Mp surface water

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Mp surface water

  1. 1. REVIEW MEETING HYDROLOGY PROJECT ~PHASE –II MP(SW+GW)
  2. 2.  The proposed project is a follow on of Hydrology Project, Phase –I. During HP-I , an integrated Hydrological Information System providing reliable, comprehensive and timely hydrological and meteorological data are established.  This consists of 24 river Gauge Stations and 52 -meteorological stations in 3 river basins namely Mahi, Tapti, andWainganga.  3750 Observation wells 625 Piezometer wells in Madhya Pradesh for collecting data on qualitative and quantitative aspects of both surface and ground water.  State level Data Centre has been established at Bhopal
  3. 3. Project Period & Cost (SW+GW)Project Period & Cost (SW+GW) • HYDROLOGY PROJECT -II 5/04/2006 to 31/5/2014 • Surface Water Component Rs. 9.98 Crores • Ground Water Component Rs. 14.69 Crores • (With Contingencies) • TOTAL COST Rs. 24.67 Crores • Surface Water Component Rs. 8.20 Crores • Ground Water Component Rs. 12.04 Crores • (Without Contingencies) • TOTAL COST Rs. 20.24 Crores
  4. 4. HYDROLOGY-HYDROLOGY- PROJECT II SW+GW COST & EXPENDITUREPROJECT II SW+GW COST & EXPENDITURE SW Amount in lac GW Amount in lacs TOTAL (SW+GW) Amount in lacs Project Initial Cost 820.0 1204.0 2024.0 Project Cost MTR I 2009 1503.26 1203.68 2706.94 Project revised cost ( 2013) 1137.08 432.49 1569.57 Total Expenditure up to 3/14 730.33 332.89 1063.22 Expenditure up to 4/14 in FY 2014-15 38.37 0.0 38.37 Total expenditure up to 4/14 768.70 332.89 1101.59
  5. 5. CATEGORY WISE COST & EXPENDITURE (SWCATEGORY WISE COST & EXPENDITURE (SW)) sl no. category As per PIP As per MTR I 2009 As per 2012 (Revised) As per 2013 (Revised) Expenditu re up to 4/2014 Balance 1 CIVIL WORK 95.03 259.95 340.45 393.81 297.41 96.4 2 GOODS 270.38 734.49 481.51 523.79 280.22 253.57 3 CONSULTENCY 64.92 76.93 27.52 19.11 0.35 18.76 4 TRAINING 122.41 141.41 54.19 39.65 25.70 13.95 5 RECURRENT 268.16 290.47 154.01 160.72 165.01 -4.29 TOTAL 820.90 1503.25 1057.68 1137.08 768.70 368.39
  6. 6. ITEM As per PIP As per MTR 2009 As Per 2012 Revised As Per 2013 Revised Tot. Exp. Up-to-April 13 Balance INVESTMENT COST GW-MP Component-I (Institutional Strengthening) 279 332 162 149.10 118.30 0 Component- II( Vertical Extension) 547 512 180 179.90 137.55 58.50 Total Investment Cost: 826 844 342 329 255.85 58.50 RECURRENT COST GW-MP Component-I (Institutional Strengthening) 202 166 046 46.43 41.80 1.50 Component-II (Vertical Extension) 176 190 057 57.06 35.25 0 Total Recurrent Cost: 378 360 103 103.49 77.05 1.50 TOTAL – GW 1204 1203 445 432.49 332.90 60.0
  7. 7. Componen t Cost Table 2013 (lakh 2007- 08 2008 -09 2009- 10 2010- 11 2011-12 2012 -13 2013- 14 Total Exp. Up-to 31- 03- 2014 Works 206.15 0 0 21.76 93.73 53.16 9.35 0.25 178.25 Goods 88.78 0 0.17 0 22.66 14.18 1.49 23.68 62.18 Consultancy 4.68 0 0 1.00 3.28 0.40 0.00 0.00 4.68 Training 29.39 0 0 1.65 2.70 3.32 206.15 0.00 7.87 Recurrent Cost 103.49 3.89 2.58 4.96 36.43 23.11 6.08 2.87 79.92 Total 432.49 3.89 2.75 29.37 158.80 94.17 17.12 26.80 332.90 Categoty wise Financial Progress(GW)Categoty wise Financial Progress(GW)
