Digitally proficient organisations presentation

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Infoxchange Australia recommends that specific ICT funding be allocated to the not-for-profit sector so that it can become smarter and achieve digital proficiency. This is a vital means of removing …

Infoxchange Australia recommends that specific ICT funding be allocated to the not-for-profit sector so that it can become smarter and achieve digital proficiency. This is a vital means of removing barriers to performance and enhancing service delivery.

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  • 1. Imagine the benefits to community if CSOs could use ICT more proficiently.
  • 2. The research is complete.
    The findings are published.
    The bigger picture is clear.
  • 3. The majority of CSOs we surveyed only utilise a small % of their ICT capability.
  • 4. That’s the equivalent of having the resourcesof this many people.
  • 5. But only utilising this many.
  • 6. In 2010, we propose to assist CSOs to become digital proficient.
  • 7. dpo
    Digitally Proficient Organisation
  • 8.
  • 9. Digital proficiency
    • Development in communication technology changes the way organisations function.
    • 10. No development has been more profound than the present transformation of information communication technology (ICT).
    • 11. Digital proficiency improves the capacity, effectiveness and reporting efficiency of organisations.
    • 12. Efficiency in this century, requires the use of ICT; we have to get smarter.
  • The time is now
    • Business has adapted and proved the irreplaceable value of ICT.
    • 13. Community sector organisations (CSOs) must embrace the opportunity.
    • 14. It was never more important than now.
    • 15. The global financial crisis has placed growing demands on CSOs.
    • 16. Projected population increases will increase future demand.
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    Development Plans and Funding
    • Two (2) of the 120 CSOs audited were working to an effective ICT development plan.
    • 17. 84% of organisations audited reported that they had no ICT development plan.
    • 18. 71% of metropolitan CSOs audited and 39% of regional CSOs had included ICT in their annual budgets.
    • 19. The average CSO budget for ICT was $6,392 per annum.
    • 20. •74% of CSOs audited purchased their equipment from a retail outlet.
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    Software
    • Windows XP and the Microsoft Office suite is overwhelmingly the most used software.
    • 21. CSO responses to questions about the software they use for client relationship management highlighted a lack of awareness of software applications that effectively track the client/CSO relationship.
    • 22. CSOs use software they are familiar with and rarely experiment or explore new forms of software.
    • 23. CSO staff generally do not know how to find the right application to meet their needs.
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    Communication Technology
    • 73% indicated that they have a good functional level of IT literacy.
    • 24. 59% rated themselves as confident in using the internet and 17% rated themselves as expert.
    • 25. Despite such confident claims there was little evidence that the key communication and research tools available through the internet were being effectively used.
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    Communication Technology (cont)
    • Most CSOs audited thought that they were paying too much for telecommunication services.
    • 26. A majority of CSOs rated their hardware as adequate and reliable (satisfactory to good).
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    CSOs need information about
    • Computer hardware and where to source it economically;
    • 27. Computer software that most effectively meets the CSO’s IT needs;
    • 28. Internet potential and its effective use;
    • 29. Telecommunications procurement.
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    Education
    • 51% of staff in the survey received no IT education in the past year.
    CSOs need education in
    • software use;
    • 30. internet use;
    • 31. ICT networking within the CSO, between CSOs, with clients and with the community.
  • Snapshot of ICT in CSOs
    Support services
    • 33% of CSO staff nominated either lack of understanding or lack of IT support as a barrier to IT use.
    Continued monitoring of digital proficiency
    • 23% of CSO staff nominated lack of time as a barrier to IT use. Lack of time linked with the rate of change in software and internet services highlights the need for regular monitoring to maintain and improve the effectiveness of government and community funding outlays.
  • Getting smarter
    • Moving beyond email.
    • 32. ICT is not just a tool, it’s a strategic asset.
    • 33. ICT is a path to efficiency, it helps to shape client services and ensures participation in professional networks.
  • Digital proficiency will for CSOs and government
    • Reduce the regulatory burden;
    • 34. Streamline interaction with government, clients and professional networks;
    • 35. Increase the capacity of community organisations;
    • 36. Encourage innovation and growth;
    • 37. Enhance the CSO role in the community;
    • 38. Facilitate coordination across government and the community sector.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation
    Comprehensive Digital Proficiency Plan and governance processes supporting ICT development
    • Established Digital Proficiency Plan that is reviewed on at least a quarterly basis.
