0
Keeping Pace with K-12
Online and Blended Learning:
A Guide to Policy and
th Edition)
Practice 2013 (10
• John Watson, Eve...
Contact Information
John Watson – john@evergreenedgroup.com
Amy Murin – amy@evergreenedgroup.com
Evergreen Education Group
Keeping Pace 2013 is
proudly sponsored by:

www.kpk12.com
Program Advisory Board
• Suzanne Falkenstein
Athenian Schools
• Lynn Torres
Lufkin ISD (TX)
• Kimberly Loomis
Clark County...
KEEPING PACE CATEGORIES
• Single-district programs
• Blended schools
• Multi-district FT online
• State-supported Suppleme...
Is K-12
Blended
Learning
Disruptive?
May 2013
Fully Blended Schools
How Keeping Pace defines fully blended
schools:
• A stand-alone school w/ a school code.
• Much of t...
States with Fully Blended Schools
Single District Programs
•
•
•
•
•

Riverside Unified School District
Metro Nashville Public Schools
Clark County School D...
2013 : 29 states : 310,000 students
Lost Virginia, redefined Hawaii
3% of Ss
per district

Statewide cap
of .018 %
(900) of all Ss

# schools,
# students per
school

1 school,
limited

2% Ss...
Types of restrictions
# of students
New
Hampshire,
Arkansas

Michigan

# of
schools

Mass.
Tenn.

Other Texas:
Grades 3-12...
State-supported Supplemental Options
SVS 2013 : 27 states, 742,728 enrollments
Lost Connecticut and Louisiana in SY13-14
Course choice

Keeping Pace defines a course choice program as
one that allows:
1. Students to choose to take a course fro...
Course choice

Keeping Pace defines a course choice program as:
1. Students can choose to take a course from one
or more p...
States with Course Choice Programs
Course Choice Program Details
State

Year Started

# Enrolls

Key Notes

Arizona

2009-10
Grades K-12

Data not
available
...
Close but not quite . . .
• Oklahoma: Final determination and selection of the
provider(s) is left to the discretion of th...
Private / Independent Schools:
Why no history of online /blended?
• Perceived lack of need until recently
• Many public on...
Private / Independent Schools:
Why now?
• National Association of Independent Schools
identifying growing number of online...
What states allow private students to take
state-supported supplemental courses?
• Yes, 8 states: Alabama, Florida, Georgi...
Key Policy Issues
• Online learning requirements
• MOOCs
States with Online Learning Requirements
MOOCs in K-12
• K-12 Teaching in the 21st Century
– Michigan Virtual University & Kent State University
– In-service teach...
MOOCs in K-12
The Promise: Reasonable or free access to a
wide variety of online courses designed by top
faculty around th...
Planning for Quality:
Questions and Timelines

What educational goal are you
trying to meet?
Traditional Time
Additional tasks for Time-Shift Program
End Goals for Each Program
Keeping Pace 2013 is
proudly sponsored by:

www.kpk12.com
Contact Information
John Watson – john@evergreenedgroup.com
Amy Murin – amy@evergreenedgroup.com
Evergreen Education Group
iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning
iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning
iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning
iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning
iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning
iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning

869

Published on

This iNACOL webinar took place on November 13, 2013 and featured John Watson and Amy Murin discussing the findings from the Keeping Pace Report. Download the free report here: http://kpk12.com/

