Cispb010  final (8-10)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Cispb010 final (8-10)

on

  • 895 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
895
Views on SlideShare
895
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Cispb010 final (8-10) Document Transcript

  • 1. Years 8-10Protective Behaviours: EarlyRefining skills for life AdolescenceHealth and Physical Featured text Chicken Soup forEducation the Kid’s SoulProtective Behaviours: Refining skills for life is a programof work intended for use by teachers of students in Years8-10. It provides teaching strategies linked to the EarlyAdolescence (8-10) Syllabus scope and sequencestatements. Teachers should use their professionaljudgement to decide how much of the content to addresswith any particular class according to the students’ needsand abilities.Chicken Soup for the Kid’s Soul: 101 stories ofcourage, hope and laughter for kids aged 8-12By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Patty Hansen andIrene DunlapThis book contains a collection of courageous stories writtenby children, teenagers and celebrities. The stories covertopics of persistence, relationships, problem-solving, goalsetting and decision making. Chicken Soup for the Kid’s Soul by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Patty Hansen and Irene Dunlap, published by Health Communication Inc. Reproduced with permission of Health Communication Inc.Lesson plans developed by Protective Behaviours WA(Inc), Senior Editor, Justine OMalley in collaboration withthe Department of Education WA.This resource contains various images from© Thinkstock, 2010 and © Department of Education,Western Australia, 2010 used under licence. CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS
  • 2. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Table of contents Overview 1 About this resource 2 What do I need to know? 3 Importance of teaching 8 Protective Behaviours Content focus 17 What will I do in my 21 classroom? Lesson plans 21 Resources 58 1 What if..? Questions to promote problem solving 117 skills Teacher toolkit 120 Teacher toolkit templates 134 Protective Behaviours 157 order formCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS
  • 3. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Lesson themes Theme 1: We all have the right to feel safe at ALL times Overview Theme 2: We can talk with someone about anything no matter what it is Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Theme 1 Theme 1 Theme 1 Developing a range of Early warning signs Stages of safety continuum feelings Safe and unsafe risk taking Minimising risk Rights and responsibilities Lesson 4 Lesson 5 Lesson 6 Theme 2 Theme 2 Theme 2 Safe versus unsafe secrets Networks Definition of persistence Minimising risk scenarios How to talk/listen to Persistence as a strategy someone on your network Lesson 7 Lesson 8 Lesson 9 Lesson 10 Theme 2 Theme 2 Theme 2 Program review Public versus private Safe and unsafe touches Assertiveness Review of personal network Internet safety Personal space Saying noCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours – Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 1
  • 4. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence About this resourceProtective Behaviours: Refining skills for life is a series of ten lessons which encourages thelearning and development of skills for life in order for students to feel, be and keep safe.Teachers are encouraged to implement the full series of ten lessons into their schoolprogram to ensure that the content identified in the Health and Physical Educationlearning area of the Early Adolescence (8-10) Syllabus is addressed. Lessons can betaught in isolation but would not address the full range of content. Cross curricular activitiesand opportunities have been included in the program. If you feel uncomfortable teachingcertain aspects of the Protective Behaviours program, there are a number of agencies thatare available to teach the content or assist you with the delivery of the content. Phase/s of Learning Early Childhood Middle Childhood Early Adolescence Late Adolescence 8-10 Learning Area/s Languages The Arts English H&PE Mathematics Science S&E T&E (LOTE) x Values Pursuit of Respect & knowledge & Self acceptance concern for Social & civic Environmental commitment to & respect of self others & their responsibility responsibility achievement of rights potential x x x xThis resource includes: advice to teachers about the resource the focus of teaching showing links to the Early Adolescence (8-10) Syllabus an overview of lessons and related resources learning and teaching activities, monitoring suggestions and supporting resourcesTeachers should use their professional judgement to decide how much of the contentto address with their particular class.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 2
  • 5. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence What do I need to know?ChildrenChildren enter the classroom bringing with them experiences gained from their family,community, culture and place. They bring their diverse experiences, perspectives,expectations, knowledge and skills to their learning. It is important that teachers ascertainchildren’s prior knowledge before beginning a program of work to determine ways ofsupporting all children to learn.Opportunities to work in pairs and in large and small groups provide contexts for children toengage in oral language build new relationships and co-operate with others. They learn tocommunicate their needs and emotions while recognising and being aware of the needs andemotions of others. Research shows that students are more likely to use and understand alife skill that they have practiced repeatedly. It is also important that students are madeaware if and when they are using a life skill in order that they better understand that life skillscan be used in a range of situations. These skills need to be taught throughout all phases oflearning over a range of contexts and situations in order that students have opportunities topractice, understand and master them.TeacherTeaching Protective Behaviours – some fundamental principlesWhen introducing and teaching Protective Behaviours, teachers must ensure that the contentof the program is supported and reflected in the creation of a safe learning environment.More information on strategies for teaching a Protective Behaviours program can be found inthe Teacher toolkit section of this program.Supporting Aboriginal childrenAboriginal children generally enter the school learning environment with a rich culturalbackground and as proficient communicators in their home language. While some childrenmay have little or no understanding of English, others may understand and use an Englishdialect (Aboriginal English). Aboriginal children are more likely to thrive in a classroom inwhich their cultural background and home language is acknowledged and respected.Immersion in oral language in intended teaching and play contexts enhances the ability ofAboriginal children to learn in Standard Australian English (SAE). Continually rephrasing andrestating and providing visual cues in the form of photographs, illustrations anddemonstrations increase the likelihood of children understanding and participating inexplanations, discussions and conversations in SAE.Aboriginal children may need support in asking and responding to direct questions. Providingexplanations before asking direct questions ensures that every child has the opportunity torespond and experience success (eg This is the title. The title tells us the name of the story.What is this?). Aboriginal children are more likely to respond to questions if they understandwhy they are being asked questions (eg I want to know what you know, I do not know a lotabout home talk so I need you to tell me).For further information on supporting Aboriginal children, teachers are advised to access thefollowing resources via the Department portal: Aboriginal languages resource file (Resource ID: DETK102110) contains an online gallery of images suitable for printing and photocopyingCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 3
  • 6. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Aboriginal perspectives across the curriculum (APAC) provides information on how to broaden and deepen children’s and teachers’ understandings of Aboriginal cultures and ways of being. It can be accessed at det.wa.edu.au/education/apac Embedding Indigenous perspectives across the curriculum is a national project that supports teachers in exploring and better understanding the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ distinct values, histories, languages, cultural beliefs and practices: embeddingindigenousperspectives.edu.auIt is important that approaches to protective behaviour strategies take the culturalbackgrounds of the students (and their families/carers) into respectful consideration. This isespecially important if the norms of behaviour of the school are not consistent with those ofthe home. These norms can include any area such as parenting, discipline, social dynamicsor language. The difference in behaviours and expectations between home and school maynot only cause confusion for the students, but it may also cause friction with the families.When giving advice, any of the specific challenges and stressors that face families who areculturally and linguistically diverse must be taken into account. These challenges include: Migration stress; Acculturative stress; Displaced sense of belonging and cultural identity; Perceived or experienced racism and discrimination; Intergenerational conflict; Low standard Australian English proficiency; Insufficient awareness of institutional systems and local services available; Loss or lack of extended family, social and community supports; Negative previous experiences in education; Poor settlement experience in period after arrival in new country, and Socioeconomic disadvantage. (Adapted from Sawrikar, 2009)Therefore approaching advice must be done with care. A qualified cultural mediator who maybe, for example, a respected elder in the community, an appropriate community member whospeaks the same language as the those concerned or a local Aboriginal and IslanderEducation Officer (for Aboriginal students) will be able to greatly assist in dealingwith protective behaviour strategies.The learning, teaching, assessment cycleThe learning, teaching, assessment cycle begins with what the children know and can do.Therefore it is recommended that teachers gather quality information about the abilities oftheir children before beginning any program of work. This information will guide teachers inusing their professional judgement to decide on when to introduce content based onchildren’s prior learning and achievement.The following resources are recommended to assist teachers in providing a differentiatedcurriculum for children in their classes and can be found via the Department portal: Early Childhood (K-3) Syllabus scope and sequence documents provide advice on what to teach children at each year level in all eight learning areas. Some pre-primary children may be ready to learn and be taught content for Year 1. Literacy and Numeracy Resources are practical resources that have been developed to support teachers to improve the literacy and numeracy skills of children.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 4
  • 7. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Literacy Net and Numeracy Net can be used to track the development of children and assist teachers in making judgements about what to teach. First Steps Literacy and First Steps Numeracy materials help teachers to be more strategic about what to teach, how to teach it, when to teach it and, more importantly, why.Otitis mediaThe ability to hear the sounds of the English language is critical for literacy learning. Otitismedia (middle ear infection) may result in conductive hearing loss and can have a severeimpact on learning. One of the strategies for decreasing the occurrence of otitis media isBreathe, Blow, Cough (BBC). Information on otitis media and BBC can be found on theAboriginal Education Directorate web page on the Department of Education website -det.wa.edu.au/aboriginaleducation/detcms/portal.Resources used in the programResource kitTeachers/schools have the option to purchase a resource kit from Protective Behaviours WAto support the program. A Protective Behaviours WA resource order form has been includedat the end of this resource. The prices of resources and their availability are correct at timeof writing.BooksCastle, C 2000, For Every Child, Phyllis Fogelman Books, New YorkKrovatin, C 2004, The Best Ghost Stories Ever, Turtleback Books, St Louis USAJohnsen, K 1986, The Trouble with Secrets, Parenting Press Inc, Seattle, Washington USAThomas, R 2002, The Paper Bag Baby, Red Fox, London UKCanfield, J, Hansen, M, Hansen & P, Dunlap, I 1998, Chicken Soup for the Kid’s Soul: 101Stories of Courage, Hope and Laughter, Health Communications Inc, Deerfield Beach,Florida USAMarsden, J 1993, Tomorrow, When the War Began, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaMarsden, J 1994, The Dead of the Night, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaMarsden, J 1995, The Third Day, the Frost, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaMarsden, J 1996, Darkness be my Friend, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaMarsden, J 1997, Burning for Revenge, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaMarsden, J 1998, The Night is for Hunting, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaMarsden, J 1999, The Other Side of the Dawn, Pan Macmillan Publishers, AustraliaOther useful resourcesSongsThere are many songs that can be used to develop the concepts of Protective Behaviours.Specific songs about Protective Behaviours can be purchased from Protective BehavioursWA. Teachers can also source many engaging songs that have meaning to the topics andconcepts of Protective Behaviours.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 5
  • 8. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceThe CD Sing yourself safe is a useful resource which compliments the themes and learningexperiences in the Protective Behaviours program. A copy of the first verse and chorus ofthese songs has been included in as resource 27. The songs cover topics of early warningsigns, feelings, feeling safe, saying no, public and private, persistence and secrets. The CDcan be purchased from Safe4Kids, Protective Behaviours WA and Wooldridges.Other songs used in the resource include:‘Wibbly the wombat’ by Jayne HeskettBooksAbdel-Fattah, R 2006, Ten things I Hate About Me, Pan Macmillan Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney,AustraliaBrugman, A 2002, Walking Naked, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, AustraliaByars, B 1973, The Eighteenth Emergency, The Bodley Head, United KingdomDumbleton, M 2003, Watch Out for Jamie Joel, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, AustraliaMurphy, K 2005, The King of Whatever, Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Camberwell, VictoriaPaterson, K 1977, Bridge to Terabithia, Harper Collins, United KingdomWebsitesChild Health Promotion Research Centre – established at Edith Cowan University, WesternAustralia, to improve the overall physical, emotional, mental health and well-being of childrenand young people and their families through high-quality, applied research. Website at:http://www.chprc.ecu.edu.auSummary of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child from the UNICEF website athttp://www.unicef.orgThinkUKnowhttp://www.thinkyouknow.org.auThe Linehttp://www.theline.gov.auCybersmarthttp://www.cybersmart.gov.auProtective Behaviours WAhttp://www.protectivebehaviourswa.org.au/Children’s Safety Australia website: posters and other resourceshttp://www.childsafety.org.au/resources.htmlSafe4Kidshttp://www.safe4kids.com.auChildwisehttp://www.childwise.netCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 6
  • 9. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceTeacher resourcesLaws, C & Moore, A 2009, Protective Behaviours: Early Learning, The Protective BehavioursConsultancy Group of NSW, Sydney.Children’s Protections Society 2003, Protective behaviours: A personal safety program,Lesson Plan level: 1 & 2, Children’s Protections Society, West Heidelberg, Vic.Teacher resources accessible though the Department of Education websiteBreathe, Blow, CoughCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 7
  • 10. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Importance of teaching Protective BehavioursBackground informationProtective Behaviours: Refining skills for life is a living skills and personal safety program.The aim is to strengthen the resilience of students as they grow and develop.It focuses on giving students life skills to protect themselves from abusive situations and onteaching students to avoid a wide range of potentially unsafe situations.Why do we need Protective Behaviours? Because 96% of abused children are abused by someone known and trusted by them (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2000-2001). 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 7 boys are sexually abused in Australia before they reach the age of 18 (Australian Institute of Criminology 2004). To help protect children as we simply cannot be with them every minute of the day. To empower children with the right to feel safe and act to keep themselves safe. To give children and adults permission to talk about problems they face. 1 in 5 respondents lacked confidence/knowledge on what to do if they suspected child abuse (Australian Childhood Foundation Report 2006). Only 3% of children will ever tell of their abuse (Savi Report 2004).What does Protective Behaviours aim to do?Statistical data shows that students are more likely to be harmed by someone they knowrather than someone they do not know.There are many personal safety issues that our students are exposed to. We are now moreaware of the physical and emotional trauma of bullying, cyber bullying, exclusions, sexualabuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse and living with domestic violence.Our students are potentially exposed to a wide range of situations that put them at risk thatcould cause them short and long term physical and emotional harm and violate their basicrights.Teaching preventative strategies is a proactive way to strengthen our students’ ability to keepthemselves safe and minimise risk. It is important students develop personal safety andresilience skills from a well presented and structured program.For child abuse prevention programs to be of value they need to be taught over time andconstantly reinforced.Protective Behaviours can be used by students and adults to keep themselves safe andworks towards reducing violence in the community.It provides the basis for helping students be safe and stay safe from the risks that surroundus in everyday lives.The Protective Behaviours beliefs and skills: are lifelong; are for a range of places where we might be unsafe – at home, at school, in the community; and can be applied to a range of unsafe situations including physical abuse, family violence, sexual abuse, bullying, emotional abuse and verbal abuse.How is Abuse Categorised?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 8
  • 11. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescencePhysical abuseDeliberate, ill treatment commonly characterised by physical injury and harm. Physical harmor maltreatment is caused to the child as a result of practices such as biting, beating,shaking, scalding, burning, punching, kicking, shoving and breaking bones.Physical indicators of physical abuse: Bruises Welts Burns Cuts Missing teeth Fractures Self mutilation Clumps of hair missing Bite marks SwellingBehavioural indicators of physical abuse: Fear of going home Injuries that are not consistent with the explanation that the child gave Evasive answers to questions Avoidance of issues, questions and situations Disclosure of abuse directly to a teacher or adult or indirectly to friendSexual abuseSexual abuse is when an adult or young person uses their power, authority or force toinvolve a child in sexual activity. Includes a range of behaviours including oral sex; touching a child’s genitals; exhibitionism; any form of penetration; any exposure to or involvement in child pornography; molesting; and fondling.Physical indicators of sexual abuse: Bruises or bleeding in genital area Blood stained underwear Pregnancy or fear of pregnancy Urinary tract infections Pain, swelling or itching in genital area Sexually transmitted infectionCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 9
  • 12. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Massive weight changeBehavioural indicators of sexual abuse: Disclosure of involvement in sexual activity directly to an adult Indirectly disclosing to a friend or acquaintance Possession of pornographic material Reluctance to change clothes in front of others Inappropriate sex play or premature understanding of sex Threatened by physical contact, closeness Fear of going home Injuries that are not consistent with the explanation that the child gave States of fear are evident, eg. anxiety, depression, socially withdrawn Poor peer relationships Inappropriate expressions of affection Evidence of sexual themes evident in play, artwork, stories or actionsEmotional AbuseWhere persistent and consistent inappropriate behaviour undermines and erodes theemotional development and wellbeing of an individual. Involves such abuse as humiliation,intimidation and threats.Physical indicators of emotional abuse: Symptoms of stress Bedwetting Diarrhoea Lethargy or fatigue Eating disorders Psychosomatic complaints Failure to thrive Speech disordersBehavioural Indicators: Mental or emotional developmental lags Behaviours inappropriate for age Poor peer relationships Extreme attention seeking behaviours Run away attempts Attempted suicide Low self esteemCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 10
  • 13. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Truancy or school avoidance Excessive shyness or withdrawal Severe depression Violence is a subject for art or writing Habit disordersNeglectThe failure to provide reasonable care where the result can be detrimental to developmentand wellbeing. Children may be neglected when they do not receive food, care and attention.Physical indicators: Unexplained bruises Poor hygiene Constant fatigue Consistent hunger Inappropriate dress Inadequate nutrition Unattended medical needs Developmental delaysBehavioural Indicators: Self destructive Frequently absent Tardiness Regular displays of fatigue Early arrival at school or reluctant to leaveIt is important to note that not any single indicator proves that abuse is taking place, but therepeated presence of an indicator or a combination of indicators should raise concerns toeducators of the possibility of abuse.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 11
  • 14. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceProtective Behaviours themes Theme 1 Theme 2 We all have the right to We can talk with someone about feel safe at all times anything no matter what it is Key Concepts Key Concepts Early Warning Signs Safety Networks Body signals Feeling safe Asking for help Specific, internal, Recognising safety Relationships physical sensations Rights and Communicating with Feelings and responsibilities and supporting others reactions Secrets and surprises Inviting people to be Minimising risk on your network Safety continuum Persistence Personal spaceStrategies for teaching Protective Behaviours1. Desensitised early warning signsWhen reviewing early warning signs it is necessary to consider that not all students mayexperience early warning signs for a variety of reasons. Some students may have becomedesensitised through previous or current traumatic experiences or have sensory disorders.The concept of early warning signs is expanded beyond physical responses of the body tounsafe situations to include emotional responses and external indicators such as time orlocation2. Creating the learning environmentIt is important that teachers are provided with the skills and strategies to build an atmosphereof trust and confidence.Protective Behaviours education can generate strong feelings, therefore it is important thatthe teacher is resourced with strategies and skills to emphasise strengths and positivefeelings, develop trust and build communication.Such strategies include: Parent/caregiver involvement Group norms Ground rules One step removed Protective Interrupting Language of safety Network review Persistence Theme reinforcement Teacher supportCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 12
  • 15. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Parent/carer involvement Even though parental consent is not necessary, parents still need to be informed about the curriculum content and how they may be involved in reinforcing the themes. Group norms Group norms are behaviours that form part of regular classroom activities. They include the behaviours formed from group discussions and are usually generated by the students themselves. Group norms are part of a protective strategy to prevent disclosure of personal or distressing events. Examples of group norms include: listening to others; talk when it is your turn; don’t talk about something that has happened to yourself or your family; if you don’t want to talk about something – you don’t have too, just pass. Ground rules Establish ground rules. This is important as it helps provide a safe environment for students to express their opinions. These can include: o Only one person to talk at a time o Use appropriate language – this includes appropriate terminology o Racially or sexist language o Show respect for the views of others o Allow everyone to express their views One step removed One step removed is a third person strategy that allows students to practise a skill in a non-threatening situation without disclosing personal or family information. Students are presented with a potentially abusive situation such as a story or picture and asked what the person could do to keep safe. For younger students puppets, songs and scenarios could be used to problem solve. Questions could include, ’What could someone do to keep safe?’ or ‘What if …….. What could they do then?’ Protective interrupting Protective interrupting is a strategy to prevent students from making a personal disclosure in a situation where the student or others who may be exposed to the disclosure are vulnerable. The teacher must interrupt the student and invite them to talk privately as soon as possible after the lesson. Protective interrupting involves the following steps: 1. Interrupt the child by acknowledging them and preventing further disclosure (eg ‘Thank you, it sounds as though you have something important to talk about, why dont we have a chat at recess?’) 2. Be supportive and gently indicate that the child can talk in a more private situation. 3. Quietly arrange to see the child as soon as possible. 4. Listen attentively in a private location within the school and reassure the child that telling was the right thing to do. 5. If abuse is disclosed, explain to the child that because they are being harmed you need to make sure they are safe and gain some help for them. Do not promise the child you will keep it secret. 6. Reassure the child that the abuse was not their fault. 7. Explain what is likely to happen next. 8. Complete the school reporting form for child abuse as soon as possible. Language of safety The language of safety includes verbal and non-verbal messages that will create a safe environment. Language that is respectful, empowering, non-threatening, and inclusive and promotes communication is a core element of developing protective behaviours.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 13
