APHA
Boston, MA
Monday, November 4, 2013
Opportunities for technology-based HIV prevention among
secondary students in Cap...
Disclosure
The authors have no conflicts to declare.
Acknowledgements
The project described was supported by Grant
Number R03MH094238 from the National Institute
of Mental Hea...
Study motivation
Estimates suggest that if the current HIV
infection rates remain stable in South
Africa, 50% of 15-year-o...
Study motivation


Programs are only as impactful as they are
interesting and engaging to youth, however.



Needs asses...
Cape Town Adolescent Health
Survey





In 2012, 1,107 10th – 11th graders completed a
paper-and-pencil survey.
Respond...
Survey sample
characteristics
Respondents were on average, 17.6 years
of age (SD: 1.3, Range: 16-24).
 59% percent were f...
Access to technology
No

Yes

Don't Know

Text messaging 1%

Internet

Decline to answer

81%

15%

0%

10%

10% 8%

4%

8...
Likelihood of accessing an HIV prevention
program if it were available via…
Internet

15%

Text messaging

15%

Email

14%...
Interest by mode and biological
sex
90%
80%
70%

Male

77%
68%

Female
62%

60%

52%

52%

56%
55%

50%

41%
40%

38%

32%...
Interest by mode and selfappraised likelihood of getting
HIV
90%
80%

Less than average chance
74%
71%

Above average chan...
Interest by mode and selfappraised HIV programming
fatigue
90%
80%
70%

76%
69%

60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

* p<0.05

All...
Limitations
Data are from three purposefully selected
high schools in Cape Town, South Africa.
The generalizability of the...
Conclusions
Access to the Internet and SMS is high
among low income adolescents attending
high school in Cape Town.
 Inte...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Opportunities for technology-based HIV prevention among secondary students in Cape Town, South Africa

148

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
148
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • If an HIV prevention program was offered online, 53% of youth would be somewhat or extremely likely to access it; slightly fewer (47%) felt the same about an SMS-based program. In comparison, 73% said they would be likely to access a program if it were offered at school. Email was the least endorsed delivery mechanism (38%).
  • Interestingly, girls (52%) were more likely than boys (38%) to like an SMS-based delivery, but similar percentages were noted for Internet delivery (56% versus 55%, respectively).
  • Slightly more youth who rated their likelihood of getting HIV to be above average were interested in Internet delivery (51%) compared to SMS (46%).
  • Similar trends were noted for youth who were tired of hearing messages about HIV prevention.
  • Opportunities for technology-based HIV prevention among secondary students in Cape Town, South Africa

    1. 1. APHA Boston, MA Monday, November 4, 2013 Opportunities for technology-based HIV prevention among secondary students in Cape Town, South Africa Michele L. Ybarra MPH PhD, Center for Innovative Public Health Research, San Clemente, CA Kelvin Mwaba PhD, University of Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa Nicolette Roman PhD, University of Western Cape, South Africa Bronwyn Rooi BA, University of Western Cape, South Africa Tonya Prescott BA, Center for Innovative Public Health Research. , San Clemente, California Sheana Bull PhD, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USA
    2. 2. Disclosure The authors have no conflicts to declare.
    3. 3. Acknowledgements The project described was supported by Grant Number R03MH094238 from the National Institute of Mental Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Mental Health or the National Institutes of Health. We would like to thank our collaborators at CiPHR and University Western Cape, as well as Dr. Leickness Simbayi, our consultant. We’d also like to thank the schools for their support of the research and the participants for their time taking the survey.
    4. 4. Study motivation Estimates suggest that if the current HIV infection rates remain stable in South Africa, 50% of 15-year-olds alive today will die from AIDS.  Effective programs exist in South Africa, but they are not having the intended impact.  Programs that are easily scaled up and that address structural and fidelity challenges, are urgently needed.  Joint United Nations Programme On HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) (2000). AIDS epidemic update: December 2000. Geneva: Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and World Health Organization (WHO). Available on the world wide web at: http://www.unaids.org/en/media/unaids/contentassets/dataimport/publications/ircpub05/aidsepidemicreport2000_en.pdf
    5. 5. Study motivation  Programs are only as impactful as they are interesting and engaging to youth, however.  Needs assessments are critical in this regard so that researchers can understand the acceptability of program delivery across modes. Image from: http://www.nspreview.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/06/youth.jpg
    6. 6. Cape Town Adolescent Health Survey    In 2012, 1,107 10th – 11th graders completed a paper-and-pencil survey. Respondents were enrolled in one of three public high schools located in predominantly black, lower income neighborhoods in Cape Town. Youth answered questions about experiences and exposures related to sex and HIV; and about opportunities for HIV prevention programming that might be particularly salient and interesting for youth.
    7. 7. Survey sample characteristics Respondents were on average, 17.6 years of age (SD: 1.3, Range: 16-24).  59% percent were female  96% were Black.  44% percent of respondents’ fathers had completed secondary school or less (equivalent to a high school education in the U.S.).  Image from: http://conceptovihsida.blogspot.com.es/p/metodos-deprevencion-y-enalces.html
    8. 8. Access to technology No Yes Don't Know Text messaging 1% Internet Decline to answer 81% 15% 0% 10% 10% 8% 4% 81% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
    9. 9. Likelihood of accessing an HIV prevention program if it were available via… Internet 15% Text messaging 15% Email 14% Decline to answer Somewhat unlikely 23% 12% 32% 17% 12% 10% 5% 0% 10% 26% 16% Relgious organization School 20% 20% 32% 24% 15% 11% 19% 36% 30% 40% 23% 19% 22% 44% 60% 80% Not at all likely Somewhat likely 100%
    10. 10. Interest by mode and biological sex 90% 80% 70% Male 77% 68% Female 62% 60% 52% 52% 56% 55% 50% 41% 40% 38% 32% 30% 20% 10% 0% School** ** p<0.01 *** p<0.001 Relgious organization** Email ** Text messaging *** Internet
    11. 11. Interest by mode and selfappraised likelihood of getting HIV 90% 80% Less than average chance 74% 71% Above average chance to get hIV 70% 60% 58% 54% 47% 46% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 38% 31% 56% 51%
    12. 12. Interest by mode and selfappraised HIV programming fatigue 90% 80% 70% 76% 69% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% * p<0.05 All other Somewhat/very extremely tired of HIV prevention messages 58% 58% 57% 51% 47% 47% 38% 37%
    13. 13. Limitations Data are from three purposefully selected high schools in Cape Town, South Africa. The generalizability of these data to greater South Africa, and youth not enrolled in high school is unknown.  Given the sensitivity of the topic and the stigma related to both HIV/AIDS and sexual behavior among adolescents in South Africa, it is possible that some youth did not answer honestly. 
    14. 14. Conclusions Access to the Internet and SMS is high among low income adolescents attending high school in Cape Town.  Internet programs may be more acceptable, and therefore have the potential to reach more youth than SMS.  Given the preference for school-based programming, embedding the intervention within a school setting is recommended. 
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×