    • 39. Key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure effectiveness and monitor implementation of Digital Proficiency Plan.
    • 40. Governance and operational management processes ensuring optimisation of ICT costs, continuous improvement and service level accountability.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Alignment with board and organisational objectives
    • Digital Proficiency plan linked to organisation’s strategic objectives
    • 41. Regular review at board level to ensure alignment with strategic direction and priorities.
    • 42. Individual projects to measure benefits against strategic objectives and organisation goals.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Tightly integrated business systems supporting efficient processes
    • Implementation of integrated business systems that effectively support organisational processes.
    • 43. Automated reporting across business systems for internal management and reporting to external funding agencies, government and other stakeholders
    • 44. Continuous assessment and improvement of processes leveraging business system capabilities.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Effective relationship management and service coordination systems
    • Effective and easy to use client management systems supporting service delivery needs.
    • 45. Service coordination tools enabling finding of services, electronic referral, sharing of information and management of capacity between services.
    • 46. Connectivity with broader stakeholders through open web based interfaces ensuring appropriate security and privacy of information at all times.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Open and engaged knowledge management and information sharing
    • Support staff and volunteers with the capture and sharing of information using web based collaboration tools.
    • 47. Encourage use of ICT to share ideas and knowledge across the sector and more broadly around the world.
    • 48. Use of online tools and Web 2.0 applications to improve communications and engagement with stakeholders.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Training and development of staff and volunteers leveraging ICT
    • Use of technology to deliver training to staff and volunteers, manage training/ development plans and measure organisational capability.
    • 49. Sharing of training and education content across the sector using web based e-learning tools and virtual classrooms.
    • 50. Incorporate appropriate ICT training into staff and volunteer development plans.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Optimal ICT procurement ensuring best value
    • Established procurement processes and procedures for ICT purchases.
    • 51. Use of buying groups available to the sector to ensure best value procurement for ICT products and services.
    • 52. Sharing of procurement best practices and purchasing agreements across the sector for the benefit of all community sector organisations.
  • Attributes of a digitally proficient organisation (cont.)
    Flexible workplace supporting multiple devices and locations
    • Capacity for online access from client premises, home or other locations through web based interfaces, smart phones and other technologies.
    • 53. Advanced collaboration tools enabling service coordination using video conferencing, live document sharing and other technologies.
    • 54. Use of ICT to improve responsiveness to clients and other stakeholders.
  • Benefits of digital proficiency
    Information
    Consultation
    Record keeping
    Reporting
    Monitoring
    Accountability
    Public presentation
    Support base
    Fundraising
  • 55. Benefits of digital proficiency
    Individual workers
    • Time saving
    • 56. Access to shared files from any location
    • 57. Access to the information systems and email from any location
    • 58. Capacity to better assist clients through access to online services including client management systems and booking systems
    • 59. Capacity to keep informed and networked to other professionals in the same field
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    Individual workers (cont.)
    • Increased choice in terms of time spent in the office/at home/with clients
    • 60. Increased job satisfaction by cutting out duplication
    • 61. Greater sharing of knowledge and experience with graduates, team members and volunteers
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    Community Sector Organisations
    • Improved use of meeting time, as non-critical issues can be addressed by file sharing/ secure online forums
    • 62. Increased access to organisational knowledge through effective use of wiki’s
    • 63. Increased exposure to potential funding bodies through effective use of online fundraising and marketing e.g. You Tube, Twitter and Facebook
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    Community Sector Organisations (cont.)
    • CSOs who use i-phones and blackberries are more likely to develop a robust organisational memory, mapping intellectual and social capital more effectively
    • 64. Greater flexibility in training staff, providing online induction manuals to new projects and facilitating dialogue with new team members
    • 65. Improved staff productivity resulting from networked document management and online collaboration tools
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    Community Sector Organisations (cont.)
    • Reduced staff and volunteer time through electronic service coordination and use of online applications allowing additional time for direct service delivery.
    • 66. Reduced telecommunications costs as a result of less phone calls and faxes between agencies using electronic service coordination and online applications.
