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  • 1. 2007-2008 Central Ground Water Board Ministry of Water Resources Govt. of India Faridabad
  • 2. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 - 2008 CONTENTS Sl. CHAPTERS Page No. No. Executive Summary i - vii 1. Introduction 1 - 6 2. Ground Water Management Studies 7 - 51 3. Ground Water Exploration 52- 88 4. Development and Testing of Exploratory Wells 89 5. Taking Over of Wells by States 90 - 91 6. Water Supply Investigations 92 7. Hydrological and Hydrometereological Studies 93 - 110 8. Ground Water Level Scenario (Monitoring of Ground Water Observation Wells) 111 - 112 9. Geophysical Studies 113 - 126 10. Hydrochemical Studies 127 - 137 11. High Yielding Wells Drilled 138 - 149 12. Hydrology Project 150 13. Studies on Artificial Recharge of Ground Water 151 - 154 14. Mathematical Modeling Studies 155 15. Central Ground Water Authority 156 - 157 16. Ground Water Studies in Drought Prone Areas 158 - 159 17. Ground Water Studies in Tribal Areas 160 – 161 18. Estimation of Ground Water Resources based on GEC-1997 Methodology 162 - 165
  • 3. Sl. No. CHAPTERS Page No. 19. Technical Examination of Major/Medium Irrigation Schemes 166 20. Remote Sensing Studies 167 21. Human Resource Development 168 - 170 22. Technical Documentation and Publication 171 - 174 23. Implementation of RTI Act – 2005 (Right to Information) 175 24. Meetings 176 - 193 25. Construction/Acquisition of Office Buildings 194 26. Dissemination and Sharing of technical know-how (Participation in Seminars, Symposia and Workshops) 195 - 206 27. Research and Development Studies/Schemes 207 - 208 28. Publicity and Public Awareness 209 - 211 29. Propagation and Progressive Use of Hindi Language 212 30. Personnel Management 213 31. Vigilance 214 32. Persons with Disabilities 20076-08. 215 33. Budget and Accounting 216 - 217 Annexure – 1 Location and Jurisdiction of Regional and other offices of CGWB
  • 4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Ground water plays a key role in meeting the water needs of various user-sectors in India. With growing awareness, the dependability on ground water as a sustainable resource in nation building reasserts the need for an organization like Central Ground Water Board which is vested with the responsibilities of assessing and managing the ground water resources of the country through ground water management studies, exploration, evaluation and monitoring of ground water regime. The main activities of the Board include macro level Hydrogeological investigations, deep exploratory drilling coupled with remote sensing studies, geophysical studies and pumping tests to study the subsurface Hydrogeological features and nation-wide monitoring of the behavior of water table and water quality through a network of ground water observation wells. The data generated from these investigations provide the scientific base for preparation of ground water development schemes by the State Governments. Besides advising the States on planning, financing and administration of ground water development schemes, the Board undertakes research & development schemes, water balance studies, conjunctive use studies and artificial recharge studies. The Board also organizes training of personnel of different disciplines of Central and State Government Organisations in ground water related activities. OBJECTIVES Under the mandate given based on principles of economic, ecological efficiency and equity, the major activities of Central Ground Water Board are to : Periodically assess the country's ground water resources. Monitor and guide ground water development to promote its sustainable management. Develop, refine and disseminate basin specific technologies for sustainable ground water development and management. Plan augmentation, conservation and regulation of ground water resources. Establish a National Information System to collect, store, process and disseminate ground water data. Promote the economic and efficient use of manpower, energy and equipment employed in ground water sector. Support and co-ordinate the efforts of State Government for planned development of ground water. Foster International co-operation to promote scientific exchanges, acquisition of useful technology. Promote environmental awareness and water quality consciousness, impart training and promote applied research. ORGANISATIONAL SETUP The Central Ground Water Board is headed by the Chairman and has four main wings namely 1) Exploratory Drilling & Material Management 2) Sustainable Management & Liaison 3) Survey, Assessment & Monitoring and 4) Training and Technology Transfer. Each wing is headed by a Member . The administrative & financial matters of the Board are being dealt with by the Director (Administration) and Finance & Accounts Officer (FAO) respectively.
