Interview with author and news anchor Greg Dobbs
<ul><li>Greg Dobbs launched his career in journalism as an editor for Paul Harvey on ABC Radio. While spending more than 2...
Q: What has been your most memorable experience following major news stories? <ul><li>A: So many of my experiences are mem...
iU: Why did you decide to write Life in the Wrong Lane? <ul><li>A: There were two reasons for writing the book, one seriou...
<ul><li>Con’t:  It wasn’t until years afterward that I realized – learning from friends who seemed interested in the “back...
Q: Who do you hope to reach with this book? <ul><li>A: I hope to reach two groups of readers: 1) News junkies who might be...
Q: Why did you decide to self publish? <ul><li>A: I have friends who have published via the traditional route. They have t...
Q:  How has your publishing experience been with iUniverse? <ul><li>A: I couldn’t be happier. iUniverse has treated it lik...
Q: What are your future plans? <ul><li>A: For almost six years now, I have been a correspondent for a documentary-style we...
Q: As a journalism and mass communication professor for several years and an author of a university-level textbook, are th...
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Author Greg Dobbs Case Study

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Greg Dobbs launched his career in journalism as an editor for Paul Harvey on ABC Radio. While spending more than 20 years covering major news stories. Now a correspondent for HDNet television’s “World Report,” Dobbs has compiled the stories that happen behind-the-news-scenes for his book Life in the Wrong Lane

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Author Greg Dobbs Case Study

  1. 1. Interview with author and news anchor Greg Dobbs
  2. 2. <ul><li>Greg Dobbs launched his career in journalism as an editor for Paul Harvey on ABC Radio. While spending more than 20 years covering major news stories such as the Gulf War, revolutions and takeovers, natural disasters and civil wars as an ABC News correspondent, Dobbs earned two national Emmys as well as awards and recognition from groups such as the Society of Professional Journalists. Now a correspondent for HDNet television’s “World Report,” Dobbs has compiled the stories that happen behind-the-news-scenes for his book Life in the Wrong Lane .  </li></ul>
  3. 3. Q: What has been your most memorable experience following major news stories? <ul><li>A: So many of my experiences are memorable in different ways – sometimes because of the personal experiences I didn’t expect to have, sometimes because of the ways in which they affected the world. But probably the most vivid is the revolution that brought Islamic fundamentalism to Iran, because while I’ve covered many wars and revolutions, this one spread like a wildfire – one day the streets were quiet, the next day they were a battlefield. And, it resulted in a seismic shift in Middle Eastern politics: for the first time in a millennium, an Islamic nation would be governed not just by religious rules but by religious leaders and that, of course, has taken root as an aspiration for radicals throughout the region. </li></ul>
  4. 4. iU: Why did you decide to write Life in the Wrong Lane? <ul><li>A: There were two reasons for writing the book, one serious and one selfish. The selfish reason is, people always told me when I came home from an interesting trip and related funny, wacky, sometimes silly and sometimes harrowing tales of my travels, “You ought to write a book.” The reason, they said, was that I got to see and do things firsthand that few others got to do (or, truth be known, would want to do). The writing process was probably the closest I’ve ever come to journaling, which of course I’ve always done professionally but never before personally. I figured that the stories I had to tell were part of the stories I reported on the air. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Con’t: It wasn’t until years afterward that I realized – learning from friends who seemed interested in the “back” stories – that some of the most interesting experiences were the ones I never reported until writing the book . The serious reason is, Americans take a lot for granted, including the First Amendment which allows for the free flow of information to which we are exposed every day of our lives.  So part of my motivation was to help people understand that sometimes that information comes with a hard cost to the people who are gathering and reporting it. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Q: Who do you hope to reach with this book? <ul><li>A: I hope to reach two groups of readers: 1) News junkies who might be interested in what happens to reporters while they’re reporting, and 2) People who are simply interested in the world around us, and how different nations’ cultural and moral values affect the journalists who are reporting from those parts of the world. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Q: Why did you decide to self publish? <ul><li>A: I have friends who have published via the traditional route. They have told me about the hassle of dealing with agents, and publishers who put almost no resources into marketing books by first-time authors. On the other hand, two friends have published and enjoyed success with iUniverse.  </li></ul>
  8. 8. Q: How has your publishing experience been with iUniverse? <ul><li>A: I couldn’t be happier. iUniverse has treated it like the best-seller we hope it will become. That pertains to editing, marketing and generally a level of attention that is nothing short of flattering. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Q: What are your future plans? <ul><li>A: For almost six years now, I have been a correspondent for a documentary-style weekly hour-long program called “World Report” on the all high-definition television network HDNet. That has taken me on new adventures to some 20 countries on every continent, as well as around the United States. When I first communicated with iUniverse, I mentioned to a couple of the company’s executives that since writing Life in the Wrong Lane , I have continued to record my not-part-of-the-story-itself experiences in the narrative form of letters to family and friends. I sent a compendium of those letters to the executives, who believe these are the makings of a second book. Of course that will depend on the success of the first.  </li></ul>
  10. 10. Q: As a journalism and mass communication professor for several years and an author of a university-level textbook, are the stories in this book helpful for people new to the field? <ul><li>A: Sure, these stories ought to be helpful in two ways. First, I hope they will inspire people to work in the world of journalism because it can be full of adventure and insight. Second, I hope they will discourage people from working in the field of journalism if they don’t think the adventure – and danger, and travel, and discomfort, and long absences from home – are really what they want. </li></ul><ul><li>For more information about self publishing, visit us at www.iuniverse.com . </li></ul>
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