Ten Years of Transformation: A
Vision of the Future of Learning

October 28, 2013
Susan Patrick
President & CEO
Internatio...
The Boy Genius of Ulan Bator
Transforming to
Student-Centered
Learning
www.inacol.org
Student-Centered Learning
Students at the Center (JFF)

• Critical and distinct elements of student-centered
approaches to...
Personalized learning is tailoring learning for
each student’s strengths, needs and interests
— including enabling student...
Survey on Personalization
1. Student agency (student has voice and choice on level of
standards/lesson and some control ov...
Personalized Learning 4 Attributes
(From Scott Benson, BMGF)

• Four essential attributes for a personalized
learning mode...
Horn and Staker’s Blended
Learning Definition
―Blended learning is any time a student learns, at least
in part, at a super...
GPS
Time to Destination
Blended Learning: Optimizing
• Blended learning involves an explicit shift of the
classroom-level instructional design to ...
Blended Learning
• ―Blended learning is about the ability to
personalize instruction. The only way to do that
is for teach...
Redesign of Instructional Model
• Blended learning should be approached not
merely as a temporal construct, but rather as ...
Research on Blended Learning
• Changing roles of educators
• Teacher as conductor, designer, coach,
engineer . . .
– Facil...
New Learning Models Continuums
Competency Education

www.inacol.org
23

Competency Education:
5-part Definition
1. Students advance upon demonstrated mastery.
2. Competencies include explici...
In a proficiency system, failure or poor
performance may be part of student’s
learning curve, but it is not an outcome.
--...
Competency Education Policy
Standards
―As our mental models shift from time-based
to competency- based, it is also important to
move away from linear ...
New Learning Models Vision
• The ultimate power of blended and online learning lies in
their potential to transform the ed...
Instructional Models: Questions
to Ask
• How is your program engineered to personalize
learning?
• How do you enable stude...
Wave IV Planning and Launch Grants:
$12 Million for Breakthrough Schools
What is NGLC?
 Next Generation
Learning Challenges
(NGLC) accelerates
educational
innovation through
applied technology t...
NGLC Grant Awards
 $42 million distributed to
116 grantees representing more
than 300 partner institutions
 Projected nu...
Wave IV: How Much and How Soon?
Cycle

Grant

Opening

Awards

Amount

Cycle
1
Closed

Launch

Fall 2013

8

Planning

Fal...
What is a Breakthrough School?






Student-centered and -owned
meets the diverse learning needs of
each student every...
And… a Breakthrough School is…
 Sustainable and Scalable
accomplished on recurring public revenue at current or lower spe...
Breakthrough Schools Focus on Student
Outcomes:


1.5 years of growth annually
on Common Core State
Standards in ELA and ...
Student Centered
Designed to meet the diverse learning needs of each student every day

1. Academic Model

High Expectatio...
Get Started Today!
Visit nextgenlearning.org:
 Access the RFP, FAQs and
application
 Follow the NGLC Blog to get the
lat...
Policy: Enablers and
Challenges

www.inacol.org
Challenges
• Human Capital: Teachers & Leaders (TA)
– Leadership development: competencies
– Re-design pre-service & in-se...
We view iNACOL’s role as doing
what it takes to ensure that the field
reaches its full potential

Where we
seek to be
• Al...
Quality: A Vision for the Future
Student
Knowledge
Individual
Growth
Student
Knowledge
On Entry (Adaptive
Assessment to id...
Outcomes Quality Assurance:
Performance Metrics
Performance metrics
• Proficiency Benchmark/Entry
• Growth
• College and C...
New York Times:
The United States, Falling Behind
@susandpatrick

spatrick@inacol.org

www.inacol.org
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation
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iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation

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In the Fall of 2003, seventeen pioneering leaders formed what was then the North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL) with a vision for transforming K-12 education through online teaching and learning, fostering a landscape that promoted student success and lifelong learning.

Just ten years later, hundreds of new learning models have taken root across the continuum of blended and online learning, with tools and resources transforming the way traditional classrooms differentiate instruction for each and every student.

