Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Swpbs past present future
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Swpbs past present future

1,665
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,665
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • “Drowning Frogs”“Green to Yellow to Red” Cards“Full to partial to limited” privileges
  • NOTICE GREEN GOES IS FOR “ALL”
  • NOTICE GREEN GOES IS FOR “ALL”
  • NOTICE GREEN GOES IS FOR “ALL”Baker, 2005 JPBI
  • NOTICE GREEN GOES IS FOR “ALL”Baker, 2005 JPBI
  • NOTICE GREEN GOES IS FOR “ALL”Baker, 2005 JPBI
  • NOTICE GREEN GOES IS FOR “ALL”
  • Research to Practice is dependent on good research.
  • Transcript

    • 1. SWPBS: Past, Present, & Future
      George Sugai
      OSEP Center on PBIS
      Center for Behavioral Education & Research
      University of Connecticut
      June 25 2011
      www.pbis.org www.scalingup.org www.cber.org
    • 2. PURPOSE
      Examination of current SWPBS practices, systems, & outcomes in context of early influences & future directions
      • Keynote overview: All
      • 3. Follow-up: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators
      • 4. Coaching: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators
      • 5. Brief History
      • 6. Foundations
      • 7. Implementation
      • 8. Example
    • “Notes to Self”
    • 9. Problem Statement
      “We give schools strategies & systems for improving practice & outcomes, but implementation is not accurate, consistent, or durable, & desired outcomes aren’t realized. School personnel & teams need more than exposure, practice, & enthusiasm.”
    • 10. Brief PBIS History
    • 11. Special Education & BD
    • 12. “Abbreviated” SWPBS History
    • 13. SWPBS Foundations
    • 14. “Big Ideas” from Early Years
    • 15. “Early Triangle”(p. 201)Walker, Knitzer, Reid, et al., CDC
    • 16. Guskey, 1986, p. 59
    • 17. SWPBS Logic!
      Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, durable, scalable, & logical for all students
      (Zins & Ponti, 1990)
    • 18. “BIG PICTURE”
    • 19. 12 Basics
    • 20. Basics
    • 21. 1. Invest in prevention
    • 22. Redesign of teaching environments…not students
    • 23. 2. Teach, supervise, reinforce
    • 24. 2. NATURAL CONTEXT
      1. SOCIAL SKILL
      Expectations
      3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES
    • 25. 3. Emphasize implementation framework, not curriculum
    • 26. SWPBS (aka PBIS/RtI) is
      Framework
    • 27. Team
      GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”
      Agreements
      Data-based
      Action Plan
      Implementation
      Evaluation
    • 28. 4. Integrate outcome, data, practices, & systems
    • 29. Integrated
      Elements
      Supporting Social Competence &
      Academic Achievement
      OUTCOMES
      15
      Supporting
      Decision
      Making
      Supporting
      Staff Behavior
      DATA
      SYSTEMS
      PRACTICES
      Supporting
      Student Behavior
    • 30. 5. Invest in multi-tiered prevention logic
    • 31. Tertiary Prevention:
      Specialized
      Individualized
      Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior
      CONTINUUM OF
      SCHOOL-WIDE
      INSTRUCTIONAL &
      POSITIVE BEHAVIOR
      SUPPORT
      FEW
      ~5%
      Secondary Prevention:
      Specialized Group
      Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior
      ~15%
      SOME
      Primary Prevention:
      School-/Classroom-
      Wide Systems for
      All Students,
      Staff, & Settings
      23
      ALL
      ~80% of Students
    • 32. 23
      Continuum of Support for ALL
      Few
      Some
      All
      Dec 7, 2007
    • 33. Continuum of Support for ALL
      “Theora”
      Math
      Science
      Spanish
      Reading
      Soc skills
      Soc Studies
      Basketball
      Label behavior…not people
      Dec 7, 2007
    • 34. Continuum of Support for ALL:
      “Molcom”
      Anger man.
      Prob Sol.
      Ind. play
      Adult rel.
      Self-assess
      Attend.
      Coop play
      Peer interac
      Label behavior…not people
      Dec 7, 2007
    • 35. Implementation Framework
    • 36. 6. Adopt doable implementation “blueprint” or approach
    • 37. Implementation Levels
      State
      District
      School
      Classroom
      Student
    • 38. www.scalingup.org
      Dean Fixsen
      Karen Blase
      UNC
    • 39. SWPBS Implementation Blueprint
      www.pbis.org
    • 40. 7. Embed “Response-to-Intervention” logic & principles
    • 41. RtI
    • 42. Intensive, Individual Interventions
      • Individual Students
      • 43. Assessment-based
      • 44. High Intensity
      Intensive, Individual Interventions
      • Individual Students
      • 45. Assessment-based
      • 46. Intense, durable procedures
      Targeted Group Interventions
      • Some students (at-risk)
      • 47. High efficiency
      • 48. Rapid response
      Targeted Group Interventions
      • Some students (at-risk)
      • 49. High efficiency
      • 50. Rapid response
      Universal Interventions
      • All students
      • 51. Preventive, proactive
      Universal Interventions
      • All settings, all students
      • 52. Preventive, proactive
      Responsiveness to Intervention
      Academic Systems
      Behavioral Systems
      1-5%
      1-5%
      5-10%
      5-10%
      80-90%
      80-90%
      Circa 1996
    • 53. Responsiveness to Intervention
    • 54. Continuum of Support for ALL
      “IFB School”
      Literacy
      School Climate
      Technology
      Numeracy
      Social Studies
      Writing
      Attendance
      Specials
      Science
      Align supports
      Dec 7, 2007
    • 55. Continuum of Support for ALL
      “District: Literacy”
      Trek E.S.
      Bianchi M.S.