  • 5. The Exploratory Drilling & Materials Management wing is responsible for the drilling and construction of Exploratory and other type of boreholes required for ground water exploration including monitoring of stores, consumption and inventory for efficient and economic machine utilization, purchase action in respect of drilling equipment, vehicles, instruments etc. The Sustainable Management and Liaison wing looks after sustainable management of ground water related policies, issues etc., work related to monitoring of ground water regime and development, conjunctive use of surface and ground water, urban ground water management, drought management, data collection, storage and retrieval etc. The Survey, Assessment & Monitoring Wing of Central Ground Water Board is vested with the responsibilities for undertaking Ground Water Management Studies, Aquifer mapping and assessment of aquifer characteristics based on exploration and surveys, Hydro- chemical analyses and studies, pollution studies, short term water supply investigations, special studies, preparation of various Hydrogeological maps, Atlases, Master plans, State reports, District reports, etc. The Training and Technology Transfer Wing is vested with the responsibility of imparting training at different levels to entrepreneurs, professionals and administrators concerned with ground water development and management. The wing is also responsible for formulation of overall training policy, assessment of training needs, conceptualization of the training modules and the programme implementation strategy etc for the organization. For undertaking the activities in field, 18 Regional Offices, each headed by a Regional Director, have been established in the country. 11 State Unit Offices have also been established in those states having large geographical area for better management of field activities. 17 Divisional offices handle the exploratory drilling and related activities, each headed by an Executive Engineer. Both the State Unit offices and Divisional Offices work under the overall administrative control of the respective Regional offices. The details of Regional office wise field formations and their jurisdiction are given in Annexure- 1. The Board has about 500 Scientists, 200 Engineers; and about 3500 technical & administrative/ministerial supporting staff. The Board has a fleet of 87 drilling rigs (33 Direct Rotary, 41 Down the Hole and 13 Percussion Combination types) for taking up drilling operations. ACTIVITIES & ACHIEVEMENTS Ground Water Management Studies Ground Water Management Studies are carried out in different parts of various districts to assess the impact of ground water development within a period of 5 years. The survey has components of key hydrograph monitoring; pumping tests; collection of statistical data pertaining to irrigation structure cropping pattern, Land use and hydrometeorological data. The entire data generated during survey is analyzed & accordingly the future scenario for development of ground water is visualized to further plan ground water development & management in the area. During the year 2007-2008, an area of 1,64,087 Sq.km. have been covered by the Board under Ground Water Management studies (Reappraisal Hydrogeological Surveys) as against target of 1,61,807 Sq km. The Board gave a special emphasis to this study in tribal and drought prone areas and 39402 & 48534 sq km area respectively were covered to assess the status of ground water development in the area.
  • 6. Ground Water Exploration Exploratory drilling is carried out for establishing the sub-surface aquifer geometry, followed by pumping test to evaluate the aquifer parameters & collection of water samples from different zones. The entire exercise is aimed at quantitative & qualitative evaluation of ground water in aquifers of the area. These studies help in identifying areas worthy of further development and in guiding the States to adopt follow up action with regard to ground water development on a scientific footing. During 2007-08 the Board carried out the ground water exploration work with a fleet of 87rigs (Rotary-33, DTH-41, Percussion-13) and a total of 811 (463 EW, 158 OW, 188 PZ, 1 SH and 1 DW) bore holes were constructed departmentally against the target of 817 (443 Exploratory Wells, 179 Observation Wells, 195 Peizometers) boreholes. It is heartening to report that out of 811 wells, 585 bore holes , 209 bore holes and 17 bore holes were constricted in hard rock, alluvium and bouldary formation respectively. 196 wells and 256 wells were constructed for exploration in tribal and drought prone areas respectively. The Board has so far drilled a total of 27567 bore holes to identify areas worthy ground water development in the country till March, 2008. Monitoring of Ground Water Observation Wells The Board closely monitors the ground water regime in the Country through ~ 15640 Ground Water Observation Wells. It monitors changes in water level through these stations 4 times a year (Jan/may/Aug/Nov) and collects water samples once a year in May for water quality analysis. During the year the water level data so generated by these network stations were analyzed to ascertain seasonal and long-term water level changes. Depth to water and water level fluctuation maps were prepared to study the ground water regime for the whole country. Geophysical Studies To support and supplement ground water management studies, ground water exploration and water supply investigations, the Board conduct geophysical investigations through its regional offices. Under surface geophysical studies a total of 1793 Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) were conducted and resistivity profiling of about 39.89 line km was covered. A total of 167 boreholes were logged in various parts of the country while the meterage logged was about 22919 m. The Central Geophysical Cell is located at Headquarter office, Faridabad and is responsible for the planning and programming of geophysical activities of the entire Board. Hydrochemical Analysis Water samples collected during the course of ground water management studies , ground water exploration, monitoring of Ground Water Observation Wells, Water supply investigations etc., are analysed at 16 well-equipped chemical laboratories located at its regional directorates. During the year, a total of 17566 samples were analysed for basic, 643 samples for specific analysis, 2341 samples for heavy metal determinations and 104 samples for organic, for evaluating the ground water quality and its suitability for various uses.