The next ten years offer even more of an unprecedented window of opportunity — in addition to new barriers and challenges — for this transformative shift toward student-centered learning. If we want those directing the future of education to act differently, we must get them to think differently. Working with innovators across the field, iNACOL’s annual symposium seeks to host thought-provoking discussions and unparalleled networking opportunities in order to share ideas and enable innovation to take hold in schools across the country and around the world.

Susan Patrick will explore trends shaping the future of learning, reflect on success stories from the across field and spotlight early indicators identified in breakthrough new models using online, blended and competency-based environments.

For more information, please visit http://inacol.org.

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  • "Battushig, then 15, became one of 340 students out of 150,000 to earn a perfect score in Circuits and Electronics, a sophomore-level class at M.I.T. and the first Massive Open Online Course, or MOOC — a college course filmed and broadcast free or nearly free to anyone with an Internet connection — offered by the university."The principal of his high school "...had students watch the Circuits and Electronics MOOC lectures at home, but he wanted to supplement them with real-world labs."The boy "said. “I had never done that kind of thing before. It was really a watershed moment for me.” To help his classmates, he made videos in Mongolian that offered pointers and explanations of difficult concepts and posted them on YouTube. ""...In the past decade, Mongolia, which had limited landlines, invested heavily in its information technology infrastructure and now has an extensive 3G network. Most homes in Ulan Bator have Internet connections, and almost everyone, including nomads, has at least one cellphone. Even on the steppe, with only sheep in sight, you can get a signal.”
  • How many Battushigs do you know?Can can create learning environments that reach more of our students?How do we make learning so engaging to help our kids want to be able to follow their passions to be completely engaged and enthralled in their own learning?Goals? Interests?
  • To be clear, personalized learning is not equal to competency-based learning — but they are related and terms are often (mistakenly) used interchangeably. Competency-based learning is a system of education, often referred to as proficiency or mastery-based, in which students advance and move ahead on their lessons based on demonstration of mastery.In order for students to progress at a meaningful pace, schools and teachers provide differentiated instruction and support. People across the field of K-12 education are using the terms competency-based, proficiency- based, mastery-based, performance-based interchangeably in their own contexts — however, we use the term competency education.
  • approach
  • Personalization allows students to take ownership of their learning, giving them the opportunity to feel valued, motivated, in control. It also changes the dynamic between the teacher and the student. Personalization is about many ideas. It is about... Discovering students’ prior knowledge and experience of the content they are about to learn and meeting them where they are; guiding students to make healthy academic decisions; Developing learning communities that celebrate the individuality and contributions of each student; and Consolidating forms of student learning data so that they are useful for planning for personalized instruction.
  • Personalized learning is an instructional strategy. Compare these essential attributes to what most traditional one-size-fits-all classroom environments look like: learner profiles with precise knowledge and skills, students with personal learning paths versus a lecture-based learning experience; flexible learning environments with a variety of modes, resources and modalities (e.g. connectivism, as illustrated in Figure 1) versus one approach for all students at the exact same pace using a single textbook. Today, with these contrasts, the vast majority of traditional classrooms in the K-12 education system are far from realizing the promise of personalized learning. However, this is where the shift to blended learning instructional models can begin to incorporate the essential elements for personalized learning — providing a roadmap and solution as a method or modality for delivery — and a means to transform education to student-centric learning. Realizing this transformation requires highly personalized, blended learning environments designed and built upon competency education.
  • Learner Profiles: Captures individual skills, gaps, strengths, weaknesses, interests & aspirations of each student. Personal Learning Paths: Each student has learning goals & objectives. Learning experiences are diverse and matched to the individual needs of students. Flexible Learning Environment: Multiple instructional delivery approaches that continuously optimize available resources in support of student learning. Individual Mastery: Continually assesses student progress against clearly defined standards & goals. Students advance based on demonstrated mastery.
