Icaac 2013

1,831 views
1,792 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,831
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
41
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Icaac 2013

  1. 1. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   1   Video  from  ICPIC  2013  (available  on  YouTube)   InfecEon  control  talks  are  generally  rated  as  “therapeuEc”    for  HCWs  with  sleeping  disorders.   Disclaimer     As  a  non-­‐naEve  (Dutch/German)   English  speaker  some  of  the  things   I  say  may  sound  “harsher”  than   meant  to  …   hUp://www.slideshare.net/iPrevent/voss-­‐icaac-­‐online   hUp://actu.epfl.ch/news/slowing-­‐the-­‐aging-­‐process-­‐only-­‐with-­‐anEbioEcs/   Propionibacterium   Eur  Spine  J    2013    Apr  22(4):  689  +  690  +  697  
  2. 2. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   2   Conclusions   The  addiEon  of  anEbioEcs  to  therapeuEc   regimens  for  uncomplicated  severe  acute   malnutriEon  was  associated  with  a   significant  improvement  in  recovery  and   mortality  rates.   Trehan  et  al.    N  Engl  J  Med    2013;368:5   Kluytmans  et  al.    CID  2013;56:478   ¤  One  hundred  forty-­‐five  ESBL-­‐EC  isolates  from  retail  chicken  meat,   human  rectal  carriers,  and  blood  cultures  were  analyzed  using   mulElocus  sequence  typing,  phylotyping,  ESBL  genes,  plasmid   replicons,  virulence  genes,  amplified  fragment  length  polymorphism   (AFLP),  and  pulsed-­‐field  gel  electrophoresis  (PFGE).   RESULTS:   ¤  Three  source  groups  overlapped  substanEally  when  their  geneEc   composiEon  was  compared.     ¤  A  predicEon  model  based  on  the  combined  data  classified  40%  of  the   human  isolates  as  chicken  meat  isolates.     CONCLUSIONS:   ¤  We  found  significant  geneEc  similariEes  among  ESBL-­‐EC  isolates  from   chicken  meat  and  humans  …     Chicken  meat  is  a  likely  contributor  to  the  recent  emergence  of  ESBL-­‐ EC  in  human  infecEons  in  the  study  region.     Kluytmans  et  al.    CID  2013;56:478   Kluytmans  et  al.    CID  2013;56:478   Kluytmans  et  al.    CID  2013;56:478  Kluytmans  et  al.    CID  2013;56:478   ¤   Carbepeneames  in  the  food-­‐chain?  
  3. 3. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   3   Collignon  P  et  al.    EID  Augustus  2013   Es9ma9on  based  on  dutch  data!   ¤ EsEmate  for  NL   ²   21  addiEonal  death,     ²   908  hospital  bed-­‐days   ¤ EsEmate  for  Europe   ²   1,518  addiEonal  death,     ²   67,236  hospital  bed-­‐days     ¤ The  ongoing  use  of  3GC  in  mass  therapy  and   prophylaxis  should  be  urgently  examined  and   stopped,  parEcularly  in  poultry,  not  only  in   Europe,  but  worldwide!   Collignon  P  et  al.    EID  Augustus  2013   Ammerlaan  et  al.    CID  2012;54:1342           ¤ Increased  nosocomial  BSI  rates  due  to  ARB  occur  in   addiEon  to  infecEons  caused  by  ASB,  increasing  the   total  burden  of  disease.     Ammerlaan  et  al.    CID  2012;54:1342       “… for to everyone who has, more shall be given, and he will have an abundance’ hUp://www.slideshare.net/iPrevent/voss-­‐icaac-­‐online   ¤  Whole  genome  mapping  creates  high-­‐resoluEon,  ordered   whole  genome  restricEon  maps   ¤  Access  WGM  for  (LA-­‐)MRSA   Bosch  et  al    PLOSone  8(6):  e66493    
  4. 4. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   4   ¤ Whole  genome  mapping  produced  highly   reproducible  results   ¤ Provided  a  much  higher  discriminatory  power  than   spa-­‐typing,  PFGE,  or  MLVA   ¤ Whole  genome  mapping  can  provide  a  comparison   with  other  maps   Bosch  et  al    PLOSone  8(6):  e66493     ¤  Samples  from  71   ambulances  from  34   different  Chicago-­‐area   municipaliEes     ¤  At  least  one  S.  aureus   sample  was  found  in  69%   of  ambulances  tested     à  12%  MRSA.   James  V.  Rago  et  al.  Am  J  Infect  Control,  April  20122   Na9onal  MRSA  Rates  Run   Along  with  Fair  Play  of   Na9onal  Football  Teams:     A  Cross-­‐naEonal  Data   Analysis  of  the  European   Football  Championship,  2008   E.  Meyer  et  al.    InfecEon  2012  epublished  August  5     r  =  0.628   p  =  0.038   cards  /  100  min   MRSA  %   E.  Meyer  et  al.    InfecEon  2012  epublished  August  5   Copper a day - Keeps MRSA away Noyce  et  al.    J  Hosp  Infect  2006;63:289-­‐297   ¤   Repeat  of  study  in  The  Netherlands      woud  not  be  possible  …  
  5. 5. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   5   Edmond  &  Wenzel    New  Engl  J  Med    May  2013   Editorial:  Huang  et  al.  Targeted  versus  universal  decolonizaEon  to  prevent  ICU  infecEon.               N  Engl  J  Med    2013.  DOI:  10.1056/NEJMoa1207290.   ¤ Ver9cal  infec9on-­‐preven9on  strategy.     ² VerEcal  intervenEons  are  designed  to  reduce  colonizaEon   or  infecEon  due  to  a  specific  pathogen  by  detecEon  and   isolaEon  ,  they  typically  have  high  resource  uElizaEon,  and   costs   ² The  philosophical  underpinning  is  one  of  excepEonalism:   some  pathogens  are  more  important  than  others  and  merit   special  control  measures.     ¤ Horizontal  strategy     ² is  populaEon-­‐based,  is  applied  universally,  and  uses   intervenEons  effecEve  in  controlling  all  pathogens   transmiUed  by  means  of  the  same  mechanism.   ² Includes  hand  hygiene,  chlorhexidine  bathing,  and  care   bundles,  and  they  oqen  require  modificaEon  of  the   behavior  of  HCWs   Edmond  &  Wenzel    New  Engl  J  Med    May  2013   O’Brien  AM  et  al.  (2012)  PLoS  ONE  7(1):e30092   Largest   sampling  of  raw   meat  products   for  MRSA   contaminaEon   to  date  in  the  U.S.   ¤ 395  pork  samples  were  collected  from  a  total  of  36   stores  in  Iowa,  Minnesota,  and  New  Jersey.     ¤ S.  aureus  was  isolated  from  256  samples  (64.8%)   S.aureus   MRSA     Conven9onal       67.3%     95%  CI  61.7%–72.6%         6.3%     95%  CI  3.9%—9.7%     An9bio9c-­‐free     56.8%     95%  CI  46.3%–67.0%       7.4%   95%  CI  3.0%–14.6%   convenEonal   alternaEve   convenEonal   O’Brien  AM  et  al.  (2012)  PLoS  ONE  7(1):e30092   van  Rijn  et  al.  PLoS  ONE  8(6):  e65594   ¤ Regular  consumpEon  of  poultry     (OR  2.40;  95%  CI  1.08–5.33)   ¤ CaUle  density  per  municipality     (OR  1.30;  95%  CI  1.00–1.70)   ¤ Sharing  of  scuba  diving  equipment     (OR  2.93  5%  CI  1.19–7.21)     ¤ CA-­‐MRSA  carriage  was  not  related  to   being  of  foreign  origin.   van  Rijn  et  al.  PLoS  ONE  8(6):  e65594  