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
869
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • 10th anniversarySponsors – public, private, nonprofitCreative commonsWebsiteblog
  • 1st-ever program advisory board to help us keep an eye to what is happening on the ground in schools and districts around the country
  • Keeping Pace looks at 7 different program types including fully online schools, supplemental online course providers, and blended learning providers. However, what we are starting to see more and more each year is the increase in the number and variety of blended learning providers merging into all of these worlds.
  • 310,000 students in 30 states in SY 2012-13We counted about 295,000, but know that some programs aren’t in our counts (single-district, California could be an undercount) Largest number of students in Arizona (42,000), although that is a unique student count that includes some part-time studentsNext largest number in California, although that is an estimate. Largest number we can trust? Ohio with 38,519 and Pennsylvania with 34,69429 states in SY 2013-14We changed our classification of Hawaii from fully online to fully blendedVirginia’s one school is no longer statewide; focused on two districts, and out-of-district must pay an enrollment fee9 of those states operate with restrictions
  • Arkansas: 1 school, limited to 3,000 studentsCalifornia: Schools limited to serving students in contiguous countiesIowa .018 % (approximately 900) student cap statewide for full-time schools; no more than 1% from any one district. Mass. No more than 2% of students statewide in virtual schools. At least 5% of students from sponsoring district. 10 virtual schools max. Michigan SB619 (2012) limited number of cyber charters and their enrollments. New Hampshire1 school; enrollment limited by appropriation.Oregon 3% cap on the number of students in virtual schools from each district. Tennessee Initial enrollment limited to 1,500; never more than 5,000. No more than 25% of a virtual school’s students may come from outside the LEA. Restrictions are lifted or schools closed based on school performance. TexasTxVSN Online Schools serves grades 3-12.For good measure: Virginia is no longer statewide
  • Many of the restrictions fall into one of three categories: # of students: this could be limited by percent of state student population, % of students from any district, or simply by budget# of schools: some states limit the number of virtual schools allowed to operate in the state, or to serve students statewideOut-of-district: In an effort to prevent schools from “making money” on out-of-district students, some states limit the number of out-of-district enrollments, or mandate a minimum number of in-district students.
  • Amy
  • State virtual schools742,728 course enrollments in SVS in 27 states in SY 2012-13 Connecticut and Louisiana closed at the end of the school yearOperating in 25 states in SY 2013-14FLVS by far the largest with 410,962 course enrollments
  • Course choice programs7 states: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Utah4 of these also have SVS (FL, GA, MI, UT)Many other states in the ‘close but not quite’ categoryAZ: enrollment data not available
  • One enrollment = one student enrolled in one semester-long supplemental courseWhile we work to maintain neutrality about the positivity / negativity of particular options for students, we do believe that any option that results in more choices for students is at its core a good thing. However, how that plays out in legislation and then on the ground is critical toward understanding the potential effect on students and student performance.
  • First time covered in Keeping Pace1st private school sponsor, private school representative on Program Advisory Board
  • Note that many of the policy details mentioned in the preceding and upcoming slides are detailed in a snapshot that leads each profile
  • As of September 2013, 4 states require students to complete an online course to graduate (Alabama, Florida, Michigan, and Virginia) 2 more (North Carolina and Arkansas) are in the process of implementing a requirement4 more states (Georgia, West Virginia, New Mexico, Massachusetts) encourage but don’t require it
  • the first thing we do with a school district – before we even sign a contract – is to ask them what educational goal they are trying to solve.
  • 10th anniversarySponsors – public, private, nonprofitCreative commonsWebsiteblog
  • Transcript of "iNACOL Webinar: Keeping Pace with Blended and Online Learning"

