Institute for Material Sustainability<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />How We Can Recycle Eve...
Contents<br />The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />T...
The Linear Production-Consumption System<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />3<...
Landfills are Growing<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />4<br />This is the li...
Resources are Being Depleted<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />5<br />This is...
Linear Systems are Unsustainable<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />6<br />Thi...
Eliminate Extraction and Disposal<br />1 June 2010<br />7<br />This is the linear production-consumption system that we ha...
The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute a...
1 June 2010<br />9<br />New, Sustainable Systems<br />This is a generic version of a system for material sustainability. <...
Inorganic Materials System<br />1 June 2010<br />10<br />This version of the system applies to things such as appliances, ...
Two Important Roles<br />1 June 2010<br />11<br />Let’s look briefly at two of these roles:  the disassembler and the mate...
Disassembler<br />1 June 2010<br />12<br />The disassembler is a factory for taking things apart.  <br />First, the plans ...
Reuse, Repair or Reprocess<br />1 June 2010<br />13<br />The disassembler uses a computerized system to automatically rout...
Materials Processor<br />1 June 2010<br />14<br />The materials processor is a facility that reprocesses unusable parts in...
Organic (Biological) Systems<br />1 June 2010<br />15<br />Naturally, some products are organic, meaning that their source...
Organic and Inorganic Products<br />1 June 2010<br />16<br />In this system, the product, blue jeans, is made of cotton an...
Organic-only Products<br />1 June 2010<br />17<br />If the product (e.g., blue jeans) was made completely of organic mater...
More Information on Systems<br />1 June 2010<br />18<br />These systems are explained in depth in the book, Recycle Everyt...
The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute a...
Materials, Products, Costs, Experts and Mindset<br />1 June 2010<br />20<br />These are some of the challenges that we fac...
The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute a...
The Four Goals<br />The institute plans to accomplish four main goals:  <br />Develop 100% recyclable materials for indust...
1 June 2010<br />23<br />Develop 100% Recyclable Materials<br />First, we need materials that are 100% recyclable.  We cal...
1 June 2010<br />24<br />R&D Challenges<br />Here’s an example of a product with several challenges to be solved by materi...
Design Products for Recycling<br />Factories and equipment must be designed for disassembly<br />Processes must be optimiz...
Working Models of Systems<br />26<br />1 June 2010<br />We intend to run ‘full system tests’ using working models of syste...
Materials
Engineering designs
Parts
Assembly plans and processes
Assembly facilities
Disassembly plans and processes
Disassembly facilities
Materials processing plans and processes
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Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability (How to Recycle Everything)

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Can everything be recycled? Yes, with the sustainable systems described in this presentation. Sustainable production-consumption systems are cyclical and self-contained, not linear. The presentation points out the challenges that have to be addressed to make material sustainability possible. And finally, the presentation describes the work of the Institute for Material Sustainability, which is working toward making it possible to recycle everything.

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  • Keywords: sustainability, green business, ecology, environment, manufacturing, story of stuff, cradle to cradle.
  • Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability (How to Recycle Everything)

    1. 1. Institute for Material Sustainability<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />How We Can Recycle Everything<br />19 May 2010<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />
    2. 2. Contents<br />The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute and Its Goals<br />Contact Us<br />1 June 2010<br />2<br />Welcome! In this presentation, we’re going to look at a plan for recycling everything that’s made by us human beings. Let’s start by looking at our current linear production-consumption system. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    3. 3. The Linear Production-Consumption System<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />3<br />This is the linear production-consumption system that we have in the world today.<br />This system, although it provides a good lifestyle for some, consumes resources and produces garbage. There is no incentive to conserve. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    4. 4. Landfills are Growing<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />4<br />This is the linear production-consumption system that we have in the world today.<br />Most people are aware of growing landfills, garbage dumps and islands of trash in the oceans …<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    5. 5. Resources are Being Depleted<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />5<br />This is the linear production-consumption system that we have in the world today.<br />But resource depletion is becoming a greater threat to the continued production of all the things we consume.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    6. 6. Linear Systems are Unsustainable<br />1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />6<br />This is the linear production-consumption system that we have in the world today.<br />Essentially, this linear system is not sustainable in the long term. A sustainable system must be cyclical, self-contained and self-perpetuating. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    7. 7. Eliminate Extraction and Disposal<br />1 June 2010<br />7<br />This is the linear production-consumption system that we have in the world today.<br />x<br />x<br />The main thing we must do is eliminate the extraction (of inorganic materials) and disposal from the system. Then we take the remaining roles and connect them in a circle. <br />This may sound a little far-out at first, but we’re eventually going to have to do it—if we want to continue to produce and consume. We believe it is possible. We’re going to show you how. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    8. 