  8. 8. Reimbursement claims Details (SW+GW)Reimbursement claims Details (SW+GW) year Claim Submitted Amount in Lakhs (INR) Claim Received Amount in Lakhs (INR) 2007-08 4.71 4.71 2008-09 3.37 3.37 2009-10 52.91 52.80 2010-11 307.85 301.46 2011-12 254.26 249.27 2012-13 206.08 206.07 2013-14 110.83 79.95 Total 940.04 897.61
  9. 9. HYDROLOGY PROJECT II MADHYAHYDROLOGY PROJECT II MADHYA PRADSHPRADSH • Status of Reimbursement Claims as on 1/5/2014 in Rs. Lakhs Compon ent Project revised cost may 2013 Total expendit ure up to 3/13 total Claims submitt ed up to 3/2013 total Claims Receive d up to 3/2013 Expendit ure in FY 13-14 Reimbur sement claim submitt ed up to 3/14 in 2013-14 total Claims Received up to 3/14 in FY 2013- 14 total R/Claims Submitted up to 4/2014 total R/Claims Received up to 4/2013 SW 1137.08 630.51 554.06 551.03 99.83 84.77 74.14 638.84 625.16 GW 432.32 306.01 275.14 266.63 26.80 26.06 5.81 301.20 272.44 Total 1569.40 936.52 829.20 817.66 126.63 110.83 79.94 940.04 897.61
  10. 10. Planning of remaining period (SW)Planning of remaining period (SW) Sl no. Project cost as per cost table 2013 in lacs Expenditure up to 4/2014 in lacs Likely expenditure to be incurred during May 1, 2014 to May 31, 2014 (Rs. in lakhs) Likely expenditure to be incurred during Jun 1, 2014 to Aug 31, 2014 for the work completed up to 31/5/2014 (Rs. in lakhs) Total Likely expenditure in MP (SW) Expenditu re to be incurred beyond HP-II in Lacs 1 1137.08 768.70 83.30 148.00 1000.00 43.72
  11. 11. Planning of remaining period (GW)Planning of remaining period (GW) Sl no. Project cost as per cost table 2013 in lacs Expenditure up to 4/2014 in lacs Likely expenditure to be incurred during May 1, 2014 to May 31, 2014 (Rs. in lakhs) Likely expenditure to be incurred during Jun 1, 2014 to Aug 31, 2014 for the work completed up to 31/5/2014 (Rs. in lakhs) Total Likely expenditure in MP (SW) Expenditu re to be incurred beyond HP-II in Lacs 1 432.49 332.89 50.00 10.00 392.89 NIL
  12. 12. Works for which tender to be floatedWorks for which tender to be floated (SW+GW)(SW+GW)Sr.No Descripation of Works/Goods/Consultancy Estimated Cost (Rs inLakhs) Tentative data of bid floating Likely expenditure on the contract upto May 31,2014 (Rs in Lakhs) 1 NIL
  13. 13. LIST OF ON GOING WORKS (SW)LIST OF ON GOING WORKS (SW) Sl. No. Name of work. Name of Agency Agreement No. Agreement- ed c ost in Lacs Expenditure up to 4/2014in Lacs Balance Payment to be made in Lacs Remark 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 1 Procurement of Goods and Related Services for Supply, installation Testing and commissioning with 5 years operation and maintenance of Real Time Data Acquisition Systems (RTDAS) in Wainganga basin in Madhya Pradesh. M/s. Mechatronics Systems Pvt. Ltd. Pune 1/ICB/HP- II/SW(m.P.) 2013-14 300.82 55.00 245.82 On going
  14. 14. LIST OF ONGOING WORKS(GW)LIST OF ONGOING WORKS(GW) Sl. No. Name of work. Name of Agency Agreement No. Agreement- ed c ost in Lacs Expenditure up to 4/2014in Lacs Balance Payment to be made in Lacs Remark 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 1 2. Procurement of Multi channel resistivity meter 1 no. procurement of vehicle M/s. Pinnecle Geosystem New Delhi DGS&D rate contract 48.48 10.00 0.0 0.0 48.48 10.00 ongoing On going Total in Rs. Lakhs 58.48 58.48
