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How protective against child and adolescent aggressive behavior is a violence-free media diet?
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How protective against child and adolescent aggressive behavior is a violence-free media diet?

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  • All prevalence rates are statistically significantly different based upon level of media violent exposure based upon chi-square tests (p<0.001).
  • Compared to youth reporting that “most” or “many/all” of at least one type of media is violent: Those reporting “some” or fewer of their media is violent are 51% less likely to report seriously violent behavior Those who report “none” of all of the media they watch depicts violence are 94% less likely to report seriously violent behavior.
  • Using multinomial logistic regression… The conditional odds of infrequent bullying were 34% less, and the conditional odds of frequent bullying were 66% less for youth reporting “some” rather than ‘many’, ‘most/all’ exposure to violence in media. The conditional odds of infrequent bullying were 79% less for youth reporting “none” rather than ‘many’, ‘most/all’ exposure to violence in media. None of the youth reporting ‘no’ exposure to media violence also reported frequent bullying. The odds are therefore not calculatable.
  • Using multinomial logistic regression… The conditional odds of infrequent fighting were 37% less, and the conditional odds of frequent fighting were 68% less for youth reporting “some” rather than ‘many’, ‘most/all’ exposure to violence in media. The conditional odds of infrequent fighting were 86% less, and the conditional odds of frequent fighting were 84% less for youth reporting “none” rather than ‘many’, ‘most/all’ exposure to violence in media.

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  • 1. How protective against child and adolescentaggressive behavior is a violence-free mediadiet?Michele L Ybarra MPH PhDInternet Solutions for Kids, Inc.Marie Diener-West PhDJohns Hopkins School of Public HealthAmerican Public Health Association, Oct. 25-28 2008, San Diego CAAcknowledgement: Data collection for this presentation was supported by Cooperative Agreement numberU49/CE000206 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely theresponsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC.* Thank you for your interest in this presentation.  Please note that analysesincluded herein are preliminary.  More recent, finalized analyses can be foundin: Ybarra M, Diener-West M, Markow D, Leaf P, Hamburger M, & Boxer P.Linkages between internet and other media violence with seriously violentbehavior by youth. Pediatrics. 2008;122(5):929-937, or by contacting CiPHR forfurther information.
  • 2. Presenter Disclosures(1)The following personal financial relationships withcommercial interests relevant to this presentation existedduring the past 12 months:Michele YbarraNo relationships to disclose
  • 3. Motivation for studyMedia violences contribution to aggressivebehavior has been reported across severalstudies (see the work of Huesmann, Eron,Bushman, Anderson, etc)The role of violence-free media in preventingviolent and aggressive behavior is less wellstudied.
  • 4. Brief Description of the Growing upwith Media surveyOnline data collection among randomly identified households withadult members of Harris Poll OnLine Baseline data collected August – September 2006 1,588 households Youth between the ages of 10-15 years Internet use monthly in the last 6 months English speaking 26% response rate Data weighted to approximate US households with children10-15 years of age Propensity scoring applied to address selection bias due tomembership in the HPOL
  • 5. Exposure to violent mediaIn the last 12 months,when you watch TV or movies, how many of them show…when you listen to music, how many songs talk about …when you play video, computer or Internet games, how many show …how many of the websites you go to show real people…how many of the websites you go to show cartoons…physical fighting, hurting, shooting, or killing?Almost none/noneSome of themMany of themAlmost all/all(Cronbach’s alpha = 0.76)