  • ToDaY, WITh a gPS, IT IS alMoSTIMPoSSIBlE To gETloST. ThEgPSknoWSMulTIPlEWaYS To Your DESTInaTIon. You have access to information on the routes, speed of travel, the time to destination, and places of interest along the way to explore. Imagine if today’s learning environments were re-imagined to work more akin to the experience of using a gPS when you are driving. Just as a car’s gPS system provides an immediate alert when a wrong turn is made or the driver gets stopped in a traffic jam, a learning system can provide immediate feedback to keep a student aware of the pacing and progress toward their learning goals — and advise them when they need help. Effective blended learning environments provide this gPS for students, allowing them to navigate with flexibility along individual pathways for truly personalized learning. A next generation education system would offer each student their own gPS-like dashboard for learning so that each student would know if they were on track toward their destination — graduation, college and career-readiness — every moment of every day and every point along the way. You’d no longer have to wait until the end of a grading period or school year to take a summative assessment for accountability to show whether you are on or off-track. With a gPS, the moment a student makes a wrong turn, the system would help let the student know to turn around, to seek help and exactly where to find resources to get back on their route toward success and graduation. Blended learning offers a vehicle for optimizing the instructional design toward personalization through transparent data dashboards and enhancing a student’s choice of path. This flexibility allows students to access multiple resources and a variety of content (with reviews and recommendations), but provides a clear profile of how far they have traveled along their pathway and the work still needed to continue along the pathway if they are to achieve success. Not every student’s learning happens along a straight line. Side trips — peaked by interests that contribute to the broader acquisition of an individual’s knowledge and skills — can bring joy to the journey. The blended learning journey is supported by people harnessing advanced, adaptive technologies that provide immediate feedback on time to destination, re-routing or help in order to get back on track, and opportunities to dive into areas of unique interests for deeper learning along the way. The journey is not necessarily linear, and a student is able take multiple pathways to achieve their learning goals and explore based on individual interests — all while co- piloting with educators and receiving regular feedback on progress so they don’t get lost. A GPS for learning is an apt analogy to demonstrate how blended and online learning environments can be a vehicle for personalized learning through use of a customized dashboard display showing real-time information and offering tools to support optimized pathways along a personalized learning journey toward graduation and student success.
  • True blended learning is a modality to realize a fundamental shift in the instructional model toward personalized learning. The key to ensuring that blended learning is beneficial to students is to focus on how it enables personalized learning and instruction. Blended learning is not teachers simply putting lesson plans online or content resources online. Itis not just having teachers recording lessons so that all students do the exact same lesson in the same format with the same pacing each day. One-to-one laptop or tablet initiatives or students using the latest technological devices, software or digital content alone does not equal a blended learning model. While there may be certain educational benefits to these examples of integrating technology in education, such as increased learner engagement (Taylor & Parsons, 2011), the concept and definition of blended learning is more focused on transformation of instructional models toward student-centered learning. “In a Personalized Learning environment, students’ learning experiences — what they learn, and how, when, and where they learn it — are tailored to their individual developmental needs, skills, and interests. Although where, how, and when they learn might vary according to their needs, students also develop deep connections to each other and their teachers and other adults.” Scott Benson, Program Officer for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation one of the great benefits of blended learning is that the technology helps to provide teachers with data, expand student choices for educational resources, learning materials and provides opportunities for students to practice and to demonstrate high levels of performance. However, blended learning isn’t about the technology; rather, it is about empowering educators to better understand how to support and differentiate instruction for kids and make their learning experiences engaging and meaningful.