    1. 1. Keeping Pace with K-12 Online and Blended Learning: A Guide to Policy and th Edition) Practice 2013 (10 • John Watson, Evergreen Education Group • Amy Murin, Evergreen Education Group November 2013
    2. 2. Contact Information John Watson – john@evergreenedgroup.com Amy Murin – amy@evergreenedgroup.com Evergreen Education Group
    3. 3. Keeping Pace 2013 is proudly sponsored by: www.kpk12.com
    4. 4. Program Advisory Board • Suzanne Falkenstein Athenian Schools • Lynn Torres Lufkin ISD (TX) • Kimberly Loomis Clark County School District • James H. Hardman Crown Point Community School Corporation (IN) • Kevin Croghan Denver Public Schools • Greg Ottinger San Diego County Office of Education • Chris Thuman Scottsdale Unified School District • Robert Cole Howard County Public School System (MD) • Richard Frank Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools (TN) • Frank Goodrich Minneapolis Public Schools • David Haglund Riverside Unified School District
    5. 5. KEEPING PACE CATEGORIES • Single-district programs • Blended schools • Multi-district FT online • State-supported Supplemental • Private / Independent
    6. 6. Is K-12 Blended Learning Disruptive? May 2013
    7. 7. Fully Blended Schools How Keeping Pace defines fully blended schools: • A stand-alone school w/ a school code. • Much of the curriculum is delivered online. • Attendance is required at a physical site during the school year for more than just state assessments.
    8. 8. States with Fully Blended Schools
    9. 9. Single District Programs • • • • • Riverside Unified School District Metro Nashville Public Schools Clark County School District Washington DC Public Schools Minneapolis Public Schools * Blended courses * Fully online option * *Supplemental online courses * Teacher professional development * BYOD / 1:1 programs *
    10. 10. 2013 : 29 states : 310,000 students Lost Virginia, redefined Hawaii
    11. 11. 3% of Ss per district Statewide cap of .018 % (900) of all Ss # schools, # students per school 1 school, limited 2% Ss statewide, <5% indistrict Ss, <10 schools Contiguous counties Grades 3-12 only 1 school, 3,000 Ss Initial enrollment limited to 1,500 Ss. Min. of 75% indistrict Ss. No school shall exceed 5,000 Ss. Restrictions lifted or schools closed based on school perf.
    12. 12. Types of restrictions # of students New Hampshire, Arkansas Michigan # of schools Mass. Tenn. Other Texas: Grades 3-12 California: Contiguous counties Iowa Oregon Out-ofdistrict
    13. 13. State-supported Supplemental Options
    14. 14. SVS 2013 : 27 states, 742,728 enrollments Lost Connecticut and Louisiana in SY13-14
    15. 15. Course choice Keeping Pace defines a course choice program as one that allows: 1. Students to choose to take a course from one or more providers, where 2. A district cannot deny a student’s request to enroll in an out-of-district course, and 3. Funding follows the student at the course level.
    16. 16. Course choice Keeping Pace defines a course choice program as: 1. Students can choose to take a course from one or more providers, 2. A district cannot deny a student’s request to enroll in an out-of-district course, and 3. Funding follows the student at the course level.
    17. 17. States with Course Choice Programs
    18. 18. Course Choice Program Details State Year Started # Enrolls Key Notes Arizona 2009-10 Grades K-12 Data not available State authorizes providers; 74 in SY 2013-14 Funding is prorated based on % of ADM Florida 2002, 2009-10 428,315 Grades K-12 enrollments All districts must make PT + FT options available to all K-12 students Funding based on completion Georgia 2012-13 Grades 9-12 25,877 enrollments Georgia Virtual School is only provider $250 / student / course + appropriation Louisiana 2013-14 Grades 9-12 New State authorizes providers; 45 in SY 2013-14 Funding based on appropriation + grants Michigan 2013-14 Grades 5-12 New Up to 2 courses from MVS or statewide catalog 80% funding w/enrollment, 20% on completion Minnesota 2003-04 Grades K-12 9,933 enrollments State authorizes providers; 27 in SY 2013-14 88% of proportional ADM to provider; can be based on seat time or completion Utah 2011-12 Grades 9-12 1,279 enrollments State authorizes providers 50% funding w/enrollment, 50% on completion
    19. 19. Close but not quite . . . • Oklahoma: Final determination and selection of the provider(s) is left to the discretion of the local district. • Texas: Restrictions. Districts and charter schools . . . – Are not required to pay for more than 3 year-long courses each year, – may deny access to courses if the district or charter school offers a substantially similar course, and – have the final say over which course provider a student chooses. • Kansas, Oregon, and Wyoming: Legislation is not in place to support a student’s right to choose at the course level, although there are mechanisms for students to split their course loads among multiple providers.
    20. 20. Private / Independent Schools: Why no history of online /blended? • Perceived lack of need until recently • Many public online programs evolved from distance education; that is not the case with private / independent schools • Private / independent schools known for “high-touch” environment, which is not consistent with the perception of online
    21. 21. Private / Independent Schools: Why now? • National Association of Independent Schools identifying growing number of online & blended programs in its report, “Stories of Excellence: Case Studies of Exemplary Blended and Fully Online Learning” • OESIS Conference • Way to cut costs
    22. 22. What states allow private students to take state-supported supplemental courses? • Yes, 8 states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Utah • No, 21 states • The other 21 states do not have statesupported supplemental options
    23. 23. Key Policy Issues • Online learning requirements • MOOCs
    24. 24. States with Online Learning Requirements
    25. 25. MOOCs in K-12 • K-12 Teaching in the 21st Century – Michigan Virtual University & Kent State University – In-service teachers, pre-service teachers, and high school students interested in teaching as a profession • ilearnOhio has authorized 14 MOOCs created by Coursera; students apply for FlexCredit • AP Computer Science MOOC designed by Amplify being piloted in districts around the country • Florida legislation directing DOE to figure out how to authorize MOOCs for credit in the future
    26. 26. MOOCs in K-12 The Promise: Reasonable or free access to a wide variety of online courses designed by top faculty around the world. • Challenge: How will credit be issued? • Challenge: How will courses be funded (development and participation)? • Challenge: Will providers be held to quality and accountability standards?
    27. 27. Planning for Quality: Questions and Timelines What educational goal are you trying to meet?
    28. 28. Traditional Time
    29. 29. Additional tasks for Time-Shift Program
    30. 30. End Goals for Each Program
    31. 31. Keeping Pace 2013 is proudly sponsored by: www.kpk12.com
    32. 32. Contact Information John Watson – john@evergreenedgroup.com Amy Murin – amy@evergreenedgroup.com Evergreen Education Group
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×