8. The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute and Its Goals<br />Contact Us<br />1 June 2010<br />8<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />Next we’re going to see a few examples of systems for material sustainability. <br />There are two main kinds of systems, one for inorganic materials (metals, minerals and plastics) and one for organic (agriculture, etc.)<br />The chief difference is that organic materials are composted to provide soil nutrition.<br />Let’s take a look…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    9. 9. 1 June 2010<br />9<br />New, Sustainable Systems<br />This is a generic version of a system for material sustainability. <br />The materials that make up all the things that we produce and consume are contained within this system.<br />Note that extraction and disposal are eliminated.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    10. 10. Inorganic Materials System<br />1 June 2010<br />10<br />This version of the system applies to things such as appliances, some furniture, electronics, vehicles, and buildings.<br />Things such as these are made of inorganic materials— metals, minerals, plastics and industrial and household chemicals. <br />These kinds of materials must be engineered to be 100% recyclable.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    11. 11. Two Important Roles<br />1 June 2010<br />11<br />Let’s look briefly at two of these roles: the disassembler and the materials processor. <br />These two roles exist now but they will be greatly expanded in the new system.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    12. 12. Disassembler<br />1 June 2010<br />12<br />The disassembler is a factory for taking things apart. <br />First, the plans for assembling and disassembling products are developed by the producer. <br />The producer collaborates with the disassembler to design the disassembly factory and select equipment. <br />It may even be possible to use the same factory for assembly and disassembly. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    13. 13. Reuse, Repair or Reprocess<br />1 June 2010<br />13<br />The disassembler uses a computerized system to automatically route products to the correct equipment to be disassembled. <br />The disassembler then sorts the parts into three types: reuse as is, repair and reprocess. <br />Parts that can be reused (after repair) are sent back to the producer.<br />Parts that can’t be reused are sent to the materials processor. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    14. 14. Materials Processor<br />1 June 2010<br />14<br />The materials processor is a facility that reprocesses unusable parts into stock.<br />These parts are transformed by various means (e.g., melting down) and made ready for use in new parts and products.<br />Here again, the plans for (re-) processing materials must be developed by the producer, who then collaborates with the materials processor to design the facility and select equipment. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    15. 15. Organic (Biological) Systems<br />1 June 2010<br />15<br />Naturally, some products are organic, meaning that their source is biological. <br />Organic raw material producers are farms, logging and fishing operations, orchards, vineyards, meat and dairy producers. <br />Things like wooden furniture, natural fiber cloth and food waste are routed to compost and then to fields and forests to provide nutrients to new crops.<br />Let’s look at an example of a sustainable system for a product that uses both organic and inorganic materials: blue jeans…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    16. 16. Organic and Inorganic Products<br />1 June 2010<br />16<br />In this system, the product, blue jeans, is made of cotton and metal (snaps and zippers). <br />Since clothing may pass through several hands, the consumer is responsible to turn in items that are no longer usable. <br />The cloth is shredded and used in agriculture and the metal returns to the producer. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    17. 17. Organic-only Products<br />1 June 2010<br />17<br />If the product (e.g., blue jeans) was made completely of organic materials like natural fiber cloth, wood, bone or even biodegradable plastic, it could go from the consumer directly to the materials processor. <br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    18. 18. More Information on Systems<br />1 June 2010<br />18<br />These systems are explained in depth in the book, Recycle Everything—Why We Must, How We Can.<br />View the book on Google Books<br />Buy the book on Amazon <br />Let’s move on to the challenges…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    19. 19. The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute and Its Goals<br />Contact Us<br />1 June 2010<br />19<br />The Challenges<br />Naturally, there’s a lot more to making sustainable systems successful. Let’s look at a few of the challenges…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    20. 20. Materials, Products, Costs, Experts and Mindset<br />1 June 2010<br />20<br />These are some of the challenges that we face in implementing systems for material sustainability:<br />Materials must be engineered to be recycled and reused. Material processing plants must also be designed, equipment created and processes defined.<br />Products have to be designed to be disassembled easily and cost-effectively. Disassembly factories must be designed, equipment created and processes defined.<br />The entire system must be optimized to be cost-effective. Some of the roles may be combined (disassembler, used-parts broker, materials processor, producer-assembler) to reduce floor space, equipment needs and transportation costs.<br />For this effort to be a success, we’ll need a lot of help from experts in various fields.<br />Everyone needs to adopt a new mindset of borrowing products (leasing, to be exact) rather than owning them. <br />The Institute for Material Sustainability (i4ms) is working toward these changes…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    21. 21. The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute and Its Goals<br />Contact Us<br />1 June 2010<br />21<br />The Institute and Its Goals<br />Now we’re going to look at the Institute for Material Sustainability and its plans for making these systems a reality.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    22. 22. The Four Goals<br />The institute plans to accomplish four main goals: <br />Develop 100% recyclable materials for industry<br />Design products using these new materials and new processes for material recovery<br />Construct working models of systems for material sustainability<br />Establish a consulting agency to work with industry to co-develop and implement these systems<br />1 June 2010<br />22<br />The mission of the Institute for Material Sustainability is to help industries make the transition to systems for material sustainability (s4ms). <br />Let’s look at each of these briefly…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    23. 