  • IT IS DIffICulT To IMagInEBEIngaBlE To IMPlEMEnTPErSonalIzEDlEarnIngWIThouTTEChnologY. The tools in blended and online learning can support flexible pacing, differentiated instruction, immediate interventions, and anywhere, any time learning. What is most important is to understand the nuanced differences between blended learning models and the instructional designs that can enable personalized learning and how personalized learning itself can be a driving concept for new learning models. Blended learning is a combination of face-to-face learning experiences and online learning platforms, content, and tools for personalizing instruction. True blended learning is a modality to realize a fundamental shift in the instructional model toward personalized learning.
  • KK
  • To be clear, personalized learning is not equal to competency-based learning — but they are related and terms are often (mistakenly) used interchangeably. Competency-based learning is a system of education, often referred to as proficiency or mastery-based, in which students advance and move ahead on their lessons based on demonstration of mastery.In order for students to progress at a meaningful pace, schools and teachers provide differentiated instruction and support. People across the field of K-12 education are using the terms competency-based, proficiency- based, mastery-based, performance-based interchangeably in their own contexts — however, we use the term competency education.
  • Students at the center, we are agnostic in how we get there…
  • To be clear on what we mean by competency education, Sturgis and Patrick (2011) developed a five-part working definition in partnership with the field at the Competency-based Education Summit hosted by iNACOL and Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO): Students advance upon demonstrated mastery. Competencies include explicit, measurable, transferable learning objectives that empower students. Assessment is meaningful and a positive learning experience for students. Students receive rapid, differentiated support based on their individual learning needs. Learning outcomes emphasize competencies that include application and creation of knowledge along with the development of important skills and dispositions. In a competency-based education system, students understand learning objectives and also know what they must “know and show” to be proficient. If a student does not demonstrate adequate proficiency to advance, they must be provided with supports and interventions that help them fill the gaps in their knowledge and skills. When we think about the traditional “time-based system”, students essentially have variable amounts of learningin fixed amounts of time — quite simply allowing students to have varying levels of gaps as they move through the system with passing grades. For example, in a time-based system, even a “B” average in a course assumes the student may be missing 15-20% of the content knowledge. Students are passed on with “C”s and “D”s, unprepared for the next course.
  • The same high standards that exist for graduating are set for all students to maintain rigor — but students have greater voice and choice in how, where, when and what they are learning to achieve competency (aligned to the standards) and how they demonstrate mastery through a performance. A competency education system enables personalized learning by opening the system constraints to allow multiple pathways for demonstrating what a student knows and can do – through mastery.
  • The time-based education system that revolves around students being sorted by age into grade levels, with public schools accountable for one-grade level’s worth of growth per 180 day school year, is incredibly limiting in terms of what is possible for maximizing learning environments so that each and every student can reach their full potential — ensuring every student has the knowledge, skills and dispositions to be prepared for college, careers and success in today’s global society. Thus, competency education is a necessary foundation in both policy and practice for personalized learning approaches to thrive. Across the United States, there are significant developments in state-level policy towards competency education systems to enable new learning models and focus on mastery. This map illustrates the state-by-state snapshot of competency-based implementation in the United States.
  • The academic standards and competencies that students must know are the learning goals and create a progression. New learning models can drive personalized designs for learning these standards. The standards are the base for what a student must know and do. Once standards are set, they become the floor of expectations and set the bar. A high bar of expectations for all students helps drive equity. Competencies built on these world-class standards set clear expectations for what a student must “know andshow” to demonstrate mastery. The areas that relate competency education to personalize learning most clearly are competency education’s focus on: 1) each student having a personalized learning map, or student profile, exhibiting how and when a student learns and demonstrates mastery, 2) creativity and choice enabled by learning competencies in a way that is personalized to a student’s interests, and 3) flexibility in competency education to support anytime, everywhere learning toward meeting the learning objectives and goals with the emphasis on each student’s deeper learning through the application of knowledge and skills. If we want American students to be globally competitive, we want our students to achieve internationally benchmarked academic standards.