  • 16. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence The teacher should model and students encouraged to use language that is not abusive, racist, sexist, violent or victimising. Language can be used to build self-worth, confidence and problem solving. Network review Students need to identify a number of trusted people who they can talk to. Students who are isolated may experience difficulty in developing a network and should be made aware of services available. Networks must be reviewed regularly to ensure that people are suitable, willing and available. Persistence This is a strategy where students are persistent in seeking help or taking action with a person on their network. If a child is not satisfied with the response of one person, they try the next person until they feel that they have been heard and got the help needed to feel safe. Theme reinforcement Theme reinforcement is used to ensure that the message is emphasised and clearly understood. The themes need to be continually repeated throughout the Protective Behaviour lessons and ideally across all learning areas throughout the curriculum. Examples of achieving theme reinforcement include: posters, songs or stories. Teacher support Teaching protective behaviours may arouse feelings that cause distress or concern. Teachers should ensure that they have developed their own personal network of trusted people with whom they can discuss their reactions or concerns. Counselling is available to metropolitan and country teachers through the Prime Employee Assistance Program.3. Responding to disclosuresOne of the objectives of the Protective Behaviours program is to increase a child’s helpseeking behaviours such as telling a person on their network if they feel unsafe. Teachersmay experience feelings of shock, anger and helplessness. It is important to conceal thesefeelings as your reactions may adversely affect the child concerned.Do Reassure the child that telling was the right thing to do. Allow the child to tell the story in their own words. Use protective interrupting if their disclosure is in an inappropriate situation. Find a quiet place to talk. Let the child know what will happen next.Don’t Dismiss or ignore the disclosure. Put words in the child’s mouth, push for details or investigate as this could jeopardise the interviewing process of DCP and WA Police. Make the child repeat the disclosure to the principal or third party. Stop the child from talking even though you may have heard enough to make a report. Promise not to tell. Confront the person believed to be the abuser. Engage in general staffroom discussion about the disclosure.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 14
  • 17. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence4. Skills for lifeResearch shows that students are more likely to use and understand a life skill that they aremade aware of. It has been proven that students need to rehearse and practise these skillsin order to better understand how to use them effectively. It is important to teach thestudents the names of the skills, as well as how to utilise them in a real situation. Learningthe name of a skill will help students to recall on it when needed.The Department of Education K-10 Syllabus states that life skills can be taught as standalone topics or can be integrated throughout a Health program. The Protective Behaviours:Refining skills for life program engages both these methods to help students develop thefollowing skills for life in order to empower the students and promote resilience. Helpful and positive thinking- which involves skills such as: o understanding links between thoughts/feelings and behaviour; and o positive self-talk. Understanding emotions- which involves skills such as: o being aware of a range of feelings; o regulating their own feelings; and o reading others’ emotions. Resourcefulness- which involves skills such as: o problem predicting and problem solving; o decision making; o goal setting; and o persistence. Relationship skills- which involves skills such as: o group skills; o help seeking and disclosure; and o assertive communication. Self-understanding- which involves skills such as: o knowing their own values and how to stand up for them; and o self-reflection.A successful method for encouraging students to learn and practise these life skills is to havethem on display in the classroom. At the closure to each lesson, teachers can refer back tothese displays and articulate with the students which skills were being practised. A Skills forlife poster has been included in the resources section to put on display in the classroom. Theposter can be kept on display throughout the program to provide the teacher and thestudents with a reference of the skills for life they will be practising.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 15
  • 18. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Preventive Education and the Health Promoting Schools FrameworkThe Health Promoting Schools Framework (World Health Organisation, 1986) is widely recognised as a best practice model of promoting health within a school community. This framework suggests that positive health outcomes are much more likely when classroom health education is complemented and reinforced by a supportive school environment and effective links to family and the community. Curriculum professional development Ethos and environment for school staff Whole-school approach to protective behaviours, skills for life, Online Professional Learning Protective Behaviours resilience and safety education Online Professional Learning Child Protection Promote a safe, supportive school environment Background information package in resources Promote resilience HPE Newsletter Protective Behaviours Safety Guidelines and action plans Professional Learning Seminars Procedures for student support and incident management SDERA Professional Learning Help to identify support roles in the school community Promote and facilitate student and staff well-being Resources linked to HPE Learning Area outcomes Preventative Education content planned across all year levels Protective Behaviours K/PP Package A planned comprehensive cross-curricular approach to preventive Protective Behaviours Years 1-3 Package education across all year levels Protective Behaviours Years 4-7 Package All staff members understand they have a responsibility for Protective Behaviours Years 8-10 Package Protective Behaviours Education in a context of Respectful Relationships Education and National Safe Schools Framework Growing and Developing Healthy Relationships Specific policies related to child protection Mind Matters SDERA Challenges and Choices (K-10) SDERA Getting it together(Drug and Road Education) Keeping in Touch Curriculum Framework K10 HPE Syllabus Overview K10 HPE Integrated Scope and Sequence Parents/caregiver and community Curriculum Overview Information flyer sent to parents Parent information evenings Parent tab on school website with Protective Behaviours information Forums Information in school newsletters Links with community agencies (eg Child Protection , PBWA) CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 16
  • 19. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Content focusThe content focus for Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life consists of scope and sequence statements from the Early Adolescence (8-10)Syllabus. Teachers will continue to make professional judgements about when to introduce content based on students’ prior learning andachievement.Health and Physical Education YEAR 8 YEAR 9 YEAR 10Context and topics Content Context and topics Content Context and topics ContentWellness Knowledge and Wellness Knowledge and Wellness Knowledge andSelf-understanding Understandings Self-understanding Understandings Self-understanding Understandings developing and The meaning and influences of different The meaning and understanding mental The meaning and maintaining self- dimensions of health beliefs and values, dimensions of health health issues and their dimensions of health esteem as an attitudes and values including those related lifestyle behaviours and impact on self and social, cultural, adolescent Growth and to sexuality and gender consequences society environmental and recognition of roles development on self-esteem and Growth and Lifelong relationships political factors that self-concept development influence the recognition of changes behaviours that relationships and community’s health in responsibilities influence growth and mental health issues how to enhance the community support to and attitudes development Developing respectful health of self and enhance relationships well-being balancing community strategies Social-emotional well relationships others the social, emotional, mental health services to promote health physical and mental being building and assessing the impact of emotional and mental dealing with negative Growth and mental health different types of maintaining positive health on behaviours relationships development relationships relationships as anTypes and nature of adolescent the positive and health promotions – lifestyle behaviours andrelationships values and beliefs government support for their impact on society understanding changing negative effects of peer importance of family Ways to keep healthier pressure on health building positive societal cohesion relationships and peers and safer behaviours relationships applying social skills to the impact of stress factors influencing managing risk Social-emotional well relationships in the and strategies to different situations and relationships strategies to enhance being work place manage stress relationships relating appropriately in resilience strategies to manage enhancing personal Social-emotional well cyber bullying relationships rules, laws, policies to relationships health and the health of being promote health SMS bullying others qualities of positive Ways to keep healthier strategies to enhance relationships enhancing seeking advice and help and safer communicating and encourage societal environments Enhancing resilience as effectively in the cohesion rights and plans to avoid and factors to consider for a an adolescent manage risk community responsibilities in safe learning public health harm minimisation andCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 17
  • 20. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence relationships environment thinking optimistically coping strategies services/agencies Ways to keep healthier appreciating diversity Resources and making connections rules laws and policies domestic violence and saferPower in relationships consumer skills to promote safety Inclusivity risk management in the promoting positive health actions and strategies community types of power attitudes discrimination, services/agencies to promote taking action to peer pressure protective behaviours – harassment and Learning physical health – enhancing maintain their own and Plan A/Plan B vilificationBeing resilient as an activities physical and social others’ mental andadolescent time management environments Resilience emotional health factors to consider for a coping and responding strategies to seek help Resources and managing change preventative measures safe learning to change and environment benefits of support consumer skills coping with loss and strategies to minimise challenge factors that influence grief harmful or risky identifying fears and access and use of coping with breakdown behaviours and Self-management Safety health services hazardous situations feelings of relationships Skills Safety me and others health information dealing with conflicting reaching out rules, laws and policies demands Understanding going out about safety to promote a safe emotions physical and social creating connections – strategies to keep safe how to identify the Safety environment friendships and identification and Self-management different types of Managing risk Resources and belonging emotions and ways protection against Skills strategies to deal with consumer skills protective strategies they are expressed unsafe situations Understanding emotions personal safety issues sources and access toRecognising abuse how to take cultural factors influencing risk in an uncontrolled health information for differences into taking strategies to identify, feelings and warning environment different communities signals account in self- recognising, assessing interpret and monitor influences on ‘the self’ influences on health factors that influence a understanding and responding to risk protective strategies decision making model community’s ability to ways to enhance our situations how to examine the and risk behaviours access and use health self-understanding Road safety and our influence of others on servicesSafety self-understanding Driving and socialising Managing emotions attitudes andSafety with behaviours how to track and responsible driver and how to manage passenger behaviour Self-managementindependence laws and rules challenge the emotions Skills connection between skills and attitudes that gaining independence strategies to cope with risk taking thoughts, feelings and support safe road Understanding and the risks it brings emotions positive choices behaviours behaviour emotions positive and negative Reviewing the situation how to limit the impact Environmental health how to examine the risks factors to consider of peer pressure influence of others settings and making our when choosing the Managing emotions environment safer and strategies to cope with circumstances where most appropriate risk taking occurs how to manage healthier influences person for help emotions and limit the workplace health and strategies to cope with protective behaviours Planning before impact of value laden safety outside influences onSafety in community deciding judgements self-understanding rights and strategies to assert strategies to owning Managing emotions responsibilities themselves and taking community strategies safe practices near Deciding and acting responsibility for that are used to copeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 18
  • 21. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence buses/trains ways to apply the emotional health of self with intense emotions passenger safety decision making model and others in particular situations safety on wheels Monitoring and ways to identify strategies to cope with evaluation emotional states and and reduce stress aquatic safety proposed strategies to skills and actions to Deciding and acting cope with overt and cope with them how to analyse covert peer influence strategies to monitor community measures how to review the thoughts, emotions and used to protect effectiveness of physical feelings that individuals strategies to resilience influence personal Reviewing the situation identity and the how decisions can preventative measure behaviour of others affect health and safety strategies to create ways to enhance self- awareness and limit confidence Interpersonal Skills fallout Reviewing the situation Communicating Monitoring and how to apply the evaluating ways to adapt decision making model communication skills strategies to monitor when considering and evaluate decisions active listening skills to beliefs and values; establish relationships predicting risks and how to analyse benefits individual and group how to read body decisions and the language how to select people effects they have on Building and nurturing and services that can the environment and relationships help the health and safety of how to behave Planning before themselves and others appropriately in varying deciding relationships/situations strategies to assert individual rights and Interpersonal Skills Preventing and Communicating managing conflict predict the consequence of active listening skills to ways to deal actions enhance relationships appropriately with conflict communication skills to Interpersonal Skills manage conflict of ways to deal values appropriately with Communicating teasing/bullying Building and nurturing ways to establish relationships how to apply assertive effective skills communication ways to build and showing empathy, influence relationships risk evaluation within the community strategies tolerance and sensitivity how to treat others ways to communicate when in a position of effectively when there powerCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 19
  • 22. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Cooperating and is conflict strategies to limit collaborating in groups how to recognise and negative influences ways to cooperate with respond to the Preventing and peers to enhance emotional states of managing conflict safety others how to manage/resolve strategies to deal with ways to communicate conflict when in a exclusion in a range of social position of power Leading, initiating and situations ways of selecting, facilitating Building and nurturing applying and adjusting ways to organise and relationships assertion manage groups how to build ways to minimise leadership skills to relationships with potential conflict enhance safety unfamiliar others harm minimisation ways to cope with skills dysfunctional ways to cope with relationships change/conflict/challen how to demonstrate ging situations acceptable and negotiation skills appropriate behaviour Leading, initiating and ways to cope with facilitating changes in relationships leadership strategies when supporting others how to consider rights of other how to express feelings, needs, ideas, Preventing and empathy and support managing conflict to others in a socially assertive and culturally communication skills to appropriate manner manage conflict negotiation skills problem solving skills ways to minimise harm through selection and planning assertion techniques Leading, initiating and facilitating leadership strategiesCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 20
  • 23. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence What will I do in my classroom?This section contains a series of detailed learning and teaching activities and supporting resources with a Health and Physical Education focus.For detailed information on the links to the Early Adolescence (8-10) Syllabus refer to the content focus for this series of lessons. By clicking onthe attachment tab, you can access this section as a word document.Health and Physical Education Content Lesson focus Activities and monitoring ResourcesWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 1: We all have Lesson 1: Feelings Resource 1: StrengthKnowledge and the right to feel safe cardsUnderstandings at all times Resource 2: Theme Observation and monitoring:The meaning and Establish students’ posters During the lesson note the students who are able to:dimensions of health base line of Resource 3: Safety knowledge identify when they feel safe brainstorm attitudes and values Students to describe how they are feeling in different contexts and situations Resource 4: Skills forWays to keep healthierand safer understand Theme 1 analyse and discuss the Bill of Rights life poster and be aware that it KWL chart, KWHL rules, laws, policies to relates to them as promote health Learning experiences: chart and X-chart well as everyone from Teacher toolkit enhancing environments else 1. Introduce the Protective Behaviours program. templates factors to consider for a Develop/reinforce Write the words ‘Protective Behaviours’ on the whiteboard. safe learning Summary of the UN students’ Divide the class into small groups. Provide each group a KWL chart or Convention on the environment understanding of KWHL chart. Ask each group to discuss the topic and then summarise Rights of the ChildSelf-management Skills rights and the KWL chart (know, want to know, learnt) or KWHL chart (know, available atUnderstanding emotions responsibilities want to know, how to learn it, learnt). Jigsaw the answers from each http://www.unicef.org how to identify the Explore the range of group to provide a class list. /magic/media/docum different types of emotions/feelings Summarise the class thoughts on Protective Behaviours and create a ents/what_rights_flye emotions and ways they that may be class KWL or KWHL chart. r_english.pdf are expressed experienced or the book For Explain the importance of the Protective Behaviours program to theInterpersonal Skills Develop an students by saying, ‘The Protective Behaviours program is very Every Child - the UNBuilding and nurturing understanding that important because it teaches us how to feel, be and keep safe. Convention on the feelings differ Protective Behaviours provides opportunities to develop skills for life rights of the child inCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 21
  • 24. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescencerelationships between people and that can be applied to a range of contexts and situations. These skills words and pictures how to behave situations, and that are essential to help keep you feel, be and keep safe throughout your UNICEF appropriately in varying this is ok life. Now that you are getting older there are different situations that you Pictures/photos of relationships/situations Students to be able might find yourself in where you feel unsafe. It is still really important landscapes from to visualise their that you remember that you all have the right to feel safe at all times calendars/books safe place whether you are 3 years old or 13 years old. The Protective BehavioursYEAR 9 Blank paper programs talks about feelings, safe and unsafe risk taking, safe andKnowledge and unsafe secrets, persisting in asking for help from people on your Writing/drawing toolsUnderstandings network and respecting personal space. The Protective Behaviours WhiteboardGrowth and development program teaches us that each of you are very important people. Let’s Whiteboard markers start by finding out what your strengths are’. how to enhance the Resource 26: health of self and others 2. Feelings activity: EmotionsWays to keep healthier Discuss skills for life and the importance for using positive self-talk with Backgroundand safer the students. The Skills for life poster (Resource 4) can be displayed to information on help reinforce these skills. Protective rules laws and policies to promote safety Spread the Strength cards (Resource 1) out on a table/bench area. interrupting from the Ask students to select one or two cards they feel, or someone has told Importance of actions and strategies to them, reflects some of their strengths. Protective promote health – Behaviours section enhancing physical and Invite students to share the choices they have made and why they made social environments them.Self-management Skills Each student then cuts out the question cards (Resource 1) and assignsUnderstanding emotions strengths to each of the questions, or provides a written response. how to track and Discuss with others to compare. challenge the connection 3. Set the parameters: between thoughts, Explain to students what can and cannot be discussed. Disclosures of feelings and behaviours personal things need to be addressed with the teacher after class.Managing emotions Explain protective interrupting to ensure students know which personal strategies to owning and things should not be shared with the group. Information on protective taking responsibility for interrupting is provided in the section ‘Importance of teaching Protective emotional health of self Behaviours’. and others Set group guidelines such as the teacher cannot keep unsafe secrets strategies to monitor and must share any information with authorities that is relevant. thoughts, emotions and Discuss group norms and then create group norms for the class. physical feelings that influence personal 4. Introduce Theme 1: discuss Theme 1 with the students. identity and the Write it on the board to keep it displayed for the duration of the lesson. behaviour of others Show students the Theme posters (Resource 2) and use as a templateInterpersonal Skills for them to create their own to be displayed around the classroom.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 22
  • 25. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceBuilding and nurturing 5. Group discussion: Theme 1relationships Dissect Theme 1 using an X-chart format where students include at least how to demonstrate five words to describe each of the following sections of the theme: acceptable and ‘We all’ – who do we mean by all? Make sure students understand that appropriate behaviour each of them are included in ‘all’. ‘have the right’ – what is a right? Something we are born with, thatYEAR 10 cannot be bestowed or taken away by someone else.Knowledge and ‘to feel safe’ – why feel safe rather than be safe? We cannot guaranteeUnderstandings that we are going to be safe in every situation, however we have theThe meaning and right to feel safe.dimensions of health ‘at all times’ – what do we mean by all? Day, night, today, tomorrow, social, cultural, yesterday, 24/7. environmental and Ask students to brainstorm what safety means to them using the Safety political factors that brainstorm activity sheet (Resource 3). influence the 6. UN Convention on the Rights of the Child community’s health and attitudes Discuss what a child is in the terms of the law: someone under the ageSocial-emotional well of 18, or someone who appears under the age of 18 without properbeing identification. strategies to enhance Explain to the students the history of the UN Convention on the Rights of and encourage societal the Child. It was developed in 1989 to protect children from cohesion discrimination, neglect and abuse. The Convention includes civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights.Ways to keep healthierand safer Hand out a copy of UN Convention on the Rights of the Child to the students. rules, laws and policies to promote a safe Discuss the skills for life of self-understanding and emphasise the physical and social importance of knowing own values and how to stand up for them. environment 7. Group discussion: Rights and responsibilitiesSelf-management Skills Discuss with the students that with rights comes responsibility. That is ifUnderstanding emotions we all have the right to feel safe, do we have the responsibility to ensure strategies to cope with other people feel safe? outside influences on Focus on articles 12, 14, 16, 24, and 28. self-understanding Discuss a ‘Bill of Rights’.Deciding and acting 8. Bill of Rights activity: how to analyse Ask students to form groups of four or five. community measures used to protect Using the following scenario, the groups must create a Bill of Rights withCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 23