  6. 6. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   6   Top  Infec9on  Preven9on  Papers   2012  –  2013   Victoria  J.  Fraser,  MD   Adolphus  Busch  Professor    and   Chairman  of  Medicine     Washington  University  School  of  Medicine   St.  Louis,  Missouri   Disclosures   ¤ Consultant:  BaUelle   ¤ Research  Funding:     ² CDC  Epicenters  Program     ² NIH  K24  Mid  Career  Award     ² NIH  CTSA  Research  &  EducaEon  Director     ² NIH  KM1  CER  Career  Development  Program   ² AHRQ  R24  CER  Infrastructure  Grant     ² BJH  FoundaEon   ¤ Husband  VP  @  Express  Scripts,  3  kids    
  7. 7. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   7   Surveillance  and  Epidemiology     are  S9ll  Key     NNIS  à  NHSN  &  CLABSI  Surveillance:     BACKGROUND  &  METHODS   ¤ #  ICUs  reporEng  á  from  144  (1990)  to  794  (2010)   ¤ ICU  days  á  236,000  (1990)  to  11.4m  (2010)   ¤ ProporEon  of  Large  teaching  hospitals  â  from  57%  (1990)  to   24%  (2010)   ¤ 34%  (CI  31.3-­‐36.6%)  –  55%  (CI  53.4-­‐57%)  fewer  CLABSI  in   2009  vs  2001   ¤ CriEcal  care  days  obtained,  CLABSI  rates  NNIS/NHSN,  applied   adjusted  CLABSI  rates  to  criEcal  care  days     ¤ 3  scenarios:  1)  no  adjustment,  2)  NNIS  CLABSI  rates   2004-­‐2006  to  1990-­‐2004  (surveillance  arEfact),  3)  â  NNIS   rates  by  1/2  of  scenario  2:  Monte  Carlo  simulaEons,  adult  pts.   ¤ Account  for  Δ  definiEons,  hospital  type,  Δ  to  NHSN   Wise  ME  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:547-­‐554   Na9onal  Es9mates  of  CLABSIs     in  Cri9cal  Care  Pa9ents   Wise  ME  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:547-­‐554   Figure  3.   Hospital-­‐onset  CLABSI  rates  (cases  per  1,000  ICU    pt  days  )  adjusted  for  CLABSI  definiEon  change,  surveillance  parEcipaEon   changes,  and  system  transiEon,  excluding  neonates,  U.S.,  1990–2010   Wise  ME  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:547-­‐554  
  8. 8. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   8   Incidence  Trends  in  Pathogen-­‐Specific  CLABSI     in  U.S.  ICUs,  1990–2010   Fagan  RP  et  al.  Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:893-­‐899   ¤ Methods  –  AcEve  ICU  surveillance,  CDC  NNIS   1990-­‐2004  &  NHSN  2006-­‐2010   ¤ Results   ² 60%  â  in  ICU  CLABSIs  over  the  past  decade   ² Incidence  of  HO-­‐MRSA  BSI  â  11%/year  2005-­‐2008   ² EsEmated  18,000  CLABSI/year  since  2006   ² Since  2006   ²  S.  aureus    -­‐18.3%  (CI,  -­‐20.8  to  -­‐15.8%)  annual  â   ²  GNR  -­‐16.4%  (CI,  -­‐18  to  -­‐14.7%)  annual  â   ²  Enterococci  -­‐17.8%  (CI,  -­‐19  to  -­‐16.1%)  annual  â   ²  Candida  -­‐13.5%  (CI,  -­‐15.4  to  -­‐11.5%)  annual  â   ² No  Δ  in  pediatric  ICU  for  S.  aureus     Risk  of  Acquiring  ESBL  Klebsiella  &  E.  coli     From  Prior  Room  Occupants  in  the  ICU   Ajao  AO  et  al.  Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:453-­‐458   ¤ Methods   ² MICU  –  SICU  pts  of  U  of  MD  9/2001  –  6/30/2009,     ² Perianal  cultures  (LOTS)   ¤ Results   ² 267/7651  (3%)  pts  acquired  ESBL  GNR  in  ICU   ² 32/267  (12%)  in  room  ¯ˉ 𝑐   prior  ESBL⊕  pt   ² Prior  room  not  significantly  associated     ² AOR  1.39  (CI  0.94-­‐2.08)   ² 6/32  (18%)  had  similar  PFGE  strain  to  prior  occupant   Ajao  AO  et  al.  Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:453-­‐458   Discon9nua9on  of  CP  for  MRSA:  A  RCT  Comparing   Passive  &  Ac9ve  Screening  With  Culture  &  PCR   Shenoy  ES  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:176-­‐184   ¤ RCT  @  MGH,  MRSA  prevalence  8%  (Hx  on  admission)   ¤ No  rouEne  CHG  bathing  or  decolonizaEon  protocol   ¤ Pts    MRSA  Hx  >  90  days;  12/2010  –  9/2011,  could  enroll   on  anEbioEcs  (but  not  D/C  CP);  admission  alert  ID  pts   ¤ NonintervenEon  =  usual  care;  HO  orders  3  MRSA  nasal   Cx,  24  hrs  apart;  OFF  anEbioEcs,  1°  team  not  noEfied  of   enrollment   ¤ IntervenEon  =  Cx  and  PCR  x3,  24  hrs  apart  (Cepheid)  
  9. 9. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   9   Discon9nua9on  of  CP  for  MRSA:  A  RCT  Comparing   Passive  &  Ac9ve  Screening  With  Cx  &  PCR   Shenoy  ES  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:176-­‐184   ¤ 634  eligible;  457  included  (198  control,  259   intervenEon)   ¤ 62/198  (31%)  controls  screened  (1/2  on  ICUs  acEve   screening);  259/259  (100%)  intervenEon  screened   ¤ 19/198  (9.6%)  controls;  &  191/259  (73.7%)   intervenEon  completed  screening   ¤ SensiEvity=  90.9%,  95.5%,  100%  (1st,  2nd,  3rd  swab)   ¤ CP  stopped  4x  more  in  intervenEon  (CI,  2.3-­‐7.1)   ¤ ~  ½  off  anEbioEcs  at  screen;  ~  both  arms  NS   Discon9nua9on  of  CP  for  MRSA:  A  RCT  Comparing   Passive  and  Ac9ve  Screening  With  Cx  and  PCR   Shenoy  ES  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:176-­‐184   ¤ First  PCR  vs  3  Cx  =  sensiEvity  93.9%  (95%  CI,   85.4-­‐97.6%),  specificity  92%  (95%  CI,  85.9-­‐95.6%),   PPV  86.1%  (95%  CI,  75.9-­‐93.1%)  and  NPV  96.6%  (95%   CI,  91.6-­‐99.1%)   ¤ Passive  Cx,  AcEve  Cx,  PCR,  CP  D/C  rates  (6.6,  26.6   and  63.8%)  and  â  CP  days  104,  418  and  1841     ¤   (55%  â  CP  days)   ¤ Annualized  savings  $86,950,  $349,472,  $1,539,180   ¤ No  difference  if  pts  on  anEbioEcs   So  Much  Pain  Over  So  Many  Regula9ons:  Has  it   Made  a  Meaningful  Difference?   