  15. 15. MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP(SW)MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP(SW) • Upgradation of data centre of Bhopal division, Hoshangabad division & Balaghat sub division, Khandwa sub division, State Water Data Centre. • Upgradation of 24 Rain gauge stations, 2 G& D sites to real time in Wain Ganga Basin. • Upgradation of IT Hardware & soft ware • Up gradation of 9 FCS manual, Upgradation of 20 no. for AGR well(DWLR) of Wainganga ,Mahi & Tapti basin, Upgradation of 20 G&D Sites (20 no. digital current meter ) Upgradation of khairy, chhindlai & chandan D&D sites
  16. 16. MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP(SW)MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP(SW) • Upgradation of AGR Well on 14 no G&D sites,, construction of RCC gauge post on 23 G&D sites, Upgradation of Chokidar hutments on 18 G&D sites,, over hauling work of 6 BOCW. • Procurement of IT Hardware & soft ware • Procurement of office equipments. • 4 New G&D sites established in wainganga basin of Madhya Pradesh. • Application of DSS such as Seasonal planning of Sanjay Sarovar reservoir, Impacts of changes in cropping pattern, particularly in dry years for the reservoir, Seasonal Ground water planning for Dhuty right bank canal has been completed
  17. 17. MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP(SW)MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP(SW) • MP WRD and NIH Bhopal centre has taken up jointly Shipra basin for development of new DSS (P). The work is under progress. • Sedimentation survey of Tawa Reservoir undertaken by bathometric boat in March 2014 jointly by CWPRS & WRD under PDS. Report is awaited from CWPRS. • The DSS planning software has been installed on servers and workstations and useful applications developed are being used. All necessary IT infrastructures has been procured and installed. • HIS data are being disseminated to Govt. & private organizations as per demand.
  18. 18. • Replacement of 51 No Defunct Peizometers and 29 no new Peizometers under DSS Wainganga Basin and 20 no Peizometer under PDS Dhasan basin Sagar and PDS Shahpura lake basin • Replacement of 7 sets of non functional WQ Lab equipments • Upgradation of 4 no Div. data center and 1 no Ground Water Circle level Training cell. • 30 no In well Boring under PDS and 15 no Hydro fracturing work under PDS Dhasan basin Sagar • Procurement of 8 no single channel resistivity meter • Procurement of 1 Multi channel resistivity meter including Vehicle • 3 purpose driven study MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP (GW)MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN MP (GW)
  19. 19. Lessons LearntLessons Learnt • Awareness of the New Technology & Knowledge of Hydrology amongst the officers of the department is needed. • Knowledge of procurement procedures of World Bank aided project is must for all officers working in Hydrology project. • Procurement of major items should be started in the beginning of the project.
