Beams with I-shaped cross sections are used extensively as components in long span concrete structures. The use of high strength concrete leads to the design of smaller sections, thereby reducing the dead weight, allowing longer spans and more usable area of buildings [1]. Addition of fibers in concrete may improve the fracture toughness, fatigue resistance, impact resistance, flexural strength, compressive strength, tensile strength, thermal crack resistance, rebound loss, and so on. The magnitude of the improvement depends upon both the amount andthe type of fibers used [2]. Addition of fibers to concrete makes the concrete more homogeneous and isotropic and transforms it from a brittle to ductile material. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) sheets are used for strengthening and rehabilitation of beams. The advantages of using CFRP include reduced installation time, corrosion resistance and ease of application. Also, externally bonded CFRP can be used to repair and strengthen damaged prestressed concrete girder bridges [3]. The use of external (CFRP) has became a popular technique of strengthening of concrete structures in resent years, most of literatures are about strengthening of rectangular and T-section and very few or no one about I- beam and this is due to lack of data on I-beams.. Much of recent works (Meier and Kaiser, 1991[4]; Alam and Zumaat, 2009[5]; Sobuz and Ahmed, 2011[6]) have shown that external bonded of FRP to structural concrete members is an effective and simple method to increase their structural capacity, for example as in reinforced concrete columns or reinforced concrete beams retrofitted by FRP laminates. The objective of the present study is to investigate, experimentally, the behavior of reinforced concrete I-beams externally strengthened or repaired I- beams with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer sheets (CFRP) attached to their flexural sides. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM Ten beams were tested in this investigation and only the concrete type of the beam was varied, while, the dimensions of the tested beams and the reinforcement were kept unchanged. 1. DETAILS OF TEST BEAMS The details of the tested beams are shown in Fig.(1). The lower face of the compression flange and the upper face of the tension flange were made with (1/5) slopes. Were taken into consideration to be All beams in this study were similarly in dimensions, and details of steel reinforcement properties are shown in Table (1) and they were designed to fail in flexural , they arranged in (10) group each group includes (3) beams for flexural strength test. Table( 1) Steel reinforcement properties Diameters 8mm 6mm Yield stress (ࢌ࢟ ) (MPa) Ultimate stress (ࢌ࢛ ) (MPa) Elongation% 653 636.93 798.5 683.92 7.5 6.5 48
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME Figure (1) Details of test beams (a) beam cross-section (b) side view (c) isometric view 2. MATERIALS The properties of materials used in concrete mixtures are given below. 2.1 Cement Ordinary Portland cement type (CEM II/A-L 42.5R, KARASTA) is used. It is tested per Iraqi standard Specifications I.Q.S No.5/1984 [7], and has met all the requirements. The chemical and physical properties of this cement are presented in Table (2) and (3). Table( 2) Chemical Composition of Cement Oxides composition Content % Limit of Iraqi specification No. 5/1984 CaO Al2O3 SiO2 Fe2O3 MgO SO3 Loss on Ignition, (L.O.I) Insoluble material Lime Saturation Factor (L.S.F) 60.45 4. 65 20.11 3.62 4.1 2.33 2.72 1.33 0.89 8% Max 21% Max 5% Max 5 % Max 2.5 %Max 4 %Max 1.5 %Max (0.66-1.02) 49