Payment  &  Repor9ng  Policies  &  HAI  Impact   ¤  10/2008  CMS  eliminates  payment  for  HAC  (CVC  BSI  one  example)   ¤  1/2011  CMS  requires  all  hospitals  parEcipaEng  in  IPPS  to  report  CVC  BSI  to   CDC  NHSN   ¤  32  states  &  Washington  DC  mandate  CVC  BSI  reporEng   ¤  Oregon  ICU  study;  external  validaEons  &  adjudicaEon  á  publicly  reported   rates  27%   ¤  “ReacEve  measure”  –  measure  that  modifies  phenomenon  under  study  &   changes  thing  being  measured   ¤  “Shame  &  financial  penalty”  incents  â  sensiEvity   ¤  2  studies  of  CMS  nonpayment  policy  found  NO  measurable  impact  on  CVC   BSI  or  other  HAI  rates  &  no  difference  in  CVC  BSIs  in  hospitals  in  voluntary   or  mandatory  reporEng  states   Krein  SL  et  al.  JGIM.  2012;27(7):773-­‐779.   Lee  GM  et  al.  NEJM.  2012;367(15):1428-­‐1437.   Dixon-­‐Woods    &  Perencevich  ICHE.  2013;34(6):555-­‐557.   Effect  of  Nonpayment  for  Preventable   Infec9ons  in  U.S.  Hospitals   ¤ NHSN  Data  2006  –  2011,  CLABSI  and  CAUTI  vs  VAP   ¤ Quasi-­‐exp,  interrupted  Eme  series,  398  hospitals   ¤ â  secular  trends  for  CLABSI,  CAUTI  &  VAP  LONG   BEFORE  POLICY  IMPLEMENTED   ¤ No  change  in  rates  post  vs  pre  CLABSI  (IRR  1,  p=.97),   CAUTI  (IRR  1.03,  p=0.08),  VAP  (IRR  0.99,  p  =  .52)   ¤ No  difference  in  mandatory  reporEng  states,  or  by   volume,  size,  type  ownership,  teaching  hospital     Lee  GM  et  al.    NEJM.  2012;367:1428-­‐1437  
  10. 10. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   10   Effect  of  Nonpayment  for  Preventable  Infec9ons  in  U.S.  Hospitals Lee  GM  et  al.    NEJM.  2012;367:1428-­‐1437   Figure  1.  Incidence  Rates  of   Infec9ons  Reported  by  Hospital   Units  between  January  2006  and   March  2011.     The  dashed  line  in  all  three  panels   indicates  the  Eming  of   implementaEon  of  the  Centers  for   Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services   policy,  in  October  2008.   Effect  of  Nonpayment  for  Hospital-­‐Acquired,   Catheter-­‐Associated  Urinary  Tract  Infec9on   ¤ Retro  Before-­‐  Aqer,  HCUP  inpt  data  from  MI;  2007  &   2009   ¤ Non-­‐CAUTI   ² 5.2  –  17.1%  (mean  10%,  CI  9.5  –  10.5%)  2007   ² 5  –  20%  (mean  10.3%,  CI  9.8  –  10.9%)  2009   ¤ CAUTI   ² 0  –  1.1%  (mean  0.09%,  CI  0.06  –  0.12%)  2007   ² 0  –  0.95%  (mean  0.14%,  CI  0.11  –  0.17%)  2009   ¤ 2009,  2.6%  (CI  1.6  –  3.6%)  HA  UTIs  coded  as  CAUTI   ¤ Nonpayment  for  CAUTI  only  â  payment  (0.003%)   HospitalizaEons   Meddings  JA  et  al.  Ann  Intern  Med.  2012;157:305-­‐312   Effect  of  Nonpayment  for  Hospital-­‐Acquired,   Catheter-­‐Associated  Urinary  Tract  Infec9on   Meddings  JA  et  al.  Ann  Intern  Med.  2012;157:305-­‐312   â Rates  of  hospital-­‐acquired  non-­‐CAUTIs  and  CAUTIs  in  2009  and  change  in  rates  from  2007  to  2009.   A  hospital's  rate  of  diagnosis  was  calculated  as  the  percentage  of  each  hospital's  discharges  of  adults  with  the  indicated  diagnosis.   CAUTI  =  catheter-­‐associated  urinary  tract  infec9on. Figure  Legend:   ON  MY  HANDS   hUp://www.slideshare.net/iPrevent/voss-­‐icaac-­‐online  
  11. 11. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   11   Scheithauer  et  al.  BMC  InfecEous  Diseases  2013,  13:367   ¤ 378  paEent  cases  were  evaluated  with  5674   opportuniEes  for  hand  rubs  (HR)  and  1664  HR   performed.   ¤ Compliance  increased  from  21%  to  29%,  and  finally   45%   ¤ IntervenEons  were  aimed  at  increasing  compliance  as   well  as  reducing  the  number  of  HR  needed  by   improving  workflow  prac9ces.   Scheithauer  et  al.  BMC  InfecEous  Diseases  2013,  13:367     For  individual  paEent  care,     the  number  of  HH  moments   significantly  decreased  from     22  to  13  for  non-­‐surgical  and   from  13  to  7  for  surgical   paEents      (both  p<0.001)   Scheithauer  et  al.  BMC  InfecEous  Diseases  2013,  13:367   ¤   EvaluaEng  and  improving   the  workflow  is  an   important  (and  oqen   forgoUen)  intervenEon  to   improve  HH  compliance  in   our  “overloaded”  HCWs!   Kirkland  et  a.    BMJ  Qual  Saf  2012;21:1019–1026   ¤ IntervenEons     ² (1)  leadership/accountability;  (2)  measurement/ feedback;  (3)  hand  saniEser  availability;  (4)  educaEon/ training;  (5)  markeEng/communicaEon   ¤ Results     ² HH  compliance  increased  significantly  from  41%  to  87%   (p<0.01),  and  improved  further  to  91%  (p<0.01)  the   following  year.   ² Nurses  achieved  higher  HH  compliance  (93%)  than   physicians  (78%).     ² There  was  a  significant,  sustained  decline  in  the  HAI-­‐ rate  from  4.8  to  3.3  (p<0.01)  per  1000  inpaEent  days.   Kirkland  et  a.    BMJ  Qual  Saf  2012;21:1019–1026  
  12. 12. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   12   Nothing  new,   but  s9ll  nice  to   see  that  HH   works  ..   Kirkland  et  a.    BMJ  Qual  Saf  2012;21:1019–1026   Allegranzi  et  al.    Lancet  Infect  Dis  2013,  August  23rd   Works  gloabbly,   too..   ¤  Overall  compliance  increased  from  51·∙0%  before  the  intervenEon   to  67·∙2%  aqer.   ¤  Compliance  was  independently  associated  with  gross  naEonal   income  per  head,  with  a  greater  effect  of  the  intervenEon  in  low-­‐ income  and  middle-­‐income  countries  (OR  4·∙67).     Stone  et  al.    BMJ    2012;344:e3005   ¤ InvesEgate  the  associaEon  between     infec9ons  and  procurement   ¤ 187  acute  trusts  in  England  and  Wales   ¤ Combined  procurement  of  soap  and  alcohol  hand   rub  tripled  from  21.8  to  59.8  mL  per  paEent  bed   day   ¤ Rates  fell  for  MRSA  bacteraemia  (1.88  to  0.91   cases  per  10  000  bed  days)  and  C.  difficile  infecEon   (16.75  to  9.49  cases).  MSSA  bacteraemia  rates  did   not  fall.   Stone  et  al.    BMJ    2012;344:e3005   Aqer  roll-­‐out   increase  in   soap  >  alcohol   Stone  et  al.    BMJ    2012;344:e3005   ¤ Increased  procurement  of  soap  was   independently  associated  with   reduced  C.  difficile  infecEon     ¤ Increased  procurement  of  alcohol   hand  rub  was  independently   associated  with  reduced  MRSA   bacteraemia  (delayed  effect)   Stone  et  al.    BMJ    2012;344:e3005  