  20. 20. Post project plan for continuation of HP-Post project plan for continuation of HP- 2 activities:2 activities: • Application of DSS (P) activities in other basins of Madhya Pradesh. • Sedimentation survey in other reservoir. • As the HP phase –II is ending in May 2014 for which most of the staff was redeployed from the departmental resources. This staff shall be continued further for the proper sustainability of the project. • A training plan for the incremental staff is necessary so that the new staff could also be made well conversant with the available hard wares/ softwares as well as with the new techniques. About 10 to 20% staff who are expected to retired can be replaced through redeployment. Training of these new staff to the extent of 20% is designed accordingly
  21. 21. DEVELOPMENT OF DSS(PLANNING) FOR WAINGANGA BASINDEVELOPMENT OF DSS(PLANNING) FOR WAINGANGA BASIN Wainganga Basin 25480 Sq km
  22. 22. WORK DONE UNDER DSS(P)WORK DONE UNDER DSS(P)  Data collection : daily rainfall, runoff, meteorological data, agricultural information, demographic data, reservoir data, groundwater data, etc  Need Assessment for DSS(P) in Madhya Pradesh  Development of MIKE BASIN Model of Wainganga Basin  Application of MIKE 11 NAM rainfall runoff model  Model customization  Development of scenarios in DSS(P) software
  23. 23. OUTCOME OF DSS IN MADHYA PRADESHOUTCOME OF DSS IN MADHYA PRADESH S.N . Activity Status Remarks 1. Assessment of Surface and Ground Water Availability in Wainganga Basin Completed 2. Surface Water Seasonal Planning. Completed. 3. Seasonal Planning for Reservoir and crop selection. Completed 4. Seasonal Ground Water Planning Completed 5 Performance evaluation of Rajiv Sagar Project Completed 6. Development of DSS IT Infrastructure and DSS online connectivity. Completed
  24. 24. SEASONAL PLANNING OF SANJAY SAROWAR PROJECTSEASONAL PLANNING OF SANJAY SAROWAR PROJECT Scenario DevelopedScenario Developed Main inputs to the Seasonal Planning application : Crops grown and its area Water user demands Initial reservoir Level Results of Seasonal planning application: Variation in reservoir water level and storage at various probabilities Water demand-supply and surplus-deficit scenario Planning for crop selection Optimal utilization of available water
  25. 25. WATER AVAILABILITY ASSESMENTWATER AVAILABILITY ASSESMENT • Wainganga basin was divided into 22 sub- catchments. • Average daily surface runoff and average daily groundwater recharge time series generated for each sub catchment • Runoff Estimated in Different Sub Catchments of Wainganga Basin is given in table Scenario DevelopedScenario Developed
  26. 26. IMPACT OF REHABILITATING THE PROJECT INFRASTRUCTUREIMPACT OF REHABILITATING THE PROJECT INFRASTRUCTURE HHigh level of water loss in irrigation systems of Sanjay sarowar and Dhuty command (30 %igh level of water loss in irrigation systems of Sanjay sarowar and Dhuty command (30 % ) from the source.) from the source. The model has been applied to assess the impact of reducing the losses from 30% to 15%.The model has been applied to assess the impact of reducing the losses from 30% to 15%. Scenario DevelopedScenario Developed Benefits •Increased efficiency of the irrigation projects, Additional water availability for irrigation •Reduction in demand deficit Increased reliability of the system
  27. 27. RESERVOIR OPERATIONRESERVOIR OPERATION  An analysis has been carried out for the Sanjay Sarowar dam for improved flood control based on the forecast of the inflow to the reservoir.  This would enable pre-release from the dam and thereby an increase in the available flood cushion before inflow starts increasing.  This analysis formed the base for establishment of RTDAS in the Wainganga basin.
  28. 28. Real Time Data Acquisition System in Wainganga BasinReal Time Data Acquisition System in Wainganga Basin Under Hydrology Project Phase II Madhya Pradesh Water Resources Department is establishing Real Time Data Acquisition System(RTDAS) in Wainganga Basin for real time flood forecasting to support reservoir operations and water management.
  29. 29. Details of Telemetry stations under RTDASDetails of Telemetry stations under RTDAS S.No. DescriptionofItems Quantity Remarks 1 AutomatedRain-GaugeStations(ARG)withGSM/GPRSbasedtelemetryandpower 28 2 AutomatedWeatherStationswithGSM/GPRSbasedtelemetryandpower 3 3 AutomatedRiver&ReseriorwaterlevelsensorradarType 14 4 Automated,Spillway,Irrigation&PoweroutletGateSensor 13 5 Web-basedDataCollectionprocessinganddisseminationsystem 1
  30. 30. Performance Evaluation ofPerformance Evaluation of Rajiv Sagar Project (Bawanthadi)Rajiv Sagar Project (Bawanthadi) • The performance of the Interstate Rajiv Sagar Major Project (under construction) has been tested in the MIKE BASIN model using the available catchment runoff series from 1976 to 2006. • The analysis indicated that sufficient water will be available in the reservoir to meet the full demands in approximately 90% of the years. Scenario DevelopedScenario Developed
  31. 31. Issues Regarding DSSIssues Regarding DSS • Change of Basic modeling software (Mike basin to Mike Hydro) • Frequent change of DSS(P) version which is not comfortable. • DSS software for decision making and result projection requires the knowledge of scripting programming which we are unable to perform. • Complexity in Scenario development option in DSS. • Need of regular refresher courses .