  • 7. Artificial Recharge Studies The Board is carrying out demonstrative artificial recharge studies in high water demand areas with over-exploited / critical stage of ground water development. Artificial Recharge studies have been completed in most of the Regions and impact assessment of ongoing & completed Schemes, monitoring & report submission are in progress. During 2007-08, A demonstrative scheme on “Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Recharge to Ground Water” has been taken up in the (1) Lingala, Pulivendula Vemula and Vemalli blocks in Kadapa district, Andhra Pradesh (2)Gangavalli block in Salem district, Tamil Nadu (3)Mallur block in Kolar district, Karnataka (4)Bel watershed, Amla & Multai blocks in Betul District, Madhya Pradesh.(5) Upper reaches of Choti Kali Sindh river in parts of Sonkatch & Bagli blocks in Dewas district, Madhya Pradesh. 122 artificial recharge structures have been completed during the year. R&D Studies Central Ground Water Board, is assisting Ministry of Water Resources in carrying out R&D studies as a member of a sub-committee of Indian National Committee on Hydrology (INCOH), with a view to accelerate the research & development programme in ground water sector. This Committee examines the project proposals received by INCOH in the field of ground water for their suitability for funding by MOWR and also monitors the research schemes funded by INCOH. During the year, 9 New R&D proposals received are under scrutiny where as, three proposals have been recommended to INCOH Secretariat for further approval . Proposals have also been cleared for funding, which will be monitored for their progress. Reports and Information Booklets Results of investigations carried out by Central Ground Water Board are suitably documented in the form of reports and maps which are categorized under four main heads viz. Ground Water Management study reports, district reports, state reports, basic data reports and maps. 23 Ground Water Year Books, 30 District Ground Water Resources Development & Management Reports, 4 State Reports, 4 Ground Water Exploration Reports have been completed during 2007-2008 . 79 Ground Water information Booklets have been also released during year in the different states. ‘Bhujal News’ is a quarterly journal published by Central Ground Water Board highlighting the latest advances in ground water research. Besides scientific papers, the journal also contains technical notes, news items and regular columns. The journal has more than 1500 readers from all over the country amongst the Central Govt, State Govt., academic institutions and others. During the year 2007-08, the Vol. No 20 (3 & 4), special issue on Rajasthan State and Vol. No. 21 special issue on Uttarakhand state has been printed and issued. Vol. No. 22, 2007 issue is under finalization. Water Supply Investigations The Board carries out short-term water supply investigations for Government Agencies and helps them in augmenting their water supply. Normally minimum financial implications are charged from all other departments except Defence. The Board has carried out a total of 185 investigations during this year .
  • 8. Dissemination and Sharing of Technical Know-how Central Ground Water Board, organized / participated in various Seminars/symposia/workshop/conference with a view to share its expertise in Ground Water field and also for getting exposure to new ideas / technological developments in Ground Water science with others. The officers of the Board also participated in various meetings /committees etc. to render advice on ground water development in specific area. Re- Assessment of Dynamic Ground Water Resource The Dynamic Ground Water Resource of the country has been jointly estimated by State Ground Water Departments and Central Ground Water Board, based on the methodology recommended by Ground Water Estimation Committee-1997 (GEC-97). The Ground Resource was estimated as on March, 2004. The National level report on “Dynamic Ground Water Resources of India” was finalized and approved by the R&D Advisory Committee in its seventh meeting held at New Delhi on 19th August, 2005. As per the report, the Annual Replenishable Ground Water Resource for the entire country is 433 billion cubic metre (bcm), Net Annual Ground Water Availability is estimated as 399 billion cubic metre where as the Annual ground water draft for irrigation, Domestic & Industrial was 231 billion cubic metre and their Stage of Ground Water Development for the Country as a whole is 58%. Technical Examination of Major/Medium Irrigation Project proposals As per directives of the steering committee on Irrigation projects constituted by Planning Commission, the major and medium irrigation project reports and proposals sent by State Governments through Central Water Commission (CWC)/Command area Development (CAD) Authority were scrutinized and cleared by CGWB from Ground Water Development and impact assessment point of view. Suggestions were made for modification / addition of ground water development in these schemes. During the year 2007-2008, Nineteen major irrigation project proposals of Central Water Commission and 2 R&D proposals were examined and area specific recommendations were made. Human Resources Development It has been the earnest endeavor of the Board