  13. 13. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   13   ¤ Q:  Why  is  the  overall  compliance  (for  both   groups)  decreasing  over  Eme?   ¤ A:     ² wearing  off  of  the  novelty  of  cleanyourhands  as   other  quality  iniEaEves  were  introduced   ² performance  of  the  ward  co-­‐ordinators  had  not   been  monitored  and  no  retraining  offered   hUp://www.aricjournal.com/supplements/2/S1   ¤   1600  stock-­‐photos  were  evaluated.     ¤   Most  common  mistakes  were  with  regard  to      HCWs  white  coats  and  uniforms     ¤   Of  the  photos     ²   displaying  doctors  89%        were  incorrect   ²   displaying  nurses  31%        were  incorrect     Spierings  et  al.    P141,  hUp://www.aricjournal.com/supplements/2/S1   Spierings  et  al.    P141,  hUp://www.aricjournal.com/supplements/2/S1   Conclusion     ²  The  results  seem  to  reflect  the  real  world  with  only   40%  of  stock  photos  displaying  correct  behavior  and   doctors  shown  as  being  worse  than  nurses.     ²  It  seems  that  the  stereotype  image  of  a  doctor  does   not  agree  with  the  current  hand  hygiene  guidelines.     ²  If  we  aim  for  higher  compliance  rates  with  IC   measures,  we  need  to  change  the  social  image  of   HCWs   John  A.  Bergh  
  14. 14. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   14   ¤   TV/adverEsing  is  expressly   directed  at  ge‚ng  us  to  do   something  that  is  in  the  best   interests  of  the  adverEser,  but  not   necessarily  our  own.   ¤ Elementary  school  children  see  an   average  of  15  TV  food  ads  per  day     ² 98%  of  these  ads  promote  products   high  in  fat  and  sugar).   ¤ Children  exposed  to  food  ads   during  a  cartoon  ate  significantly   more  of  the  snack  food  in  front  of   them  (45%  more!)   We  need  ads  with   “correctly   behaving”    HCWs   on  TV   Makary    JAMA,  April  17,  2013—Vol  309,  No.  15  1591   Same  system  being  used  to  evaluate  OR  Eme-­‐out,  compliance  with  isolaEon  measures,  …   The  Wallstreet  Journal    12  December  2012   Gustafson  et  al.    Mayo  Clin  Proc  2000;75:705-­‐8   Sheldon  Cooper,  The  Big  Bang  Theory  
  15. 15. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   15   BACKGROUND:   ¤  Minimal  research  has  been  published  evaluaEng  the  effecEveness  of   hand  hygiene  delivery  systems  (ie,  rubs,  foams,  or  wipes)  at   removing  viruses  from  hands.     METHODS:   ¤  Hands  of  30  volunteers  were  inoculated  with  H1N1  and  randomized   to  treatment  with  foam,  gel,  or  hand  wipe  applied  to  half  of  each   volunteer's  finger  pads.     RESULTS:   ¤  Treatments  with  all  products  resulted  in  a  significant  reducEon  in   viral  Eters  (>3  logs)  at  their  respecEve  exposure  Emes  that  were   staEsEcally  comparable.   Larson  et  al.    Am  J  Infect  Control  2012;40:806   Cleanliness  is  Next  to  Godliness   Effect  of  Daily  Chlorhexidine  Bathing  on   Hospital-­‐Acquired  Infec9ons   Climo  MW  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:533-­‐42   ¤ MulEcenter,  cluster-­‐randomized  nonblinded   crossover  trial   ¤ Daily  bathing    CHG-­‐impregnated  washcloths   ¤ 9  ICU’s  &  BMT’s  in  6  hospitals  (7,727  pts),  no-­‐rinse   2%  CHG  cloths  vs  non-­‐anEmicrobial  cloths  x  6  mos   ¤ IR  of  MDRO  &  HA-­‐BSI  compared  Poisson  regression   ¤ MDRO  acquisiEon  5.6/1000  pt  days  vs  6.6/1000  pt   days  (p  =  0.03);  23%  lower    CHG   ¤ HA-­‐BSI  4.78/1000  pt  days  vs  6.60/1000  pt  days  (p  =   0.007);  28%  lower    CHG   Effect  of  Daily  CHG  Bathing  on  HAIs     Caveats   ¤ Study  interrupted  by  recall  of  CHG  cloths  due  to   Burkholderia  cepacia  contaminaEon   ¤ AcEve  surveillance  for  MRSA  &  VRE;  isolates   submiUed  for  CHG  resistance   ¤ No  Δ  in  MRSA  acquisiEon   ¤ â  rates  fungal  CA-­‐BSI   ¤ Emergence  of  high  level  CHG  resistance  not  seen,   low  toxicity   Climo  MW  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:533-­‐42  
  16. 16. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   16   Effect  of  Daily  CHG  Bathing  on  HAIs   Climo  MW  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:533-­‐42   Figure  2.  Rates  of  Primary   Bloodstream  Infec9ons  According  to   the  Type  of  Hospital  Unit.     Incidence  rates  of  hospital-­‐acquired   primary  bloodstream  infecEons  are   shown  among  units  using  daily   bathing  with  either  chlorhexidine-­‐ impregnated  washcloths  or   nonanEmicrobial  washcloths  (control).   BMT  denotes  bone  marrow   transplantaEon  unit,  MICU  medical   intensive  care  unit,  and  SICU  surgical   intensive  care  unit.   Effect  of  Hospital-­‐Wide  Chlorhexidine  Pa9ent   Bathing  on  Healthcare-­‐Associated  Infec9ons   ¤ Hibiclens  4%  CHG   ¤ Monitored  CLABSI,  CAUTI,  VAP,  VRE,  MRSA,  CDI   ¤ “Horizontal”  infecEon  prevenEon   ¤ Ease  of  use,  broad  spectrum,  prolonged  residual   effect   Rupp  ME  et  al.    ICHE.  2012;33(11):1094-­‐1100   Effect  of  Hospital-­‐Wide  Chlorhexidine  Pa9ent   Bathing  on  Healthcare-­‐Associated  Infec9ons   ¤ Quasi-­‐experimental,  staged,  dose-­‐escalaEon  x19  mos   ¯ˉ𝑐   4  mo  washout,  3  cohorts  (2008-­‐2010)   ¤ Academic  center,  NE,  all  pts  except  infants/neonates   ¤ CHG  basin  baths  3x/week  or  daily   ¤ Adherence  ICU  (90%)  vs  (57.7%)  non-­‐ICU  p  =  <  .001   ¤ C  diff  â  all  cohorts  0.71  (95%  CI,  0.57-­‐0.89;  p  =  .003)   3x/wk  &  .041  (95%  CI,  0.29-­‐0.59;  p  =  .001)  daily  CHG   ¤ Washout  1.85  (95%  CI,  1.38-­‐2.53;  p  =  <  .001)   Rupp  ME  et  al.      ICHE.  2012;33(11):1094-­‐1100   Effect  of  Hospital-­‐Wide  Chlorhexidine  Pa9ent   Bathing  on  Healthcare-­‐Associated  Infec9ons   Rupp  ME  et  al.    ICHE.  2012;33(11):1094-­‐1100   Figure  1.   Effect  of  chlorhexidine  gluconate  (CHG)  bathing  on  Clostridium  difficile  infecEon.  Trends  in  incidence  of  C.   difficile  infecEon  are  shown  for  the  3  cohorts  of  paEents  over  the  course  of  the  study.  The  long-­‐dashed  line  depicts  the   3-­‐days-­‐per-­‐week  bathing  period.  The  solid  line  starEng  aqer  the  3-­‐days-­‐per-­‐week  bathing  period  in  each  cohort   depicts  the  every-­‐day  CHG  bathing  period.  The  short-­‐dashed  line  indicates  the  washout  period.  pt  d,  paEent-­‐days.  