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME Table (3) Physical Properties of Cement Physical properties Specific surface area (Blaine method), (m2/kg) Test results Limit of Iraqi specification No. 5/1984 308 (230 m2/kg) lower limit Setting time (vacate apparatus) Initial setting, (hrs : min) Final setting, (hrs : min) Compressive strength (kg/cm2) For 3-day For 7-day 2hrs 15min Not less than 45min 4hrs 10min Not more than 10 hrs 288 Not less than 150 kg/cm2 342 Not less than 230 kg/cm2 2.2 Fine aggregate Natural sand with a 4.75-mm maximum size is used. The grading of the sand conformed to the requirement of IQS No. 45/1984 - zone No.(3) [8]. Its sieve analysis results are given in Table (4). Table(4) Grading of fine aggregate Sieve size 4.75-mm (No.4) 2.36-mm (No.8) 1.18-mm (No.16) 600-µm(No.30) 300-µm(No.50) 150-µm(No.100) Cumulative retained% 9.05 13.38 90.95 88.62 Limit of IQS No. 45/1984 for zone No. (3) 90-100 85-100 21.45 78.55 75-100 33.04 83.26 66.96 16.74 60-79 12-40 95.66 4.34 0-10 Cumulative passing % 2.3 Coarse aggregate Crushed gravel with maximum size of (12.5 mm). The grading of the gravel conformed to the requirement of IQS No. [45/1984][8]. Its sieve analysis results are given in Tables (5). NO. Table( 5) Grading of Coarse aggregate % Passing Sieve Size Iraqi specification No. 45/1984 %Coarse Aggregate 1 2 10 mm 100 73.4 90 -100 50 - 85 3 5 mm 3.3 0 -10 4 pan 0 - 14 mm 2.4 Super plasticizer A commercially available super-plasticizer Structuro 502 is used throughout this work as a (HRWRA) in all mixtures. Structuro 502 combines the properties of water reduction and workability retention. 50
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 2.5 Fibers Two different types of fiber are used. The first is the steel fiber manufactured by Bekaert fiber Dramix® ZP305 Fig.(2-a) and having a ‘trough’ shape with hooks at both ends, and glued in a) bundles. Steel fibers are 30 mm long and 0.55 mm in diameter, while the second is nylon fiber Fig.(2-b) of crimped shape and rectangular cross section (of dimension 0.8*0.5 mm) with length of b) cross 45 mm.. In this investigation, three percentages by volume of concrete (0.5%, 1% and 1.5%) are used with mix proportion of 100-0%, 50-50% and 0-100% for each fibers percentage (steel to Nylon). 50% 0 100% (a) (b) Figure (2) (a) Steel Fibers, (b) nylon Fibers 2.6 Carbon Fiber Reinforced polymer and epoxy resin Carbon fiber fabric laminate of type Sika Wrap Hex-230C and epoxy based impregnating Hex 230C resin of type Sikadur-330 have been used to externally strengthen the reinforced concrete I -section 330 the beams, as shown in Figure (3). Figure (3) CFRP strips and epoxy resin(A + B) 3. MIXTURE PROPORTIONS First, a control mixture (without fibers) is designed in accordance with the provisions of Standard Practice for Selecting Proportions for high strength concrete, ACI 211.4R-08[9] , to have a 211.4R211.4R 28-day cube compressive strength of (61 MPa) (Table 6), slump value for control mix is between day (95-105 mm) for a good mix workability. Thus, the total concrete mixes which contain fibers are 105 mixes nine. The W/Cm ratio is maintained at 0.3, slump values for FRC were kept in range (95 (95-105 mm). 51
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME Table(6) Concrete Mix Proportions Water Constituent Amount (kg/m3) Cement Fine Aggregate Coarse aggregate Super plasticizer 137.85 459.5 738.4 896 4.59 4. CFRP INSTALLATION The experimental program consists of (10) I-section beams, the concrete surface at bottom faces of beams was cleaned from lousy materials by a surface cleaning machine. Firstly, the twoparts of epoxy (A and B) were mixed in 4:1 ratio. The epoxy mixer has been applied to the surface of concrete at location of CFRP strips in length of (60 cm) to fill the cavities. Also the epoxy mixer poured on surface of CFRP strips and these strips applied to the surface of concrete as shown in figure (4), The properties of epoxy and (CFRP) used are shown in table (6)and (7). Figure (4) Repair steps beams Table (7) Properties of epoxy resin Density 1.31 Kg/L mixed (Comp. A+B) Mixing ratio (A:B) by weight 1:4 +15oC :90 min. +35oC :35 min. Pot life Open time +35oC :30 min. Viscosity Pasty, not flow able. Substrate and ambient temperature: +15oC to +35oC Concrete fracture after 1 day (>15oC), on sandblasted substrate Application temperature Adhesive tensile strength on concrete Tensile strength (Curing 7 day, +23oC)= 30 N/mm2 (Curing 7 day, +23oC) = 3800 N/mm2 Flexural-E-Modulus 52
