Monitoring Humanitarian Crises in the Digital Age
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Monitoring Humanitarian Crises in the Digital Age

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Slides of Live Web Seminar: Monitoring Humanitarian Crises in the Digital Age: Crisis Mapping, Crowdsourcing, and Satellite Imagery

Slides of Live Web Seminar: Monitoring Humanitarian Crises in the Digital Age: Crisis Mapping, Crowdsourcing, and Satellite Imagery

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  • How many people here actually use social mediaGalvanizeCould you imagine what if we all got behind thisData driven analysis
  • Vast majority from inside Syria, 6%
  • SEVERAL OTHER AGENCIES, BOTH US AND NON US ARE ALSO USING SYRIA TRACKER.
  • Rise of crowdfeeding
  • Rise of crowdfeeding
  • In conclusion, I want to emphasize that these new technologies are not just important for us in the humanitarian space to make better decisions, they are equally important for disaster affected communities themselves. Take this crisis map of the major snow storm that paralyzed the city of Washington DC in early 2010. The Washington Post didn’t only crowdsource problems, they also crowdsourced solutions. In effect, they created a self-help map. A self-recovery map. Why? Because we’re not all affected the same way in a disaster, and those of us less affected often want to help others in need. So why not empower local communities directly to help them rebound after a crisis. The real first responders are not the SAR teams from Iceland who fly in 48 hours later. The first responders are the disaster affected communities themselves. And unlike humanitarian professionals who can’t be everywhere at the same time, the crowd is always there. The crowd is always there. Which is why most survivals in disasters are thanks to local communities rather than external help.What we really need is a match.com for humanitarian response to automatically match local needs with local resourced. In other words, we need to turn these humanitarian technologies into platforms for self-organization. Increasing local capacity for self-organization builds resilience, which should be our ultimate goal. Crowdsource action, crowdsource agency, crowdsource positive deviance, solutions, live maps, crowdsource changeGEO FENCING!!!!So we’ve been to Haiti and Somalia in this expedition. Lets finish this journey right here in DC. Just weeks after the Haiti earthquake, a massive snow storm paralyzed the city of Washington DC. So the Washington Post launched a live map using the Ushahidi platform to help residents help themselves. A SELF HELP MAP. A SELF-RECOVERY MAP. Indeed, not only did they crowdsource problems, they crowdsourced solutions! Why? Because we’re not all affected the same way in a disaster, and those of us less affected often want to help others in need. So why not empower local communities directly to help them rebound after a crisis, just like wildlife and fauna that we’ve heard about in previous talks? Why not connect local communities so they can help themselves and become more resilient in the process? To be sure, the real first responders are not the SAR teams from Iceland who fly in 48 hours later. The first responders are the disaster affected communities themselves. What we really need is a match.com for humanitarian response to match local needs with local resources and thereby Crowdsource action, crowdsource agency, crowdsource positive deviance, solutions, live maps, crowdsource changeShortly after the earthquake in Port-au-Prince, a major snowstorm paralyzed the city of Washington DC. The Post set up an Ushahidi map to help residents dig themselves out of the snow. They crowdsourced a map of needs. But they also crowdsourced solutions, which was brilliant To be sure, the real first responders are not the SAR teams from Iceland who parachute in 72 hours later. The real first responders are the local communities. So why not empower then directly by connecting them directly and build more resilience societies this way? Humanitarian professionals cannot be at every the corner of every street in every city. But the crowd is always there. REBOUND / SELF RECOVERYSo lets crowdsource positive deviance, crowdsource agency, crowdsource maps, crowdsource changeSo what we need is a match.com of humanitarian response, were local needs and resources can be matched to catalyze positive social impact.
  • How many people here actually use social mediaGalvanizeCould you imagine what if we all got behind thisData driven analysis

Monitoring Humanitarian Crises in the Digital Age Monitoring Humanitarian Crises in the Digital Age Presentation Transcript

  • Digital Humanitarian Response @patrickmeier
  • www.iRevolution.net
  • www.DigitalHumanitarians.com
  • Typhoon Pablo #Philippines 2012
  • Typhoon Bopha Credit: @hotOSM Credit: PyBossa
  • Human Rights Violations #Syria
  • Challenges
  • Crowd Computing & Artificial Intelligence
  • Conclusion
  • Social Media for Crisis Response iRevolution.net