  • The ultimate power of blended and online learning lies in their potential to transform the education system and enable higher levels of learning through competency-based approaches. Technology-based models can allow for rapid capture of student performance data and differentiated instruction tailored to the specific needs of individual students. By adapting instruction to reflect the skills and knowledge students have mastered, blended and online models have the potential to keep students engaged and supported as they learn and to help them progress at their own pace, leading to dramatically higher levels of learning and attainment.
  • Student Centered:Embracing the adolescent’s experience and learning theory as the starting point of education; Harnessing the full range of learning experiences at all times of the day, week, and year; Expanding and reshaping the role of the educator; and Determining progression based upon mastery. “What blended learning offers is a rational approach, focused on redesigning instructional models first, then applying technology, not as the driver, but as the enabler for high-quality learning experiences that allow a teacher to personalize learning and manage an optimized learning enterprise in the classroom.”
  • Richer, deeper, more sophisticated application pool: The field has palpably advanced in the 18 months since Wave IIIa’s RFP was releasedConfirmed by the market: true breakthrough models (at this stage) are more envision-able through new school launch than existing school migration or turnaroundTremendous interest from diverse players: NGLC cohort now reflects:Top-drawer CMOs and school networks inventing their 2.0 models (Summit, KIPP, Aspire, New Tech)Districts pursuing whole-district change (Lebanon, PA; Danville, KY; Horry County, SC; and iZone, NYC)Compelling startups and partnerships with great organizations in the field (Public Impact, Center for Teacher Leadership)
  • Check slide
  • I would recommend ending PPT here!
  • Circle the 3rd check mark
  • Fulfilling the potential of a student-centric, competency-based system will require that the field of blended and online learning — and the policy environment in which it operates — evolve to demand models that are not only different, but more effective than traditional schooling. iNACOL wants to accelerate the development of effective new learning models necessary in order for the field to achieve its potential, enabling all students to achieve success. Blended and online learning models that are competency-based provide enormous potential for transforming the education system toward student-centered, personalized learning. iNACOL’s ambitious vision of blended and online learning models requires research, development and identification of promising practices to better understand where the field is today relative to that potential. iNACOL will continue to work with its networks across the field of K-12 education to lead innovation through collaboration on research, development, rapid prototyping, sharing information, building tools and capacity in the field to implement and sustain a variety of new learning models.
  • The information sharing system that we now know of as the Internet was founded on the principle of freedom. It is a freedom that permits open and free discourse, innovation, and collaboration on interconnected networks; freedom that allows for constant expansion.  As a result, we live in a world where technology enables pervasive, perpetual social change and young people are at the forefront driving that change. This week, we are in Costa Rica at the International Telecommunication Union’s BYND 2015 Global Youth Summit, leading a delegation of talented Americans, ages 18-25. The delegation joins young people from all corners of the globe in a series of workshops, presentations and debates.  UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon encourages us to imagine a future where everyone has access to enough food, to an education, and to the energy required to develop jobs and a robust economy.  Our challenge is to use information and communication technologies (ICTs) as a platform for that positive change.This is our challenge, too.- See more at: http://blogs.state.gov/stories/2013/09/09/young-internet-entrepreneurs-change-world#sthash.v8vo0UnB.dpuf
  • Great sessions.Policy. Transformative Leadership. Networking on the beach tonight. Student Panel with their own perspectives. Wednesday – Learning sciences and breakthrough leadership – how learning engineers . . .
  • iNACOL 2013 Symposium - Susan Patrick - Ten Years of Transformation