      Jamis E.S.
      Masi H.S.
      Serrota E.S.
      Look M.S.
      Look M.S.
      Davidson M.S.
      Specials
      Science
      Align supports
      Dec 7, 2007
    • 56. Teacher Practice
      Student Behavior
      CONTEXT
      or
      SETTING
      Continua of Responsiveness & Support
      District Operations
      School Reform
    • 57. 8. Integrateliteracy & behaviorimplementation & supports
    • 58. Elementary School Suspension Rate
      PBIS in Virginia
    • 59. Elementary School
      Improvements in behavior can be associated with improvements in academic outcomes
      PBIS in Virginia
    • 60. Bob Algozzine
      NC Positive Behavior Support Initiative
      Schools w/ Low ODRs & High Academic Outcomes
      Proportion of Students Meeting State Academic Standard
      Office Discipline Referrals per 100 Students
      PBIS in North Carolina
    • 61. Academic-Behavior Connection
      Algozzine, B., Wang, C., & Violette, A. S. (2011). Reexamining the relationship between academic achievement and social behavior. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 13, 3-16.
      Burke, M. D., Hagan-Burke, S., & Sugai, G. (2003). The efficacy of function-based interventions for students with learning disabilities who exhibit escape-maintained problem behavior: Preliminary results from a single case study. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 26, 15-25.
      McIntosh, K., Chard, D. J., Boland, J. B., & Horner, R. H. (2006). Demonstration of combined efforts in school-wide academic and behavioral systems and incidence of reading and behavior challenges in early elementary grades. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 8, 146-154.
      McIntosh, K., Horner, R. H., Chard, D. J., Dickey, C. R., and Braun, D. H. (2008). Reading skills and function of problem behavior in typical school settings. Journal of Special Education, 42, 131-147.
      Nelson, J. R., Johnson, A., & Marchand-Martella, N. (1996). Effects of direct instruction, cooperative learning, and independent learning practices on the classroom behavior of students with behavioral disorders: A comparative analysis. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 4, 53-62.
      Wang, C., & Algozzine, B. (2011). Rethinking the relationship between reading and behavior in early elementary school. Journal of Educational Research, 104, 100-109.
    • 62. “Viewed as outcomes, achievement and behavior are related; viewed as causes of each other, achievement and behavior are unrelated. In this context, teaching behavior as relentlessly as we teach reading or other academic content is the ultimate act of prevention, promise, and power underlying PBS and other preventive interventions in America’s schools.”
      Algozzine, Wang, & Violette (2011), p. 16.
    • 63. 23
      Behavior Continuum
      Academic Continuum
      RTI
      Integrated Continuum
      Mar 10 2010
    • 64. 9. Align professional development & support with implementation phase
    • 65. Where are you in implementation process?Adapted from Fixsen & Blase, 2005
    • 66. 10. Implement evidence-based practice with fidelity
    • 67. Start
      w/
      What Works
      Focus on Fidelity
      Detrich, Keyworth, & States (2007). J. Evid.-based Prac. in Sch.
    • 68. Maximum Student Benefits
      Fixsen & Blase, 2009
    • 69. RCT & Group Design PBIS Studies
      Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Thornton, L.A., & Leaf, P.J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), 100-115
      Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Bevans, K.B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), 462-473.
      Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, 133-148.
      Bradshaw, C.P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K.B., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, 1-26.
      Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, 133-145.
      Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), 1-14.
    • 70.
      • Reduced major disciplinary infractions
      • 71. Improvements in academic achievement
      • 72. Enhanced perception of organizational health & safety
      • 73. Improved school climate
      • 74. Reductions in teacher reported bullying behavior
    • 11. Work smarter by doing a few effective things very well
    • 75. Sample Teaming Matrix
      Are outcomes measurable?
    • 76. 17
      SWPBS
      Practices
      School-wide
      Classroom
      Family
      Non-classroom
      • Smallest #
      • 77. Evidence-based
      • 78. Biggest, durable effect
      Student
    • 79.
    • 80. ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS
      TERTIARY PREVENTION
      • Function-based support
      • 81. Wraparound
      • 82. Person-centered planning
      TERTIARY PREVENTION
      ~5%
      ~15%
      SECONDARY PREVENTION
      • Check in/out
      • 83. Targeted social skills instruction
      • 84. Peer-based supports
      • 85. Social skills club
      SECONDARY PREVENTION
      PRIMARY PREVENTION
      • Teach SW expectations
      • 86. Proactive SW discipline
      • 87. Positive reinforcement
      • 88. Effective instruction
      • 89. Parent engagement
      PRIMARY PREVENTION
      ~80% of Students
    • 90. 12. Guide decisions with data
    • 91. Data Decision Making
    • 92. 13. Consider Context & Culture
    • 93.
    • 94. 2011+ Basic Big Ideas
    • 95. Implementation Example: Bullying Prevention
    • 96. Bullying Program Component Review Purpose
    • 97. Preliminary Conclusions
    • 98.
    • 99.
    • 100. PREVENTION
      De-emphasis on adding consequence for problem behavior
    • 101. Initiator
      Target
      Context
      or
      Setting
      Continuum of Behavior Fluency
      Staff
      Bystander
    • 102. Four basic strategies….if you do nuthin’ else….
    • 103. Doesn’t Work
      Works
      Label student
      Exclude student
      Blame family
      Punish student
      Assign restitution
      Ask for apology
      Teach targeted social skills
      Reward social skills
      Teach all
      Individualize for non-responsive behavior
      Invest in positive school-wide culture
    • 104.
    • 105. www.pbis.org
    • 106.
    • 107.
    • 108. Non-Classroom Management: Self-Assessment
    • 109.
    • 110.
    • 111.
    • 112. 2011+ Basic Big Ideas