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MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
MBA 713 - Chapter 01
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MBA 713 - Chapter 01

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MBA 713 - Chapter 01

MBA 713 - Chapter 01

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  • The global economy profoundly affects your daily life, from the products you buy to the prices you pay to the interest rates you are charged to the kind of job you hold. To operate comfortably in this environment, you need to learn the basic ideas and concepts—the common body of knowledge—of international business. This book is intended to provide you with knowledge, insights, and skills that will help you function effectively in the global marketplace.
  • This chapter’s learning objectives include the following:Discussing the meaning of international business.Explaining the importance of understanding international business. Identifying and describing the basic forms of international business activities. Discussing the causes of globalization.Understanding the growing role of emerging markets in the global economy.
  • International business consists of transactions between parties from more than one country. The parties involved in such transactions may include private individuals, individual companies, groups of companies, and/or governmental agencies.
  • International business differs from domestic business for a number of reasons:Domestic business involves transactions occurring within the boundaries of a single country, while international business involves transactions across national boundaries. The countries involved may use different currencies, forcing at least one party to convert its currency into another. The legal systems often vary, forcing one or more parties to adjust their practices to comply with local law. The cultures may differ, so each party must adjust to the expectations of the other. The availability of resources will differ by country. Thus, the way products are made and the types of products that are produced will vary by country. The basic skills and knowledge needed to be successful are similar, whether one is doing business domestically or internationally. However, the skills and knowledge needed for international business are more complex than those needed to succeed in domestic business.
  • This section introduced International Business and presented some differences in how business is done domestically and internationally. The next section will address the following question: “Why study international business?”
  • There are many different reasons why today’s students need to learn more about international business. Gaining knowledge about this increasingly important area will help you assess career opportunities. It will also help you to interact with coworkers, managers, suppliers, customers, and others.
  • First, almost any large organization you work for will have international operations or be affected by the global economy. If one day you start your own business, you may find yourself using foreign-made materials or equipment, competing with foreign firms, and perhaps even selling in foreign markets. In either case, global business skills will help you build a successful business career. Another reason for you to study international business is to keep pace with your future competitors. You must ensure that your global skills and knowledge aid your career, rather than allow their absence to hinder it.Studying international business will help you stay abreast of the latest business techniques and tools, because no single country has a monopoly on good ideas. Managers who are ignorant of the innovations of their international competitors are bound to fail in the global marketplace.Finally, studying international business fosters cultural literacy. You will encounter colleagues, customers, suppliers, and competitors from different countries and cultural backgrounds. Knowing something about how their countries and companies fit into the global economy can help you earn their respect and confidence, as well as give you a competitive edge in dealing with them.
  • This concludes our discussion of why it is important to study International Business. The next section will review typical International Business Activities.
  • Historically, international business activity first took the form of exporting and importing.However, in today’s complex world of international commerce,numerous other forms of international business are also common.
  • Exporting is the selling of products made in one’s own country for use or resale in other countries. Importing is the buying of products made in other countries for use or resale in one’s own country. Exporting and importing activities often are divided into two groups. One group of activities is trade in goods—tangible products such as clothing, computers, and raw materials. Official U.S. government publications call this type of trade merchandise exports and imports; the British call it visible trade. The other group of activities is trade in services—intangible products such as banking, travel, and accounting activities. In the United States, this type of trade is called service exports and imports; in the United Kingdom, it is called invisible trade.
  • International investments are the second major form of international business activity. They consist of capital supplied by residents of one country to residents of another. Such investments are divided into two categories: Foreign direct investments (FDI) are made for the purpose of actively controlling property, assets, or companies located in host countries. The country in which the parent company is headquartered is called the home country; any other country in which the company operates is known as a host country.  Foreign portfolio investments (FPI) are purchases of foreign financial assets (stocks, bonds, etc.) for a purpose other than control, such as increasing the rate of return on a portfolio of assets.
  • International business activity can also take other forms. International licensing is a contractual arrangement. Under this arrangement, a firm in one country licenses the use of its intellectual property (such as patents, trademarks, brand names, or copyrights) to a firm in a second country in return for a royalty payment. International franchising is a specialized form of international licensing. It occurs when a firm in one country (the franchisor) authorizes a firm in a second country (the franchisee) to utilize its operating systems, brand names, trademarks, and logos in return for a royalty payment.An international management contract is an arrangement wherein a firm in one country agrees to operate facilities or provide other management services to a firm in another country for an agreed-upon fee. A firm that engages in any of these types of transactions can be labeled an international business.
  • An international business is any organization that engages in cross-border commercial transactions with individuals, private firms, and/or public sector organizations. The term multinational corporation (MNC) identifies firms that engage in foreign direct investment and own or control value-adding activities in more than one country. MNCs buy resources, create goods and/or services, and sell those goods and services. MNCs usually coordinate their activities from a central headquarters, but they may also give foreign affiliates or subsidiaries considerable latitude in adjusting their operations to local circumstances. Because some large MNCs, such as accounting partnerships, are not true corporations, some writers distinguish between multinational corporations and multinational enterprises (MNEs). Further, not-for-profit organizations, such as the International Red Cross, are not true enterprises; so the term multinational organization (MNO) can refer to both not-for-profit and profit-seeking organizations.