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 5. TESTING Compressive strength of concrete is measured on 150 mm cubesin conformity with B.S 1881: part 116: 1989[10]. The split tensile strength is determined as per the procedure outlined in ASTM C . 496-96[11] to assess the split tensile strength of concrete cylinder specimens of (150*300) mm. The I-section beams are tested to investigate flexural strength. The beams were subjected to section two-point loading as shown in figure (5), the loading rate was subjected using Universal machine point with capacity of 5000 kN at a rate of 3 MPa/min. The specimen is tested at the age of 28 days and after the failure of the beams, opposite load applied on the beam to repair it by using carbon fiber opposite sheet and test it again. two point Fig.( 5): Details of I- Beam with Externally Bonded CFRP under two-point load 53
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME Table( 8) Properties of carbon fiber strips 1 Fiber type High strength carbon fibers 2 Fiber orientation 00 (unidirectional) Construction Warp: Carbon fibers(99% of total a real weight) Weft: Thermoplastic heat-set fiber(1% of total a real weight) 4 A real weight 225 gm/cm2 5 Fiber density 1780 kg/m3 6 Fiber design thickness 0.13 mm (Based on total area of carbon fiber) 7 Tensile strength 3500 N/mm2 8 Tensile -E-modulus 230,000 N/mm2 9 Elongation at break 1.5% 10 Fibric length / roll 11 Fibric width 12 Shelf life Unlimited 13 Package 1 roll in card board box 3 ≥ 45.7 m 305/610 mm 6. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 6.1 Slump Test Results of the slump tests are presented in Table (9). The clearest effect was noted when adding the fibers into the cement matrix, was the reduction in workability as fiber content increased. To get, almost, similar workability for all mixes of this study, the (S.P/c) ratio changed when type and the volume fraction of fiber changed. Table (9) Compressive & Tensile Strength and Slump for different volume fraction Fibers percentage Symbol ࢂࢌ % M1 R M2 Mix No. Compressive strength (28) day (ࢌࢉ࢛ ) MPa Splitting tensile strength (28) day (ࢌࢉ࢚ )MPa Slump (mm) SF% NF% 0 0 0 61.10 3.85 102 S1 0.5 100 0 64.20 5.05 98 M3 S2 1 100 0 72.74 7.45 100 M4 S3 1.5 100 0 67.50 6.51 105 M5 N1 0.5 0 100 62.20 4.53 95 M6 N2 1 0 100 56.67 4.61 105 M7 N3 1.5 0 100 48.37 4.22 100 M8 HY.1 0.5 50 50 67.55 4.63 96 M9 HY.2 1 50 50 69.70 5.73 103 M10 HY.3 1.5 50 50 64.60 5.57 100 54
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 6.2 Compressive and tensile strength Table(9) show The results of compression tests and tensile strength that determined at the age of 28 days, as a means of quality control , Test results show that the addition of nylon fibers has addition minor effect on the improvement of the compressive and tensile strength values, but the addition of steel fibers has a major effect which is larger than the effect of nylon fibers. 6.3 Flexural Strength The average results of the flexure tests are given in table (9) as a ultimate load. The flexural strength trend for steel and nylon fiber varies when fiber increased. The maximum increase ultimate load can be achieved for fiber percentage equal to 1.5% for steel fiber. In general, for the all fiber percentage, the flexure strength of the FRC specimens increased as the steel fiber percentage increases and it can be seen that the addition of nylon fibers slightly increases the flexural strength. 6.4 Repair beams Table (10) and figure (6) shown result of repair beams, it indicate that the strength with ure carbon fiber sheet have increased the resistance of bending for beams and this increase varies with fiber contain, figure (7-16) show the load deflection of repair beam and figure(17) shows the shape 16) of the failure before and after repairs. Beam With Repair Load (KN) Beam With Out Repair Beams Figure (6) ultimate load & CFRP ultimate load for different volume fraction ratios 55