  17. 17. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   17   The  Efficacy  of  Daily  Bathing  with  Chlorhexidine  for   Reducing  HAI  BSIs:  A  Meta-­‐analysis   ¤ Similar  efficacy  cloth  or  liquid     ¤ Wipes:  OR=  0.41  [95%  CI,  0.25-­‐0.65],     ¤ All  others:  OR=0.47  [95%  CI,  0.31-­‐0.69])   ¤ Similar  sensiEvity  CLABSI  (OR  0.40  [95%  CI,   0.27-­‐0.59]),     ¤ All  BSI  (OR  0.46  [95%  CI,  0.31-­‐0.69])   ¤ Greatest  evidence  in  MICUs,  single  SICU  no  benefit,   no  benefit  GNR,  Heterogeneous  studies   O’Horo  JC  et  al.    ICHE.  2012;33(3):257-­‐267   O’Horo  JC  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2012;33(3):257-­‐267   Figure  3.   Risk  of  healthcare-­‐associated  bloodstream  infecEon  (BSI)  with  chlorhexidine  (CHG)  bathing  and  comparator,  using  paEent-­‐days  in  the  analysis.   “Events”  refers  to  the  study  end  point  of  central  line–associated  BSI  or  BSI,  as  defined  in  Table  1.  Studies  using  a  CHG-­‐impregnated  cloth  are  listed  in  the   lower  subgroup  (1.2.2);  all  other  studies  are  listed  on  top  (1.2.1).  CI,  confidence  interval;  M-­‐H,  Mantel-­‐Haenszel.   Scary  Hospital  Outbreaks   Hospital  Outbreak  of  MERS  Coronavirus   ¤ WHO  reported  iniEal  2  cases  9/2012  MERS-­‐CoV   ¤ Saudi  Arabia,  Qatar,  Jordan,  UK,  Germany,  France,   Tunisia  and  Italy   ¤ Novel  lineage  C  –  MERS-­‐CoV   ¤ 4/1/2013  –  5/23/13  =  23  confirmed  &  11  probable,   single  monophyleEc  clade  cases  in  the  eastern   province  of  Saudi  Arabia   Assiri  A  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;369:407-­‐16   Hospital  Outbreak  of  MERS  Coronavirus   ¤ Median  age  56,  most  male   ¤ Signs/symptoms:  fever  87%,  cough  89%,  vomiEng  or   diarrhea  35%   ¤ Onset   ² ICU:  median  5  days  (1  –  10  d)   ² MV:    median  7  days  (3  –  11  d)   ² Death:    median  11  days  (5  –  27  d)   Assiri  A  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;369:407-­‐16  
  18. 18. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   18   Hospital  Outbreak  of  MERS  Coronavirus   ¤ Survival  3/4  (75%)  acEve  surveillance  vs  3/19  (16%)   clinically  idenEfied  (p  =  0.04)   ¤ IncubaEon  5.2  d  (95%  CI,  1.9  -­‐  14.7  d)   ¤ Person-­‐to-­‐person    transmission  in  HD  units,  ICUs,   inpt  units  in  3  faciliEes,  21/23  cases,  5  family   members,  2  HCWs   ¤ CP  &  droplet  precauEons,  surveillance  &  IC  criEcal   Assiri  A  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;369:407-­‐16   Hospital  Outbreak  of  Middle  East  Respiratory   Syndrome  Coronavirus   Assiri  A  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;369:407-­‐16   Figure  1  Epidemiologic  Plot  of  Confirmed  and  Probable  Cases  of  MERS-­‐CoV  InfecEon  in  Saudi  Arabia,  April  1–May  23,  2013.  All  confirmed  and  probable  cases  are   shown,  according  to  the  locaEon  of  the  most  probable  transmission.  One  of  the  five  family  contacts  (PaEent  M)  who  is  included  as  having  been  exposed  in   Hospital  A  was  also  exposed  through  caring  for  the  paEent  at  home  and  may  have  acquired  the  infecEon  either  in  the  hospital  or  in  the  community.   Hospital  Outbreak  of  Middle  East  Respiratory   Syndrome  Coronavirus   Assiri  A  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;369:407-­‐16   Figure  2  Transmission  Map  of  Outbreak  of  MERS-­‐CoV  InfecEon.  All  confirmed  cases  and  the  two  probable  cases  linked  to  transmission  events  are  shown.  PutaEve   transmissions  are  indicated,  as  well  as  the  date  of  onset  of  illness  and  the  se‚ngs.  The  leUers  within  the  symbols  are  the  paEent  idenEfiers  (see  Fig.  S2  in  the   Supplementary  Appendix).   Innova9ve  Interven9ons  to  Reduce  HAIs   Beyond  the  bundle  –  journey  of  a  ter9ary  care   MICU  to  zero  CLABSIs   ¤ ObservaEonal  cohort,  25  bed  MICU,  1/2008  –  12/2011   ¤ MulEdisciplinary  team;  bundle,  inserEon  checklist,   demonstraEon  of  competencies  for  line  maintenance  &   access,  daily  CL  necessity  checklist,  quality  rounds,   surveillance  &  feedback   ¤ Molecular  epi,  environmental  Cx  &  cleaning,  â  VRE   contaminants   ¤ CHG  bathing;  RCA  of  all  CLABSI   ¤ IntervenEons  to  â  contaminants  needed  to  get  to  zero   Exline  MC  et  al.    CriEcal  Care.  2013;17:R41  
  19. 19. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   19   Beyond  the  bundle  –  journey  of  a  ter9ary  care  MICU  to  zero   CLABSI   Exline  MC  et  al.    CriEcal  Care.  2013;17:R41   Figure  1.  Central  line-­‐associated  bloodstream  infecEons,  compliance  with  central  line  inserEon  and  dressing   maintenance  during  the  study  period.  NHSN,  NaEonal  Health  Safety  Network.   Targeted  versus  Universal  Decoloniza9on  to   Prevent  ICU  Infec9on   ¤ PragmaEc  cluster  RCT:   1.  MRSA  screening  &  isolate  MRSA  +   2.  Targeted  decolonizaEon  (screening,  isolaEon  &   decolonizaEon  of  MRSA  carriers)   3.  Universal  decolonizaEon  (no  screening,  decolonize  all)   ¤ 43  hospitals,  74  ICUs,  74,256  pts  randomized   ¤ (BIG,  Just  amazing  to  implement)   Huang  SS  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:2255-­‐2265   Targeted  versus  Universal  Decoloniza9on  to   Prevent  ICU  Infec9on   ¤ 12  mo  baseline  1/1/09  –  12/31/09;  phase-­‐in  1/1/10   –  4/7/10,  18  mo  intervenEon  4/8/10  –  9/30/11   ¤ Primary  outcomes:  ICU  aUributable  MRSA  ⊕  Cx,     ¤ 2°  outcome:  ICU  aUributable  MRSA  BSI  &  all  BSI   ¤ Designed  80%  power  to  detect  40%  â  in  MRSA  BSI   rate  in  grp  2,  &  60%  â  grp  3;  ITT   Huang  SS  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:2255-­‐2265   Targeted  versus  Universal  Decoloniza9on  to   Prevent  ICU  Infec9on   ¤ Grp  1:    <  1.0%  got  mupirocin  or  CHG   ¤ Grp  2:    90.8%  (56-­‐100%)  MRSA  carriers  got   mupirocin  &  88.8%  (54-­‐98.4%)  got  CHG   ¤ Grp  3:    86.1%  (41-­‐99.1%)  got  mupirocin  &  80.8%   (53.1-­‐98.6%)  got  CHG  (highest  baseline  BSI  rate,   BMT,  Tx)   ¤ Grps  similar  @  baseline;  7  adverse  rash  events   Huang  SS  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:2255-­‐2265   Targeted  versus  Universal  Decoloniza9on  to   Prevent  ICU  Infec9on   Huang  SS  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:2255-­‐2265  