  • 26. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence individuals ten rights that everyone must abide by.Interpersonal Skills ‘You have been shipwrecked with a group of 20 people of varying agesPreventing and and gender on a deserted island. The island is not on regular shippingmanaging conflict lanes or aircraft flight plans so it may be awhile before you are rescued.’ ways to minimise Come back together as a class and share each group’s Bill of Rights. potential conflict 9. Safe place visualisation: Helpful verses unhelpful thinking harm minimisation skills Explain to the students that people can use visualisation to help reduce anxiety and feel safer, as well as to promote helpful thinking. Display one or more examples of safe places (you could use pictures from calendars, posters). Let the students know that for this exercise they can use their own safe place if they have one, or they can borrow one of the ones on display. Ask them to close their eyes (if they feel comfortable doing so) and picture their safe place. Tell them to picture each item in the scene, hear any sounds that would be present and smell any scents that would be present. After three to four minutes ask them to open their eyes. Invite students to draw or write about their safe place. Ask students for examples of situations where they may visualise their safe place to help reduce anxiety, help them feel safer and help them to take a safe risk (give examples such as getting ready for an exam, going on an aeroplane, standing up in front of the school at assembly). Extension or variation: My strength pack: Ask students to select 10 strengths cards which reflect strengths that they have. Tell them to record the strengths on cards and draw a picture reflecting the chosen strength. Students can either create their own cards, or decorate the templates provided (Resource 1). Lyrics activity: Ask students to analyse the lyrics of a current popular song (eg ‘Fun House’ by PINK) and identify the feelings within the song. Use of songs: Song lyrics can be a very powerful medium. Ask students to research songs that have a focus on personal safety and safety of others. Tell students to form groups and discuss the lyrics of the song that they have chosen and the implication or messages that the song is discussing. Diorama: Invite students to create a 3D model or diorama of their safe place. This may be done as a homework project over a few weeks.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 24
  • 27. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Expressing feelings: Focus on the skills for life of understanding emotions, reading others’ emotions and being aware of a range of feelings: o Give each student a set of emotion cards and work in pairs (Resource 26). Students take turns miming the feeling on their card while their partner tries to determine what feeling they are showing. o Ask the students to come back together as a large group and share their experiences (eg how hard or easy was it to recognise the other person’s feeling?). o Ask for volunteers to share whether they would feel safe or unsafe if they had to show this feeling in public, or whether they would only show it with a particular person such as a friend or family member. Safe breathing exercise: o Ask students to take a deep breath in, hold it for a count of five and then slowly release it, relaxing their muscles at the same time. Repeat this exercise several times. Turn this activity into a preparation for tests, exams or complex lessons. Senses exercise: o Explain to the students that sometimes we have feelings that are so strong they can overwhelm us (eg anger, frustration). Discuss this and mention the life skill of regulating own feelings. o Suggest that a way to regain control of ourselves is to record our senses. As a class, brainstorm five things they can see, smell, touch, taste and hear in the classroom. o Homework: students can use this technique at least once over the next week by taking a piece of paper into their room and writing down five things they can hear, see, smell, touch and taste. Feelings tape activity: This activity is designed to demonstrate that different people feel different things about the same piece of music (event or activity) and that this is ok. o Play a pre-constructed CD containing a range of snippets of six very different types of music (eg a current song, relaxation music, 60s music). o Ask the students to write down how each piece of music makes them feel. At the completion of the exercise work through the pieces of music from start to finish, name each piece and ask the students to share their feelings about it.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 25
  • 28. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 1: We all have Lesson 2: Early warning signs Resource 5: RiskKnowledge and the right to feel safe taking activitiesUnderstandings at all times Resource 6: Early Observation and monitoring:Social-emotional well Students to warning signs During the lesson note the students who are able to:being recognise and Balloon describe their own recognise and name different types of early warning signs values and beliefs Pin early warning signs recognise the difference between safe and unsafe risk takingWays to keep healthier Whiteboardand safer contribute to the discussion of early warning signs after the balloon activity Whiteboard markers managing risk identify and draw their own physical and emotional early warning signs in a Pictures/photos of strategies to enhance range of scenarios high risk activities resilience discuss strategies to cope with changing emotions.Self-management SkillsUnderstanding emotions Learning experiences: how to identify the 1. Review Theme 1, feelings and the life skills of understanding emotions different types of with the students. emotions and ways they 2. Invite students to close their eyes and see if they can feel/sense their face, are expressed arms and legs. Encourage students to think about how their body is feeling ways to enhance our (eg whether their body is feeling relaxed or tense). The goal of this exercise self-understanding is to put students in touch with their body. Discuss understanding theirManaging emotions emotions and the ability to read other people’s body language. strategies to cope with 3. Early warning signs: emotions Introduce the life skill of understanding links between how to manage emotions thoughts/feelings and behaviour and discuss in relation to early warning signs.Interpersonal Skills Show pictures of high risk activities (eg abseiling/mountain climbing/Preventing and parachuting/swimming with sharks).managing conflict risk evaluation strategies Discuss how the participants in these activities might be feeling (eg scared/exhilarated/excited/terrified). Discuss what physical body reactions the participants in these activitiesYEAR 9 might be experiencing? (eg heart pounding, sweating, butterflies in theKnowledge and stomach).Understandings Label these body reactions as early warning signs.Growth and development Discuss the question: What are our body reactions warning us about? assessing the impact of (We may be in a risky situation – it could be that we are taking a safe emotional and mentalCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 26
  • 29. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence health on behaviours risk or it may be an unsafe risk or unsafe situation).Ways to keep healthier 4. Risks:and safer Brainstorm safe risks (eg abseiling with appropriate training and harm minimisation and equipment) and unsafe risks (eg getting into a car with a drunk driver). coping strategies Reinforce that if they are getting their early warning signs then they needSelf-management Skills to stop and assess the risk. Is it safe or unsafe?Understanding emotions A model to assess risk: strategies to identify, o Consider the safety and risks of the situation. interpret and monitor o Using the following prompts influences on ‘the self’ - WHO…is at risk? how to track and challenge the connection - WHAT...is the risk? between thoughts, - HOW…is it a risk? feelings and behaviours - WHERE...is the risk?Managing emotions - WHEN…is the situation risky? ways to identify Ask students to rate the level of safety of aspects of the situation as emotional states and follows: proposed strategies to o no risk cope with them o possible riskReviewing the situation o very risky how to apply the decision making model If they feel unsafe then they need to problem solve ways to feel safe when considering beliefs again. and values; predicting Take two examples from the unsafe risk brainstorming activity and ask risks and benefits for suggestions on what someone could do if they recognised their earlyInterpersonal Skills warning signs and felt unsafe. Ask ‘What if...? questions about theseCommunicating risks. how to recognise and Complete the Risk taking activities sheet (Resource 5). respond to the emotional Using a problem solving model process a potential safety risk. Write the states of others risky situation in the problem box. Complete the problem solving sheet to identify the best way to reduce the harm.YEAR 10 5. Balloon activity:Knowledge and Ask students to go outside and form a circle with the teacher in theUnderstandings centre.Ways to keep healthier Explain that the teacher will be walking around the circle, blowing up aand safer balloon and at some point unknown to the students will pop the balloon. Allow for choice by giving the students the option of closing their eyes toCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 27
  • 30. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence taking action to maintain enhance the activity or, if they are uneasy/afraid of balloons, permission their own and others’ to step out of the circle or go inside to watch the activity through the mental and emotional window, depending on their level of fear. Explain to the class the reason health for giving students the choice. The reason is that to regain safety preventative measures someone needs power and control and time limit. strategies to minimise Ensure students understand that it is ok that they will all feel differently harmful or risky about the balloons and the activity depending on their previous behaviours and experiences with balloons. hazardous situations Ask the students to concentrate on how their body feels as the activitySelf-management Skills progresses and when then balloon pops.Understanding emotions Return to the classroom. strategies to cope with Draw a body outline on the whiteboard. influences Ask students to brainstorm some of the early warning signs theyManaging emotions experienced during the activity. Write them on the body. strategies to cope with 6. Provide each student with an Early warning signs activity sheet (Resource 6) and reduce stress and have them draw in their own personal early warning signs.Interpersonal Skills 7. Group discussion:Preventing and How do we know when we are feeling safe again? When our earlymanaging conflict warning signs have disappeared. Relate this back to the life skill of harm minimisation skills helpful and positive thinking (understanding links between ways to cope with thoughts/feelings and behaviour). change / conflict / When reviewing early warning signs it is necessary to consider that not challenging situations all students may experience early warning signs for a variety of reasons. Some students may have become desensitised through previous or current traumatic experiences or have sensory disorders. The concept of early warning signs is expanded beyond physical responses of the body to unsafe situations to include emotional responses and external indicators such as time or location. Use questions such as: o Do we all have the same early warning signs? o Do our early warning signs change? o What if someone doesn’t have their early warning signs and they are in an unsafe situation? o How would they know they were unsafe? 8. Homework: Ask students to pay attention to their body’s feelings over the next weekCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 28
  • 31. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence and see if they can recognise when their body is trying to tell them something, and record how they felt and what was happening at the time. Extension or variation: Ask students to interview family and friends and find out safe risk taking activities they have participated in and what were their early warning signs. Invite the students to discuss how different people experience different early warning signs in different situations. Tell students to choose a safe risk taking activity they would like to participate in (either now or when they are older). Ask them to create a poster about the activity (eg pictures/training required/equipment needed/cost involved). Ask students to read The Best Ghost Stories Ever edited by Christopher Krovatin. Discuss with the class if and when students get early warning signs.Wellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 1: We all have Lesson 3: Safety continuum Resource 7: NewsKnowledge and the right to feel safe article Girl saves lifeUnderstandings at all times of teacher by taking Observation and monitoring: control of carGrowth and development Reinforce that early During the lesson note the students who are able to: Resource 8: Safety warning signs do not behaviours that influence provide appropriate examples for the different safety continuum stages only appear when we continuum signs growth and development feel unsafe but may identify that decisions relating to levels of risk taking are related to aspects of (four copies)Ways to keep healthier appear when we are choice, control and time limit Resource 9: Safetyand safer doing something contribute to discussion on risk continuum scenarios managing risk exciting or provide appropriate suggestions on ways to reduce early warning signs Resource 10: WhatLearning physical challenging and do you do cardsactivities taking safe risks discuss strategies to minimise harmful or risking behaviours in a range of Pictures of different factors to consider for a Students to contexts. activities (safe, safe learning understand the unsafe and risk environment different stages of Learning experiences: taking) the safety continuum.Self-management Skills 1. Review the topics of Theme 1, early warning signs and the skills for life of WhiteboardUnderstanding emotions Students to understanding emotions and helpful and positive thinking. understand that Whiteboard markers ways to enhance our 2. Safety continuum: different people may self-understanding feel different levels of Explain what a safety continuum is for the students. safety although theyCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 29
  • 32. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceManaging emotions are in the same Display safety continuum signs around the classroom. strategies to cope with situation (eg some Ask students to suggest examples of each stage emotions people feel ‘fun to feel scared’ on a o Safe (no early warning signs + lots of choice and control).Deciding and acting o Fun to Feel Scared (some early warning signs + some choice and roller coaster while ways to apply the others feel ‘unsafe’ control + enjoyable activity). decision making model on a roller coaster o Risking on Purpose (more early warning signs, + less choice andMonitoring and Students to control + activity may not be enjoyable but the outcome is worth it).evaluation understand that o Unsafe (lots of early warning signs, none/little choice and control). how decisions can affect Safety = Choice, Give examples if needed (use pictures on cards as starting point). health and safety Control and Time Limit. Be prepared to protectively interrupt if necessary. Notes are provided in how to review the the ‘Importance of teaching Protective Behaviours’ section. effectiveness of Students to strategies to resilience recognise situations 3. Risk activity:Interpersonal Skills that may trigger their Read the newspaper article Girl saves life of teacher by taking control of early warning signs car to the class (Resource 7).Preventing andmanaging conflict Students to problem Draw the safety continuum on the whiteboard and ask students to risk evaluation strategies solve how to reduce identify which parts of the article fit onto the safety continuum. their early warning Discuss:Leading, initiating and signs in an ‘unsafe’facilitating situation o When do you think Sarah felt safe? (traveling in the car on the way leadership skills to to the excursion). enhance safety o When do you think Sarah felt unsafe? (heard a loud noise and she saw her teacher was unconscious).YEAR 9 o Did Sarah have control over the situation when she felt unsafe (No – the situation would have felt out of her control – no one steering theKnowledge and car).Understandings o How did Sarah risk on purpose? (grabbed the steering wheel andThe meaning and steered the car off the road).dimensions of health o Did Sarah have control over the situation when she risked on lifestyle behaviours and purpose (Yes – she took control of the situation, steered the car, consequences rang the police and calmed the other students).Growth and development o What could have happened if Sarah hadn’t risked on purpose? (car assessing the impact of could have crashed). emotional and mental o Was this a safe or unsafe risk (safe risk)? health on behaviours o When would grabbing the steering wheel be an unsafe risk? (if the the positive and negative person driving had the car under control). effects of peer pressure on health behaviours Explain to the students that Safety = Choice, Control and Time Limit,CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 30
  • 33. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceWays to keep healthier and help them to relate this concept to their decision-making.and safer 4. Group discussion: harm minimisation and Ask the students a series of questions: coping strategies What encourages people to take risks?Self-management Skills Is it generally spontaneous or planned?Understanding emotions How likely are they to jump right in to help someone? how to examine the influence of others on What are possible blocks to early warning signs? (wanting to be seen as self-understanding tough, not a ’wimp’ in front of others). how to track and What are some examples of risking on purpose? challenge the connection What strategies can you take to minimise harmful or risky behaviours between thoughts, and hazardous situations in the following settings: feelings and behaviours o HomeManaging emotions o School ways to identify o With friends emotional states and proposed strategies to o With people you know cope with them o With people you do not knowReviewing the situation 5. Safety continuum activity: how to apply the Place the four Safety continuum cards (Resource 8) in a row on the floor decision making model of the classroom. when considering beliefs Read out the Safety continuum scenarios (Resource 9) brainstormed and values; predicting earlier, one at a time. risks and benefits Ask students to stand behind the most appropriate safety continuumInterpersonal Skills card for them. This will form a human graph for each scenario.Communicating Remind students that we all need to respect each others’ choices and ways to establish that people can feel differently about the same scenario and that the effective communication things that give some people early warning signs may have no effect on showing empathy, other people. tolerance and sensitivity Discuss the scenarios that have different levels of choice and control (eg Preventing and seeing a snake in a cage at the zoo and seeing a wild snake on themanaging conflict footpath). assertive communication How does this impact on the level of safety? skills to manage conflict 6. Tell students to choose one example where people identified feeling unsafe negotiation skills and problem solve ways they could feel safe again. problem solving skills 7. Rehearsing answers: ways to minimise harmCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 31
  • 34. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence through selection and Ask class to form groups of four to five students. planning assertion Refer to the section of the program called ‘What if...? Questions to techniques promote problem solving skills’ and tell each group to choose three or four scenarios discuss ways to minimise harm. It is important thatYEAR 10 students have the opportunity to rehearse answers in a variety ofKnowledge and contexts. These rehearsal skills are essential in the development of lifeUnderstandings skills. At the conclusion of the group activity debrief with questions relating to:Growth and development o How difficult was it to rehearse possible answers? lifestyle behaviours and their impact on society o Why do we need to rehearse answers?Ways to keep healthier 8. Strengths activity:and safer Provide each student with a copy of the what do you do cards (Resource taking action to maintain 10). Read out a selection of problematic scenarios appropriate to the their own and others’ students and ask them to indicate using the cards which action or mental and emotional actions they might take for that situation. Examples are provided on the health resource. Discuss the students’ chosen action and the consequences that might occur. Discuss other possible or better actions they could preventative measures perform for each scenario. strategies to minimise harmful or risky behaviours and Extension or variation: hazardous situations Ask students to search the internet for other stories about child heroes andSelf-management Skills discuss how they risked on purpose. Note: Discuss internet safety and risks prior to this activity.Understanding emotions In groups of four, ask students to create a poster about the differences on strategies to cope with the safety continuum that they will then present to younger students. outside influences on self-understanding Ask students to interview a family member about a time they risked onManaging emotions purpose. They can explore questions such as, ‘When did they do something that was scary but worth the outcome? What did they do, how did they feel, strategies to cope with what was the outcome?’ and reduce stress Discuss cyber safety. Construct an internet safety continuum discussingInterpersonal Skills safe activities. Discuss early warning signs that might occur from using thePreventing and internetmanaging conflict ways to minimise potential conflict harm minimisation skillsLeading, initiating andCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 32
  • 35. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescencefacilitating leadership strategies when supporting othersWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 2: We can talk Lesson 4: Secrets Resource 2: ThemeKnowledge and with someone about postersUnderstandings anything no matter Resource 11: what it is Observation and monitoring:Social-emotional well Safe/Unsafe secretbeing Students to During the lesson note the students who are able to: scenarios different types of understand the full recognise what is a safe/unsafe secret in the scenarios The Trouble with relationships meaning of Theme 2 analyse individual and group decisions and the effects they have on the Secrets by KarenResources and Students to have a environment and the health and safety of themselves and others Johnsenconsumer skills clear understanding use active listening skills to establish relationships. Placement strategy health services/agencies of the difference from Teacher toolkitSelf-management Skills between safe/good templates and unsafe/bad Learning experiences:Reviewing the situation Butcher’s paper secrets 1. Review the safety continuum and risk with the students. factors to consider when Markers choosing the most 2. Introduce Theme 2: Whiteboard appropriate person for Discuss Theme 2 with the class. Whiteboard markers help Write it on the board to keep it displayed throughout the lesson.Monitoring and Display Theme 2 posters (Resource 2).evaluation 3. Group discussion: dissect Theme 2 skills and actions to cope with overt and covert ‘We can talk with’ – what do we mean by talking with someone, rather peer influence than talking to them? It is a conversation/discussion where the otherInterpersonal Skills person actively listens and participates in the conversation.Communicating ‘someone’ – not just anyone - someone we trust, feel comfortable with, ways to adapt who will listen to us and take action if required. communication skills ‘about anything’ – what do we mean by anything? Good, bad, major or active listening skills to insignificant things. establish relationships ‘no matter what it is’ – what is it? The topic/event/issue that we want toBuilding and nurturing talk about.relationships Ask students to create their own Theme 2 poster. Display the posters how to behave around the classroom. appropriately in varying 4. Introduce the skill for life of relationship skills and discuss the importance relationships/situations of having and using these skills. Ask students to brainstorm what specificCooperating and skills could make up the skill for life. Draw particular attention to the skills ofCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 33
  • 36. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescencecollaborating in groups help seeking and disclosure and group skills. ways to cooperate with 5. Game: Chinese whispers peers to enhance safety Tell students to arrange themselves in either a line or a circle, standing strategies to deal with close enough to be able to reach the next person. exclusion Start the whisper for the students – ‘I am going to a surprise fancy dress party on Saturday night for my Aunt’s birthday – I’ll be dressed up asYEAR 9 Superman’ – by whispering it to the first student.Knowledge and Ask the students to then take turns whispering it to each other until theyUnderstandings reach the end of the line or the last person in the circle.The meaning and Tell the last person to write the whisper on the board.dimensions of health lifestyle behaviours and If it has changed from the original sentence then correct for the students consequences on the board. Discuss how the message has been changed.Social-emotional well 6. Hold a group discussion and brainstorm on the question: ‘What makes abeing good listener?’ strategies to manage 7. Small group activity: relationships Ask students to break into groups of four and provide them with a list ofWays to keep healthier questions describing the secret from the game of Chinese whispers.and safer o Is the secret a safe secret? actions and strategies to o Is the secret a worrying secret? promote health – enhancing o Is the secret hurting anyone? physical and social o Does the secret make anyone feel sad? environments o Does the secret make anyone feel unsafe?Resources and o Who else knows about the secret?consumer skills o What will happen if you tell the secret? health information about safety Tell students to work together to answer the questions and then come back together as a whole group.Self-management Skills Invite the groups to share their answers and write them on the board.Managing emotions how to manage emotions Ask the students to decide as a group whether the ‘surprise party’ from and limit the impact of the game of Chinese whispers is a safe/unsafe secret. value laden judgements 8. Safe and Unsafe: strategies to owning and Hold a discussion about ‘safe’ and ‘unsafe’ by asking the students questions taking responsibility for such as: emotional health of self What is a secret? and others What makes a safe/good and unsafe/bad secret?Reviewing the situationCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 34