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME Table (10) ultimate load & CFRP ultimate load for different volume fraction ratios Symbo ࢂࢌ % Mix No. l Fibers percentage SF% NF% Ultimate Ultimate Load(EXP.)(k Load(CFRP)(k N) N) Percent of increase % M1 R 0 0 0 72.37 88.30 22.1 M2 S1 0.5 100 0 89.98 112.22 24.72 M3 S2 1 100 0 95.6 127.50 33.36 M4 S3 1.5 100 0 100.55 131.50 30.78 M5 N1 0.5 0 100 78.83 90.70 15.06 M6 N2 1 0 100 82.9 92.50 11.58 M7 N3 1.5 0 100 80.2 96.6 20.45 M8 HY.1 0.5 50 50 76.93 91.8 19.33 M9 HY.2 1 50 50 91.72 107.65 17.56 M10 HY.3 1.5 50 50 88.75 116.70 31.50 R: reference Concrete S1: Concrete containing ( S.F = 0.5% ) S2: Concrete containing ( S.F = 1 % ) S3: Concrete containing ( S.F = 1.5% ) N1: Concrete containing ( N.F = 0.5% ) N2: Concrete containing ( N.F = 1% ) N3: Concrete containing ( N.F = 1.5% ) HY1: Concrete hybrids containing (50%S.F +50%N.F) the volumetric rate of 0.5% HY2: Concrete hybrids containing (50%S.F +50%N.F) the volumetric rate of 1 % HY3: Concrete hybrids containing (50%S.F +50%N.F) the volumetric rate of 1.5% 100.00 80.00 Load (KN) 60.00 (REF. (CFRP 40.00 . REF 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (7) Load-deflection curve for reference and CFRP beam 56
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 120.00 100.00 80.00 (S.F (CFRP%) 0.5( S.F%) 0.5( Load (KN) 60.00 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection(mm) 15.00 Figure (8) Load-deflection curve for steel 0. 5 % and CFRP beam 140.00 120.00 100.00 Load (KN) 80.00 60.00 (S.F (CFRP%) 1( 40.00 S.F%) 1( 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (9) Load-deflection curve for steel 1 % and CFRP beam 140.00 120.00 100.00 80.00 60.00 Load (KN) …S.F %) 1.5( 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (10) Load-deflection curve for steel 1.5 % and CFRP beam 100.00 80.00 Load (KN) 60.00 (N.F (CFRP%) 0.5( 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (11) Load-deflection curve for nylon 0.5 % and CFRP beam 57
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 100.00 80.00 Load (KN) 60.00 40.00 (N.F (CFRP%) 1( 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (12) Load-deflection curve for nylon 1 % and CFRP beam 120.00 100.00 80.00 Load (KN) 60.00 (N.F (CFRP%) 1.5( N.F%) 1.5( 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (13) Load-deflection curve for nylon 1.5 % and CFRP beam 100.00 80.00 Load (KN) 60.00 (HY (CFRP%) 0.5( HY%) 0.5( 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (14) Load-deflection curve for hybrid 0.5 % and CFRP beam 120.00 100.00 80.00 Load (KN) 60.00 (HY (CFRP%) 1( HY%) 1( 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (15) Load-deflection curve for hybrid 1 % and CFRP beam 58
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 140.00 120.00 100.00 Load (KN) 80.00 (HY (CFRP%) 1.5( HY%) 1.5( 60.00 40.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 10.00 Deflection (mm) 15.00 Figure (16) Load-deflection curve for hybrid 1.5 % and CFRP beam Figure (17) shape of the failure before and after repairs 6. CONCLUSIONS 1- 2- 3- The addition both type of fibers with different volumetric ratios leads to a decrease in the workability of HSC. The addition of Steel Fibers caused an increase in compressive and tensile strength of about 19 % and 93.5 % respectively for fiber volume fraction equal to 1% at age of 28 days but addition of nylon fiber caused slightly effect. Adding both type of fiber to HSC with different volumetric ratios leads to a clear improvement in the properties of hardened state, so there is a significant increase in the flexural strength for the concrete mix including 1.5% steel fiber equals to 38.94 % and for nylon fiber including 1 % equal to 14.6 % and for hybrid fiber including 1 % equal to 26.74 %, compared with the reference beam. Experimental results indicate that the use of CFRP sheets is satisfactory strengthening way for I- section beams. It gives up to 22.1% increment in ultimate load for reference beam and (30.78%, 20.45%, 31.50%) increment for fiber volume fraction equal to 1.5% for steel and nylon and hybrid fiber respectively . 59