    1. 1. Ten Years of Transformation: A Vision of the Future of Learning October 28, 2013 Susan Patrick President & CEO International Association for K-12 Online Learning www.inacol.org
    2. 2. The Boy Genius of Ulan Bator
    3. 3. Transforming to Student-Centered Learning www.inacol.org
    4. 4. Student-Centered Learning Students at the Center (JFF) • Critical and distinct elements of student-centered approaches to learning challenge the current schooling and education paradigm: – Embracing the adolescent’s experience and learning theory as the starting point of education; – Harnessing the full range of learning experiences at all times of the day, week, and year; – Expanding and reshaping the role of the educator; and – Determining progression based upon mastery.
    5. 5. Personalized learning is tailoring learning for each student’s strengths, needs and interests — including enabling student voice and choice in what, how, when and where they learn — to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible. – Mean What You Say: Integrating Personalized, Blended and Competency Education (Patrick, Kennedy, Powell, iNACOL 2013)
    6. 6. Survey on Personalization 1. Student agency (student has voice and choice on level of standards/lesson and some control over how they learn) 2. Differentiated instruction 3. Immediate instructional interventions and supports for each student is on-demand, when needed 4. Flexible pacing 5. Individual student profiles (personalized learning plan) 6. Deeper learning and problem solving to develop meaning 7. Frequent feedback from instructors and peers 8. Standards-based, world-class knowledge and skills 9. Anywhere, any time learning 10. Performance-based assessments — project-based learning, portfolios, etc.
    7. 7. Personalized Learning 4 Attributes (From Scott Benson, BMGF) • Four essential attributes for a personalized learning model: – Learner Profiles: Captures individual skills, gaps, strengths, weaknesses, interests & aspirations of each student. – Personal Learning Paths: Each student has learning goals & objectives. Learning experiences are diverse and matched to the individual needs of students. – Flexible Learning Environment: Multiple instructional delivery approaches that continuously optimize available resources in support of student learning. – Individual Mastery: Continually assesses student progress against clearly defined standards & goals. Students advance based on demonstrated mastery.
    8. 8. Horn and Staker’s Blended Learning Definition ―Blended learning is any time a student learns, at least in part, at a supervised brick-and-mortar location away from home and, at least in part, through online delivery with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace. The modalities along each student’s learning path within a course or subject are connected to provide an integrated learning experience‖ (Horn & Staker, 2013).
    9. 9. GPS Time to Destination
    10. 10. Blended Learning: Optimizing • Blended learning involves an explicit shift of the classroom-level instructional design to optimize student learning and personalize learning. Blended learning implementations should provide greater student control and flexibility in pathways for how a student learns, where and when a student learns and how they demonstrate mastery. • Simply, blended learning is a delivery mechanism for personalized learning.
    11. 11. Blended Learning • ―Blended learning is about the ability to personalize instruction. The only way to do that is for teachers to use the data constantly to individualize instruction and provide targeted instruction. It isn’t about the tech, it is about the instructional model change. Blended learning is not about whether you are just giving a kid a computer.‖ – Samantha Sherwood, Assistant Principal, Bronx Arena High School in New York City
    12. 12. Redesign of Instructional Model • Blended learning should be approached not merely as a temporal construct, but rather as a fundamental redesign of the instructional model with the following characteristics: – A shift from lecture- to student-centered instruction in which students become active and interactive learners (this shift should apply to the entire course, including face-to-face contact sessions); – Increases in interaction between student-instructor, studentstudent, student-content, and student- outside resources; – Integrated formative and summative assessment mechanisms for students and instructor.‖
    13. 13. Research on Blended Learning • Changing roles of educators • Teacher as conductor, designer, coach, engineer . . . – Facilitators of learning – Monitors of progress – Graduation coaches • See Keane , Irvin, de la Varre, & Hannum, 2010; Pettyjohn, Kennedy, & LaFrance, 2012; Cavanaugh, Barbour, & Clark, 2009; de la Varre, Keane, and Irvin, 2011; Irvin, Hannum, Farmer, de la Varre, & Keane, 2009
    14. 14. New Learning Models Continuums
    15. 15. Competency Education www.inacol.org
    16. 16. 23 Competency Education: 5-part Definition 1. Students advance upon demonstrated mastery. 2. Competencies include explicit, measurable, transferable learning objectives that empower students. 3. Assessment is meaningful and a positive learning experience for students. 4. Students receive timely, differentiated support based on their individual learning needs. 5. Learning outcomes emphasize competencies that include application and creation of knowledge, along with the development of important skills and dispositions
    17. 17. In a proficiency system, failure or poor performance may be part of student’s learning curve, but it is not an outcome. ----- Proficiency Based Instruction and Assessment, Oregon Education Roundtable
    18. 18. Competency Education Policy
    19. 19. Standards ―As our mental models shift from time-based to competency- based, it is also important to move away from linear toward flexible pathways for learning.‖ – Chris Sturgis, Art & Science of Designing Competencies