to keep its technical personnel abreast with the latest developments in all aspects related to ground water development & management. Trainees from State Departments and candidates from abroad are included in the training programme being organized by the Board. Seventeen training courses including one special training course out of proposed 16 training programmes have been conducted successfully during the year under Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training and Research Institute. Total 290 trainees from various disciplines have been trained in the above training courses conducted at various places. Hydrology Project II The Hydrology Project - Phase –II (HP-II) is a follow up project of HP-I. Its major thrust is to use Hydrological Information System (HIS) data effectively and efficiently for water resources planning and management. A longer-term aim of the project is to assist the Governments at both Central and State levels to address the issues of intra-sectoral demands and overall resource planning and management through the establishment of
  • 9. core hydrological organizations serving all specialized water agencies. The expenditure incurred on the project till March, 2008 is Rs 114.10 lakhs. Mathematical Modeling Studies The Central Ground Water Board has undertaken two studies in Ranchi and Patna urban area on ground water modeling during the year. Mathematical modeling have been taken up in Madaram watershed for creating the data base for simulation of mathematical model and Kottukal thodu water shed of Neyyar basin for groundwater flow and the impact of various stresses on the flow regime. Concept note has been prepared for comprehensive modeling studies in Yamuna Flood Plain Delhi in progress. Remote Sensing Studies The following studies were initiated during 2007-08 Application of Remote sensing and conventional methods in Impact assessment of existing Artificial Recharge structures in Hosadurga taluk, Chitradurga district, Karnataka; Remote sensing studies in Neyyar basin in Kerala; Feasibility studies for reclamation of Ravines using remote sensing techniques in Sawai Madhopur district, Rajasthan ; Demarcation of younger alluvium (Vulnerable to arsenic contamination) along Ganga River, Bihar in collaboration with BIT Mesra ; Hydrogeomorphological mapping and delineation of ground water potential areas using remote sensing techniques in Ganjam district, Orissa ; Feasibility studies for demarcating Ravines area in part of Sengar river watershed, Kanpur Dehat, Uttar Pradesh; Ground Water Development and Management using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques in Pithoragarh district, Uttarakhand ; Remote Sensing Studies in Lakhimpur district, Assam ; Remote Sensing Studies in Northern parts of Vizianagaram district, Andhra Pradesh ; Feasibility studies for reclamation of Ravines using remote sensing techniques in Mandsaur and Ujjain districts, Madhya Pradesh . Publicity and Public Awareness With a view to generate awareness among the masses, "Water Resources Day" is celebrated every year since 1986. The Board has played a very active role in organizing Water Resources Day functions jointly with CWC and other State Govt. Organisations. On these occasions, emphasis was laid on educating the rural population on various aspects of water resources in the country. Important technical achievements of the Board were brought to the knowledge of the public through radio talks, television interviews, telecast of a short film on ground water pollution, Newspaper reports, release of district reports and Atlases at various public functions. Central Ground Water Authority Central Ground Water Authority has organized Mass Awareness programmes and Training’s on Rain Water Harvesting including Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting at different locations of the Country, with the aim of educating the common people about judicious and optimum utilization of ground water. 20 Mass awareness programs were organized during the year for ground water conservation, artificial recharge and ground water protection and 22 Ground water management training programs were also organized in different parts of the country for designing rain water harvesting structures for augmenting the water. During 2007-08, CGWA has notified 43 Blocks/ Mandals / Talukas etc. in the country for regulation of groundwater development in the states of Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, West Bengal, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, NCT Delhi
  • 10. and Union Territory of Diu. So far, 65 Blocks/ Mandals / Talukas in the country have been notified for registration of groundwater structures in the states of Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamilnadu, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, NCT Delhi and Union Territory of Pondicherry. 142 drilling agencies were registered with CGWA including renewal of registration certificates. During the period (April 2007 to March 2008) Forty four (44) industries have been accorded for NOC’s. Budget The Expenditure of 6098.86 lakhs(Gross) & 5120.00 lakhs(Net) and 5951.37 lakhs of rupees were incurred by the Board during the year under various Plan and Non-plan sub- heads respectively to carry out various activities mentioned above.