  32. 32.    HDROLOGY PROJECT-IIHDROLOGY PROJECT-II MADHYA PRADESHMADHYA PRADESH GROUND WATER COMPONENTGROUND WATER COMPONENT PROGRESS REVIEW BY WORLD BANKPROGRESS REVIEW BY WORLD BANK    Chief Engineer (BODHI)Chief Engineer (BODHI) Water Resources departmentWater Resources department Bhopal (MP)Bhopal (MP)    May, 2014May, 2014
  33. 33. Purpose Driven Study (Title): “The Impact of Contaminated Shahpura Lake on Ground Water Purpose Driven Study (Title): “The Impact of Contaminated Shahpura Lake on Ground Water  Environment, Bhopal, MP” Environment, Bhopal, MP”  Objectives of the P D S  Development of long term monitoring mechanism to keep vigil on progression of surface water pollution by studying systematic & periodically physico-chemical parameters.  Monitoring of groundwater water quality to study ingress of chemical contamination into fringe area aquifer used for drinking water supplies.  Study the impact of contaminants on biological diversity, tropic status of lake and identification of the indicator species.  Tie up of Limnological data with ground water quality in the study area  Dissemination of project output for awareness and management
  34. 34. Major FindingsMajor Findings • The medium separating the lake water and ground water aquifer is contact of DeccanThe medium separating the lake water and ground water aquifer is contact of Deccan Trap Basalt and Vindhyan Sand stone. Cracks and fractures of Basalt may be theTrap Basalt and Vindhyan Sand stone. Cracks and fractures of Basalt may be the possible reason for intrusion of lake water contaminants in to ground water.possible reason for intrusion of lake water contaminants in to ground water. • Propagation of pollution in ground water aquifers in the fringe area is governedPropagation of pollution in ground water aquifers in the fringe area is governed by the Hydraulic gradient of aquifer & used by at least 60 thousand populationsby the Hydraulic gradient of aquifer & used by at least 60 thousand populations .. Surface Water:Surface Water: • Lake is reported having very rich nutrients value such as nitrate andLake is reported having very rich nutrients value such as nitrate and phosphatephosphate alongalong withwith ammonical nitrogen toxicityammonical nitrogen toxicity and rich organic matter (COD) content in north-and rich organic matter (COD) content in north- eastern and north-western upstream and south-western downstream side.eastern and north-western upstream and south-western downstream side. • To an average value of 27.74 mg/l,To an average value of 27.74 mg/l, 4.06 mg/l4.06 mg/l,, 5.2 mg/l5.2 mg/l and 67.86 mg/l respectively.and 67.86 mg/l respectively. • Shahpura lake water shows the percentage of DO ranged between 0% (at confluence)Shahpura lake water shows the percentage of DO ranged between 0% (at confluence) to 98.9% (southern part) in surface layer and nil DO in the bottom layer (possibly dueto 98.9% (southern part) in surface layer and nil DO in the bottom layer (possibly due to higher microbial activity).to higher microbial activity). • Lake is hyper-eutrophic due to high nutrients load in sediment which enhanced theLake is hyper-eutrophic due to high nutrients load in sediment which enhanced the production of algal biomass.production of algal biomass. MPL -WHO PO4 -  <1.0  NH3-N - <0.3  NO3 – <45  COD - <10
  35. 35. Major FindingsMajor Findings Ground water: • The overall well water at both downstream southern side (Chunna Bhatti residential area) and south western side (Amrapali enclave) and upstream north-eastern side (Near Academy building) of the lake are found contaminated. At upstream (north-east and north-west side of lake): • Average value of nutrients such as nitrate & phosphate along with the organic matter reported as 29.30 mg/l, 0.23 mg/l, and 18.56 mg/l respectively. • Peizometric well situated within the 100 meter of lake also reported presence of ammonical nitrogen toxicity above its permissible limit of <0.3 mg/l, with a maximum value of 2.25 mg/l and an average of 0.63mg/l NH3-N. At  downstream (south and south-western side of lake):  • Nitrate, Phosphate and Organic matter values reported to the maximum of 109.2 mg/l, 1.0 mg/l and 64 mg/l and an average of 26.99 mg/l, 0.26 mg/l and 14.95 mg/l respectively. • Increased level of organic matter in ground water aquifer establishes intrusion of sewage water. • Whereas domestic wells located at downstream to waste-wear with massive basaltic sand stone formation reported low contamination level. MPL -WHO PO4 -  <1.0  NH3-N - <0.3  NO3 – <45  COD - <10
  36. 36. Major FindingsMajor Findings Fish Productivity: • Due to high contamination level , Indian major carps (Catla, Rohita) and other economically benefitted fish productivity are low. Whereas Tilapia mossambica is flourishing well because it grows well in the sewage polluted water.