  • This section explored the following International Business Activities: exporting and importing, global investing, international licensing and franchising, and management contracting. It also defined international business and multinational corporations, multinational enterprises, and multinational organizations. The next section will cover The Era of Globalization.
  • International business has grown so rapidly in the past decade that many experts believe we are living in the era of globalization. According to Thomas Friedman, globalization can be defined as “the inexorable integration of markets, nation-states, and technologies . . . in a way that is enabling individuals, corporations and nation-states to reach around the world farther, faster, deeper, and cheaper than ever before.”
  • Globalization has led to an intensification of the role of international trade in the economies of the world. As this graph shows, the ratio of international trade to economic activity has risen dramatically. In 1950, merchandise trade accounted for about 1 percent of the total GDP of the world’s nations; by 2009, it represented 21 percent. International trade in services added another 6 percent to this total. You may also note the impact of the global recession: in 2009, trade volumes decreased more than the world’s GDP did, thus causing the trade-to-GDP ratio to fall.
  • Another manifestation of globalization is the growing importance of foreign direct investments made by citizens of one country, in order to operate and control assets in another. As the graph demonstrates, the importance of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the world’s economy has risen significantly over time. In 1980, the stock of FDI was only 2.4 percent of the world’s GDP; by 2009, the stock of FDI was over 30 percent of that year’s GDP.
  • The growth of international business in recent years has been clear and dramatic. But why has this growth occurred? And why is international business activity likely to skyrocket during the next decade? There are two broad reasons: strategic imperatives, which motivate globalization, and environmental changes, which facilitate it.
  • Several strategic imperatives have compelled firms to become more global. One motive is the opportunity to leverage a core competency that a firm has developed in its home market. A core competency is a distinctive strength or advantage that is central to a firm’s operations. By utilizing its core competency in new markets, the firm is able to increase its revenues and profits. Another important reason for going international is to acquire resources such as materials, labor, capital, or technology. In some cases, organizations seek foreign sources because certain products or services are either scarce or unavailable locally.Seeking new markets is also a common motive for international expansion. When a firm’s domestic market matures, it becomes increasingly difficult to generate high revenue and profit growth. By expanding into new markets, the firm may achieve significant growth in sales. It may also obtain economies of scale and diversify its revenue stream.Finally, businesses sometimes enter foreign markets to better compete with industry rivals. Leading firms attack and counterattack each other in every region of the world to prevent rivals from gaining a competitive advantage in any country.
  • Firms would not have been able to expand their post-World War II international activities so significantly without changes in two key areas: the political environment and the technological environment.After World War I, many countries, imposed tariffs and quotas on imported goods and favored local firms on government supply contracts. As a result, international trade and investment declined throughout the 1930s. However, after World War II, reductions to trade barriers were negotiated through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and its successor, the World Trade Organization (WTO).Regional accords, such as the European Union, the Mercosur Accord, and the North American Free Trade Agreement, also have relaxed trade and investment barriers among their members.
  • Improvements in technology—particularly in communication, transportation, and information—have served as major catalysts in the globalization of business. These advances make managing distant businesses easier today than executives would have dreamed possible just a few decades ago; so they have facilitated expansion into international markets.
  • This section introduced the Era of Globalization. It started with two graphs—one that depicts exports as a percentage of world GDP and one shows the stock of foreign direct investment (FDI) relative to world GDP. The remaining slides covered the contemporary causes, strategic imperatives, and environmental causes of globalization. The next section will cover Globalization and Emerging Markets.
  • Globalization has led to an intensification of international business activity. It has also prompted businesses to expand into new markets that had been insulated from the international marketplace.
  • During the cold war between the United States and the Soviet Union, many scholars divided the world into three regions: The First World consisted of the rich, major trading nations from Western Europe, North America, Australia, and parts of Asia. Most of these nations maintained diplomatic ties with the United States. The Second World consisted of the Soviet Union and allied Communist states. The Third World consisted primarily of the low- to medium-income countries populating Latin America, Africa, and most of Asia. Most international business activity took place between members of the First World. The Second World walled itself off to commerce with the First World. The Third World was primarily viewed as a supplier of raw materials and commodities to First World countries. 
  • Today, much of the attention of international business is focused on the emerging markets, countries whose recent growth or prospects for future growth exceed that of traditional markets. Many companies are finding that growth in their sales and profits is attributable to these new markets.There is no universally accepted definition of the countries to be included in the emerging markets category. Some scholars limit the term to the BRIC countries—Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Other researchers have used the term to describe the so-called Big Ten—Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Poland, South Africa, South Korea, and Turkey. Other experts have a more expansive definition, including most non-high-income countries in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. Regardless of the definition, it is clear that international businesses that ignore the emerging markets do so at their own risk.