  20. 20. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   20   Targeted  versus  Universal  Decoloniza9on  to   Prevent  ICU  Infec9on   ¤ Universal  decolonizaEon  most  effecEve  â  MRSA   clinical  Cx  37%  &  all  BSI  44%   ¤ Strengths:  sample  size,  diverse  se‚ngs,  usual   pracEce,  real  world   ¤ Need  to  decolonize  181  pts  to  prevent  1  +  MRSA  Cx   &  decolonize  54  to  prevent  1  BSI   ¤ Why  did  it  work  this  way?     ¤ 1)  started  on  Day  1  no  delay,  2)  â  environmental  burden,   3)  â  skin  colonizaEon   Huang  SS  et  al.    NEJM.  2013;368:2255-­‐2265   hUp://www.slideshare.net/iPrevent/voss-­‐icaac-­‐online   Leverstein-­‐van  Hall  et  al.    Lancet  Infect  Dis  2011;10:830   Emerging  InfecEous  Diseases  •  www.cdc.gov/eid  •  Vol.  19,  No.  8,  August  2013   Emerging  InfecEous  Diseases  •  www.cdc.gov/eid  •  Vol.  19,  No.  8,  August  2013   Where  do  I   need  to  go  …  
  21. 21. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   21   slide  from  Sunita  Paltansing   Central  A  &   Carabians:   25%   South   America:   6%   North   Afria:    40%   Middle   Afria:    30%   South   Afria:    12%   Middle   East:    13%   Central   Asia:    30%   South-­‐east   Asia:    34%   East  Asia   (China):   67%   South-­‐Asia   (India):    72%   Overall:  31%  ESBL+  aqer  travel   Emerging  InfecEous  Diseases  •  www.cdc.gov/eid  •  Vol.  19,  No.  8,  August  2013   ¤   Although  26  parEcipants  had  posiEve  results   for  ESBL-­‐E  6  months  aqer  travel,  they  were  not   all  posiEve  for  the  same  enterobacterial  strain   that  was  idenEfied  immediately  aqer  travel.   ²   15  of  26  (57%)  different     ¤ What  does  that  mean  with  regard  to  isolaEon/ (de-­‐)flagging  of  paEents?   AE  Andersson,  et  al.  AJIC  2012,  Jan  28  epublished   ¤   High  levels  of  CFU  correlated  with  total  traffic        flow  per  operaEon  and  the  number  of  persons      in  the  OR     ¤   Traffic  flow,  number  of  persons  present,  &      procedure  duraEon  explained  68%  of  the      variance  in  total  CFU         AE  Andersson,  et  al.  AJIC  2012,  Jan  28  epublished   ¤ 177  (33.5%)  =  necessary   ²   40    =  expert  consultaEons     ²   137  =  supplies  &  equipment   ¤ 184  (35.7%)  =  semi-­‐necessary     ²   76  =  surgical  team  members  entering  or  leaving     ²   134  =  breaks   ¤ 168  (31.8%)  =  unnecessary   ²   30  =  logisEcs,  like  planning  other  operaEons  /     ²   45  =  social   ²   93  =  no  detectable  reason          AE  Andersson,  et  al.  AJIC  2012,  Jan  28  epublished  
  22. 22. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   22   ¤ 77  (13.8%)  =  necessary   ²   40    =  expert  consultaEons     ²   37  =  supplies  &  equipment   ¤ 76  (13.6%)  =  semi-­‐necessary     ²   76  =  surgical  team  members  entering  or  leaving     ¤ 402  (72.4%)  =  unnecessary   ²   134  break  ,  100  supplies  &  equipment   ²   30  =  logisEcs,  like  planning  other  operaEons  /     ²   45  =  social   ²   93  =  no  detectable  reason          AE  Andersson,  et  al.  AJIC  2012,  Jan  28  epublished   ¤ OperaEng-­‐suit  aqer  4-­‐8h  the  worst   ¤ No  clothing  –  (no)  shedding   Hill  et  al.      Lancet  ,  November  9,  1974   “Naked  below   the  elbow”   really  works   Merollini  et  al.    AJIC  2013  in  press   Methods     ¤ Baseline  use  of  anEbioEc  prophylaxis  (AP)  was   compared  with  no  anEbioEc  prophylaxis  (no  AP),   anEbioEc-­‐impregnated  cement  (AP  +  ABC),  and   laminar  air  operaEng  rooms  (AP  +  LOR).     ¤ A  Markov  model  was  used  to  simulate  long-­‐term   health  and  cost  outcomes  of  a  hypotheEcal  cohort  of   30,000  total  hip  arthroplasty  paEents.   Merollini  et  al.    AJIC  2013  in  press   Conclusion   ¤ PrevenEng  deep  SSI  with  anEbioEc  prophylaxis   and  anEbioEc-­‐impregnated  cement  has  shown   to  improve  health  outcomes  among   hospitalized  paEents,  save  lives,  and  enhance   resource  allocaEon.     ¤ Based  on  this  evidence,  the  use  of  laminar  air   opera9ng  rooms  is  not  recommended.   Merollini  et  al.    AJIC  2013  in  press  
  23. 23. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   23   Gastmeier  et  al.  .    J  Hosp  Infect  2012;81:73-­‐78   Conclusions:  It  would  be  a  waste  of  resources  to  establish  new   operaEng  rooms  with  LAF,  and  quesEonable  as  to  whether  LAF   systems  in  exisEng  operaEng  rooms  should  be  replaced  by   convenEonal  venElaEon  systems   Bischoff  et  al.    J  Infect  Dis  2013  Jan  30   Bischoff  et  al.    J  Infect  Dis  2013  Jan  30   ¤   Subjects  with  influenza-­‐like  symptoms   ¤   QuanEtaEve  impact  air  samples   ¤   43%  of  subjects  emiUed  influenza-­‐virus   ²   19%  super-­‐spreaders  (32x  more  than  others)     ¤   Emission  >50%  of  human  infecEous  dose  at      1,  3,  and  6  feet  distance   C.  Makison  Booth  et  al.    J  Hosp  Infect  2013   Methods   A  dummy  test  head  aUached  to  a  breathing  simulator   was  used  to  test  the  performance  of  surgical  masks   against  a  viral  challenge.  …   C.  Makison  Booth  et  al.    J  Hosp  Infect  2013   Findings   Live  influenza  virus  was  measurable  from  the  air   behind  all  surgical  masks  tested.    A  surgical  mask   will  reduce  exposure  to  aerosolised  influenza   virus;  reducEons  ranged  from  1.1-­‐  to  55-­‐fold   (average  6-­‐fold),  depending  on  the  design  of  the   mask.       C.  Makison  Booth  et  al.    J  Hosp  Infect  2013  
  24. 24. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   24       Conclusion   The  results  show  limitaEons  of  surgical  masks  in  this   context,  although  they  are  to  some  extent  protecEve.   C.  Makison  Booth  et  al.    J  Hosp  Infect  2013   Might  there  be  a  difference  if  the  mask  is  molded  or  not?   Gedik  et  al.    AnEmicrobial  Resistance  Infect  Control    2013;2:22   Bacterial  ContaminaEon   of  an  Automated   Pharmacy  Robot  Used   for  Intravenous   MedicaEon  PreparaEon   Cluck  et  al.    ICHE  2012;33:517-­‐520   no need for humans to cause outbreaks   3  isolates  from  the  robot   and  3/6  isolates  from   lidocaine  dispensed  by     the  robot  had  idenEcal     B.  cereus  isolates.   Cluck  et  al.    ICHE  2012;33:517-­‐520  
  25. 25. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   25   TO  ERR  IS  HUMAN,   but  to  really  foul     things  up  you     need  a  robot   TO  ERR  IS  HUMAN,   to  blame  it  on   someone  else  shows   management  potenEal   Cluck  et  al.    ICHE  2012;33:517-­‐520                            Policing            One-­‐track  mind   Guidelines   Guidelines   Guidelines   Guidelines   More   guidelines   IC  needs  to  be  to-­‐the-­‐point   hUp://www.slideshare.net/iPrevent/voss-­‐icaac-­‐online  