  • 37. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence how to select people and Use the following situations from the book The Trouble with Secrets, and services that can help students decide which one is a safe secret and which one is an unsafeInterpersonal Skills secret. Making a batch of cookies for your dad, or somebody hurts youCommunicating and warns you not to tell anyone. how to recognise and Read the following text to help students self-correct their answers: respond to the emotional If you want to surprise your daddy with a batch of chocolate chip states of others cookies, keep it a secret. Wait till after dinner and then surprise him. ways to communicate in He’ll probably give you a hug. a range of social If somebody hurts you, don’t keep it a secret. Even if they warn you situations not to tell anybody, you need to talk to someone you trust. You canBuilding and nurturing try your mum or dad or your teacher. They can help you find ways torelationships be safe. how to build (Excerpt taken from The Trouble with Secrets by Karen Johnsen reproduced with the relationships with permission of Parenting Press Inc.) unfamiliar others Read The Trouble with Secrets with the class and discuss. If you are ways to cope with unable to locate this story, you can read another story which compares dysfunctional safe and unsafe secrets as a substitute. relationships Discuss the statement, ‘secrets can always be shared with someone wePreventing and trust!’managing conflict Ask students to form groups of three and use a placemat strategy to negotiation skills define a safe secret and an unsafe secret. problem solving skills Note: Safe/good secret o It is only a secret for a short time (eg Mum will know what her presentYEAR 10 is when she opens it on her birthday so it will no longer be a secret).Knowledge and o Other people can know about the secret (eg We can’t tell Mum whatUnderstandings her birthday present is but we can tell our friend or Grandma).Growth and development o We do not get early warning signs about the secret. societal cohesion o Usually have a happy outcome. the impact of stress and strategies to manage o Are not kept between one adult and one child, or one adult and a group of children. stressWays to keep healthier Unsafe/bad secretand safer o It is for a long time or forever. preventative measures o No one else can know about the secret. strategies to minimise o May involve a threat that something bad will happen if you tell. harmful or risky o We get early warning signs about the secret. behaviours and hazardous situations o We feel sad, uncomfortable or unsafe about the secret.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 35
  • 38. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResources and o Secrets can always be shared with someone we trust.consumer skills 9. Small group work: Scenario analysis sources and access to Ask students to break into small groups. health information for different communities Provide each group with a Safe/unsafe secret scenarios sheet (Resource 11).Self-management SkillsReviewing the situation Tell students to use the categories decided on earlier to determine whether the secret is safe or unsafe and what the people in the scenario preventative measure could do if the secret is unsafe. strategies to create awareness and limit 10. Invite students to role-play scenarios. fallout 11. Advise students that next week you will be discussing networks. AskMonitoring and students to use the time until their next lesson to think about who they wouldevaluating tell if they had an unsafe secret and wanted to share it with someone. how to analyse individual and group decisions and Extension or variation: the effects they have on Communication activity: the environment and the health and safety of o Ask students to form pairs. themselves and others o Provide each student with a card containing a word or picture of an item.Interpersonal Skills o Tell one student in the pair to describe the word while the other studentBuilding and nurturing is to draw it.relationships o The student describing the word is not allowed to say what the item is; ways to build and they must describe it in terms that will allow the other student to draw it. influence relationships Once the drawing is complete, the students swap roles. within the community o At the conclusion of the activity students are to share with each other how to treat others when what the image was on the card and compare it with the drawing done in a position of power by their partner.Preventing and o Ask students to discuss in pairs which communication was helpful andmanaging conflict which was not (if applicable) and discuss possible methods to help ways to minimise improve the communication. potential conflict o Bring the students back together to form a whole group and have a harm minimisation skills discussion about what is required for good communication.Leading, initiating and Read The Paper Bag Baby by Ruth Thomas with the class and discuss iffacilitating keeping the baby a secret is a safe or unsafe secret. leadership strategies Hold a ‘Great race’ day. Divide the class into groups. Give secret clues and when supporting others instructions to follow (like a treasure hunt) around the school until they reach the final destination. Award a prize to the first group to reach the destination.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 36
  • 39. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 2: We can talk Lesson 5: Networks Resource 12:Knowledge and with someone about Network invitationUnderstandings anything no matter Resource 13: what it is Observation and monitoring:Social-emotional well Relationship circle During the lesson note the students who are able to:being Students to Resource 14: understand the identify the network of a sportsperson Healthy/unhealthy different types of importance of a identify the characteristics and responsibilities of a good network person relationship relationships network brainstormWays to keep healthier participate in discussionsand safer Students to Resource 15: create their own personal network. understand what Maintaining healthy managing risk qualities are required relationshipsResources and for someone to be on Learning experiences: Resource 16:consumer skills a network 1. Review Theme 2 and the skill for life: relationship skills. Relationship health services/agencies Students to identify a 2. Hold a class discussion on, ‘What is a network?’ using a placemat strategy. problemsSelf-management Skills network of their own Resource 17: My 3. Small group activity: Mind mapReviewing the situation Ask the students to form small groups of four or five. trust circle factors to consider when Introduce the concept that in sports, particularly team sports such as Placement strategy choosing the most football, the players all have a network of people that are there to and Mind map appropriate person for provide support and assistance if needed. strategy from help Teacher toolkit Tell each group to choose a different sport and ask them to create a templatesPlanning before deciding mind map listing the people who create the network for a player. strategies to assert Whiteboard For example – An AFL football player’s network could include: themselves Blank paper o Team mates – if the player is running towards his goals with the ballInterpersonal Skills and a member of the opposite team is trying to tackle him, one of his Writing/drawing toolsCommunicating team mates will attempt to ‘shepherd’ the opposing team’s player active listening skills to away from him. establish relationships o Water boys – provide water so that the player does not becomeBuilding and nurturing dehydrated during the game.relationships o Medical team – provide assistance if the player is injured, either how to behave during the game, during the breaks or after the game is over. appropriately in varying o Umpires – ensure players are playing by the rules which keep all relationships/situations players safer.Leading, initiating and o Coach – provides information, strategies and tips designed to keepfacilitating the players safe and help them win the game. Also watches during ways to organise and the game and swaps players out if they need a rest or are beingCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 37
  • 40. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence manage groups targeted too much by the other team. leadership skills to o Fans – provide encouragement during the game. enhance safety o Family – provide support and encouragement both during the game and in-between games.YEAR 9 o AFL Tribunal – provides players with protection from aggressiveKnowledge and players that may cause injuries through rough play.Understandings Ask the groups to come back together as a whole class and share theSocial-emotional well networks for the different sports they have identified.being 4. Personal network: strategies to manage Discuss with the class the importance of help seeking and disclosure relationships and self-understanding (knowing own values and how to stand up forWays to keep healthier them).and safer Introduce students to the concept of a personal network and the plans to avoid and importance of having a personal network. manage risk Reinforce the idea that anything can be shared with someone on your harm minimisation and network whether it is good, bad, embarrassing, insignificant or major. coping strategies Hold a brainstorm on a list of possible network people – who do you actions and strategies to come into contact with on a regular basis? promote health – enhancing physical and Note: all answers are to be accepted without judgement and listed on social environments the board by the teacher.Resources and 5. Characteristics of a good network person?consumer skills Brainstorm characteristics that the students come up with that define a factors that influence good network person. Be sure to include the following characteristics in access and use of health the brainstorm: services o Someone who is an adult – discuss with students what age they health information about would consider someone to be an adult. They may feel it is safety appropriate to talk to someone who is 16, 17 or 18 (someone whoSelf-management Skills could drive a car).Managing emotions o Someone who is available. strategies to owning and o Someone who you can trust. taking responsibility for o Someone who will listen. emotional health of self o Someone who will believe you. and others o Someone who can/will take action. ways to identify Draw up a table on the whiteboard and demonstrate to students how to emotional states and determine who can or should not be included on their personal network proposed strategies toCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 38
  • 41. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence cope with them using 10 examples from the previously brainstormed list of potentialReviewing the situation network people. Work through each person to determine their suitability. Use the example below as a guide. Ask students to create their own how to select people and table to help them to assign their network people for use later on. Ensure services that can help that the important point is made that everyone feels differently towardsInterpersonal Skills different people, and that it is ok for one person to include their mum orCommunicating dad on their network, and for someone else not to. ways to communicate Adult Available Trust Will Will Take effectively when there is listen believe action conflict BestBuilding and nurturing x ? friendrelationships how to build Teacher relationships with x Pet dog unfamiliar others ways to cope with Note: Some children may suggest a network participant who is not dysfunctional human (eg a pet dog). It is important not to discredit these suggestions relationships as quite often students will disclose abuse to a pet at least once before disclosing to an adult. Pets can fit just about all of the criteria (eg a five ways to cope with year old dog is 35 in human years and is effectively an adult) however, changes in relationships they cannot take action for the student. Pets or groups such as LifelinePreventing and can be ‘kept up the sleeve’ so that they are included in the network butmanaging conflict not the primary network people. assertive communication 6. Using your network hand: skills to manage conflict Demonstrate to the students how they can use their hand to create their negotiation skills personal network. problem solving skills Explain that if someone from home is included on the network they ways to minimise harm should be placed in the thumb. through selection and planning assertion Unless students are insistent only one person from home should be techniques included in the network. Students should also include two people from school, and two peopleYEAR 10 from the community on their network.Knowledge and Ask students to include phone numbers for each person. Include KidsUnderstandings Help Line/Lifeline and their phone number ‘up the sleeve’. This is called the extended network. List agencies or services that can be on theGrowth and development extended network. the impact of stress and 7. Invitation to your network: strategies to manageCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 39
  • 42. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence stress Explain to students that we cannot just expect people that we haveWays to keep healthier identified that we want on our network to be willing to participate.and safer Explain that they will need to invite their network people. preventative measures Ask students to brainstorm ways to invite people to be on their network strategies to minimise (eg ask them in person, give them a written invitation). harmful or risky behaviours and Discuss how they could explain to them what a network is and why they hazardous situations want them to be included in their network.Resources and Tell students to create an invitation for each of their network people. Theconsumer skills invitation needs to include the responsibilities of the network people. sources and access to Sample Network invitations are provided in Resource 12 or students can health information for create their own. different communities 8. Using a brainstorm discuss: ‘If someone wanted to talk to one of their factors that influence a network people about something that was difficult or embarrassing to talk community’s ability to about, what would make it harder or easier to talk to that person?’ access and use health 9. Role-play: services Demonstrate for the students how to approach a network person throughSelf-management Skills role-play. The teacher is the network person and a student mustManaging emotions approach him/her for assistance. Following this, brainstorm with the community strategies student’s the techniques and things to say that may make it easier for that are used to cope someone to approach a network person. with intense emotions in 10. Individual activity: particular situations Ask each student to complete the Relationship circle activity sheet strategies to cope with (Resource 13) to assist with the creation of their personal network. and reduce stress 11. Individual activity:Interpersonal Skills Ask students to create their own personal network. They can use theCommunicating hand shape if they wish or be creative about how they depict their active listening skills to network, as long as it includes names and phone numbers for each enhance relationships network person. Students can create two networks if they want to. OnePreventing and network should involve the adults already discusses, and the secondmanaging conflict can include their peers and friends. ways to minimise Ensure students know they are not required to share their networks with potential conflict anyone else, either in class or at home, unless they wish to. harm minimisation skills 12. Homework: Ask students to invite their identified people to be on their personal network. negotiation skills 13. Reflection: How did it feel to ask each of your network people? What wasLeading, initiating and difficult? What made you feel good about the process?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 40
  • 43. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescencefacilitating 14. Safe relationships: leadership strategies Divide the class into small groups of about four students. Provide each when supporting others group with a Healthy/unhealthy relationship brainstorm activity sheet (Resource 14). Ask each group to brainstorm all the things they can think of that happens in unhealthy or abusive relationships. Nominate one person from each group as the speaker to share their ideas with the class. Then ask the groups to commence the brainstorm about all the things they can think of which happens in a healthy or respectful relationship. Tell the speaker to share their group’s ideas with the class. As a whole class discuss the differences between each type of relationship. Ensure that students come to the decision that it is better to be in a healthy relationship. Ask students to individually record the role of different people that affect their lives in the circles on the Maintaining healthy relationships activity sheet (Resource 15) (eg parents, brothers, sisters, friends, boyfriend/girlfriend, neighbours, sports coach, people from work and teachers). Tell students to then record different things that happen and things that we do in each relationship to ensure that it is a healthy relationship and stays healthy, writing one point per connecting line. Discuss that each relationship will be different, because we act differently depending on who we are with. It is important for students to make one of the circles represent themselves and record things that they can do to maintain healthy emotional well-being and self esteem. Note: To allow adequate writing space on the activity sheets you may need to increase the size to A3 or ask the students to create their own. Allow students the opportunity to personalise their planning sheets and decorate accordingly. This will allow students to individualise their work, and help to develop attitudes and values towards healthy relationships. 15. Relationship problems: Conduct a decision making activity with the students. It is important for students to develop skills to help make informed life decisions. For this activity students use the decision making framework to work through different relationship problems to find a suitable and realistic action to help resolve the issue. o Photocopy a set of problem scenario cards from the Relationship problem activity sheet (Resource 16) for each student. o Photocopy a decision making planner (Resource 16) for each problem you want the students to work through. o Ask students to cut out the problem scenario card and glue it intoCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 41
  • 44. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence the PROBLEM box on the planning sheet. o Tell students to write two possible actions they could make to help solve the problem, and possible consequences that might occur from these actions in the corresponding boxes. Each consequence is then related to an emotion or feeling. Using these feelings, ask students to decide which action would be the most suitable for them to take if they were in a similar situation. o Ask students to share and discuss their decision making planner with others to compile a list of actions they might not have thought of, as well as their reasoning for their choice. o Note: This activity can be completed as a whole class activity first to model the use of the decision making planner if it is a new strategy. Extension or variation: Invite students to make network business cards to keep in their wallets/purses with contact numbers of network people and help lines. Trust scenarios: Hold a discussion about people we trust in the context of roles and responsibilities and environment (eg I trust police to… I trust my friends to… I trust my parents to… I trust doctors to…). Safety/trust circles: Show students the My trust circle activity sheet (Resource 17). Ask them to draw a large circle in the middle of a piece of paper and tell them to write their name in the centre to represent their safety/trust circle. Tell them to put the names of people they trust inside the circles in their safety circle and to put names of people they do not know or trust in circles outside of their safety circle. The names of people they trust in contexts go in the circles overlapping their safety circle. The circles can also be colour co-ordinated, and include emergency services. Trust activities: Prior to commencing these activities, ensure that you discuss with the students the importance of saying ‘stop’ if they feel their partner is in an unsafe situation, or stopping if they are blindfolded and feel unsafe. Ensure that the activities maintain the element of choice about whether or not the students want to participate, or be blindfolded, or just close their eyes. o Trust walk: In pairs, one student is blindfolded, while the other leads them through an obstacle course or pathway, by holding onto their shoulders. o Trust walk (verbal): in pairs, one student is blindfolded, while the other leads them through an obstacle course or pathway by communicatingCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 42
  • 45. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence verbally only. o Trust lean: In pairs, one student stands in front of the other student with their back towards them. They then gently fall backwards, and the other person catches them. o Trust lean (group): A group of students form a circle around a blindfolded student. The group stands arms length away from the blindfolded student. The person blindfolded spins slowly and chooses when to lean backwards. One student in the group catches the blindfolded person. They are then passed around the circle slowly. o Trust run: In pairs, one student is blindfolded and holds the hand of the other student. The other student then leads the blindfolded student along a safe straight path gradually adjusting their speed from a slow walk to a run. o Trust tree: In an area with lots of trees, students are divided into pairs, with one student blindfolded. The other student leads the blindfolded student to a tree. The blindfolded student uses their other senses to memorise features of the tree, and are then lead back to the start. The blindfold is removed, and that student must then try to locate their tree. Ask students to read the Tomorrow Series by John Marsden and identify Ellie’s different networks at different times throughout the series, and the skills for life that Ellie uses to help her throughout the books. Revisit this lesson before the summer holidays to ensure students have ‘available’ network people over the break.Wellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 2: We can talk Lesson 6: Persistence Chicken Soup for theKnowledge and with someone about Kids Soul by JackUnderstandings anything no matter Canfield what it is Observation and monitoring:Ways to keep healthier ‘Wibbly the Wombat’and safer During the lesson note the students who are able to: song by Jayne Students to managing risk understand what take turns in persisting in asking for help Heskett strategies to enhance persistence is identify why is it important to persist? resilience Students to adapt their communication skills in a range of contextsSelf-management Skills recognise that demonstrate ways to cope with change/conflict/challenging situationsReviewing the situation network people will not always be factors to consider when available when Learning experiences: choosing the most required 1. Review the topic of networks with the students. appropriate person forCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 43
  • 46. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence help Students to 2. Definition of persistence:Planning before deciding understand the Provide students with definitions of persistence from the Dictionary.com strategies to assert benefits of website: themselves persistence Persistence (noun) – the act or fact of persistingDeciding and acting Persist (verb) – to continue steadfastly or firmly in some state, purpose, ways to apply the course of action, or the like, esp. in spite of opposition, remonstrance, decision making model etc.Interpersonal Skills Identify persistence as a skill for life. Discuss the other skills for life thatCommunicating fall under the resourcefulness category, such as decision making and ways to adapt goal setting, and why they are an important skill to have and use. communication skills 3. Read the students the story Just Ask (page 228) from Chicken Soup for thePreventing and Kids Soul by Jack Canfield (resource 28).managing conflict 4. Ask the students to form groups to discuss the story and develop three ways to deal important take-home messages. appropriately with 5. Persistence time line: teasing/bullying how to apply assertive Ask students to draw a persistence timeline based on the story Just Ask skills from Chicken Soup for the Kids Soul. Start with David reading the article on Harvest (organisation that deliversYEAR 9 left over food from restaurants to homeless shelters) to David meeting the First Lady Hillary Clinton.Knowledge andUnderstandings 6. Group discussion:Ways to keep healthier Explain the concept of using persistence to the students using theand safer following questions to initiate discussion: harm minimisation and o If someone wanted to discuss something with one of their network coping strategies people, would it be likely that all of their network people would be actions and strategies to available to talk to them at that time? promote health – o What could someone do if they tried to talk to someone on their enhancing physical and network but that person was not available? social environments o What could someone do if they come up against a roadblock whenSelf-management Skills they are using their network? (like when David spoke with theManaging emotions Principal about his idea) ways to identify 7. Small group activity: emotional states and proposed strategies to Ask students to break into groups of four or five. cope with them Tell the class that each group is to create a five minute skitReviewing the situation demonstrating persistence. how to select peopleCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 44
  • 47. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence and services that can Invite the groups to present their skits to the class. help Reflection: What was the most difficult aspect of trying to be persistent?Interpersonal Skills What could you do to make this easier or less stressful?Communicating ways to communicate Extension or variation: effectively when there is conflict Written activity: Revise the scenarios from the early warning sign ways to communicate in brainstorming session in Lesson 3. Ask students to write a short story or a range of social poem about someone who finds themselves in that situation and uses situations persistence.Preventing and Song activity: As a class ask students to create a rap version of the ‘Wibblymanaging conflict the Wombat’ song. Students can perform this song as part of an assembly assertive and encourage them to use costumes, puppets and other props. communication skills to Wibbly the Wombat manage conflict by Jane Heskett negotiation skills problem solving skills Wibbly the Wombat was feeling grim ways to minimise harm through selection and His unsafe feelings were worrying him, planning assertion So he knew just what to do techniques He’d tell his friend the kangaroo. Who said “I’m too busy jumping to talk to you!”YEAR 10 Try telling someone else Wibbly!Knowledge andUnderstandings He’d tell his friend the cockatoo,Ways to keep healthierand safer WHO SAID:“I’M TOO BUSY FLYING TO TALK TO YOU” taking action to maintain WHO SAID:“I’M TOO BUSY JUMPING TO TALK TO YOU” their own and others’ He’d tell his friend the platypus too, mental and emotional WHO SAID: IM TOO BUSY PLAYING TO TALK TO YOU health ”He’d tell his friend the koala too, preventative measures WHO SAID; ‘I’M NEVER TOO BUSY TO TALK WITH YOU!” strategies to minimise harmful or risky Wibbly the Wombat was happy at last behaviours and His unsafe feelings all were past, hazardous situations Keep on asking and telling too,Self-management Skills And you’ll discover it works for you and you and YOU!!!Managing emotionsCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 45
