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FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES
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FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNING ACROSS DISCIPLINES

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This session explores qualitative and quantitative assessment procedures utilized across …

This session explores qualitative and quantitative assessment procedures utilized across
three undergraduate departments to examine changes in civic engagement after student
participation in a community-based learning project. Attendees will be given the
opportunity to make predictions about, interpret results and evaluate the utility of our
procedures for their own classes.
Marie Walker, Associate Professor of Psychological Science, Angelique Dwyer, Assistant
Professor of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and Kristian Braekkan,
Assistant Professor of Economics and Management, all at Gustavus Adolphus College

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • 1. FACILITATING AND ASSESSING COMMUNITYENGAGEMENT AND STUDENT LEARNINGACROSS DISCIPLINES• Dr. Marie Walker, Psychological Science• Dr. Angelique Dwyer, Modern Languages, Literaturesand Cultures• Dr. Kristian Braekkan, Economics and Management
  • 2. Demographics of Gustavus AdolphusCollege• Private Lutheran Liberal Arts College in rural MN• $40,000+ tuition• Trying to improve interdisciplinary collaboration• Working toward Carnegie classificationWho Are Our Students?• 18-22 yrs, majority White, Christian, MN natives• Millennials, midwest, expectation of more communityinvolvement• Students are engaged, but not used to uncertainty orworking outside comfort zone
  • 3. Summary of ProjectsSpring, Fall 2012- 3rd, 4th year students- 75% women- Multiple majors- 3 classes of 25 students1. Determine format and feasibility of a MentalHealth Forum in St. PeterChill Out: MentalHealth WellnessFair 20122. Use social media in marketing Mobile CrisisTeam for Mankato’s South Central Crisis Center3. Fund an Intermediate Care Facility forChildren with Developmental Disabilities withNicollet County Social ServicesAbnormal Psychology
  • 4. Summary of ProjectsFall 2011, 2012- 3rd, 4th year students- 75% women- Multiple majorsFrom Latin America toLatinos in the U.S.InterculturalMediator:Latino Student1 LatinoFamily2 SpanishStudentsLanguage BuddiesModel
  • 5. Summary of ProjectsJustice and Equity in theWorkplaceFall 2012- 1st year students- 62% women- Multiple majors- 1 class of 13 studentsCollegeprofessorsGroups of3-4 studentsDiversityCouncilPurpose:Developing a “joint”understanding of theemployment relationshipContext:Immigration, race, gender, and poverty
  • 6. Assessment of Projects1. Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment Tools:- Civic Attitudes and Skills Questionnaire CASQ (Moely et al., 2002)- Open-Ended Reflection Questions2. Assess multiple times (Beginning, Middle and End ofsemester)- Learn student perspectives at different points in semester to beprepared for concerns, questions
  • 7. The Civic Attitudes and Skills Questionnaire(CASQ)• Measure of Civic Action, Interpersonal and Problem-SolvingSkills, Political Awareness, Leadership Skills, Social JusticeAttitudes, Diversity Attitudes• CASQ values (ceiling effects – social desirability)• Self-report• Made available to all faculty at Gustavus on SurveyMonkey, allowsfor control groups, frequently used by community based learningfellows and other faculty• 44 items Moely, et al., 2002), five-point scale• Internal consistencies (Cronbach’s coefficient alpha) values rangefrom .69 to .88 (based on two samples; N = 761 & N = 725)
  • 8. Results: Quantitative Assessment for AllClasses• N = 179 with different classes and control groups• 61% women• 39% menMEANS for CASQ Subscales• Civic Action = 4.05, SD = .56• Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills = 4.28, SD = .38• Political Awareness = 3.15, SD = .65• Leadership Skills = 3.77, SD = .61• Social Justice Attitudes = 4.01, SD = .48• Diversity Attitudes = 3.85, SD = .52
  • 9. Results: Quantitative Assessment - CASQAt Time 1 – Similarities/Differences from the Outset• Significantly highest subscale score on Interpersonaland Problem Solving Skills for entire sample• Lowest subscale scores on Political Awareness• Justice and Equity FTS had higher scores on Political Awareness(topic or age?)• Latin American Cultures had higher Social Justice Attitudes
  • 10. Your Students and Civic Engagement• Where will your students stand at Time 1 as a function ofyour discipline, course level, gender, college?
  • 11. Results: Quantitative Assessment - CASQCBL vs. Control at Time 2 – Bottom Line• Social Justice and Diversity Attitudes were significantlyhigher in the CBL group vs. the Control.• For Abnormal Psych, Civic Action was higher, too.• Women higher than Men on• Civic Action, Interpersonal and Problem-Solving Skills, SocialJustice Attitudes and Diversity Attitudes
  • 12. CBL vs. Control• Can you find a control group? Which class can you use?• What differences are you expecting? Which will you find?• Would you have similar findings for all your CBL classes?
  • 13. Results: Quantitative Assessment - CASQSignificant Subscales Change Over Time (not including Latin AmericanCultures) – perhaps due to age, topic and CBL• Civic Action went down in Justice and Equity FTS over time, especiallythe Men. Similar effect in one of the Abnormal Psychology classes.• Also, Interpersonal and Problem Solving Skills, Leadership Skillsand Social Justice Attitudes went down in Justice and Equity FTS forMen over time.• Political Awareness went down in Justice and Equity over time.Political Awareness went up in one section of Abnormal Psychology.Both effects were due to Men only.• Leadership Skills went down for Men over time.• Diversity Attitudes went up for Women and down for Men in Justice andEquity FTS over time.
  • 14. Changes in Civic Engagement AcrossTime• What constitutes positive or negative change?• As a function of gender? Age? Discipline?• What is the time span that you are devoting to the CBLproject? Will you be able to discern change?
  • 15. Results: Qualitative Assessment for AllClassesBefore beginning the projectsMid semesterAt the end of the projects
  • 16. Results: Qualitative Assessment for AllClassesBefore beginning the projectsSTUDENTS:• Put theory into practice• Gain real world experience• Group work• Increase individual knowledge• Application of specific skills• Benefit the community / contribute• Nervousness and/or excitement
  • 17. Results: Qualitative Assessment for AllClassesAt the end of the projectsSTUDENTS:• Not enough time• Recognition of amount of work• Got a glimpse of “reality”• Mixed feelings: “disappointed” yet “proud”• Pushed out of our “comfort zone”
  • 18. Pre and Post Qualitative Reflection• Will your students recognize change in themselves?• Have you seen different responses in your classes?
  • 19. Benefits of Conducting AssessmentAcross Disciplines• Recognizing general goals of liberal arts curriculum thatapply across all disciplines• Sharing instruments• Learning better ways to engage in this type of learning• Broaden network of colleagues conducting CBL• Differences in use of technology to help do the CBL• Learn about differences and similarities in your ownmajors• Reinforce development of applied skills across thecurriculum• Through assessment, identify areas of need for curricularchange
  • 20. • What benefits do you foresee in working with colleaguesfrom other disciplines? What have you experiencedalready?• Is CBL assessment college-wide on your campus? Can itbe?

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