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A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
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A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning

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A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning by Matthew Bates

A shared design: Facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning by Matthew Bates

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  • Outcomes-based Module Design Workshop 24/10/12 Dr Jon Tepper
  • Educational artefacts are context specific to each study but encompass the product and accreditation of the process by participants, facilitators and any stakeholders involved. Outcomes-based Module Design Workshop 24/10/12 Dr Jon Tepper
  • Transcript

    • 1. A shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learningMatthew Bates, Nottingham Trent University, UK
    • 2. MotivationWhy use a design-based approach to games-based learning?• Gaming is becoming the new ‘third place’• Has the potential to inspire community learning• Play requires exploration, conversation and collaboration• Which encourages creation of peripheral game resourcesWiki knowledge Video tutorials Media-rich blogs A shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 3. Research DesignHypothesis: GBL design projects modelled on higher participation ofend learners produce greater educational artefacts.Methodology:> Druin’s (2002) methods of ‘participatory design’• qualitative research based on field observations• using low tech materials to prototype new ideas> Steinkuehler’s (2004) ‘thick description’ of learning process• video footage of interactions used with observation schedule• post project review and reflection via presentation of workA shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 4. Hart’s LadderA shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 5. Investigation 1: Library Service• Level 8 of ladder: ‘Children initiated and directed’ participation• Goal: promote school library facilities to fellow students• Via weekly after school club with self selecting participants• Facilitation: passive; simply initiate and observe tasks• Result: 50% games completed which lack learning content A shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 6. Investigation 2: Secondary School• Level 4 of ladder: ‘Assigned but informed’ participation• Goal: inform primary pupils about secondary school life• Via weekly Art & Design school classes with sample class• Facilitation: active; discuss and assist with designs• Result: 83% designs completed and approved by collaborators The Optimal Level of Children’s Participation – Matthew Bates
    • 7. Investigation 3: Library Service• Level 6 of ladder: ‘Adult initiated, shared decisions’ participation• Goal: collaborate on single design with clear learning objectives• Experimentation of ideas using basic tools (pack of cards)• Implementation handled by facilitators to optimise time• Result: game now used in school visits by library service A shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 8. Investigation 4: Probation Service• Scalability of approach using participation at level 6 of ladder• Goal: can approach benefit adults at risk of social exclusion?• Weekly design workshops using university facilities• Working as design team of offenders, tutors and researchers• Result: participants invited to present work at national level• Both process and product accredited by service for future use A shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 9. ConclusionsElevating learners to design partners:• creates powerful learning environments• but requires facilitation regardless of age and experience• must balance of learner input with educator experience• balanced approach applicable and scalable to a range of studentsA shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning
    • 10. References• Bates, M., Brown, D., Cranton, W., and Lewis, J. (2008). Playing to win: motivation for teaching andlearning in today’s gaming culture. Paper presented at Interactive Technologies and Games (ITAG),November 2008, Nottingham, UK.• Bates, M., Brown, D., Cranton, W., and Lewis, J. (2009). A design for learning: exploring serious gamesdesign with children. Paper presented at Interactive Technologies and Games (ITAG), October 2009,Nottingham, UK.• Bates, M., Brown, D., Cranton, W., and Lewis, J. (2010). Formulating a serious games design projectfor adult offenders with the probation service. Paper presented at Interactive Technologies and Games(ITAG), October 2010, Nottingham, UK.• Druin, A. (2002). The role of children in the design of new technology. Behaviour and InformationTechnology, 21(1), pp.1–25.• Steinkuehler, C. (2004). Learning in massively multi-player online games. Proceedings of the 6thinternational conference on learning sciences (ICLS), June 2004, Santa Monica, CA, USA, pp. 521-528. A shared design facilitation approach to co-designing games for learning

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