  • 48. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence strategies to cope with Role-play and reduce stress o Ask for five volunteers to sit at the front of the class to representInterpersonal Skills members of a network. Teacher represents the person who is feelingBuilding and nurturing unsafe.relationships o Each person is given a toy mobile phone, including the teacher. strategies to limit o The teacher is feeling unsafe because there is a big, black spider in her negative influences home. She is afraid of spiders and needs help to get rid of it. You mayPreventing and substitute another animal here (eg snake), or another situation (eg beingmanaging conflict home alone). ways of selecting, o The teacher phones each person on her ‘network’ in turn to ask for help applying and adjusting but each person has a different reason why they cannot help, until the assertion teacher reaches the last person who is available to help. ways to minimise o Ask four students to role-play answering the phone and providing an potential conflict excuse why they are unavailable. One is to role-play offering help to the harm minimisation skills teacher. ways to cope with o Summarise the activity by holding a group discussion about persistence. change /conflict/ o Ensure all students feel safe while this activity is being conducted – be challenging situations aware of fears/phobias about spiders/snakes. negotiation skillsWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 2: We can talk Lesson 7: Public and private Resource 18: PublicKnowledge and with someone about and privateUnderstandings anything no matter Internet accessThe meaning and what it is Observation and monitoring: During the lesson note the students who are able to: Computerdimensions of health Students to attitudes and values understand that the concept of public and private refers not only to body Display screen or recognise andWays to keep healthier parts but also to places and time interactive believe that they ownand safer whiteboard their body and that take cultural differences into account in self understanding rules, laws, policies to no-one else can Whiteboard promote health demonstrate ways to communicate in a range of relationships/situations. touch their body Whiteboard markers enhancing environments unless they give Learning experiences:Resources and permission 1. Review the topic of persistence with the students.consumer skills Students to Discuss protective interrupting with students. Set parameters such as no health services/agencies understand the disclosures of a personal nature but the teacher will be available after class.Self-management Skills difference between The ‘Importance of teaching Protective Behaviours’ section provides adviceUnderstanding emotions public and private on how to protectively interrupt. how to take cultural 2. Group discussion: differences into accountCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 46
  • 49. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence in self-understanding Ask students the following questions to initiate discussion:Monitoring and Who owns your body?evaluation Do we have the right to say who can/cannot touch our bodies? skills and actions to cope with overt and covert Can we say NO if we do not want someone to touch our body? (eg if our peer influence boyfriend/girlfriend wants to hug us, if Grandma wants to hug us, if youInterpersonal Skills are sick and the doctor wants to listen to your chest)Building and nurturing If we have the right to say NO if someone wants to touch our body, dorelationships we have a responsibility to ensure that we do not touch someone else’s how to behave body without permission? appropriately in varying If we own our own bodies, whose responsibility is it to look after them? relationships/situations How can we/do we look after our bodies? (saying ‘NO’ to someone wanting to touch our body is one way of looking after ourselves).YEAR 9 4. Group discussion: Public versus privateKnowledge andUnderstandings Initiate a discussion about the self-understanding skill for life in relationThe meaning and to public and private.dimensions of health Brainstorm public versus private lifestyle behaviours and o What clothing would be considered public/private? consequences o Are there other types of clothing that could be considered both publicWays to keep healthier and private depending on the where they are being worn or theand safer cultures of people wearing them? rules laws and policies to o What places would be considered public/private? promote safety actions and strategies to o What makes a place public/private? (eg private because people need promote permission to enter – home, bedroom; public because people do not health – enhancing need permission to enter – shopping centre) physical and social o Can places be both public and private at different times or in different environments circumstances? (eg bathrooms)Resources and o Is the Internet (including chat rooms, social networking sites) a publicconsumer skills or private place? health information about o What parts of the body are considered private parts? (Note: safety Protective Behaviours WA Inc encourages the use of correctSelf-management Skills anatomical names for private parts – penis, vagina, anus).Understanding emotions o Brainstorm a list of names that are commonly used for private parts strategies to identify, instead of the correct anatomical names (eg willy, boobs). Set up the interpret and monitor brainstorm using the anatomically correct names to link the common influences on ‘the self’ names. Note: Try to discourage laughter of names, as it may make how to examine the students feel unsafe to participate or share ideas. influence of others onCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 47
  • 50. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence self-understanding o Is the mouth a private part? Why/why not? (Note: ProtectiveManaging emotions Behaviours WA Inc considers the mouth to be a private part because how to manage emotions people should not touch, kiss or insert anything into your mouth and limit the impact of without your permission). value laden judgements o What makes them private parts? Permission must be given by the strategies to owning and person before anyone can touch these areas. taking responsibility for 5. Ask students to complete the Public and private activity sheet (Resource 18). emotional health of self and othersInterpersonal Skills Extension or variation:Communicating Discuss personal space in regards to the internet and cyber safety. We all ways to communicate in have the right to personal space on the internet. a range of social Discuss way we can demonstrate our personal space on the internet. How situations can we say ‘no’ assertively on the internet?Preventing and Ask students to draw a map of the school and identify public and privatemanaging conflict areas by shading different colours. problem solving skills Tell students to explore public and private on the internet. Ask them to ways to minimise harm make lists of the types of public photos/stories/discussions/videos that are through selection and suitable for posting on social networking sites/texting/or uploading onto planning assertion video sites. Ask them to also make a list of the types of private techniques photos/stories/ discussions/videos that should not be posted on socialBuilding and nurturing networking sites/texted or uploaded onto video sites. Discuss internetrelationships safety. how to demonstrate acceptable and There are many internet safety sites that address issues such as digital appropriate behaviour reputation, online safety, how to stay in control, how to report, what can go wrong, who can I tell if I am worried and keeping your computer secure. Some of these are:YEAR 10Knowledge and o www.thinkyouknow.org.auUnderstandings o www.theline.gov.auThe meaning and o www.cybersmart.gov.audimensions of health social, cultural, environmental and political factors that influence the community’s health and attitudesGrowth and development societal cohesionCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 48
  • 51. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceWays to keep healthierand safer risk management in the community rules, laws and policies to promote a safe physical and social environmentSelf-management SkillsUnderstanding emotions strategies to cope with influencesInterpersonal SkillsBuilding and nurturingrelationships strategies to limit negative influencesPreventing andmanaging conflict harm minimisation skillsWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 2: We can talk Lesson 8: Personal space | Safe and unsafe touches Resource 19:Knowledge and with someone about Personal spaceUnderstandings anything no matter character cards what it is Observation and monitoring:Social-emotional well Resource 20: During the lesson note the students who are able to: Personal space planbeing Students to develop complete their personal space plan by identifying different levels of safe Resource 21: What different types of touch with the different people in their lives relationships an understanding of is abuse? their own personal adapt communication skills in a range of situations and contexts Whiteboard values and beliefs space identify different types of emotions and the ways they are expressed.Self-management Skills Whiteboard markers Students to develop Placement templateUnderstanding emotions an understanding Learning experiences: from Teacher toolkit how to identify the that they are in 1. Review the topic of body ownership and private/public with the students. templates different types of charge of who emotions and ways they comes into their 2. Discussion: write up this question on the whiteboard: What do you think are expressed personal space personal space is? Relate the discussion to relationship skills.Interpersonal Skills Students to develop 3. Group activity:Communicating an understanding of Tell students to pick a partner to work with.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 49
  • 52. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence ways to adapt safe touch and Ask them to stand approximately one metre apart facing each other. communication skills unsafe touch One partner stands still while the other partner walks towards the active listening skills to Students to develop stationary person. establish relationships an understanding of The stationary person puts their hand up and says stops when the how to read body different levels of walking partner has entered their personal space (ensure the students language touch with different understand they must stop when told to and that the stationary person is people in their lives in charge of their own personal space).YEAR 9 Measure the distance (personal space) between partners in terms ofKnowledge and arm length. Swap places and repeat the exercise.Understandings 4. As a class discuss:Social-emotional well Was the point at which each person began to feel uncomfortable thebeing same for both partners? If not, why would this be the case? strategies to manage What does the ‘comfortable’ distance between partners represent for relationships each person? Personal space.Self-management Skills How do we know if someone is in our personal space?Understanding emotions What could someone do if another person came too close into their how to track and personal space? Move back, walk away, tell them. challenge the connection 5. Group activity: between thoughts, Introduce the students to the topic of touching and how there are feelings and behaviours different types of touching. how to limit the impact of peer pressure Remind students that the classroom group is not the place to share anything very personal but that they can speak with the teacher afterInterpersonal Skills class if they want to.Communicating Teachers need to be ready to protectively interrupt if any disclosures ways to communicate in around unsafe touch and abuse are made. a range of social Ask students as a class to create a list of touches on the whiteboard (eg situations a close cuddle with your Mum, giving your friend a quick hug, giving yourPreventing and team mate a high-five if they score a goal, being tickled, being punchedmanaging conflict in the arm). problem solving skills Discuss the difference between a close cuddle and a quick hug with the ways to minimise harm students. through selection and Ask students to use the list on the board to categorise which touches are planning assertion safe and unsafe using different colours. techniques Discuss the concept that touches can change from being safe to beingBuilding and nurturing unsafe. For example – being tickled is a safe touch if it is fun and beingrelationships enjoyed by both people, however if one person says they do not want toCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 50
  • 53. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence how to demonstrate be tickled any more and the other person keeps tickling them it can acceptable and become an unsafe touch. appropriate behaviour Ask the students, ‘How do we tell whether a touch is safe or unsafe?’ a. Safe touches feel good and are enjoyed by both people.YEAR 10 b. Unsafe touches do not feel good and may give us our early warningKnowledge and signs. They may be painful or make us feel uncomfortable orUnderstandings embarrassed. They may create the feeling of mixed feelings andThe meaning and messages.dimensions of health Discuss with the students that some touches can be safe/unsafe social, cultural, depending on the circumstances. For example – a light punch in the arm environmental and by a friend when you are play fighting or joking around is a safe touch, a political factors that hard punch from someone who is trying to hurt you is an unsafe touch. influence the Discuss that there will be people in their lives that they know (eg maybe community’s health and their neighbour) and people they do not know (eg police officer) that they attitudes might talk with but not have any physical touch with.Growth and development Using a similar activity from the start of this lesson, divide students into societal cohesion pairs. Provide each pair with a set of Personal space character cardsWays to keep healthier (Resource 19). Each character card has a persona written on it. Theand safer person standing still indicates where the person walking should stop and indicates what action they might perform (eg wave, high-five, hug). preventative measures 6. Activity: strategies to minimise harmful or risky Provide students with the Personal space plan activity sheet (Resource behaviours and 20). hazardous situations Ask each student to fill in names of people in each of the thoughtSelf-management Skills bubbles to create a personal space plan.Understanding emotions o Close cuddles strategies to cope with o Quick hugs influences o High-five or shake handsInterpersonal Skills o Say helloBuilding and nurturing o Helpful strangersrelationships 7. Review unhealthy or abusive relationships. strategies to limit Discuss abuse in relationships. negative influences Relate to safe and unsafe touches and personal space.Preventing andmanaging conflict Ask students to complete the What is abuse? activity sheet (Resource 21) either individually or in pairs. Discuss consequences of abusive harm minimisation skills relationships. Ensure that protective interruption is used.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 51
  • 54. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceLeading, initiating and Extension or variation:facilitating Using a placemat activity ask students to work in small groups to provide a leadership strategies definition for one of the following areas of safety: when supporting others o Physical safety how to express feelings, o Emotional safety needs, ideas, empathy and support to others in o Sexual safety a socially and culturally o Financial safety appropriate manner o Spiritual safety For example, ‘Physically safe is when...’, ‘Physically unsafe is when...’ Ask students to discuss or brainstorm coping strategies or places to go for help in abusive situations. As a class share the definitions and discuss them.Wellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Theme 2: We can talk Lesson 9: Assertiveness Resource 1: StrengthKnowledge and with someone about cardsUnderstandings anything no matter Observation and monitoring Y-chart from TeacherWays to keep healthier what it is toolkit templatesand safer During the lesson note the students who are able to: managing risk Students to identify role-play No, Go, Tell with puppets/toys. strategies to enhance resilience own strengthsSelf-management Skills Students to Learning experiences:Planning before deciding understand 1. Review the topics of personal space and safe/unsafe touches with the strategies to assert assertiveness students. themselves Students to identify 2. Strengths cards activity:Monitoring and and practise Spread the Strengths cards (Resource 1) out over one or two tables atevaluation different levels of the back of the class. skills and actions to cope assertiveness with overt and covert Ask the students to go to the table and choose one or two cards which peer influence reflect something they do well.Interpersonal Skills When everyone has at least one card, ask the students to write aboutCommunicating the following question: ways to adapt communication skills o How might you use your strengths to make better decisions andPreventing and better choices about who you are?managing conflict 3. Discuss assertive communication and relationship skills with the ways to deal students. appropriately withCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 52
  • 55. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence conflict What is assertiveness? ways to deal What does ‘being assertive’ mean? appropriately with teasing/bullying Is it an important skill? how to apply assertive Is it a strength to be assertive? Why/why not? skills How can being assertive help you?YEAR 9 4. Y-chart:Knowledge and Ask students to complete a Y-chart on assertiveness. What does beingUnderstandings assertive feel like, look like, sound like?Ways to keep healthierand safer 5. Explain to the students that it is ok to say no to someone/something if you plans to avoid and are getting your early warning signs about it. Introduce the phrase ‘NO manage risk means NO!’ harm minimisation and 6. Demonstrate the five stages of no: coping strategies a) No – playful no, laughing or in disbelief (eg ‘No way!’)Self-management Skills b) No – Manners no, polite (eg ‘No thank you’)Understanding emotions how to track and c) No – Assertive no, firm but polite and confident (eg ‘No, I don’t want to challenge the connection go to see that movie, I’ve seen it twice already’) between thoughts, d) No! – Angry no, loud and determined (eg ‘No, I don’t want a cigarette!’) feelings and behaviours e) NO! – Emergency no, shouted/screamed as loud as possible (eg ‘NO! how to limit the impact of Don’t touch me!’) peer pressure 7. Activity:Planning before deciding strategies to assert Divide the class into small groups or pairs. individual rights and Each group is allocated one of the five stages of ‘No’. predict the consequence Ask the groups to think of a situation/scenario in which they might use of actions that level of No.Interpersonal SkillsCommunicating Tell the groups to practise acting out the scenario using the appropriate ways to establish level of No. effective communication Invite the groups to act it out for the class. showing empathy, 8. Homework: ask students to bring their personal network information to class tolerance and sensitivity with them next week. ways to communicate effectively when there is conflict Extension or variation:Building and nurturing Ask students to create and illustrate ‘No Means No’ posters and displayrelationships them in classroom and around the school. how to build Invite students to identify other aspects of body language. Watch a section relationships withCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 53
  • 56. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence unfamiliar others of an unfamiliar video with the sound turned down. Tell students to try to ways to cope with identify how the character is feeling by reading the body language. dysfunctional relationships how to demonstrate acceptable and appropriate behaviour how to consider rights of othersLeading, initiating andfacilitating leadership strategiesYEAR 10Knowledge andUnderstandingsWays to keep healthierand safer preventative measures strategies to minimise harmful or risky behaviours and hazardous situationsSelf-management SkillsUnderstanding emotions strategies to cope with influences how to examine the influence of othersInterpersonal SkillsCommunicating communication skills to manage conflict of valuesBuilding and nurturingrelationships strategies to limit negative influencesPreventing andmanaging conflict harm minimisation skillsCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 54
  • 57. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceWellness | SafetyYEAR 8 Program Lesson 10: Program review Resource 22:Knowledge and reinforcement Attitudes and beliefsUnderstandings Resource 23: Network review Observation and monitoring:Ways to keep healthier Protectiveand safer Post-program During the lesson note the students who are able to: Behaviours quiz managing risk evaluation review the Protective Behaviours program Resource 24: strategies to enhance To consolidate review their personal network and make necessary adjustments. Protective resilience Protective BehavioursSelf-management Skills Behaviours program evaluationUnderstanding emotions Learning experiences: Resource 25: how to identify the 1. Identify the life skill of self-reflection. Discuss the benefits of using this skill Certificate of different types of with the students. Participation emotions and ways they 2. Review the topic of assertiveness with the class. are expressed Whiteboard 3. Review the themes of each lesson and discuss and brainstorm the main ways to enhance our Whiteboard markers points from each. self-understanding 4. Personal network:Reviewing the situation factors to consider when Discuss the importance of the students reviewing their personal network choosing the most on a regular basis, every couple of months at least, and definitely before appropriate person for school holidays to ensure that they still have people who they can help contact.Interpersonal Skills 5. Activity:Preventing and Ask students to review their personal network by asking themselves themanaging conflict following questions: risk evaluation a) Do I still feel comfortable confiding in this person? strategies b) Are my network people still accessible and able to be contacted?YEAR 9 c) Is there someone new to add to my list?Knowledge and Explain that if they answer No to either a) or b) then they need to revisitUnderstandings their list of possible network people to see who could replace the person/The meaning and people that they no longer feel comfortable talking to or are no longerdimensions of health accessible. If they answer Yes to c) they need to determine who the new lifestyle behaviours and person will replace. consequences 6. Attitudes and beliefs activities:Ways to keep healthier It is important for students to identify the connection between personaland safer attitudes, beliefs and values towards particular health topics in order to harm minimisation and help them make informed decisions and to further develop skills for life. coping strategies This activity is used to help students determine how different situationsCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 55
  • 58. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceSelf-management Skills and scenarios make them feel.Managing emotions Cut out the Attitudes and beliefs cards (Resource 22). Place the AGREE strategies to owning and card at one end of the room, the DISAGREE card at the other, and the taking responsibility for UNSURE card in the middle. emotional health of self Read out a selection of age and developmentally appropriate statements and others about problems and relationships (Resource 22) one at a time. Ask ways to enhance self- students to move to the sign which best represents their opinion about confidence each statement.Planning before deciding Encourage students to discuss their reasoning for each decision, and strategies to assert allow them to move to a different sign if they change their minds. individual rights and predict the consequence Note: Ensure that you discuss the importance of individual honesty with of actions this activity. Discuss the importance of respect and confidentially ofInterpersonal Skills discussions and responses. It is also a good idea to discuss strategies toPreventing and solve problems.managing conflict 7. Quiz: assertive Ask all students to complete the Protective Behaviours quiz (Resource communication skills to 23) Students are to record their answers. manage conflict Call out the answers to the class while students self-mark their work. negotiation skills problem solving skills All quizzes are to be handed to the teacher at the completion of the lesson. ways to minimise harm through selection and 8. Ask all students to complete the Protective Behaviours evaluation form planning assertion (Resource 24). techniques 9. Students are awarded a Protective Behaviours certificate of participation (Resource 25).YEAR 10Knowledge andUnderstandings Extension or variation:The meaning and Discuss cyber safetydimensions of health Self-esteem and team build games or activities with the children: community strategies to o Writing on your back: tape a piece of paper to the back of each child. promote health The children then have to walk around the classroom without talking andGrowth and development record a positive thing about someone on their back. Children should lifestyle behaviours and repeat this until everyone has at least 3 positive comments on their their impact on society back.Ways to keep healthierand safer risk management in the communityCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 56
  • 59. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence taking action to maintain their own and others’ mental and emotional health preventative measures strategies to minimise harmful or risky behaviours and hazardous situationsSelf-management SkillsManaging emotions community strategies that are used to cope with intense emotions in particular situations strategies to cope with and reduce stressMonitoring andevaluating strategies to monitor and evaluate decisionsInterpersonal SkillsCommunicating communication skills to manage conflict of valuesBuilding and nurturingrelationships strategies to limit negative influencesPreventing andmanaging conflict how to manage/resolve conflict when in a position of power ways to minimise potential conflict harm minimisation skills negotiation skillsCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 57