    20. 20. New Learning Models Vision • The ultimate power of blended and online learning lies in their potential to transform the education system and enable higher levels of learning through competencybased approaches. • OUR VISION OF FUTURE LEARNING MODELS IS CENTERED ON THE NEED FOR INCREASING OPPORTUNITIES, ACCESS AND EQUITY FOR ALL STUDENTS to actively engage in the highest-quality, student-centered, competency education models offering personalized learning for each and every student, so that success is the only option.
    21. 21. Instructional Models: Questions to Ask • How is your program engineered to personalize learning? • How do you enable student co-design and goalsetting? • How do you provide greater transparency? • How does your program transform instructional design to student-centered?
    22. 22. Wave IV Planning and Launch Grants: $12 Million for Breakthrough Schools
    23. 23. What is NGLC?  Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) accelerates educational innovation through applied technology to dramatically improve college readiness and completion in the United States.
    24. 24. NGLC Grant Awards  $42 million distributed to 116 grantees representing more than 300 partner institutions  Projected number of students served by scaled-up NGLC projects within five years: 2.5 million 58 new breakthrough secondary and 10 postsecondary schools or degree programs 19 secondary education projects focused on innovative technology tools linked to the Common Core 29 postsecondary projects focused on blended learning, open core courseware, learning analytics and deeper learning
    25. 25. Wave IV: How Much and How Soon? Cycle Grant Opening Awards Amount Cycle 1 Closed Launch Fall 2013 8 Planning Fall 2014 30 $100K $450K total ($150K + up to a possible $300K in 1:1 matching) $450K total Deadline April 22, 2013 April 22, 2013 Launch Cycle 2 Fall 2014 12 (may be more) Planning Fall 2015 10 $100K Jan 13, 2014 Fall 2015 Up to 6 each: DC and Chicago $100K Jan 13, 2014 Regional Fund: Planning Dec 2, 2013
    26. 26. What is a Breakthrough School?    Student-centered and -owned meets the diverse learning needs of each student every day and empowers students with skills, information and tools to manage their own learning Competency-based students move at their own pace and earn credit when they demonstrate mastery of high standards Blended optimizes the use of teacher- and technology- delivered instruction in group and individual work
    27. 27. And… a Breakthrough School is…  Sustainable and Scalable accomplished on recurring public revenue at current or lower spend levels and can be scaled up to serve many more students.
    28. 28. Breakthrough Schools Focus on Student Outcomes:  1.5 years of growth annually on Common Core State Standards in ELA and Math  Deeper learning outcomes as defined by grantee  90% four-year cohort graduation rate (completion in middle grades) 80% matriculation rate School model is financially sustainable  
    29. 29. Student Centered Designed to meet the diverse learning needs of each student every day 1. Academic Model High Expectations Committed to ensuring that every student will meet clearly defined, rigorous standards that will prepare them for success in college and career Self Pacing and Mastery-Based Credit Enables students to move at their own optimal pace and receive credit when they demonstrate mastery of the material Blended Instruction Optimizes teacher- and technology-delivered instruction in group and individual work Student Ownership Empowers students with skills, information, and tools they need to manage their own learning Criteria for Review Design Principles for Breakthrough Schools Design Principles & Criteria for Review 2. Boldness & Impact 3. Scalability 4. Capacity 5. Advantages Financial Sustainability Sustainable on public per-pupil revenue within four years Scalable Designed to serve many more students if it demonstrates impact
    30. 30. Get Started Today! Visit nextgenlearning.org:  Access the RFP, FAQs and application  Follow the NGLC Blog to get the latest information leading up to submission deadlines  Check out Wave IIIa and Wave IV, Cycle 1 grantee profiles and videos of their application decks for inspiration
    31. 31. Policy: Enablers and Challenges www.inacol.org
    32. 32. Challenges • Human Capital: Teachers & Leaders (TA) – Leadership development: competencies – Re-design pre-service & in-service training to include blended/online learning – Scaling with implementation fidelity – Develop leadership capacity to lead programs, hire, evaluate, adapt, innovate new models – Develop teacher capacity to assess mastery and to use real-time data to personalize learning
    33. 33. We view iNACOL’s role as doing what it takes to ensure that the field reaches its full potential Where we seek to be • All students have access to online and blended models • The models are effective in developing their college- and career-readiness Where we are today Where we could well arrive • Some students have access to online and blended models • All students have access to online and blended models • The effectiveness of these models in developing college- and careerreadiness is largely unknown and likely varies widely • But many or most of these models are no more effective than traditional classroom instruction
    34. 34. Quality: A Vision for the Future Student Knowledge Individual Growth Student Knowledge On Entry (Adaptive Assessment to identify level and gaps) Assessed in Real-Time (multiple measures at multiple points: adaptive, embedded, formative, performance-based, summative/moderatin g) Upon Exit (understand amount of learning knowledge and skills)
    35. 35. Outcomes Quality Assurance: Performance Metrics Performance metrics • Proficiency Benchmark/Entry • Growth • College and Career Readiness • Fidelity to Student Goals • Graduation Rate • Closing the Achievement Gap
    36. 36. New York Times: The United States, Falling Behind
    37. 37. @susandpatrick spatrick@inacol.org www.inacol.org
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