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IHA 2013 World Congress: REN21: Renewable systems: sharing experience
 

IHA 2013 World Congress: REN21: Renewable systems: sharing experience

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Ms Christine Lins, Executive Secretary, REN21 ...

Ms Christine Lins, Executive Secretary, REN21

For many years, renewable energy systems were seen as dependent on non-renewable sources. Challenges of cost, variability, storage and ancillary services have been put forward as barriers to a renewable future. However, an increasing number of cases describe 100% renewable energy systems, utilizing the differentiated, but mutually supportive, characteristics of different renewable sources. Leading energy agencies will present the current status of the renewables sector, and representatives of each renewable energy technology will contribute on behalf of their constituencies

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    IHA 2013 World Congress: REN21: Renewable systems: sharing experience IHA 2013 World Congress: REN21: Renewable systems: sharing experience Presentation Transcript

    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 1Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master subtitle style1Overview of the status of renewable energypolicy and market development worldwideChristine Lins christine.lins@ren21.netExecutive Secretary of REN21 www.ren21.netKuching/Malaysia, 24th May 2013
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 2IndustryAssociations:ACORE,ARE,CEC,CREIA,EREC,GWEC,IGA,IHA,WBA,WWEA,etc.Science&Academia:IIASA,ISES,SANEDI,TERI,etc.NGOs:CURES,GFSE,Greenpeace,ICLEI,ISEP,JREF,WCRE,WRI,WWF,etc.InternationalOrganisations:ADB,EC,GEF,IEA,IRENA,UNEP,UNIDO,UNDP, Worldbanketc.NationalGovernments:Brazil,Germany,Denmark,Norway,India,Spain,UAE,UK,Uganda,etc.AMulti-stakeholderPolicyNetworkgroupingAbout REN21www.ren21.net
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 36/4/2013 3REN21 Renewables Global Status Report Launched along with UNEP’s Global trends in RE investment Team of over 500 Contributors, researchers & reviewers worldwide The report features:• Global Market Overview• Industry Trends• Policy Landscape• Rural Renewable Energy All renewable energy technologies Sectors: power, heating/cooling, transport New elements in 2013: Feature on system transformationwww.ren21.net/GSRComingsoon:12/6/13
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 46/4/2013 4Renewable Energy in the World RE supplied an estimated 18% of global final energy consumption Renewable energy continued to grow strongly despite policy uncertainty insome countries, the geography of renewables is expanding as prices fall andpolicies spreadFossil Fuels: 79.1%Nuclear: 2.5%RenewableEnergyTraditional Biomass (9.6%)Modern Biomass (3.7%)Biofuels (0.8%)Wind (0.3%)Solar (0.2%)Biogas (0.2%)Geothermal (0.2%)Waste (0.1%)Marine (< 0.01%)Hydro (3.1%)18.0%Source: IEA
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 56/4/2013 5 Renewable energy comprise more than 25%of global power generation capacity 20.3% of global electricity is produced fromrenewable energy Renewables accounted for nearly half of theestimated 208GW of new electric capacityinstalled in 2011Global Market Overview – Power Markets
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 6Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master subtitle style6/4/2013 6Hydropower 25 GW of new hydropower wasadded in 2011, an estimated 30 GWof new hydropower capacity cameon line in 2012, bringing installedcapacity to approx. 1.000 GW Globally hydropower generated3,800 TWh of electricity in 2012. Top countries for hydro capacity areChina, Brazil, the United States,Canada, and Russia, which togetheraccount for 52% of total installedcapacity GSR 2013: Sustainability Spotlight:Hydropower
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 7Wind Powerwww.ren21.net In 2012, more than 40 GW of wind power capacity were installed, increasingthe global total to 282 GW. 2012 can be characterized as record year for US installations and a slowermarket in China. Asia still led global markets, but with North America a closesecond, and Europe not far behind.
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 8Today’s renewable global cost rangesSome have reached grid parity alreadySource: IPCC, 2011
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 96/4/2013 9Clean Energy Investment$54bn$80bn$114bn$164bn$191bn $187bn$251bn$302bn$269bn48%43%45%16%-2%34%20% -11%2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 10Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master subtitle style6/4/2013 10Policy Landscapewww.ren21.net Targets in 138 countries; more than two-thirds are developing countries Renewable power generation policies remain the most common type ofsupport policy; FIT policies were in place in at least 71 countries and 28states worldwide by early 2013 Some setbacks resulting from a lack of long-term policy certainty andstability in many countries GSR provides a comprehensive policy table giving an overview of appliedinstruments worldwide on a country-by-country basis
    • Click to edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles– Second level• Third level– Fourth level» Fifth level6/4/2013 11Three complementary goals by 2030:OUTLOOK Recently the world has passed 400 ppm of atmospheric CO2 - potentially enough totrigger a warming of 2 degrees Celsius compared with pre-industrial levels. This underlinesthe need to further accelerate the deployment of renewable energy as well as energyefficiency measures. Sustainable Energy4All: Doubling the share of renewables by 2030 will need to result in atleast a tripling of the share of modern renewables incl. hydropower Big and small, we need them all! Renewable energy needs a level playing field (RE support is still 6 times less than fossil fuelsubsidies). Integration of renewable energy will be key in the future. Emergence of 100 % renewable energy projects