  • 60. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResourcesBy clicking on the attachment tab, you can access this section as a word document.Resource 1: Strength cards....................................................................................................59Resource 2: Theme posters ...................................................................................................64Resource 3: Safety brainstorm...............................................................................................68Resource 4: Skills for life poster.............................................................................................69Resource 5: Risk taking activities...........................................................................................70Resource 6: Early warning signs............................................................................................71Resource 7: News article – Girl saves life of teacher by taking control of car........................72Resource 8: Safety continuum signs......................................................................................73Resource 9: Safety continuum scenarios...............................................................................77Resource 10: What do you do cards ......................................................................................78Resource 11: Safe/unsafe secret scenarios...........................................................................83Resource 12: Network invitation.............................................................................................84Resource 13: Relationship circle............................................................................................86Resource 14: Healthy/unhealthy relationship brainstorm.......................................................87Resource 15: Maintaining healthy relationships.....................................................................88Resource 16: Relationship problems .....................................................................................89Resource 17: My trust circle...................................................................................................91Resource 18: Public and private ............................................................................................93Resource 19: Personal space character cards ......................................................................94Resource 20: Personal space plan ........................................................................................95Resource 21: What is abuse? ................................................................................................96Resource 22: Attitudes and beliefs.........................................................................................97Resource 23: Protective Behaviours quiz ............................................................................101Resource 24: Protective Behaviours evaluation...................................................................103Resource 25: Certificate of Participation ..............................................................................104Resource 26: Emotions...................................................................................................................106Resource 27: Sing yourself safe song lyrics ........................................................................109Resource 28: Just ask short story ........................................................................................114CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 58
  • 61. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 1: Strength cardsI am adventurous I am assertive I give people my I bounce back attention when I get hurt I am brave I am calm I am capable I care about others I am careful I communicate I am confident I am creative wellCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 59
  • 62. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 1: Strength cards (continued) I am curious I am determined I don’t give up I am easy to get along with I give good I am energetic I show lots of I am fair encouragement enthusiasm I am forgiving I am friendly I am fun I am gentleCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 60
  • 63. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 1: Strength cards (continued) I am a good I have good I am happy I am hardworking friend manners I like to help I am honest I show I like to join in others independence with others I make people I am a good I look after others I look after things laugh leaderCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 61
  • 64. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 1: Strength cards (continued) I am neat and I am organised I am patient I am persistent tidy I am relaxed I am reliable I am resilient I respect othersI am responsible I share with I can stand up for I am strong others myselfCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 62
  • 65. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 1: Strength cards (continued) I tell people what I can be trusted I am wise I work well with I think othersQuestion cards: Which one of these strength cards do you feel you are in Which one of these strength cards do you do well? control of? Which ones push you around? Which ones would you like to change in your life? How are your strengths the same/different from others? How do you take risks with these strengths?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 63
  • 66. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 2: Theme posters We all have the right to We can feel safe at all times talk with someone about anything no matter what it isCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 64
  • 67. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 2: Theme posters (continued) We all have the right to feel safe at all We can talk with someone about times anything no matter what it isCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 65
  • 68. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 2: Theme posters (continued) We all have the right to We can feel safe at all times talk with someone about anything no matter what it isCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 66
  • 69. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 2: Theme posters (continued) We all have the right to feel safe at all We can talk with someone about times anything no matter what it isCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 67
  • 70. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 3: Safety brainstorm Keeping safe Safe behaviour Ways to keep safe What is safety? Who? School When? Taking risks SAFETY Laws and rules Classroom What? Effects of being unsafe on learning on our health on relationships CommunityCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 68
  • 71. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 4: Skills for life poster Helpful and Positive Thinking Understanding links between thoughts/feelings and behaviour Positive self-talk Understanding Emotions Being aware of a range of feelings Regulating their own feelings Reading other’s emotions Self-understanding Knowing their own values and how to stand up for them Self-reflection Relationship Skills Resourcefulness Group skills Problem predicting and problem solving Help seeking and disclosure Decision making Assertive Goal setting communication PersistenceCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 69
  • 72. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 5: Risk taking activities Risk taking activities How do you think these people are feeling? What do you think they are thinking? What body reactions (early warning signs) do you think they are having?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 70
  • 73. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 6: Early warning signs When do you get your early warning signs? What am I feeling? What am I thinking? Draw your early warning signs on the picture below. In the thought bubble, write what you are often thinking when you feel unsafe/scared.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 71
  • 74. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 7: News article – Girl saves life of teacher by taking control of carGirl Saves Life Of Teacher By Taking Control Of CarCBSnews.com 8/5/03For 30 years, there isnt much new that can surprise fourth-grade teacher Rodney Booth at DenversSabin Elementary School.He has taught hundreds of youngsters, but Sarah Harmon may be the one he will never forget. Boothsays he is extremely grateful to her for saving his life.Like many children, Sarah is a busy bundle of energy. In class, shes part of her schools Shakespeareclub. After school, she participates in a soccer league. But her quick thinking on a recent field trip wasmore than anyone ever expected from a 10-year-old.Booth was driving his students to the Air Force Academy."I wasnt feeling well and all of a sudden, I just passed out," he recalls. "We were on the Interstate,[going] 70 miles an hour on the passing lane.""I was just sitting in my back seat, listening to my headset, and all of a sudden we hear this loudscratch type thing and then it happened another time," recalls one student.The kids noticed Booth was unconscious."He just passed out," says Sarah. "Im just like, Oh my gosh, Whats going to happen to us. I donteven remember if I thought fast or anything. I just did it."Sarah grabbed the wheel and safely steered the car through two lanes of traffic, over a grassy areainto a safe dirt road.Of course, the young girl doesnt even know how to drive. Harmon modestly says she just knew whatto do."I dont remember hitting the guardrail at all," says Booth. "The first thing I remember is that I hearSarah saying, Wake up Mr. Booth. Wake up Mr. Booth. And Im starting to wake up and shes goingfor the cell phone. Thats when I started to realize what had happened."Not only did she grab the wheel and get the vehicle safely off the highway, but she also rememberedthat her teacher had a phone in his pocket. So she found the phone and dialed 911."From what I understand, she was trying to calm the other kids as well," says Firemen Lamb. "Not onlywas she taking control of the situation, but also the other kids."CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 72
  • 75. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 8: Safety continuum signs SafeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 73
  • 76. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 8: Safety continuum signs (continued) UnsafeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 74
  • 77. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 8: Safety continuum signs (continued) Risking on purposeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 75
  • 78. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 8: Safety continuum signs (continued) Fun to feel scaredCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 76
  • 79. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 9: Safety continuum scenarios Safety continuum scenariosYou are riding your bike when You go to the zoo and see ayou see a ‘huge’ snake on the ‘huge’ snake in a cage.footpath. You are messaging a friendYou are lining up for the online in a chat room androllercoaster at the Royal someone starts sending youShow. nasty messages about personal things in your life. You are watching a reallyYou are watching a really scary movie with your mates atscary movie on DVD at home. the cinema.You are catching the train andsome older kids start calling You are singing in the shower.you names.You have been chosen to sing You have been chosen to singin front of the whole school at on Australian Idol.assembly. You are swimming at theYou are swimming in your pool beach and there are a fewat home. medium sized waves. You are walking home fromYou are caught in a rip in the sports practice in the dark andocean. you hear footsteps behind you. A relative gives you a hug and kiss that invades your personalYou give a relative a kiss and space. You ask them to stopa hug when they leave your but they keep touching you in ahouse after a visit. way that makes you feel uncomfortable.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 77
  • 80. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 10: What do you do cards What do you do?Example scenarios: use scenarios that are appropriate for the studentsWhat would you do if… someone was teasing you and calling you names everyday? someone kept giving you hugs that you don’t like? you were always the last person picked to play sport or games? your best friend says that they don’t want to be your friend anymore? you had to give a talk in front of you whole class and you are nervous? you had a big test/exam coming up and you felt unprepared? you were approached by a stranger? you and your boyfriend/girlfriend broke up? you were pressured to have sex? your parents were going through a divorce? you kept receiving rude emails or text messages? you had to give a speech at the school assembly? I talk to someone I play sport or get about the problem active I blame myself I eat lessCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 78
  • 81. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 10: What do you do cards (continued) I think about the I eat more problem constantly I confront the person I blame someone else causing the problem I keep busy I stay in bed I do something I enjoy I look after myselfCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 79
  • 82. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 10: What do you do cards (continued) I pray I watch television I try to laugh about it I think bad thoughts and make jokes I try to understand another’s point of I seek help view I pretend nothing is I make a plan wrongCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 80
  • 83. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 10: What do you do cards (continued) I make threats or get I smoke or drink angry alcohol I think about other I put on a brave face things that I like I hope things will get I scream better I keep things to I try to relax myselfCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 81
  • 84. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 10: What do you do cards (continued) I think about how I I run away might help others I work really hard I go out more I go out less and stay I feel sick in my room I don’t want to go to I cry schoolCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 82
  • 85. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 11: Safe/unsafe secret scenarios Safe/unsafe secret scenarios SCENARIO 1 SCENARIO 2 A group of friends are meeting at the food Jackie and Ally have been best friends since hall before seeing a movie. An older group of year 3. Jackie wears size 12 clothes and kids are sitting next to them. One of them always refers to herself as “fat”. Ally has offers to add something to their cool drinks. noticed lately that Jackie always goes to the The group of friends ask what it is and the bathroom for a long time after eating lunch. older kids say “it’s a secret, just try it, you’ll One day Ally follows Jackie into the bathroom like it”. and hears her throwing up in the toilet. When Ally asks Jackie if she is alright, Jackie begs Ally not to tell anyone what she is doing and Is this a safe or unsafe secret? to keep it a secret because she needs to fit into her new dress for a party on the Why? weekend. What could the group of friends do? Is this a safe or unsafe secret? Why? Discuss and role play What could Ally do? Discuss and role play SCENARIO 3 SCENARIO 4 Josh and Brad are best mates. They are 13 Alice, Summer, Connor and Jack are good years old. Last week Josh showed Brad 20 friends. They share everything even their texts from their swim coach (Beth, 32 years internet passwords. Last school holidays old, married with 2 children) saying how Alice and Summer had an argument and much she loves Brad. Yesterday Josh Alice is no longer part of the group. showed Brad a photo Beth sent him on email. No one will speak to Alice at school now In the photo she is wearing her bathers. The because she has been posting horrible and email asks Josh to meet her on Friday night untrue things about everyone on the internet. in the city at 9.30. Alice is really upset and wags school all the Josh asks Brad to cover for him as Beth has time now. told him to keep the meeting a secret from Summer has told Jack that she used Alice’s his Mum and Dad. internet password and posted all the horrible and untrue things on line. Summer has told Jack to keep this a secret so everyone will Is this a safe or unsafe secret? think it was Alice. Why? Jack really likes Summer but he can see how What could Brad do? upset Alice is. Is this a safe or unsafe secret? Discuss and role play Why? What could Jack do? Discuss and role playCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 83
  • 86. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 12: Network invitationDear ________________________________________ Dear ________________________________________ I have been learning about Protective Behaviours and about how to feel, be and keep safe. I have been learning about Protective Behaviours and I have learnt that we all have the right to feel safe at all about how to feel, be and keep safe. times, and if we don’t feel safe we can talk with someone about anything, no matter what it is. I have learnt that we all have the right to feel safe at all times, and if we don’t feel safe we can talk with _______________________________________________________ someone about anything, no matter what it is. I would like you to be on my network. Being on my _______________________________________________________ network is like being a friend who will LISTEN TO ME, BELIEVE ME AND TAKE ACTION if needed to help me keep safe. _______________________________________________________ If you don’t know how to help me, you can help me contact someone else from my network._______________________________________________________ From ________________________________________From ________________________________________CISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 84
  • 87. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 12: Network invitation (continued)Dear ____________________________________________ Dear __________________________________________I have been learning about Protective Behaviours and I have been learning about Protective Behavioursabout how to feel, be and keep safe. and about how to feel, be and keep safe.I have learnt _________________________ I have learnt that we all have the right to feel safe at all times, and if we don’t feel safe we can_________________________________ talk with someone about anything, no matter what it is. ______________________________________________________ I would like you to be on my network. Being on my network is like being a friend who will LISTEN TO ME, BELIEVE ME AND TAKE ACTION if neededI would like you to be on my network because ________________________ to help me keep safe. If you don’t know how to help me, you can help me contact someone else from my network.__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ From ___________________________ From ______________________________CISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 85
  • 88. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 13: Relationship circle MECISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 86
  • 89. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 14: Healthy/unhealthy relationship brainstorm What happens in What happens in unhealthy or abusive relationships? Relationships healthy or respectful relationships?CISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 87
  • 90. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 15: Maintaining healthy relationships MECISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 88
  • 91. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 16: Relationship problemsName:__________________________________________________________________________________________For this activity you will be working through a variety of real world relationship problems that can occur to determine an appropriate and successful action toresolve the issue. 1. cut out one of the following problem scenarios and glue it onto the PROBLEM box on your decision making planning sheet 2. choose two possible actions that you could take if you were in this situation 3. think about and record two possible consequences that might occur from these actions 4. record how these consequences would make you feel 5. decide and record the action you believe would be the best action to follow in order to resolve the issue if you were placed in the situation 6. discuss your decision making planner with a partner to share your chosen actionYou have recently entered a new relationship and your partner continuously You have noticed that a friend of yours keeps coming to school with a puts you down in front of your friends. number of bruises on his/her arms and legs. A friend of yours has recently entered a new relationship. Her boyfriendA close friend of yours offers you some drugs which he/she got from his/her doesn’t want her to hang around with you and your friends anymore and older brother/sister. you haven’t seen her for a few days. You are at a party with alcohol (which you weren’t suppose to go to) and You have been with your boyfriend/girlfriend for a few months and he/sheyou have been drinking. You need to get home, but the only people driving starts asking if they can see you naked and you feel uncomfortable. are drunk. You are at the shops with a group of people from school. The group then You walk past a group of your friends and you hear them whispering rude starts making rude and sexual comments and trying to grab people and untrue things about you. inappropriately as they walk past. A friend of yours leaves her lunch money at home and asks to borrow some You come across an email on the internet which contains some rude and from you. You let her because you want her to have something to eat.personal information about your best friend and his/her boyfriend/girlfriend. Then it starts to happen every day.CISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 89
  • 92. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 16: Relationship problems (continued) PROBLEM ACTION 1 ACTION 2 Possible Consequence Possible Consequence Possible Consequence Possible Consequence This would make me This would make me This would make me This would make me feel feel feel feel If I was in this situation, the action I would choose to take is:CISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 90
  • 93. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 17: My trust circle My trust circle example 1. Write your name in the centre of the circle, this is your trust circle. 2. Put names of people you trust and would talk to if you have a problem inside the circles in your safety circle. 3. Put names of people you would talk to about certain things in circles overlapping your trust circle. 4. Put names of people or roles of people you don’t know and wouldn’t talk to on the outside of your safety circle. 5. Include emergency services 6. Colour co-ordinate your circles. Police Stranger Mrs Smith Teacher Mum Nurse Jane Sister Amanda Bryce ME Brother Kylie Best friend Sam Dr Blake Boyfriend Doctor Neighbour Bus driverCISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 91
  • 94. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 17: My trust circle (continued) My trust circleCISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 92
  • 95. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 18: Public and private Public and privateA guy is at a concert and needs to go to the toilet. As he walks to the toilet he notices thequeues for the girls’ toilets are really long. While he is at the urinal doing his business a girlcomes bursting in saying ‘Sorry but the queues at the Ladies’ are too long and I can’t hold onanymore!’ She uses the toilet and leaves.1. Are the toilets at the concert venue a public or private place?2. Was it acceptable for the girl to use the Men’s toilets?3. Could she/he have done anything to make it acceptable?4. How would the guy have felt when the girl came into the Men’s toilets while he was using it?5. What would have been the reaction if the situation had been reversed and the guy had gone in to use the Women’s toilet because queues at the Men’s toilets were too long?CISPB010| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 93
  • 96. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 19: Personal space character cards Personal space character cards This activity is to promote personal space and social distance 1. Photocopy and cut out cards 2. Give one set of cards to each pair 3. One person stands still, while the other person stands about 10m away, facing one another. The person standing far away selects one of the character cards, and slowly walks towards the person standing still. The person standing still indicates when to stop, because that character has entered their personal space. They then indicate what type of action they can perform (eg wave, high-five, hug). 4. Discuss that there are no right or wrong answers and that people feel differently towards other people. Parent/carer Parent/carer Next door (you feel down and (you feel angry and Sister/Brother need a comforting just want to be left neighbour hug) alone) Aunty/Uncle Aunty/Uncle (you are meeting for Teacher Sports coach (you know well) the first time) Swimming Best friend New friend Police officer Teacher Shop Nurse Dentist Family friend assistant Someone you don’t Friend Friend know (you see everyday) (you see after a really Grandparents long holiday) (walking past you on the street)CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 94
  • 97. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 20: Personal space plan ___________________________________’s personal space plan High five bubble Write the names of people you would give a high Say hello Hug five to. and wave bubble bubble Write the names of Write the names of people you know people you say hello well that you would and wave to but don’t give quick hugs to. have any physical Kiss, cuddle contact with. Stranger Personal and squeeze bubble bubble space bubble My Personal Space Plan Write the roles of people Write the names of Draw a picture of people you know really I am in charge of my personal space. that are strangers that you yourself. might need to talk with to well that you would give close cuddles to. I will respect other people’s personal space. get help.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 95
  • 98. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 21: What is abuse? Emotional Physical ABUSE Sexual NeglectCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 96
  • 99. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 22: Attitudes and beliefsCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 97
  • 100. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 22: Attitudes and beliefs (continued) Problems and relationships statements Stress is the cause of violence in relationships. Women are as violent as men. It is better to stay in an unhealthy relationship than to be by yourself.It is easy to leave an unhealthy or abusive relationship. The best action in solving a problem is to confront the person causing the problem. Smoking or drinking alcohol is an action that can help solve problems. If I feel uncomfortable or unsafe, pretending nothing is wrong can be helpful.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 98
  • 101. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 22: Attitudes and beliefs (continued) Staying away from the person can help to resolve any problems you have with them. If you are at a party where there is alcohol, it is better to get into the car with a drunk driver, or drive drunk, than to phone your parents and tell them you have been drinking. Someone sends you an email about someone from your school. A good problem solving strategy is to send it to the person involved. Women are more likely to talk about their problems. There are just as many male victims as there are women victims in violent relationships. Males are more likely to be abusive or violent than women. Someone being violent or abusive in relationships is sometimes a way for them to show that they care.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 99