  26. 26. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   26   ¤ Clinical  MRSA  isolates  from  30/31  Orange  Co.,  CA   hospitals   ² 10/08  –  4/10,  ER  excluded,  100/hospitals  or  12  mo,  +  up  to   20  blood  isolates/mo   ¤ spa  type  t008  =  CA-­‐MRSA,  sample  got  MLST  &  PFGE   ¤ 46%  isolated  spa  t008  (CA-­‐MRSA)  (range  14%-­‐81%),   next  most  common  t002  (15%),  t242  (21%)   ¤ spa  t008  was  USA300  by  PFGE   ¤ Of  CA-­‐MRSA,  66%  wounds,  14%  respiratory,  9%   other,  8%  blood,  3%  urine,  also  37%  of  HO-­‐MRSA   Murphy  CR  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:581-­‐587   Murphy  CR  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:581-­‐587   Figure  1.  Percentage  of  all  isolates  that  were  community-­‐associated  methicillin-­‐resistant  Staphylococcus  aureus  (CA-­‐MRSA;  gray)  and   percentage  of  isolates  that  were  CA-­‐MRSA  and  associated  with  hospital-­‐onset  infecEon  (black),  by  hospital.  Hospitals  that  collected  fewer  than   50  isolates  are  marked  with  a  star;  fewer  than  20  isolates  were  collected  from  hospitals  3,  4,  6,  7,  and  30.   ¤ 6  PA  hospitals,  clinical  research  data  2007-­‐08   (MedMined/MediQual)   ¤ ⊕  toxin  >  48  hrs  ¯ˉ 𝑝   admit,  >  8  weeks  ¯ˉ 𝑝   previous  ⊕     ¤ 1:3  matching  ¯ˉ 𝑐   non-­‐cases,  HO-­‐CDI  had  higher  mortality   (11.8%  vs  7.3%,  p<.05),  longer  LOS  (median  interquarEle   range  12  days  (9-­‐21)  vs  11  days  (11.059-­‐38.429)  p<0.01),   higher  cost  (median  interquarEle  $20,804  ($11,059-­‐ $38,429)  vs  $16,634  ($9,413-­‐$30,319)  p<.01)   ¤ AUributable  effect  HO-­‐CDI  4.5%  mortality  (95%  CI   0.2-­‐8.7%  p<.05),  2.3  days  (95%  CI  0.9-­‐3.8  p<.01),  $6,117   ($1,659-­‐$10,574  p<.01)     Tabak  TP  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:588-­‐596   ¤ NaEonal  burden  esEmates  based  on  2009  HO-­‐CDI  data   ¤ 216,000  acute  care  discharges  ¯ˉ 𝑐   CDI  (HO-­‐CDI  ~  65%)   ² 140,000  HO-­‐CDI  discharges  2009  (Epicenters)   ¤ 300,000  á  hospital  days,  >  $850m  á  costs,  >  $6,000   deaths/year   ¤ Strengths:    90%  matching  propensity  scores   ¤ Limits:    retrospecEve,  generalizable,  toxin  tests   Tabak  TP  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:588-­‐596  
  27. 27. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   27   Tabak  TP  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:588-­‐596   Figure  1.   A,  Mortality  rate  among  Clostridium  difficile  infecEon  (CDI)  cases  versus  noncases  before  and  aqer  matching.  B,  Mortality  or   postdischarge  care  rate  among  CDI  cases  versus  noncases  before  and  aqer  matching.  C,  Average  length  of  stay  among  CDI  cases  versus  noncases   before  and  aqer  matching.  D,  Cost  per  case  among  CDI  cases  versus  noncases  before  and  aqer  matching.   ¤  Kyne:  Cost  $3,669,  LOS  3.6  days,  no  á  mortality  @  3  or  12  mo  (only   infected  pts,  HO-­‐CDI).     ¤  CID  2002;34:346-­‐353.   ¤  Dubberke:  Cost  $2,454-­‐$7,179/case  (LR  vs  propensity-­‐matched  prs)   at  end  of  admit  or  180  days,  LOS  2.8  days,  readmission  19.3%,   death  5.7%  (nonsurgical  pts,  all  CDI).     ¤  ICHE  2009;30:57-­‐66,  Emerg  Infect  Dis  2008;14:1031-­‐1038,     ¤  CID  2008;46:497-­‐504.   ¤  O’Brien:    Cost  $13,675,  LOS  2.95  days  (MA  hosp  admin  data,  20   discharge  dx  only,  not  1°.     ¤  ICHE  2007;28:1219-­‐1227.   ¤  Miller:    Endemic  mortality  1-­‐2%,  epidemic  mortality  7-­‐17%.     ¤  CID  2010;50:194-­‐201.   Tabak  TP  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:588-­‐596   Shepard  J  et  al.    JAMA  Surg.  doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2013.2246   ¤ Methods  –  RetrospecEve,  4  JH  hospitals,  record   review  collect  APR-­‐DRG  by  ICP;  2007-­‐2010   ¤ Results   ² SSI  $7,493  vs  $7,924  (p=.99)  Cost   ² 10.56  d  vs  5.64  d  (p<.001)  LOS   ² 51.94  vs  8.19/100  (p<.001)  Readmissions   Shepard  J  et  al.    JAMA  Surg.  doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2013.2246   Shepard  J  et  al.    JAMA  Surg.  doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2013.2246  
  28. 28. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   28   Shepard  J  et  al.    JAMA  Surg.  doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2013.2246   Shepard  J  et  al.    JAMA  Surg.  doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2013.2246   Figure  1.  Mean  Daily  Total  Charges  for  a  Pa9ent  vs  the  Length  of  Stay  for  the  Pa9ent   ¤  JHH  Pilot  Study  20  pts    VRE  &  other  MDROs,  cultured  5  pairs   of  “sterile  supplies”  from  room  @  discharge;    &    H2O2  vapor   ¤  7/100  supplies  VRE⊕,  4/20  rooms  (20%),    H2O2,  none    H2O2   (p=.014)   ¤  9/100  supplies  MDRO⊕  ,  6/20  rooms  (30%),    H2O2,  none    H2O2   (p=.003)   ¤  50%  recovered  organisms  DID  NOT  match  pt  isolate   ¤  ~  Direct  annual  cost  discarded  supplies  $387,055   ¤  Can  disinfect  supplies  in  rooms  undergoing  H2O2  vapor   disinfecEon   OUer  JA  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:472-­‐478   OUer  JA  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:472-­‐478   BeUer  Methods  to  Clean  &  Disinfect  the   Environment  
  29. 29. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   29   ¤ Metallic  Cu⧺  intrinsic  broad  spectrum  anEmicrobial   acEvity   ¤ In  vitro  Cu⧺  surfaces  â  bacterial  concentraEons  7   logs  in  2  hrs   ¤ MUSC,  MSKCC  &  Ralph  Johnson  VA   ¤ 8  Cu⧺,  8  std  rooms,  650  admissions  6/2010  –  7/2011   ¤ Cu  ⧺  bed  rails,  overbed  tables,  IV  poles,  arm  chairs,   call  buUon,  mouse,  computer  palm  rest,  bezel  touch   screen  monitor   ¤ Weekly  cultures   Salgado  CD  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:479-­‐486   ¤ Bivariate  analysis:  á  APACHE  II  score  assoc    á  HAI  &   colonizaEon  (p=.011)   ¤ Bivariate:  infecEon  on  admission;  HAI  16.6  vs  5.7  p=. 047  non-­‐Cu⧺  vs  Cu⧺     ¤ MV  analysis:  APACHE  II  score  (p=.011)  and  Cu⧺  (p=. 027)   ¤ Significant  associaEon    env  bioburden  &  HAI   ¤ Bioburden  17%  vs  50%  (0.76  log  â  p<.0001)    Cu⧺     ¤ Foot-­‐board  bioburden  similar  (2,786  vs  2,388  CFU/ 100cm2)  No  Cu⧺     Salgado  CD  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:479-­‐486   ¤ 53.4%  of  pts  in  Cu⧺  rooms  had  at  least  1  object   removed  (non-­‐study  bed)   ¤ 13.4%  non  Cu⧺  rooms  exposed  to  Cu⧺  chair   ¤ Caveats,  cleaning,  tarnishing,  impact  on  different   organisms,  environments,  cost  benefit   Salgado  CD  et  al.    ICHE.  2013;34:479-­‐486   Salgado  CD  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:479-­‐486   Salgado  CD  et  al.    Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:479-­‐486   Figure  2.   QuarEle  distribuEon  of  healthcare-­‐acquired  infecEons  (HAIs)  straEfied  by  microbial  burden  measured  in  the  intensive  care  unit  (ICU)   room  during  the  paEent’s  stay.  There  was  a  significant  associaEon  between  burden  and  HAI  risk  (    ),  with  89%  of  HAIs  occurring  among  paEents   cared  for  in  a  room  with  a  burden  of  more  than  500  colony-­‐forming  units  (CFUs)/100  cm2.    