  37. 37. RecommendationsRecommendations • With respect to lakes, all three attributes of the lake i.e. the basin, the water body and the command area need to be conserved instead of the present focus on the water body only. • Assessment and monitoring of water quality is very important. • Effluents/waste water treatment plants, low cost sanitation, should be set up. • Adequate policies, legislations and programmes should be formulated and effective institutions should be put in place for pollution prevention, treatment and restoration of polluted water in lakes and ground water. 1. Policy support 2. Platform for presenting output. 3. Freedom to express views regarding any project report.
  38. 38. AchievementsAchievements • IN DSS platform, we have a water balance modeling primary tool to assist water allocation decision to different sectors as per the priority. • The DSS is being used in our state particularly the GIS and time series analysis component for the feasibility and hydrological analysis in minor irrigation project planning .
  39. 39.  WRD has selected Shipra river basin for development of DSS(P) in collaboration of NIH, Regional Centre, Bhopal  To assess sub basin wise water availability  Seasonal and ground water planning for optimal utilization of water  Study of changing scenario of demand supply in shipra basin in view of Narmada-Shipra link.  Development of GIS layers and Data collection is under progress  Area of shipra basin 5750 sq km  Tributary of Chambal river Future PlanFuture Plan
  40. 40. Plan for Information DisseminationPlan for Information Dissemination  A DSS workshop for the departmental officers was organized in the State data centre for knowledge sharing and need assessment.  More workshops and trainings are proposed to be organized for the departmental staff for disseminating DSS outcomes to end users.  The DSS reports and findings are being distributed among field organizations.
  41. 41. Important lessons learnt from DSSImportant lessons learnt from DSS • Application of hydrological modeling techniques are important in planning of surface and ground water resources management in Madhya Pradesh state. • The hydrological modeling tools like MIKE 11 NAM Model, MIKE BASIN,MIKE HYDRO and water resources planning tool like DSS(P) are found efficient to develop various scenarios addressing water resources management issues in Wainganga basin and it could further be used in other basin. • The regular monitoring of hydrological and meteorological data is important for future water resources planning. The scientific validation of data is equally important. • The assessment of water availability and demand assessment need to be carried out on regular basis to meet the various water use demands in Wainganga basin • •
  42. 42. Important lesson learnt from DSSImportant lesson learnt from DSS • The reduction of water losses from Sanjay Sarovar canal, Dhuty weir LBC and Dhuty weir RBC would result in increased efficiency of the irrigation projects, additional water availability for irrigation, reduction in demand deficit and increased reliability of the system. • The surface water Seasonal planning application of DSS(P) is found useful to assess water demand-supply and surplus- deficit scenario, planning for crop selection and optimal utilization of available water resources. • The seasonal groundwater model developed for Dhuty RBC can be used in groundwater planning and to predict how much groundwater will be available at the end of May based on the groundwater level at the end of October.
  43. 43. Issues Regarding DSSIssues Regarding DSS • Change of Basic modeling software (Mike basin to Mike Hydro) • Frequent change of DSS(P) version which is not comfortable. • DSS software for decision making and result projection requires the knowledge of scripting programming which we are unable to perform. • Complexity in Scenario development option in DSS.
  44. 44. REVIEW MEETING HPII New DelhiREVIEW MEETING HPII New Delhi • THANK YOU

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