  • This section introduced Globalization and Emerging Markets. It began with an overview of the global marketplace during the Cold War. Then, it introduced today’s emerging markets and how those markets are identified. The next section will provide an Overview of the Contents of your textbook.
  • Underlying this textbook is the assumption that most readers will either work for or own a company that is affected by international business activity. Therefore, this book is intended to provide readers with knowledge that can help them succeed in international business.
  • The contents of the book move from relatively general (macro) issues to increasingly specific (micro) issues that managers must deal with on a regular basis. Part 1 consists of Chapters 1 – 5. It begins with an overview of international business, global marketplaces, and business centers. Then, it presents the legal, technological, accounting, and political environments that affect global business. This section also discusses the roles of culture, ethics, and social responsibility in the world of international business. Part 2 includes Chapters 6 – 10. This part discusses international trade and investment, the international monetary system and the balance of payments, and the foreign exchange and international financial markets. It also covers national trade policies and international cooperation among nations. Part 3 consists of Chapters 11 – 15. This section adopts the perspective of a specific organization. It focuses on international strategic management, strategies for analyzing and entering foreign markets, and international strategic alliances. It also covers design and control of international organizations, and leadership and employee behavior in international business.Part 4 includes chapters 16 – 19. This part covers how to manage the following international business functions: marketing, operations, finance, and human resources.
  • This section provided An Overview of the Contents of this Book. It grouped the book’s contents into four parts and offered a quick overview of the material covered in each part. The presentation will close with a review of this chapter’s learning objectives.
  • This concludes the PowerPoint presentation on Chapter 1, “An Overview of International Business.” During this presentation, we have accomplished the following learning objectives: Discussed the meaning of international business.Explained the importance of understanding international business. Identified and described the basic forms of international business activities. Discussed the causes of globalization.Understood the growing role of emerging markets in the global economy.For more information about these topics, refer to Chapter 1 in International Business.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Chapter 1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 1 An Overview of International Business
    • 2. Learning Objectives • Discuss international business • Explain the importance of international business • Identify and describe the basic forms of international business activities • Discuss the causes of globalization • Understand the growing role of emerging markets in the global economy Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 2
    • 3. What Is International Business? Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 3
    • 4. Differences in Domestic and International Business Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 4 Boundaries Currencies Legal Systems Cultures Resources Skills and Knowledge
    • 5. Summary of Discussion Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 5
    • 6. Why Study International Business? Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 6
    • 7. Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 7 Motivation for Study • Business Skills • Future Competitors • Business Techniques • Cultural Literacy
    • 8. Summary of Discussion Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 8
    • 9. International Business Activities Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 9
    • 10. Exporting and Importing Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 10 Tangible Intangible Merchandise Visible Trade Services Invisible Trade
    • 11. International Investments Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 11 Supply of Investment Capital For the Purpose of Active Control For a Purpose Other than Control FDI FPI  
    • 12. Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 12 International Licensing International Franchising Management Contracting Other Business Activity
    • 13. International Business Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 13 Cross-Border Commercial Transactions Multinational Corporation (MNC) Multinational Enterprise (MNE) Multinational Organization (MNO)
    • 14. Summary of Discussion Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 14
    • 15. The Era of Globalization Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 15
    • 16. Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 16 World Exports as a Percentage of World GDP 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 WorldExports/WorldGDP World Exports of Goods World Exports of Goods and Services
    • 17. 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 FDI/WorldGDP Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 17 Stock of FDI Relative to World GDP
    • 18. Environmental Changes Strategic Imperatives The Contemporary Causes of Globalization Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 18
    • 19. Strategic Imperatives Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 19 Core Competency Resources and Supplies Industry RivalsNew Markets
    • 20. Environmental Causes of Globalization Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 20 Political Changes General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) The World Trade Organization (WTO) European Union, Mercosur Accord, and NAFTA
    • 21. Environmental Causes of Globalization Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 21 Technological Changes Improved Communication Technology Improved Transportation Methods Improved Information Processing
    • 22. Summary of Discussion Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 22
    • 23. Globalization and Emerging Markets Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 23
    • 24. Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 24 • First World • Second World • Third World The Global Marketplace During the Cold War
    • 25. Emerging Markets Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 25 • BRIC Countries • Big Ten Countries • Non-High Income Countries
    • 26. Summary of Discussion Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 26
    • 27. An Overview of the Contents of This Book Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 27
    • 28. Part 1: Includes Chapters 1 – 5 Part 2: Includes Chapters 6 – 10 Part 3: Includes Chapters 11 – 15 Part 4: Includes Chapters 16 – 19 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 28 Structure of the Contents
    • 29. Summary of Discussion Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 29
    • 30. Chapter 1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 30 An Overview of International Business
    • 31. Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1 - 31 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America.

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