Off the Shelf Kinect Games for
Stroke Rehabilitation
Perspective of the Therapist
Luke Shires, James Lewis, David Brown,
N...
Stroke
Stroke is the third most common disease in the UK with over
100,000 cases annually (Bupa 2011).
Stroke is also the ...
Upper Limb Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation for an impaired upper limb following stroke
requires early and repetitive exercis...
Home Based Rehab
Gives patients the means to rehabilitate as much as they like,
when they like. Without increasing clinica...
COTS Games
Commercial off the shelf games.
Pros
• Relatively low cost.
• Easily available.

Cons
• Games are designed for ...
Xbox 360 Kinect
Study Rational
COTS systems have previously been shown to have a positive
impact when used in conjunction with a normal co...
Study Rational
COTS studies have focused on proving improvement in limb
functionality, but ignored issues surrounding usab...
Study Configuration
Recruit occupational and physiotherapists with experience of
working with stroke patients
Participants...
Study Configuration
Two games were chosen. Kinect Sports Bowling and Kinect
Sports Table Tennis.
Easy to learn as rules ma...
Kinect Sports Bowling
Kinect Sports Table Tennis
Interim Results
Recruited six therapists.
All therapists completed study.
Aiming to recruit twelve overall.
Bowling Joint Function Required
Minimum joint functionality required to play

4

3

2

1

0

Joint movement

0. No motion ...
Table Tennis Joint Function
Minimum Joint Functionality Required to play

4

3

2

1

0

Joint movement

0. No motion requ...
Bowling Movement Encouraged
Joint Exercise Encouraged

3

2

1

0

Joint movement

0. Not encouraged. 1. Encouraged but no...
Bowling Joint Exertion
Maximum Level of Exertion Encouraged

4

3

2

1

0

Joint movement

0. No exertion. 1. Low. 2. Med...
Informal Findings
Requirement to stand presents a serious risk of falling. Especially
during table tennis.
Interface is no...
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Evaluating the Microsoft Kinect for use in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation Following Stroke as a Commercial off the Shelf Gaming System. The Therapist’s Perspective

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Evaluating the Microsoft Kinect for use in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation Following Stroke as a Commercial off the Shelf Gaming System. The Therapist’s Perspective by Luke Shires, David Brown, Nasser Sherkat, James Lewis and Penny Standen

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Evaluating the Microsoft Kinect for use in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation Following Stroke as a Commercial off the Shelf Gaming System. The Therapist’s Perspective

  1. 1. Off the Shelf Kinect Games for Stroke Rehabilitation Perspective of the Therapist Luke Shires, James Lewis, David Brown, Nasser Sherkat Computing and Technology team Nottingham Trent University Nottingham, UK Penny Standen Division of Rehabilitation and Aging University of Nottingham Nottingham, UK luke.shires2007@my.ntu.ac.uk p.standen@nottingham.ac.uk
  2. 2. Stroke Stroke is the third most common disease in the UK with over 100,000 cases annually (Bupa 2011). Stroke is also the leading cause for long term disability. The cost of treatment and dealing with the long term disabilities afterwards is estimated to cost the UK economy £8.9 billion a year (Saka, McGuire and Wolfe 2009) BUPA, 2011. Stroke [online]. . Available at: http://www.bupa.co.uk/individuals/healthinformation/directory/s/stroke [Accessed 12/9 2012]. SAKA, Ö., MCGUIRE, A. and WOLFE, C., 2009. Cost of stroke in the United Kingdom. Age and Ageing, 38 (1), 27-32.
  3. 3. Upper Limb Rehabilitation Rehabilitation for an impaired upper limb following stroke requires early and repetitive exercise to maximize recovery (Feys, et al. 2004). Outpatient facilities can be difficult to travel to for survivors with mobility problems or long travel distances. New thinking suggests long term rehabilitation may have a positive effect but clinical resources are directed towards new patients. FEYS, H., et al., 2004. Early and repetitive stimulation of the arm can substantially improve the long-term outcome after stroke: a 5-year follow-up study of a randomized trial. Stroke, 35 (4), 924-929.
  4. 4. Home Based Rehab Gives patients the means to rehabilitate as much as they like, when they like. Without increasing clinical resources. Allows patients to perform effective rehabilitation exercises independently. Increases the amount of rehabilitation time available to the patient, and allow cost effective rehabilitation in the long term.
  5. 5. COTS Games Commercial off the shelf games. Pros • Relatively low cost. • Easily available. Cons • Games are designed for able bodied users. • Designed for use in a home setting. • Might not encourage the ‘right’ kind of exercise. • Recent increase in the popularity of motion controls. • Visual and GUI design are often not accessible • Games with high production values.
  6. 6. Xbox 360 Kinect
  7. 7. Study Rational COTS systems have previously been shown to have a positive impact when used in conjunction with a normal course of rehabilitation. Kinect games provide full body tracking, and new possibilities of exercises based interaction with games. Want to learn about what works well with COTS games for stroke, and use this to inform decisions about future rehab systems. MOUAWAD, M.R., et al., 2011. Wii-based movement therapy to promote improved upper extremity function post-stroke: a pilot study. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 43 (6), 527-533.
  8. 8. Study Rational COTS studies have focused on proving improvement in limb functionality, but ignored issues surrounding usability of the device for a wide range of stroke patients. We want to explore the individual joint movements encouraged. And the minimum joint functionality the patients requires to participate.
  9. 9. Study Configuration Recruit occupational and physiotherapists with experience of working with stroke patients Participants received a demonstration of each Kinect game. Then offered unlimited time to play. Answer questionnaire on joint functionality required by the Kinect game. Allowed to return to the game at any point during the questionnaire.
  10. 10. Study Configuration Two games were chosen. Kinect Sports Bowling and Kinect Sports Table Tennis. Easy to learn as rules match real life equivalent. Short play times allow study to be conducted in reasonable timeframe. Relatively low excretion for Kinect games titles explored.
  11. 11. Kinect Sports Bowling
  12. 12. Kinect Sports Table Tennis
  13. 13. Interim Results Recruited six therapists. All therapists completed study. Aiming to recruit twelve overall.
  14. 14. Bowling Joint Function Required Minimum joint functionality required to play 4 3 2 1 0 Joint movement 0. No motion required. 1. Reduced range of motion. 2. Partial range of motion. 3. Partial range of motion against gravity. 4. Full range of motion against gravity.
  15. 15. Table Tennis Joint Function Minimum Joint Functionality Required to play 4 3 2 1 0 Joint movement 0. No motion required. 1. Reduced range of motion. 2. Partial range of motion. 3. Partial range of motion against gravity. 4. Full range of motion against gravity.
  16. 16. Bowling Movement Encouraged Joint Exercise Encouraged 3 2 1 0 Joint movement 0. Not encouraged. 1. Encouraged but not required. 2. Implicit to fulfilling required task. 3. Explicit to fulfilling required task.
  17. 17. Bowling Joint Exertion Maximum Level of Exertion Encouraged 4 3 2 1 0 Joint movement 0. No exertion. 1. Low. 2. Medium. 3. High. 4. Dangerous.
  18. 18. Informal Findings Requirement to stand presents a serious risk of falling. Especially during table tennis. Interface is not accessible, confusing to follow. Too many moving elements.

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