  • 102. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 22: Attitudes and beliefs (continued) If someone offered you drugs or alcohol, it would be rude not to accept it. If you heard someone saying rude and untrue things about you behind your back, you would ignore it. If you are constantly being put down by a close friend, you should stand up for yourself. If someone tried to show you their private parts you would keep it a secret. If you notice lots of bruises on a friend, you woulddecide that it is none of your business and pretend that you didn’t see them. You recently became part of a new relationship and you decide that it is better if you spend all your time with your partner and stop seeing your friends. Your friends have started this new game of making rude and sexual comments to anyone who walks past them. It is better to play too, instead on being isolated from the group.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 100
  • 103. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 23: Protective Behaviours quiz Protective Behaviours quizName:_______________________________________________________________1. Protective Behaviours Theme 1__________________________________________________________________________2. List three rights and three matching responsibilities______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3. What are your Early Warning Signs? What feelings do you have?____________________________________________________________________________ What are your body signals?____________________________________________________________________________ What are you thinking when you feel this way?____________________________________________________________________________4. Give an example of doing something that feels... Safe _______________________________________________________________________ Fun to Feel Scared _________________________________________________________________________ Risking On Purpose _______________________________________________________________________ Unsafe _______________________________________________________________________5. Describe a situation where you took a safe risk.____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 101
  • 104. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence6. Protective Behaviours Theme 2____________________________________________________________________________7. Give an example of a safe secret________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________8. Give an example of an unsafe secret________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________9. Name five trusted adults who are on your network1. __________________________________ 2. ______________________________3. __________________________________ 4. ______________________________5. __________________________________10. Describe a situation where you persisted until you reached your goal?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________11. What can you do if someone comes into your personal space?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________12. Give an example of a time you might use an emergency/danger NO________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 102
  • 105. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 24: Protective Behaviours evaluation Protective Behaviours evaluationDid you enjoy the Protective Behaviours lessons? YES NOWhat was the most important thing you learnt?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________What would you teach your little brother or sister/cousin etc about Protective Behaviours?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Have you used your network ? If yes, what for? Did they help you?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Any other comments about the Protective Behaviours Program...CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 103
  • 106. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 25: Certificate of Participation This certificate is awarded to ________________________________ for successfully completing the Protective Behaviours program on ________________________________ Date ___________________________ ___________________________ Teacher PrincipalCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 104
  • 107. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 25: Certificate of Participation (continued) We all have the right to feel safe at all times This certificate is awarded to ________________________________ for successfully completing the Protective Behaviours program on ________________________________ Date ___________________________ ___________________________ Teacher Principal We can talk to someone about anything no matter what it isCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 105
  • 108. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 26: Emotions Aggressive Anxious Apologetic Arrogant Bashful Blissful Bored Cautious Cold Confident Curious Determined Disappointed Disbelieving Enraged Envious Exhausted Frightened Frustrated GuiltyCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 106
  • 109. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 26: Emotions (continued) Happy Horrified Hot Hurt Hysterical Indifferent Interested Jealous Lonely Love struck Negative Regretful Relieved Sad Satisfied Sick Surprised Suspicious UndecidedCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 107
  • 110. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 26: Emotions (continued)CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 108
  • 111. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 27: Sing yourself safe song lyricsIncludes first verse and chorus from the songs from Sing yourself safeCD can be purchased from:Safe4kids: http://www.safe4kids.com.auProtective Behaviours WA: http://www.protectivebehaviourswa.org.auWooldridges: http://www.wooldridges.com.auEverybody has the right to feel safe The Blues Early Warning SignsWhen you’re home with your family I’ve got the blues Wibbly wobbly jelly kneesEveryone should feel as safe as they can be I’ve got the blues Churny turny tummy queazeIf you don’t then you should say If you’re feeling sad and lonely Sweaty, fretty hands and feet‘Cos nobody should ever have to live that way Oh, you’ve got the blues I wanna run but my legs feel weakNot your mother or your father If you’ve got problems Chorus:Or your sister or your brother That make you feel blue It’s OK, I know what to do You’ve gotta tell someone I’ve gotta plan and I’ll see it throughChorus: So they can help you I’m gonna find someone from my NetworkCos everybody has the right to feel safe And tell ’em that I’ve got my Early Warning SignsAll of the time Chorus: I’m gonna find someone from my NetworkYeah, everybody has the right to feel safe You’ve got the blues – yeah! And tell ’em that I’ve got my Early Warning SignsAll of the time You’ve got the blues If you’re feeling sad and lonely Oh, you’ve got the bluesCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 109
  • 112. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 27: Sing yourself safe song lyrics (continued)Telling or Dobbing? The Network Song Keep on TryingI saw somebody colouring outside the lines I’ve got one, two, three, four five people who care If you want to take a chance to try something new about meI said it looked messy But you’re feeling scared and you’re nervous too And I can tell them anything, no matter how bad itBut they thought it looked just fine might be Don’t give up! Don’t give in! One of them is my teacher, my teacher caresChorus: about meSo I told my teacher and this is what she said, And I can tell (him) her anything no matter how You’re got to… bad it might beShe said, “Hmmm, can you tell are you telling, or Keep on trying, keep on trying againdobbing?” If I can’t find my teacher, what will I do them? Keep on trying, keep on trying, my friendShe said, “It’s easy to tell if you’re telling, or Well I’ll just tell someone else, ‘til I feel safe again ‘Cos if you want to learn how to do something newdobbing You’ve got to take a risk and practice tooIf you’re telling, you’ll have your Early Warning Cos I’ve got one, two, three, four, five people whoSigns And keep on trying, keep on trying again care about meIf you’re telling, you’ll have a No feeling inside And I can tell them anything, no matter how bad itThat’s how you tell if you’re telling, or dobbing.” might be One of them is my friend’s mum, my friend’s mum cares about me And I can tell her anything no matter how bad it might be If I can’t find my friend’s mum, what will I do them? Well I’ll just tell someone else, ‘til I feel safe againCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 110
  • 113. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 27: Sing yourself safe song lyrics (continued)Tell and Tell and Tell Public and Private You’re a StrangerWhen I get a No feeling Well, I was sitting in class You’re a Stranger – Yeah, YeahI’m gonna tell and tell and tell and tell and tell Workin’ real hard You’re a Stranger – Yeah, YeahWhen I get a No feeling When a kid across the room let off a big fart If I don’t know you and you don’t know meI’m gonna tell and tell and tell and tell and tell I said: Hey Kid! You’ve got it all wrong You’re a Stranger – Yeah, YeahI’m gonna shout about it Private sounds in PublicI’m gonna shout about it They don’t belong! A Stranger is someone you haven’t metYeah! A Stranger is someone you don’t know yet Chorus: They’re a Stranger – Yeah, Yeah Excuse me, that’s a Private thing They’re a Stranger – Yeah, Yeah We only do that in a Private place If I don’t know you and you don’t know me Hey! That’s a Private thing You’re a Stranger – Yeah, Yeah I only do that in a Private placeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 111
  • 114. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 27: Sing yourself safe song lyrics (continued)My Three Safety Questions Five No’s SecretsI have to sing at assembly Everybody knows there’s Five Nos Shhhhhhhhhhhh!But I’ve got my Early Warning Signs Everybody knows it’s true I’ve got a secret that makes me feel happy insideSo I’ll ask my Three Safety Questions Tell me do you know what No you’re gonna use Shhhhhhhhhhhh!That’ll help me decide When something happens to you? I’ve got a secret and it’s gonna be a big surprise When everyone finds out what my secret isChorus: Oh, a Playful No is a funny old No I can’t wait for that dayEven though I feel unsafe No, hee hee ha ha! It’s a good, good secretI’m with an adult I trust Sometimes you don’t really mean it when you say So I won’t tell it, no way. itAnd if I need it I can get help And you might just giggle when you do!So I’m gonna take a chanceI’m gonna believe in myselfI’m gonna take a Risk on PurposeI’m gonna do the best I canI’m gonna give it a show, give it all I’ve gotI can do it I know I canI can do it I know I canCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 112
  • 115. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 27: Sing yourself safe song lyrics (continued)Cyber Surfing Protective Behaviours AnthemEveryone’s a stranger in cyberspace This is my space, my personal spaceYou never really know them ‘til your face to face This is the space I need for me to feel safeI always use my Network if I fell unsafe This is my body, from head to toe‘Cos everyone’s a Stranger in cyberspace No-one can touch me unless I say soCyber surfing, cyber surfing Chorus:Don’t forget the net is a Public Place ‘Cos I have rights and I know That I have a voice and I can say “No” If I have my Early Warning Signs ‘Cos I’m the most important person in my world. But with rights come responsibilities, it’s true Because you have right tooCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 113
  • 116. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 28: Just ask short storyCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 114
  • 117. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 28: Just ask short story (continued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| Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 115
  • 118. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceResource 28: Just ask short story (continued) ACHIEVING DREAMS 233 20/;.#(9$$:$&#%*,#($0$T;.$.%*$%$"#$=00+$%,($-0*1$+8$ -%8$;)$;,3&$"#$%,.-#*$3.$8#.9$ :$=#&3#7#($.0$.*0,4&8$"%$80;$."0;&($893.#13:#"%$-"3&#$ *#/#373,4$ %,$ %-%*($ %$ "#$ D"3#$ 60;.#5$ :$ 001$ "#$ 0))0*;,38$0$%.1$N3*.$A%(8$63&&%*8$U&3,0,$-"%$."#$(0#.$ -3"$"#*$&#207#*.9$:$/%,$0,&8$3+%43,#$-"%$:>($"%7#$0$(0$0$ 4#$ "#$ D"3#$ 60;.#$ 0,$ "#$ &3.$ 02$ (0,0*.9$ !%&1$ %=0;$ *#($ %)#9$ $ ;1<4/#=(<4..*#1-(#>?#CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 116
  • 119. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence What if..? Questions to promote problem solving skillsResearch shows that students need the opportunity to practise and rehearse skills forproblem solving in authentic situations and scenarios in order to make informed decisions.Students need to be involved in discussions about problematic situations to assist them tomake appropriate choices, in order to feel, be and keep safe, should they ever be faced withsimilar circumstances.In order to problem solve these situations, teachers can provide students with the opportunityto use different learning strategies from the Teacher toolkit such as; decision making models,brainstorms, role-play, think-pair-share, and pair swaps. It is also important to use one-step-removed strategies such as dolls or puppets to act out the situation, particularly in the earlychildhood years, to remove threats or discomfort with the situations, as well as to minimisedisclosures.As a guide, the What if..? questions have been organised into the phases of development.Teachers need to use their own judgement about which questions to ask their studentsdepending on the development of their students and the social situations which may bepertinent to their school community. Early Childhood K-3 What if someone fell over in the playground what could you/they do? What if someone’s parent forgot to put lunch in their bag, what could they do? What if it was home time and you were the last person to be picked up because your parent was running late? What if you are playing with a toy and someone takes it off you, what could you do? What if you are feeling sad because your friends don’t want to play the same game as you? What if someone gets in trouble and feels scared what could they do? What if someone accidentally broke your favourite toy, what could you do? What if you lost your favourite toy in the sand pit, what could you do? What if you wanted to do a painting but all the paintbrushes were being used? What if someone was ripping pages in a school book, what could you do? What if someone spilt water on the floor and didn’t clean it up, what could you do? What if the road was really busy and someone needed to get to the other side, what could they do? What if someone told you that they took someone else’s toy and told you to keep it a secret, what could you do? What if someone was sad because they wanted to stay home with mum or dad, what could you/they do? Who could they talk to? What if a stranger was talking to someone and they felt unsafe, what could they do? What if someone lost their mum or dad at the shopping centre? What if you saw bigger/older children fighting, what could you do?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 117
  • 120. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Middle Childhood 4-7 What if someone borrows your pencil and forgets to give it back, what could you do, and what would be the outcome? What if someone was playing with a ball and it bounces across the road, what could they do to stay safe? What if someone told you that they took something from someone else’s bag and told you not to tell anyone because they wanted to keep it and they didn’t want to get into trouble, what could you do, and what would happen? What if someone asked someone else if they could touch their private parts and asked them not to tell, what could they do? What if someone is scared because they are riding their bicycle on a busy road, what could they do to feel safe? What if you were told that someone was throwing a surprise party for a friend, what could you do, and what would be the outcome? What if someone was feeling sad because they didn’t want to come to school today and they wanted to stay at home with mum, what could they do to feel better? Who could they talk to? What if someone was approached by a stranger and they felt unsafe, what could they do to feel safe? Who could they talk to? What could happen next? What if someone was about to hurt you, what could you do? What if someone accidentally hurt you, what could you do? What if someone hurt you on purpose, what could you do? What if you were feeling unsafe about the how someone was asking you to touch them, what could you do? What might be the outcome? What if you saw bigger/older people fighting, what could you do? Who could you tell, and what might the outcome be? What if someone was walking home alone after school and felt unsafe, what could they do to feel safe again? What if someone wanted to give someone else a cuddle, but they didn’t want them to, what could both people do, and what might be the outcome? What if it is lunch time, and you see people leave their rubbish on the floor, what could you do, and what might happen? What if you heard a group of people saying rude things to someone else, what could you do and what might the outcome be? What if you saw someone writing rude words on the playground equipment or in the classroom, what could you do? What might the outcome be? What if you saw someone taking something from someone else’s bag? What different things could you do, and what might happen?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 118
  • 121. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceEarly Adolescence 8-10 What if someone asks to give you a hug and you feel unsafe, what could you do? What could the outcome be? What are some of your other options? What if you are at a party and the person who is supposed to drive you home has been drinking, what could you do? What are your other options? What if someone was asked to perform at a whole school assembly and they felt anxious, what could they do to feel safe? What if you have an important exam coming up in a month and you are really anxious, what could you do to help you feel more confident or safe? What might the outcome be? What are your other options and possible outcomes? What if someone gets verbally teased everyday by the same group of people and they start to feel depressed and anxious about coming to school, what options do they have, and what could the possible outcomes be? What if the teasing became physical? What if you are walking home from school alone and you are approached by a stranger who asks you to come with them, and you start to get early warning signs, what are your options? What if you come home from school and there is no one home? You don’t have a house key, and your parents aren’t expected to come home until late, what would you do? What are some of your other options and outcomes? What if someone has been writing mean and untrue things about one of Sam’s friends on the internet? Sam’s friend has been feeling really sad and has stopped coming to school. Sam is then told that another one of their friends has been the one writing all the rumours. What could Sam do? What might be the outcome of this? What might happen to the friendship? What if someone kept sending you rude text messages or emails, and you didn’t know who it was, what options do you have? What could the outcomes of these options? What if a close friend of yours keeps coming to school with bruises? What options do you have and what are the consequences of these options? What if you were at a party and a friend offered you alcohol or cigarettes, what options do you have? What would the outcomes be of these options? What if you recently entered a new relationship and your boyfriend/girlfriend didn’t like your close friends and didn’t want you to spend time with them, how would you feel? What could you do? What might be the outcome? What if a close friend of yours has been in a relationship for a few months and seems really happy, until he/she starts getting really upset and stops coming to school? What might have happened to your friend? How could you approach the situation? What might be the consequences of these actions? What if you have been in a relationship with someone for a few months, and then your boyfriend/girlfriend starts asking if they can see you naked, but you don’t feel ready and start to get early warning signs? What could you say/do? Will this help you to feel safe again? What might happen next? What if a friend of yours keeps borrowing things from you, pencils, money, lunch, but never returns them? What could you do/say? Would that help to change things?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 119
  • 122. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Teacher toolkitThe teacher toolkit is a resource containing a selection of learning and teaching strategies that can be used in the Protective Behaviours: Refiningskills for life program. The strategies help to promote student-centred learning, while catering for different learning styles. The strategies havebeen broken down into the following categories: Engaging interest and understanding Gathering information Organising and analysing Promoting attitudes and values Decision making and communication Reflection and evaluationStrategies that appear within a category can be modified to be used in another category by altering the focus, the delivery of the activity and thedesired outcome. Underlying strategies have also been included in this toolkit. These strategies can be used conjunction with other strategies tohelp create enriching lessons and activities.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 120
  • 123. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceEngaging interest and understandingThe following strategies will help teachers gather information on the student’s current knowledge and skill base about a context or topic. Thisinformation can be used to help plan a program that best suits the needs of the students. Using the strategies in this section will help students toexplore their current values, attitudes and knowledge concerning a health issue, as well as promote student interest in the topic. Tool What Why How An organiser used to identify • Allows reflection of attitude changes • Divide a page into three columns labelled student beliefs, understandings and • Revisits the topics covered in the programs and before, statement and after. values before addressing a topic, consolidates new understanding • In the statements columns list a selection and after. of thought provoking statements about • Determines alternate beliefs and misunderstandings about a topic the topic Before and after • Students list their believes about the statements in the before column • After completing activities about the topic, students complete the after topic to determine any changes of belief or new understanding A strategy used to combine • Allows for the collection of both individual and • Students work in small groups and are individual thoughts with a group group ideas given a scenario, problem or question about a particular topic. • Provides information about what the students about a Protective Behaviours issue. Card clusters already know • Students write individual beliefs or • Helps to identify gaps in the student’s knowledge responses on slips of paper in the middle of the group • Promotes discussion and collaboration • The group clusters the responses together by identifying similarities A hands-on strategy used to collect • Provides information about what the students • Divide class into small groups and provide individual thoughts about topics. already know each group with a large sheet of paper • Helps to identify gaps in the student’s knowledge with a different Protective Behaviours question or problem. Gallery walk • In their groups, students individually record their thoughts concerning the issue or solving the problem for a given amount of time. • Once the time limit has been reached,CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 121
  • 124. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence each group either moves to another question/problem, or the sheets of paper are passed to a new group • This continues until each group has responded to each question or problem • The groups then come back together as a class and discuss each one An organiser used by students to • Provides information on the student’s prior • Each student is given a piece of paper KWL chart record what they already know knowledge with three or four columns, labelled KWL (know, want to about a topic and what they want to • Gives direction to future programming and planning or KWHL know, learnt) or learn. Students are also given the • Students are given a topic and recall KWHL chart opportunity to record what they • Allows for reflection everything they already know about this (know, want to learnt. topic under the K column know, how to learn it, learnt) • They then record things that they are interested in finding out about the topic or TWLH (what under the W column you think you know, want to • Students can address how they can find know, what you out this knowledge by recording it under learnt and how the H column you learnt it) as • After students have researched or been used in Primary engaged in activities about the topic, the connections L column can be filled out with things that they learnt An active activity where students • Promotes discussion about the topic • Devise a set of question and answer have to match question and answer • Raises questions about the topic cards about a Protective Behaviours topic cards by finding a partner and • Hand out a card to each student and discussing. • Helps to identify future learning needs explain that each question card has a matching answer card Question cards • Student then move around the room to find the person with the card that goes with theirs • Students discuss the question and the answerCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 122
  • 125. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceGathering informationThe gathering information strategies provide students with the opportunity to collate information and communicate ideas. Tool What Why How A Brainstorm involves a group or • Generate a range of ideas and thoughts • Identify a topic small group offering ideas and • Allow students to openly share ideas and provide • Students to volunteer related information: suggestions related to a specific input words, phrases, ideas Brainstorm topic or question. Sometimes the response may in fact open up • Enables students to build on ideas of others. • Gather ideas on paper/board another channel for future Sometimes ideas can grow and morph from a Can be done as whole class, small group or discussion. previous idea. individually. A Free Think involves a partner or • Generate a range of ideas and thoughts • Write all ideas down without comment, in small group discussing a topic, • Allow students to openly share ideas without the speakers own language problem, statement or idea. It criticism (this is one of the ground rules that needs • Encourage creativity or thinking outside of involves the group writing down all to be established) the square responses. Sometimes the response may in fact open up • Enables students to build on ideas of others. • Pose the statement/scenario in the “third another channel for future Sometimes ideas can grow from a previous idea. person” discussion. • Protect the rights of the individual Free think (Protective interrupting) When using Free thinks in the Protective Behaviours context it is a • Encourage all students to participate with useful strategy to structure the at least one Free Think question in terms of possible solutions rather than possible • Prioritise all actions problems. • Cluster of ideas/thoughts can be done at end • Review answers A jigsaw is a strategy used in small • The class works collaboratively to process • Organise students into a home group. groups. It is a cooperative learning information. Give each group member a number. activity which encourages listening, • Students move into their expert group – engagement, interaction, teaching, groups of all the same numbers to discuss Jigsaw and cooperation. and share a specific topic. • Return to their home group to report the information they have discussed.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 123