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    The Sector as a whole
    • More efficient use of funding across the sector through coordinated ICT procurement
    • 67. Enhanced inter-agency relationships through online collaboration and service coordination tools
    • 68. Improved capacity of the sector to communicate the opportunities for corporate partnerships and corporate volunteerism in a format that meets the needs of large business
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    The Sector as a whole (cont.)
    • Improved communication and timeliness of online reporting with Government and funding bodies.
    • 69. Reduced ICT costs through optimisation of infrastructure and applications across the sector.
    • 70. Reduced staff and volunteer time through electronic service coordination and use of online applications allowing additional time for direct service delivery.
    • 71. Reduced telecommunications costs as a result of less phone calls and faxes between agencies using electronic service coordination and online applications.
  • Benefits of digital proficiency (cont.)
    The Sector as a whole (cont.)
    • Increased recognition and respect for the achievements of small CSOs and the vital role they play in our society by sharing information in ways that engage the end user
    • 72. Increased capability to communicate to and with peak organisations such as Sector peaks and VCOSS , which, in turn, increases the effectiveness of peak organisations in representing the interests and concerns of small CSOs in real time
  • Levels of digital proficiency
    Basic - ICT as a cost centre
    • Adhoc and reactive response to ICT needs
    • 73. No formal alignment between ICT and organisation’s strategic objectives.
  • Levels of digital proficiency (cont)
    Intermediate - ICT as a business function
    • Digital Proficiency Plan and processes established but limited alignment with organisation’s strategic objectives.
  • Levels of digital proficiency (cont)
    Advanced - ICT as an enabler
    • Digital Proficiency Plan and associated management framework designed to support organistation’s strategic objectives.
  • Levels of digital proficiency (cont)
    Proficient - ICT as a strategic asset
    • Comprehensive Digital Proficiency Plan and governance processes with regular review against organistation’s strategic objectives.
  • The role of the Digital Proficiency Plan
    • Assess the ‘digital proficiency’ of the organisation (current state.)
    • 74. Describe the benefits of improving organisation’s use of technology
    • 75. Identify a digital proficiency ‘target’ the organisation wants to achieve in a set timeframe (12months recommended.)
    • 76. Describe the (processes) steps involved in moving from the current state, (e.g. 3/10, to future state 6/10 in 12 months.
    • 77. Describe the products and services required to achieve the desired outcome.
  • The role of the Digital Proficiency Plan (cont.)
    • Describe the benefits to the organisation in working toward their target score.
    • 78. Recommend a ‘service agreement’ to the CSO based on their needs as identified in the plan.
  • Managed Services for CSOs
    Applications
    • Service coordination
    • 79. Business productivity
    • 80. Business systems
    Support for
    • Network infrastructure (Cloud computing)
    • 81. On-site servers and applications
    • 82. Desktop and end users
    Telco services
    • Broker bulk purchase
    Training
    • Self-paced online learning
    • 83. Virtual classrooms
    Web Portal
    • Linking relevant content through portal to support the delivery of quality community services
  • Recommendations
    • Establish a demonstration program to assist CSOs to become digitally proficient
    • 84. Develop a framework that will provide a checklist of criteria for CSOs to become digitally proficient. 
    • 85. Conduct a training needs analysis (TNA) as a prelude to the development of an Digital Proficiency Plan for CSOs
    • 86. Provide education programs targeting CSOs in the use of current and future relevant hardware and software and meeting the needs discovered in the training needs analysis.
  • Recommendations (cont.)
    • Provide ongoing annual monitoring of the ICT capacity of CSOs.
    • 87. Develop intermediary services for the wholesale purchase of ICT hardware, software and telecommunications to meet the needs of CSOs.
    • 88. Establish a coordination strategy (Portal) to link all community sector web based information services, management and e-learning tools, including CSO-focused technology news and events.
    • 89. That all re usable decommissioned computer hardware from the DHS be available via Green PC to DHS funded CSOs.
  • Action
    Ensuring that Victorian Community Sector Organisations are Digitally Proficient will be one of the single most significant strategic actions the Government can take to ensure effective, efficient and coordinated service delivery over the next 20 years.
  • 90. Digital proficiency makes the most of CSOs resources