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B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness
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B11 ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness

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Since 1959, ACT has collected and reported data on students’ academic readiness for college—both nationally and state specific. Preparing for college and career is a process that occurs throughout …

Since 1959, ACT has collected and reported data on students’ academic readiness for college—both nationally and state specific. Preparing for college and career is a process that occurs throughout elementary and secondary education. Measuring academic performance over time provides meaningful and compelling information about the college readiness of students. ACT research also shows that certain nonacademic factors can play a role in student college success. Learn what to look for beyond GPA and test scores to predict the greatest likelihood of college success.

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  • ACT research shows that CCR is directly related to persistence and completion. So if we even want to move that grad rate above 57%, we need to get kids meeting those benchmarks
  • Full study avail. on ACT web site
  • Can’t meet state graduation goals at this rate
  • P&P available now; online version available beg of Nov 2011
  • P&P available now; online version available beg of Nov 2011
  • File that contains all demographic and behavioral data, ENGAGE scale scores, percentile scores, flags, etc. File is in .csv format
  • Our council had reviewed the meta analysis Since we were concerned with tool being grounded in research as well as addressing the whole student
  • The table shows the percentage of students accurately identified as having a 9 th Grade GPA < 2.0 (that is, flagging students who may be academically at-risk). As you can see, random selection has a 24% accuracy on its own. When adding in EXPLORE and ENGAGE as predictors, accuracy rises to 83%.
  • This diagram shows how ENGAGE and ENGAGE Teacher Edition can work together to inform support and intervention strategies that help to reduce student risk and how ENGAGE Teacher Edition can be used to monitor student progress.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ACT — Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors that Determine Student College and Career Readiness April Hansen, Postsecondary DirectorGeorge Schlott, Senior Consultant for Program Solutions ACT, Inc. – Midwest Region-Lincolnshire IL © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 2. A Question for All What is College and Career Readiness? Ensuring that all students, graduating from high school, have acquired the skills in English,mathematics, reading, and science that they need to be ready for entry-level college courses without remediation
    • 3. ACT College & Career Readiness System Measuring Student Progress Toward Improving Planning for College and Career Readiness Course Rigor School Improvement College & Career Readiness Information SystemEXPLORE PLAN The ACT WorkKeys ENGAGE QualityCore CoreWork Diagnostics Online service to 8th & 9th 10th grade Job skill Middle and Research- grade curriculum- 11 & 12 th th High School driven diagnose and grade assessments improve contentcurriculum- based assessment solutions for and practice areas and portable based educational curriculum- that measures strengthening credentialseducational and career based factors of curriculum &and career planning necessary academic instruction measureme for career planning program nt for success Core Practice program pathways Audit learning outcomes Online service to ACT Core diagnose and ACT College Readiness Benchmarks improve content Course and practice areas ACT College Readiness Standards Standards Research
    • 4. ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Through collaborative research with postsecondary institutions nationwide, ACT has established the following college readiness benchmarks*:Test College Course EXPLORE 8 EXPLORE 9 PLAN 10 ACT COMPASS Test College Course ACTEnglish English Composition 13 14 15 18 69 English English Composition 18Math College Algebra 17 18 19 22 65 Math College Algebra 22Reading Social Science 15 16 17 21 88 Reading Social Science 21Science Biology Science 20 Biology 20 21 24 24 NA* Minimum score needed on an ACT subject-area test to indicate a 50% chance of obtaining a B or higher or a 75% chance of obtaining a C or higher in the corresponding first-year credit-bearing college course.
    • 5. Value of College ReadinessStudents who are college/career ready when they leavehigh school have a significantly higher likelihood of:– Enrolling in a postsecondary program,– Enrolling in credit bearing courses without the need for remediation,– Succeeding in entry level postsecondary course work,– Persisting in their postsecondary education,– Completing a postsecondary degree or training program, and– Entering the job market with significantly higher lifetime earning potential. Regardless of ethnicity and SES
    • 6. Leaky Educational Pipeline Leaky Educational Pipeline• Many students are not prepared to meet the hurdles they face throughout the academic pipeline, and they don’t persist and succeed. Enter 9th HS Enter College Graduate grade Graduate College (Bachelor’s) ~100% 96.9% 74.9% 52.5% 29.0% NCES 2010• What can we do to improve student success and persistence? © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 6
    • 7. Leaky Educational Pipeline Pop QuizWhat’s the number of American high schoolstudents who drop out of school, every day,bored, frustrated, or so far behind that they’vegiven up? 6,000
    • 8. Attrition Costs Money Two-year schools -- 54 % Four-year private colleges -- 73% Four-year public -- 71% * *Wes Habley, ACT, January 2009By 2020: Cost of the average private--$60-70,000 per year Cost of the average public--$17,500-27,500 per yearIn 2008: Out of approx. 1.8 million first year college students, 450,000 did not return tothe college or university where they began their college career.* That’s 25%. *Bryan Matthews, Retention Matters, Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 2, 2009
    • 9. Do the Math!If you have an incoming class of 1000, and lose even 10% ofthe class (100 students), that’s 100 x $30,000 = $3 million $3 million x 4 years = $12 millionRetaining students allows you to maintain revenue streams while keeping tuition increases down. It’s the low hanging fruit.