  • 126. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence An organiser used to collate the • Allows for individual ideas about a topic to be • Divide a piece of paper into four sections ideas of a group of students included and individual accountability with a circle in the middle • Encourages the organisation of the most important • Select a topic and divide students into information about the topic groups of four • Students record their thoughts and ideas about the topic in a separate section on Placemat the paper • Students then share their ideas with the group • The group then select and agree on one idea ( the most common idea or the most important) and record it in the circle in the middle A hands-on strategy for the • A fun, hands-on strategy for information gathering • Provide each student or pair of students a collection of information about a • Provides students with direction when researching set of open-ended questions about a topic particular topic. and helps them to understand where to get the on a ‘scavenger sheet’ information from • Provide students with access to relevant Scavenger • Helps students to locate information literature, or resources to direct their hunt research • Provide students with direction or motivation by providing stickers or certificates for completion or in-depth and meaningful answers A strategy based around collecting • Gather point of views from a target group of people • Nominate a topic to the class and organising information gained • Allows for information to be presented in a variety • Students develop open-ended questions from asking questions to different of ways concerning the topic and select a target people. group of people Surveys • Student conduct surveys through observations, interviews or questionnaire sheets • Students collect, sort and present informationCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 124
  • 127. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceOrganising and analysingThe following organising and analysing strategies provide opportunities for students to sort and compare gathered information to develop furtherunderstanding. Tool What Why How A graphic organiser used to relate • Relates knowledge and understanding with what it • Divide page in half by drawing a real facts and information with the means to the students diagonal line from two corners thoughts and beliefs of the • Connects learnt information with the students • Label the top right triangle facts and individual ideas and the bottom left triangle so • Helps students to understand the cause and effect of 90 Degree the information what? thinking • In the facts and ideas section, student write information they have gained from their research, and in the so what section, students record the implications these facts have on them. The collection of topic focussed • This allows students to identify relationships between • A topic or idea is selected. Students ideas being organised visually using ideas and information. brainstorm related connections. • Students can represent information in a ideas/words/phrases/information about Concept the topic. mapping or diagrammatic form mind mapping • Organise the information relating to a similar feature or common theme. • Arrange these ideas in a diagram format and link with connecting lines. A visual organisational tool used to • Breaks down topics into subtopics to easily manage • Separate a large piece of paper into nine break down complex topics. complex topics sections • Collects information about a topic in an organised • Separate the middle section into another and visual way nine sections, and write the topic in the • Allows for information to be prioritised centre Lotus diagram • In the smaller squares around the centre break down the topic into subtopic • In the other squares use the same process, writing the subtopic in the centre, and breaking it down even further • Promote creative thinking and prioritising of informationCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 125
  • 128. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence A ‘T’ shaped organiser that collects • Encourages use of senses when sharing ideas about • Brainstorms ideas about topic in relation students ideas about a particular a topic with specific direction to looks like and sounds like T-chart topic in the categories of sounds like and looks like. A graphic organiser used to sort • Helps students to visually group ideas together • Draw two overlapping circles on a piece information based on similarities Encourages students to analyse pieces of information of paper. Give each circle a Protective and differences and sort them based on similarities and differences Behaviours titles, such as safe and unsafe. Venn diagram • In each circle write characteristics about each topic. The overlapping sections indicate characteristics that are shared by both groups. An organiser used to collect ideas • Allows for the collection of ideas using the topic • Identify topic and then brainstorm ideas, about a topic in relation to looks directions using the ‘x’ shaped organiser, with the X-chart like, feels like, sounds like and • Encourages the use of senses and emotions when topics of looks like, feels like, sounds like thinks like in the shape of an ‘x’. collecting ideas and thinks like. A Y chart is an organiser that • Allows students to identify ideas in specific areas. • Ideas about a certain topic in relation to: collects student ideas and • A collection of thoughts using specific criteria. looks like; feels like; sounds like. Identify Y-chart information. the topic and brainstorm ideas relating to • Encourages consideration of emotional aspects look, feel and sound.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 126
  • 129. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescencePromoting attitudes and valuesThe strategies in this section highlight the connection between the understanding of a topic and personal attitudes, values and beliefs. Thesestrategies help students to become aware of their own thinking and feelings towards the topic, and to help them make appropriate life decisions. Tool What Why How An active strategy to determine the • Identifies students’ attitudes toward a topic in a • Create displays of the numbers 1-4. different attitudes about a topic non-threatening and hypothetical way Place a number in each corner of the within the classroom using • Promotes discussions and respect of others’ points room hypothetical situations of view • Pose a statement to the class and assign each number with a possible opinion to the statement. • Students move to the corner that best represents their thoughts and beliefs Choose a corner • Students first share their reasoning for choosing that response within their similar groups, then with the whole class. Variation: human graph Place the number 1-4 in a line and students stand in straight lines behind the numbers that represents their response. Student form a human graph to determine which opinion is the most popular and why. A strategy used to group the • Promotes discussions and the respect of the points • Introduce a topic to the class different attitudes and opinions of view and opinions of others • Select three students to be the speakers. within the classroom in a non- • Helps students to identify their values and attitudes The speakers are positioned in different threatening way areas of the room and then read out three different statements relating to the Protective Behaviours topic Oxford style debate • The other students then decide which statement best represents their views on the topic and stands behind that speaker. Encourage student to be silent until everyone has made up their mind • Each group discusses their reasoning behind their choice before the speakersCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 127
  • 130. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence share it with the class • After hearing the responses from each group, groups may challenge other groups or ask for more clarification • Students should be allowed to change their minds and move to another group. Invite these students to share their reason for changing their opinion A non-verbal way to communicate • A non-threatening strategy which encourages • Pose questions or comments about opinions, agreements or sharing of opinion in younger learners particular topics. ‘Thumbs up’ disagreements. • Students answer these questions by opinion giving thumbs up (for ‘yes’ or ‘agree’) thumbs down (for ‘no’ or ‘disagree’) or thumbs sideways (for ‘OK’ or ‘unsure’). Students are required to • Allows students to identify and express their ideas • Students place themselves on a acknowledge and justify their no matter how diverse their ideas may be continuum according to their individual Values opinion on specific topics and • A strategy used to display opinions and points of values. continuum scenarios. view • Opinions can be displayed in a written • Peer pressure can influence opinions if the activity or physically by standing on a continuum is displayed physically. continuum line.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 128
  • 131. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceDecision-making and communicationThese strategies assist students to make informed decisions while considering positive and negative consequences. Making educated lifechoices is an essential skill in maintaining health and safety. Tool What Why How An organiser used to help students • Provides students with a selection of different • At the top of the page identify the problem work though a problem with possible outcomes • Student then break this problem down different possible actions and • Encourages the selection of the most beneficial into two possible actions consequences choice • Each of these actions is broken down into Decision- • Promotes understanding of action and two possible consequences making model consequence • The students then assess how each consequence would make the feel • At the bottom on the page, student then indicate which action they would decide to take A role-play strategy which allows for • Allows for a focus for the role-play • A group of observers form a large circle observers to comment and question • Enables observers to identify conflict/resolution by around a small group of learners on the issues and solutions in the focussing their observations on particular aspects • The learners role-play a particular issue or role-play. of the role-play topic and the observers focus on a Fishbowl different learner each. • At the conclusion of the role play discussion and questions are encouraged to discuss the conflicts/resolutions highlighted in the role-play A strategy used to promote • Promotes good communication skills • Select a topic communication and sharing of ideas • Allows students to share and listen to ideas of a • Two students sit with side-by-side or with Knee-to-knee/ about a topic number of students legs crossed and facing one another Side-by-side activity • Students take turns to share their ideas and opinions for a set period of time • New pairs are then formed The communication of ideas • Promotes good communication skills and provides • After dividing the class into pairs, label a Pair swaps relating to a topic with every class the opportunity to hear and respect many different student ‘A’ and ‘B’ from each pair member points of view or ideas • Students share their ideas about the givenCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 129
  • 132. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence topic • After a given amount of time all the ‘A’ students move to another ‘B’ student and share their ideas • This process repeats until each student has had the opportunity to share with everyone. Using drama to act out particular • Allows students to practice skills and strategies in a • Students work with a partner or small situation in a safe and supportive practical environment group. Role-play manner, in order to promote • A suitable strategy for allowing students to • Students discuss and plan the role-play discussion and conflict/resolution demonstrate their understanding of the skills. sharing ideas and options for the skills particular topic. The exploration and communication • Provides the students with the opportunity to work • A topic/idea/question is selected to think of a topic through both individual cooperatively in the class. about. Think – Pair – and group collaboration Share • Provides adequate thinking time for all students to • Students work with a partner and share have something to share their ideas. • Deliver ideas to a small group or the class.CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 130
  • 133. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceReflection and evaluationThese strategies help students to reflect on their learning. Some strategies used in the other sections can be modified to assist the students toevaluate their understanding, beliefs and values (for example; think-pair-share, KWL and before and after) Tool What Why How A written strategy to consolidate • Help students to make sense of new information • After learning about a topic students what the students have learnt and • Recording of learnt information is useful to teachers record 3 facts that they can remember, 2 understood. to determine if main concepts have been things that explain why the information is understood by the students relevant in relation to the connection to 3-2-1 reflect each student, and 1 question they would like answered. • Students can then join with a partner to share their reflection responses A written strategy where student • To determine what new information has be • Students are given a list of sentences finish sentences to determine what understood starters which require completing based they have learnt and understood • Helps students determine what they have learnt on their understanding of the learning and how to use this new information experiences. Sentences starters can Unfinished include: sentences I learnt… I still want to find out… A question that I have is… I was surprised to learn that…CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 131
  • 134. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceUnderlying strategiesThese strategies can be taught in conjunction with strategies from the six main categories. These strategies enable teachers to provide safe, non-threateninglearning experiences for children that help in the recording of information and the understanding of authentic Protective Behaviours topics. Tool What Why How The production of drawings to • Allows students to present and communicate their • During topic related activities, set up are communicate ideas and thoughts thoughts and ideas in different ways for children to draw their opinions and Drawing and related to a topic ideas scribing • Allows for teachers to observe student’s feelings and provide evidence • Scribe their thoughts and attach to their • Non-threatening approach to learning drawing Allows students to explore a range • Allows students to explore and discuss sensitive • Students use a process to discuss and of issues in a non-threatening issues explore issues. One step environment. removed • Situation or issue is discussed in the third person • Discussions and questions involve the and therefore can eliminate feelings of discomfort indirect approach: What if?; Suppose?; or threats Imagine. A strategy used to encourage the • Effective for role-playing for younger learners in a • Introduce dolls to the students giving exploration and problem solving of non-threatening manner them a persona and history certain topics • The use of dolls and puppets is enjoyable for • Use dolls to role-play particular topics Persona dolls younger learners and situations • Follow role-play with questions and discussions about conflict/resolution in social situations Students are provided with a • Allows students to identify a range of possible • Students use a step by step process to Problem- strategy to work through a problem. solutions work through a problem. solving • Provides students with a step by step approach to solve a problem An opportunity for students to relax • A calming strategy to help students to plan an • At the closure to an activity ask students and reflect on their learning or action to help keep them safe to find a suitable place to relax (on a methods of keeping safe. • Helps students to feel safe chair or beanbag) Relaxation • Provide relaxation techniques of; listening to soft music, doing gentle exercises, stretching, listening to a story about imaginary safe places or creating own storiesCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 132
  • 135. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Using incidental moments that • Directly relates to the students • When something happens of important happen to the students to form a • Important, relevant and interesting to the student to the school or the students form teaching and learning activity or lessons concerning these situations Teachable lesson • Is authentic- relates to the real world moments For example, if someone hurts themself in the playground, lessons can revolve around safe/unsafe situations or deliberate/accidental actions. The teaching and learning of songs • Communicating concepts and topics through music, • Listen to and learn songs that reflect the Using songs and stories to introduce and reflect songs and stories caters for different learning styles topic and stories on topics and lessons. • An alternate way to communicate sensitive issues • Use stories to introduce a topic or explain sensitive issuesCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 133
  • 136. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence Teacher toolkit templatesThis document provides a selection of templates for different classroom learning andteaching strategies. These templates can be photocopied to assist with student research, theorganisation of ideas and development of skills. For instructions on how to use each templaterefer to the Teacher toolkit document. By clicking on the attachment tab, you can access thissection as a word document.90 degree thinking strategy ..................................................................................................135Before and after chart...........................................................................................................136Brainstorm organiser ............................................................................................................137Decision-making organisers Decision-making organiser 1 ....................................................................................138 Decision-making organiser 2 ....................................................................................139 Decision-making planner ..........................................................................................140Explosion charts Explosion chart (6 ovals) ..........................................................................................141 Explosion chart (9 ovals) ..........................................................................................142KWL charts KWL chart 1 ..............................................................................................................143 KWL chart 2 ..............................................................................................................144 KWHL chart ..............................................................................................................145Lotus diagram.......................................................................................................................146Placemat strategy.................................................................................................................147T-charts T-chart 1 ...................................................................................................................148 T-chart 2 ...................................................................................................................149Venn diagrams Venn diagram 1 ........................................................................................................150 Venn diagram 2 ........................................................................................................151 Venn diagram (3 circles) 1........................................................................................152 Venn diagram (3 circles) 2........................................................................................153X-chart..................................................................................................................................154Y-charts Y-chart 1 ...................................................................................................................155 Y-chart 2 ...................................................................................................................156CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 134
  • 137. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly Adolescence90 degree thinking strategyCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 135
  • 138. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceBefore and after chart BEFORE STATEMENT AFTERCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 136
  • 139. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Brainstorm organiserBrainstorm Recording strategies: Name: • Dot points • Illustrations • Diagrams • SymbolsOrganiserFocus: Brainstorm everything I know … © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2007. The contribution of Esperance District Office is acknowledged. CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 137
  • 140. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Decision-making organiser 1Decision-making Organiser 1 Name: Problem Choices? Positive things that Negative things that might happen? might happen? What is the problem and how do I feel?I would Reprinted with permission from School Drug Education and Road Aware, Western Australia, 2005 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 138
  • 141. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Decision-making organiser 2Decision-making Organiser 2 Name: If this were the problem PROBLEM and you did this and you did this CHOICES This might happen This might happen This might happen This might happen CONSEQUENCES I would feel I would feel I would feel I would feel FEELINGS DECISION I would Reprinted with permission from School Drug Education and Road Aware, Western Australia, 2005 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 139
  • 142. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceDecision-making planner PROBLEM I could do this I could do this This might happen This might happen This might happen This might happen I would feel… I would feel… I would feel… I would feel… If I was in this situation, the action I would choose to take is:CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 140
  • 143. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Explosion chart (6 ovals)Explosion Chart Write or illustrate the key topic, theme or event in the centre oval. Write or Name:(6 Ovals) illustrate ideas relating to or expanding on the key topic into the connecting ovals. © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 141
  • 144. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Explosion chart (9 ovals)Explosion Chart Write or illustrate the key topic or event in the centre oval. Write or illustrate Name:(9 Ovals) ideas relating to or expanding on the key topic into the connecting ovals. © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 142
  • 145. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence KWL chart 1KWL Identify the topic or issue. Fill in the first two columns. When the task Name: has been completed, fill in the final column.Topic/issue/event: What I know What I want to find out What I have learned © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 143
  • 146. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceKWL chart 2 What do I KNOW? What do I WANT to know? What did I LEARN?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 144
  • 147. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceKWHL chart What do I KNOW? What do I WANT to know? HOW will I find out? What did I LEARN?CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 145
  • 148. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceLotus diagramCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 146
  • 149. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescencePlacemat strategyCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 147
  • 150. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence T-chart 1T Chart Write the topic or issue to be discussed in the Title box. Identify the two areas of focus andName: write them in as column headings. Dot point key ideas in each column. Title: © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 148
  • 151. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceT-chart 2 Looks like Sounds likeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 149
  • 152. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceVenn diagram 1Venn Diagram List the similarities in the overlapping section and the Name: differences in the areas that do not overlap. Topic/issue: © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 150
  • 153. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceVenn diagram 2CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 151
  • 154. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Venn diagram (3 circles) 1Venn Diagram (three circles) List the similarities in the overlapping section and the differences in the areas that do not overlap. The central area will contain pointsName: common to all three aspects.Topic/issue: © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 152
  • 155. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceVenn diagram (3 circles) 2CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 153
  • 156. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceX-chart Looks like Sounds Feels like like Thinks likeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 154
  • 157. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education Early Adolescence Y-chart 1Y Chart Write the topic or issue into the Title box. Write or illustrate ideas in each Name: section.Title: Looks like Feels like Sounds like © Department of Education and Training, Western Australia, 2006 CISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education © Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 155
  • 158. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceY-chart 2 Feels like Sounds like Looks likeCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 156
  • 159. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 157
  • 160. Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical EducationEarly AdolescenceCISPB010 | Protective Behaviours: Refining skills for life – Health and Physical Education© Department of Education, Western Australia, 2010 Not for NEALS 158