  • International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), ISSN 0976 – 6308 (Print), ISSN 0976 – 6316(Online) Volume 5, Issue 1, January (2014), © IAEME 7. REFERENCES [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] . [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] Newman, J., and Choo, B. S., “Advanced Concrete Technology”, 1st Edition, Elsevier Ltd., UK, 2003. Suji, D., Natesan. C., Murugesan R." Experimental Study on Behaviors of Polypropylene Fibrous Concrete Beams " Journal of Zhejiang University, SCIENCE A, pp.1101-1109,2007 Klaiber, F.W., Wipf, J.J. and Kempers, B.J., "Repair of Damaged Prestressed Concrete Bridges using CFRP", Proceedings of the 2003 Mid Transportation Research Symposium, Ames, Iowa, August 2003 by Iowa State University, www.ctre.iastate.edu. . Meier, U., Kaiser, H (1991), “Strengthening of structures with CFRP laminates”, advanced composites materials in civil engineering structures,ASCE, New York, pp 224–232. Alam, M.A., Zumaat, M.Z (2009), “Eliminating premature end peeling of flexurally strengthened reinforced concrete beams”, Journal of applied sciences, 9(6), pp 1106-1113. Sobuz, H.R. Ahmed, E (2011), “Flexural Performance of RC Beams Strengthened with Different Reinforcement Ratios of CFRP Laminates”, Key Engineering Materials, Trans Tech Publications, Vols. 471-472, pp 79-84. ACI Committee 211(2008), " Guide for Selecting Proportions for High-Strength Concrete Using Portland Cement and Other Cementitious Materials ", (ACI 211.4R-08) , American Concrete Institute, 2008. 1984 ، ‫، اد‬ ‫ةا‬ ‫وا‬ ‫ا ر ي "، ا ز ا آ ي‬ ‫ا ا ر )5(، "ا‬ ‫ا‬ ‫ا ا‬ ‫وا ء" ا ز ا آ ي‬ ‫ا‬ ‫ا‬ ‫در ا‬ ‫ا ا ر )54(، "رآ م ا‬ ‫ا‬ ‫ا ا‬ .1984 ،‫، اد‬ ‫ةا‬ ‫وا‬ B.S. 1881, Part 116, 1989, "Method for Determination of Compressive Strength of Concrete Cubes", British Standards Institution; PP. 3, 1881. ASTM C 496 – 96 "Standard Test Method for Splitting Tensile Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens". Javaid Ahmad, Dr. Javed Ahmad Bhat and Umer Salam, “Behavior of Timber Beams Provided with Flexural as Well as Shear Reinforcement in the Form of CFRP Strips”, International Journal of Advanced Research in Engineering & Technology (IJARET), Volume 4, Issue 6, 2013, pp. 153 - 165, ISSN Print: 0976-6480, ISSN Online: 0976-6499. Dr. Salim T. Yousif, “New Model of CFRP-Confined Circular Concrete Columns: Ann Approach”, International Journal of Civil Engineering & Technology (IJCIET), Volume 4, Issue 3, 2013, pp. 98 - 110, ISSN Print: 0976 – 6308, ISSN Online: 0976 – 6316. AUTHORS’ DETAIL Eng. Adnan Ibrahim Abdullah, born in 1st January 1973 complete his B.Sc. at Baghdad University, engineering college, civil engineering department in (Iraq) 1999. Recently, he pursuing his M.Tech studying in structure engineering, civil engineering department university of Tikrit / College of Engineering. (Iraq). Dr. Muyasser M. Jomaa'h; He complete B.Sc. Civil Eng. At University of Tikrit in (Iraq) 1995,M.Sc. in Civil Engineering at University of Tikrit in (Iraq) 1998, and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering atUniversity of technology-baghdad in (Iraq)2007. Dr. Alya'a Abbas Al-Attar; she complete B.Sc. Civil Eng. At salahaldin University in (Iraq) 1994,M.Sc. in Civil Engineering at University of Tikrit in (Iraq) 1998, and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at University of technology-Baghdad in (Iraq)2006. 60