    • 10. What if you had an assessment that would:  evaluate students’ personal, behavioral, and academicskills critical to high school and college achievement  determine their levels of academic risk  apply specific interventions to help them persist in theirstudies and achieve academic success  identify student strengths and areas for improvement instudent motivation, social engagement, and self-regulation predict college retention for each incoming freshman
    • 11. Research is the Foundation• The strongest predictors of college persistence and degree completion are: prior academic achievement and course selection (rigorous high school classes).• Prior academic achievement and cognitive ability surpass all other factors in their influence on student performance.• Non-academic factors can influence academic performance, retention and persistence, but cannot substitute for it.
    • 12. You Do! Grades 6-9 Grades 10-12 College Teacher
    • 13. The Challenges• Create a comprehensive assessment system that predicts success in education and work• Tailor assessments for critical transition points and context• Measure characteristics amenable to change• Help educators connect students’ needs to interventions © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 14
    • 14. ACT’s Academic Achievement, Behavior & Career Planning Solutions Grades 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 College WorkAchievement EXPLORE ® PLAN ® ACT ® COMPASS ® WorkKeys ® Behavior ENGAGE and ENGAGE Teacher Edition ENGAGE Talent Career ACT Interest Inventory & Map of College Majors Fit © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 15
    • 15. ACT’s Academic Behavior Assessments• Students’ personal characteristics and psychosocial development influence their ability to stay in school and be successful• ACT research shows that psychosocial/behavioral development can be structured into 3 broad domains: – Motivation – Social Engagement – Self-Regulation• ACT’s academic behavior assessments measure these domains © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 16
    • 16. ACT’s Academic Behavior Assessments Student Grade Levels 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 CollegeStudent reported ENGAGE ENGAGE ENGAGE (surveys) Grades 6-9 Grades 10-12 CollegeTeacher reported ENGAGE Teacher Ed. ENGAGE Teacher(teacher ratings) Grades 6-9 Ed. Grades 10-12 © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 17
    • 17. ACT’s Academic Behavior Assessments• Surveys (Student reported) – ENGAGE Grades 6-9 (typically in 6th & 9th grade) – ENGAGE Grades 10-12 (typically in 11th grade) – ENGAGE College (typically early in 1st semester)• Behavioral Measures (Teacher reported) COMING SOON! – ENGAGE Teacher Edition for Grades 6-9 and 10-12 (completed by teachers 2-3x per year for each student) © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 18
    • 18. ACT’s Academic Behavior Assessments ENGAGE Grades 10-12Domain ENGAGE Grades 6-9 & CollegeMotivation  Academic Discipline  Academic Discipline(Getting work done)  Commitment to School  Commitment to College  Optimism  Goal Striving  General Determination  Study Skills  Communication SkillsSocial Engagement  Family Attitude toward Education  Social Activity(Getting along)  Family Involvement  Social Connection  Relationships w/ School Personnel  School Safety ClimateSelf-Regulation  Managing Feelings  Academic Self-Confidence(Keeping your cool)  Thinking Before Acting  Steadiness  Orderly Conduct © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 19
    • 19. ENGAGE: Grades 6-9• Measures students’ perceptions of themselves, their families’ commitment to education, school- related factors, and important behavioral data• Developed to predict academic success and high school graduation• Low stakes, self-report instrument, 4th-grade reading level• 10 scales• Online administration © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 22
    • 20. ENGAGE 10-12 & College• Measures students’ psychosocial attributes, determines level of risk, and helps identify interventions to promote successful transition to postsecondary studies• Developed to predict academic success and retention in the first year of college• Low stakes, self-report instrument, 6th-grade reading level• 10 scales• Online administration © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 23
    • 21. ENGAGE: Reports• Academic Success and Graduation/Retention Indices• Student profiles can be used to: – Identify relative strengths and needs – Inform student advising – Match students’ needs to interventions• Aggregate reports• Roster reports• All reports available online 24/7 © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 24
    • 22. ENGAGE: Sample Advisor ReportProfile Success Indicesof scores (only on Advisor Report) Interpretive feedback, sorted from strengths to needs © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 25
    • 23. ENGAGE: Sample Profile Report © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 26
    • 24. ENGAGE: Sample Intepretative Reports © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 27
    • 25. ENGAGE: School/Institution Aggregate Report © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 28
    • 26. ENGAGE: Roster Report © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 29
    • 27. Why ENGAGE?• Grounded in research – Developed based on meta-analysis of predictors of academic performance and persistence (Robbins et al., 2004) – Validated across many studies (e.g., Allen et al., 2010; Casillas et al., in press; Robbins et al., 2006, 2008)• Helps educators to consider the whole student – Provides profile of relative strengths and needs• Practical and flexible – Administer online at any time – Reports available online 24/7 – Identify areas of challenge for students – Create a crosswalk of ENGAGE scales to existing services © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 30