  30. 30. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   30   Anderson  DJ  et  al.  ICHE  Epidemiol.  2013;34:466-­‐471   ¤ Methods   ² Env  cultures  for  VRE,  C.  diff,  Acinetobacter    before  and   aqer  UV  Rx   ² 2  hospitals,  39  rooms  of  pts  colonized  ¯ˉ 𝑐   VRE,  C.  diff,   Acinetobacter  (Tru-­‐D  SmartUVC;  Lumalier)   ¤ Results  –  UV-­‐C   ² Any  organism  (1.07  log10  â  p<.0001)   ² Target  pathogen  (1.35  log10  â  p<.0001)   ² VRE  (1.68  log10  â  p<.0001)   ² C.  diff  (1.16  log10  â  p<.0001)   ² Acinetobacter  (1.71  log10  â  p=.25)   Anderson  DJ  et  al.  ICHE.  2013;34:466-­‐471   Figure  1.  Change  in  proporEon  of  posiEve  plates  for  target  organisms  before  and  aqer  use  of  an  automated   ultraviolet-­‐C  emiUer.   Sitzlar  B  et  al.  ICHE.  2013;34:459-­‐465   ¤ Methods   ² 3  sequenEal  intervenEons   ²  Fluorescent  markers  to  monitor  &  feedback  on  cleaning   ²  Automated  UV  adjuncEve  disinfecEon   ²  Enhanced  disinfecEon,  dedicated  team,  supervision  &  clearance   ² Cleveland  VA,  21  months   Sitzlar  B  et  al.  ICHE.  2013;34:459-­‐465   ¤ Results   ² Fluorescent  marker  improved  cleaning  thoroughness   (47-­‐81%,  p<.0001)   ² ⊕  Cx  â  14%  (p=.024),  48%  (p<.001),  89%  (p=.006),   (intervenEons  1,  2  &  3)   ² Baseline  67%  CDI  rooms  had  ⊕  Cx  aqer  disinfecEon  vs   57%,  35%  &  7%  (intervenEons  1,  2  &  3)   ² 35%  of  CDI  rooms  had  ⊕  Cx  ¯ˉ 𝑝   UV  treatment   ² Daily  disinfecEon,  dedicated  team  (Clorox  Germicidal   Wipes)  &  cleaning/supervision  of  cleaning  ATP   bioluminescence  (CleanTrace;  3M)  
  31. 31. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   31   Sitzlar  B  et  al.  Infect  Control  Hosp  Epidemiol.  2013;34:459-­‐465   Figure  1.  Effect  of  sequenEal  environmental  cleaning  and  disinfecEon  intervenEons  on  thoroughness  of  cleaning  (determined  on  the  basis  of  fluorescent   marker  removal)  and  on  disinfecEon  of  Clostridium  difficile  infecEon  (CDI)  rooms  (determined  on  the  basis  of  environmental  cultures  for  C.  difficile).   IntervenEon  1  (January  1,  2011,  through  February  28,  2012;  14  months)  involved  educaEon  in  combinaEon  with  monitoring  of  fluorescent  marker  removal   from  high-­‐touch  surfaces  with  feedback  to  housekeepers;  intervenEon  2  (March  1,  2012,  through  June  30,  2012;  4  months)  included  addiEon  of  an   automated  ultraviolet  radiaEon  device  for  disinfecEon  of  CDI  rooms;  intervenEon  3  (July  1,  2012,  through  September  30,  2012;  3  months)  included  enhanced   standard  cleaning  through  formaEon  of  a  3-­‐person  dedicated  daily  disinfecEon  team  for  high-­‐touch  surfaces  in  CDI  rooms  and  implementaEon  of  a  process   requiring  that  terminally  cleaned  CDI  rooms  be  “cleared”  for  the  next  paEent  by  environmental  services  supervisors  and/or  infecEon  control  staff.  Each   intervenEon  was  divided  into  3  Eme  periods,  which  are  indicated  by  separate  bars.   Sitzlar  B  et  al.  ICHE.  2013;34:459-­‐465   Figure  2.  Improvement  in  thoroughness  of  cleaning  of  high-­‐touch  surfaces  with  the  fluorescent  marker  intervenEon.   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:631-­‐638   ¤ Methods  –  Cross-­‐secEonal  mulEcenter  electronic   survey  of  4th  year  med  students’  knowledge,   a‚tudes  &  percepEons  re:  anEmicrobial  use  &   resistance,  quanEty  &  quality  of  educaEon  on  AB   Rx;  Miami,  JH,  U  WA   ¤ Results  –  317/519  (60%)  responded;  57%  ♀,  mean   age  27,  all  had  anEmicrobial  stewardship  programs   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:631-­‐638   Medical  Students’  Percep9ons  and  Knowledge  About   An9microbial  Stewardship:  How  Are  We  Educa9ng  Our   Future  Prescribers?   ¤ Differences  in  educaEonal  resources  used,   perceived  preparedness  &  knowledge   ¤ 90%  wanted  more  knowledge  &  educaEon,   mean  correct  knowledge  51%,  only  15%  had   done  ID   ¤ Those  who  did  ID  ranked  quality  of  AB   educaEon  higher  (3.93  vs  3.44,  p=.0003),  no   difference  in  knowledge  scores   ¤ Only  1/3  reported  “adequate”  fundamental   knowledge  of  anEmicrobial  prescribing   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:631-­‐638   “Everyone  Else  is  Worse  Than  Me/Us”   ¤ Students  perceived  anEbioEc  overuse  more   naEonally  than  at  their  hospital   ¤ Residents  &  Sr  MDs  agree  “other  doctors”   overprescribe  anEmicrobials  compared  to   “themselves”;  anEbioEcs  overused  “naEonally”   compared  to  “their  own  pracEce”   Arch  Intern  Med  2002;162:2210-­‐2216   Arch  Intern  Med  2004;164:1662-­‐1668   ICHE  2011;32:714-­‐718   ICHE  2006;27:1274-­‐1277  
  32. 32. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   32   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:631-­‐638   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:631-­‐638   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.   2013;57:631-­‐638   Abbo  LM  et  al.    Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;57:631-­‐638  
  33. 33. Top  papers  ICAAC  2013   September  13th,  2013   Fraser  &  Voss   33   Bacterial  Infec9on  as  a  Likely  Cause  of  Adverse  Reac9ons  to   Polyacrylamide  Hydrogel  Fillers  in  Cosme9c  Surgery   Christensen  L  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;56:1438-­‐1444   ¤ Widespread  and  á  use  of  gel  fillers  for  cosmeEcs   ¤ á  long-­‐lasEng  adverse  reacEons  (FDA  reports  tripled   2008-­‐2011;  457  to  1309)   ¤ Hyaluronic  acid  hydrogels,  longer-­‐lasEng  collagen,   RXN  rates  4.5%  -­‐  18.6%   ¤ $22.5  billion  filler  market;  incidence  of  gel  injecEons   not  registered;  #  and  brands  of  gel  syringes  used  not   public   Bacterial  Infec9on  as  a  Likely  Cause  of  Adverse  Reac9ons  to   Polyacrylamide  Hydrogel  Fillers  in  Cosme9c  Surgery   Christensen  L  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;56:1438-­‐1444   ¤ RXNS  =  lumps,  nodules,  swelling  granulomas   ¤ EEology  unclear;  Rx  =  anE-­‐inflammatory  agents,   steroids,  anEbioEcs   ¤ MulEcenter  case-­‐control  study;  59    paEents,  28   controls,  biopsy  &  cytology,  Cx,  16S  rRNA,  Gram   stain,  FISH   Bacterial  Infec9on  as  a  Likely  Cause  of  Adverse  Reac9ons  to   Polyacrylamide  Hydrogel  Fillers  in  Cosme9c  Surgery   Christensen  L  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;56:1438-­‐1444   ¤ Bacteria  in  98%  cases,  (S  epi,  Propionibacterium)  up   to  5  years  aqer  injecEon,  none  in  controls   ¤ Long-­‐term  infecEons  likely  due  to  biofilms   ¤ Sterile  technique  and  adequate  skin  prep   mandatory    ?  Explore  anEbioEc  prophylaxis  ???   (Please  don’t)   Grade  2  (A  and  B)  and  grade  3  (C  and  D)  reac9ons  in  biopsies  from  lip  and  hand  9ssue  seen  ater  3  weeks   and  1  year,  respec9vely.     Christensen  L  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;56:1438-­‐1444   ©  The  Author  2013.  Published  by  Oxford  University  Press  on  behalf  of  the  InfecEous  Diseases  Society  of   America.  All  rights  reserved.  For  Permissions,  please  e-­‐mail:  journals.permissions@oup.com. Three-­‐dimensional  confocal  laser  scanning  microscopy  (CSLM)  of  a  biopsy  from  a  grade  3  reac9on  following   gel  injec9on  into  the  cheek  2  years  previously.     Christensen  L  et  al.  Clin  Infect  Dis.  2013;56:1438-­‐1444   ©  The  Author  2013.  Published  by  Oxford  University  Press  on  behalf  of  the  InfecEous  Diseases  Society  of   America.  All  rights  reserved.  For  Permissions,  please  e-­‐mail:  journals.permissions@oup.com.   ¤ Acknowledgements:   ¤ Andreas  Voss  for  pu‚ng  up  with  me   ¤ Washington  University  ID  Faculty  &  Fellows   ¤ BJC  &  BJH  InfecEon  PrevenEon  Specialists   ¤ CDC,  AHRQ,  HHS,  CMS,  NIH  and  Industry  for   funding  these  great  studies   ¤ The  InvesEgaEve  Teams  who  did  this  research  

×