23. 1 June 2010<br />23<br />Develop 100% Recyclable Materials<br />First, we need materials that are 100% recyclable. We call these ‘perpetually reusable materials, or PRMs. <br />We plan to solicit materials engineers worldwide to develop these materials through R&D challenges and prizes.<br />Prize for Innovation<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    24. 24. 1 June 2010<br />24<br />R&D Challenges<br />Here’s an example of a product with several challenges to be solved by materials engineers. First these materials have to be created, then the product can be designed. <br />Challenge #1: Rigid plastic.<br />Requirements:<br />Challenge #3: Steel.<br />Requirements:<br />Non-toxic, no leaching<br />100% recyclable<br />Washable<br />Durable<br />Stainless<br />100% recyclable<br />Additional challenges:<br />Requirements:<br />Challenge #2: Glass.<br />Requirements:<br />Heating element<br />Electronic controls<br />Tempered<br />100% recyclable<br />100% recyclable<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    25. 25. Design Products for Recycling<br />Factories and equipment must be designed for disassembly<br />Processes must be optimized and documented<br />All joins between parts must be reversible <br />Parts must be designed to be recoverable and reusable<br />Parts must be designed to have separable materials (for material reprocessing)<br />Longevity replaces planned obsolescence (products will be leased to 2nd-tier customers)<br />Disassembly must be cost-effective<br />1 June 2010<br />25<br />Product designers and manufacturing engineers work together to design a product that is easy to assemble. Now they must also design the product to be easy to disassemble. Here are some of the things to consider:<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    26. 26. Working Models of Systems<br />26<br />1 June 2010<br />We intend to run ‘full system tests’ using working models of systems. To do this, we need: <br /><ul><li>Key success factors (success criteria)
    27. 27. Materials
    28. 28. Engineering designs
    29. 29. Parts
    30. 30. Assembly plans and processes
    31. 31. Assembly facilities
    32. 32. Disassembly plans and processes
    33. 33. Disassembly facilities
    34. 34. Materials processing plans and processes
    35. 35. Materials processing facilities
    36. 36. Parts creation facilities
    37. 37. Experts in process optimization (lean manufacturing)
    38. 38. Personnel</li></ul>Let’s take a quick look at the test model…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    39. 39. Alpha and Beta Tests<br />27<br />1 June 2010<br />Start: System test team provides materials and parts designs to new parts suppliers <br />Here is an example of an alpha test for a 100% recyclable product. The distributor/collector and consumer would be added in the beta test.<br />Materials Processorreprocesses materials into stock for new parts<br />Disassemblerdisassembles product s into parts, sends usable parts to producer; non-usable parts to materials processor<br />New-Parts Suppliercreates parts needed for products<br />Unusable parts<br />Reprocessed materials<br />Reusable parts<br />Used products<br />New parts<br />Testingtests products and documents any issues<br />Producerassembles parts into finished products<br />New products<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    40. 40. Consulting, Collaborating with Industry<br />1 June 2010<br />28<br />After the Institute has developed a knowledge base, its experts will establish a consulting agency to work with industry to co-develop and implement these systems.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    41. 41. There’s Much More Detail in the Book<br />1 June 2010<br />29<br />The book, Recycle Everything—Why We Must, How We Can explains everything we discussed in this presentation in much more detail. The book puts these concepts within the reach of managers and enables them to apply the concepts in their organizations and supply chains. <br />View the book on Google Books<br />Buy the book on Amazon <br />Let’s work together to make the concept of recycling everything a reality…<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    42. 42. The Linear Production-consumption System<br />Systems for Material Sustainability<br />The Challenges<br />The Institute and Its Goals<br />Contact Us<br />1 June 2010<br />30<br />Contact Us<br />We’re looking for people to support the work, discuss the ideas and provide expertise in several areas.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />of 34<br />
    43. 43. 1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />31<br />Help Us Spread the Word<br />We need popular support to spread the word that it’s possible to recycle everything! Here are some things you can do to help:<br />Buy the book, read it, recommend it to others (buy it on Amazon)<br />Share the website with others (www.rebk.org)<br />Share this presentation with others<br />Like and share our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/recycle.everything)<br />Follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/recycleevrythng)<br />Write about us in blogs<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    44. 44. 1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />32<br />Let’s Collaborate<br />We are looking for people who are experts in…<br />Materials engineering <br />Computer simulations<br />Systems optimization<br />Requirements engineering<br />Lean manufacturing<br />Product design<br /><ul><li>Process design
    45. 45. Assembly and disassembly
    46. 46. Equipment and facilities design
    47. 47. Finance
    48. 48. Business consulting
    49. 49. Website design
    50. 50. Funding</li></ul>Please contact us if you can help.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    51. 51. 1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />33<br />More About Us<br />Contact us here…<br />Email: info@recycleeverythingbook.org<br />Check out…<br />www.rebk.org<br />www.facebook.com/recycle.everything<br />www.twitter.com/recycleevrythng<br />www.slideshare.net/i4ms (this presentation is available here)<br />We look forward to hearing from you.<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
    52. 52. 1 June 2010<br />Introduction to Systems for Material Sustainability<br />34<br />Thank you<br />Copyright © 2010, Janet Unruh, all rights reserved Contact Us<br />of 34<br />
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