    • 28. Percentage of students accurately identified as having a 9th-grade GPA <2.0 Selection Method Hit Rate Random 24% EXPLORE Composite only 69% ENGAGE Grades 6-9 only 80% EXPLORE & ENGAGE 83% © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 31
    • 29. Average Early High School GPA, by EXPLORE and ENGAGE Grades 6-9 Scores Average Early High School GPA, by EXPLORE and Average ENGAGE Grades 6-9 Scores Low ENGAGE Moderate ENGAGE High ENGAGE 4.0 3.5 3.63 3.34 3.0 3.13Average Early HS GPA 2.89 2.5 2.62 2.41 2.0 1.96 1.99 1.77 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 Bottom 25% Middle 50% Top 25% EXPLORE Composite Score © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 32
    • 30. Percentages of Students Accurately Identified as Being at High Risk for Dropping OutSelection Method Hit RateRandom 17%EXPLORE Composite only 37%ENGAGE Grades 6-9 Grad. Index only 42%EXPLORE & ENGAGE Grad. Index 52% © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 33
    • 31. Persistence Rates, by EXPLORE and ENGAGE Grades 6-9 Graduation Index Levels Low Graduation Index Moderate Graduation Index High Graduation Index 100 98 96 96 92 89 80 72 69Persistence Rate 60 62 48 40 20 0 Bottom 25% Middle 50% Top 25% EXPLORE Composite Score © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 34
    • 32. Use of ENGAGE College to Identify Students Academically at Risk Accuracy of IdentificationSelection Method Drop Out Academic DifficultyRandom 10% 20%ENGAGE 24% 46%Success IndicesNote. Students scoring in the bottom 5% of each of these populations were flagged. © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 35
    • 33. ENGAGE: Teacher• Designed to assess and monitor students’ development• Students are rated by teachers who know them well• Requires each student to be rated by at least one teacher• Used to 2-3 times per year• Scales are “anchored” with behavioral statements to enhance accuracy and reliability• Same dimensions for Grades 6-9 and 10-12, but rating scales are made up of different items. © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 36
    • 34. ENGAGE: TeacherDomain ScalesMotivation  Initiative(Getting work done)  Planning & Organizing  Sustained Effort  PerformanceSocial Engagement  Communication(Getting along)  Working with OthersSelf-Regulation  Managing Feelings(Keeping your cool)  Orderly Conduct © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 37
    • 35. Combining Assessment and Interventionsto Promote Student SuccessENGAGE Support Resources Reduced & RiskENGAGE Interventions Teacher Edition Continued Evaluation & Feedback © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 38
    • 36. Example Crosswalk between Interventions and Areas of Need  Interventions Goal Setting Group Work & Self- How to Areas of Cross-Age Community & Time Mentoring Communication Confidence Follow Need Tutoring Service Management Skills Workshop Rules Motivation x x x x       Social Engagement x x x x       Self- x x x Regulation         © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 39
    • 37. Behavioral Education Solutions• Grade 6-12 curriculum COMING SOON! – Units designed to help students build behavioral skills – Based on carefully developed Behavioral Learning Objectives – Fully developed and structured lesson plans and activities• ENGAGE Tool Shop (Postsecondary) – Several tools available for each ENGAGE scales to address students’ needs – Can be completed by students on their own or as part of FYE courses or other group settings © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 4040
    • 38. ENGAGE Tool Shop (College) © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 41
    • 39. Intervention Research• University of North Texas – Large university (36,000 students) – Administers ENGAGE to all incoming 1st-year students – Identify at-risk students and follow up with immediate individualized intervention• Northern Arizona University – 4-year public institution serving 13,000 students – Use ENGAGE to guide intrusive interventions with those students who need the most help © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 42
    • 40. UNT Face-to-Face Meeting• Advisor or student affairs staff meet with student during first 5-6 weeks of semester• Present ENGAGE results by focusing first on strengths, then needs• Focus resources to aid student in: – building on one strength and addressing one area for improvement – using crosswalk of ENGAGE to campus resources © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 43
    • 41. Sample Crosswalk of Resources SRI Scale Definition ResourcesAcademic Discipline Effort put into school work and • Learning Center the degree to which students see • Office of Exploring Majors themselves as hardworking and • UNT Math Tutor Lab conscientious. • UNT Student Writing LabSocial Connection Feelings of connection and • Off-Campus Student Services involvement with school and • Transfer Center community. • Residence Life • Recreation CenterAcademic Self-Confidence Belief in ability to perform well • Learning Center in school. • Counseling and Testing • Office of Exploring Majors © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 44
    • 42. www.act.org/engage/index.html © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 45
    • 43. www.act.org/engage/index.htmlFor each version of ENGAGE, website contains: – Features and Benefits – Testing Timeline – Program Materials – Research – Results and Reports © 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. 46

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