  • 6. Composite ‘violence exposure’Based upon their answers, youth were placed into one ofthree categories:“Almost none / none” on all 5media types: 6.2% (n=113)At least “Some” on at leastone media type: 43.5% (n=710)“Many” or “Almost all / all” on atleast one media type: 50.3% (n=765)6%50%44%Many, most/allSomeNone
  • 7. Seriously violent behavior Shooting / stabbing someone: 1%, n=10 Aggravated assault (involvement in a fight where someone requiredmedical care, threatening someone with a weapon): 3%, n=66 Robbery: 1%, n=25 Sexual aggression: 2%, n=374.8% (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.87)
  • 8. Other aggressive behaviorBullying: 38%, n=573Shoving or pushing someoneFighting: 29%, n=438 Been in a fight in which someone was hit, Gotten into a fight where a group of yourfriends were against another group of people
  • 9. Demographic characteristicsCharacteristic “Many”or“Most/all”Some All None P valueYouth age (mean) 12.9 12.4 11.9 <0.05Female 39% 53% 80% <0.001White race 69% 72% 90% 0.009Hispanic ethnicity 20% 18% 6% 0.04Household income<$35,00024% 21% 22% 0.79Parents married 73% 76% 72% 0.68
  • 10. Psychosocial characteristicsCharacteristic “Many”or“Most/all”Some All None P valueAlcohol consumption 18% 8% 0.9% <0.001Marijuana use 8% 3% 0% 0.008Witness of attack in real life 57% 42% 22% <0.001Witness of spousal abuse 12% 6% 2% 0.001Propensity to respond tostimuli with anger (Mean)(range: 10-30)19.5 18.3 17.0 <0.05Emotional closeness withcaregiver (Mean) (range: 3-14)6.0 5.2 4.5 <0.001
  • 11. Prevalence of violent, bullying, and fightingbehavior based upon violent media exposure6.93.10.33627.99.5 10.74.3032.122.15.2 4.21.50.805101520253035401yearprevalencerate(%)SeriouslyviolentbehaviorInfrequentbullyingFrequentbullyingInfrequentfightingFrequentfightingType of aggressive behaviorMost, Many / AllSomeAll none
  • 12. Relative odds of any seriously violentbehavior given exposure to violent media0.490.060.010.11SomeAll none***Adjusted for youth sex and ageReference group: “Many” or “Most / all” of at least one type of media depict violence* p<0.05, **p<0.01
  • 13. Relative odds of bullying given exposure toviolent media0.660.340.210.010.11Less often then monthly Monthly or more oftenSomeAll none*******Adjusted for youth sex and ageReference group: Never bullying and reporting “Many” or “Most / all” of at least onetype of media depict violence* p<0.05, **p<0.01
  • 14. Relative odds of fighting given exposure toviolent media0.630.320.140.160.010.11Less often then monthly Monthly or more oftenSomeAll none******Adjusted for youth sex and ageReference group: Never bullying and reporting “Many” or “Most / all” of at least onetype of media depict violence* p<0.05, **p<0.01
  • 15. Synopsis1 in 16 youth report no exposure to violence inmediaYouth reporting no exposure to violence in mediaare more likely to be: White race, non-Hispanic ethnicity Younger Female Not reporting psychosocial problems (e.g.,alcohol use, poor caregiver child relationships)
  • 16. SynopsisYouth who report no exposure to media violenceare more than 80% less likely to concurrentlyreport:seriously violent behaviorbullying behaviorfrequent fightingWhen compared to otherwise similar youth of thesame sex and age who report ‘many’, or ‘almostall / all’ of at least one type of media they consumeis violent.
  • 17. LimitationsCross-sectional data preclude temporal inferences.It’s just as likely that a lack of exposure to violentmedia is leading to a reduction in aggressivebehavior; or that less aggressive behavior leads to alack of exposure to violent mediaFindings are relevant only to households wherecaregiver and child have Internet access.Respondents were not observed during the datacollection process. It is possible that: Children were monitored by their parents Parents completed the youth survey
  • 18. ImplicationsA lack of exposure to violent media may beprotective against aggressive behavior. even just moving youth from ‘many’, ‘most/all’ to‘some’ violence may be influential.Efforts to engage parents and increase theirdedication to a ‘no violent media’ homeshould be increased. particularly for Hispanic, non-White homes