  • 11. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 HISTORY OF CGWB The Central Ground Water Board, as the National apex organization under the Ministry of Water Resources, Govt. of India is vested with the responsibilities to carry out ground water management studies, exploration, monitoring of development, management and regulation of country's vast ground water resources. A brief history of the organization follows; An Exploratory Tubewells Organisation (ETO) was created in 1954 as a subordinate office under the then Ministry of Food, Agriculture, Community Development and Cooperation (Department of Agriculture ) to carry out ground water exploration in the alluvial areas of the country to delineate the regional aquifer systems and evaluate their yield potential. On 3rd October 1970 the ETO was renamed as Central Ground Water Board. At that time, it was felt that there was need to have a national unified organization for all works related to ground water surveys, exploration, assessment and management in the country. On the recommendations of the Committee on Science and Technology, the Standing Group of Ministers on Science and Technology chaired by Prime Minister Smt. Indira Gandhi, in its meeting on Sept 9, 1971 approved the merger of Ground Water Wing of the Geological Survey of India (GSI) with the Central Ground Water Board. The merger was effected on August 1, 1972 which gave all the administrative and financial powers and flexibility of operation necessary for CGWB’s effective functioning. With this, Central Ground Water Board was constituted as an apex organization at the national level with a full time Chairman and two full time Members namely the Chief Hydrogeologist and the Chief Engineer. In order to streamline staffing pattern, SIU carried out detailed study (1980) and gave its report on staffing pattern of Headquarters, Regional, Divisional and District Unit Office. A High Level Multi-disciplinary Committee (HLMC) was set up in 1989 to review the role, functions and responsibilities of CGWB in terms of achievements and developments over the past three decades. The HLMC report (1990) highlighted the importance of ground water development and indicated the measures to be taken for achievement of tasks and mandate assigned to CGWB. The Committee reviewed the functions and gave the revised mandate. In order to provide scientific and technical support to the mandate, Central Ground Water Board conduct training programmes for various levels of ground water professionals/ sub-professionals from CGWB, States, Universities and NGOs. The courses include induction level courses for newly recruited scientists, engineers and drilling professionals; refresher courses for scientists on advanced techniques of ground water investigation, development and management; and training of trainers. The Board had established Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute in 1997 at Raipur. Infrastructure facilities were created by redeploying officers and staff from Central Ground Water Board. The building of the Institute has since been taken over by the Chhattisgarh State to house Legislative Assembly in 2000. It is proposed to relaunch the institute at Raipur in the newly allotted land by the Government of Chhattisgarh, SFC Memorandum in this regard is under submission. Presently the training courses are being conducted at Central Headquarters and various Regional Offices of the Board.
  • 12. Central Ground Water Authority has been constituted under Section 3 (3) of the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 to regulate and control development and management of ground water resources in the country. The Authority has been conferred with the following powers: (i) Exercise of powers under section 5 of the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 for issuing directions and taking such measures in respect of all the matters referred to in sub-section (2) of section 3 of the said Act.(ii) To resort to penal provisions contained in sections 15 to 21 of the said Act.(iii) To regulate and control, management and development of ground water in the country and to issue necessary regulatory directions for the purpose. (iv) Exercise of powers under section 4 of the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 for the appointment of officers. 1.2 MANDATE AND OBJECTIVES The future of our national food security system as well as the quality of life and livelihood of millions of our people will, to a large extent depend on our ability to conserve and utilize ground water resources in an environment friendly, economically efficient and socially equitable manner. On the basis of the principles of ecology, efficiency, economics and equity, mandate of the Board has been postulated below: "Develop and disseminate technologies, monitor and implement national policies for the scientific and sustainable development and management of India's ground water resources including their exploration, assessment, conservation, augmentation, protection from pollution and distribution based on principles of economic and ecological efficiency and equity”. Commensurate with the above mandate, the objectives laid down for the Central Ground Water Board are:- 1.2.1 Periodically assess the country's ground water resources and publish, once in 3 years, a report on the status of India's ground water resources. 1.2.2 Formulate perspective plans, basin or sub-basin wise, for harnessing ground water resources in a phased or need based manner and resolve regional imbalances. 1.2.3 Monitor ground water development in the country and promote its sustainable management on principles of ecology, economics, efficiency and equity. 1.2.4 Develop, refine and disseminate, on its own as well as in coordination with other agencies, basin-specific technologies for sustainable ground water development and management involving priority areas such as major command areas for conjunctive use of ground water and surface water, monitoring, prevention and remedy of pollution and saline ingress and the location, design, operation and maintenance devices, recycling and reuse of waste water, and solutions to other problems of urban areas. 1.2.5 Plan augmentation, conservation, protection and regulation of ground water resources keeping in view the existing and future ground water demand scenario. 1.2.6 Establish a National Information System in collaboration with State Governments and other agencies to collect, store, process and disseminate ground water data as part of an overall water resources data bank.
  • 13. 1.2.7 Forecast the manpower, equipment, energy and financial requirements for the ground water sector, in the context of demand projections. 1.2.8 Promote the economic and efficient use of manpower, energy and equipment employed in the ground water sector through various measures including setting up performance appraisal and management information systems, training, development of technical and managerial skills, and personal development. 1.2.9 Support and coordinate the efforts of State Ground Water Organizations for the planned development of their ground water resources on the above lines, specially where inter-state issues arise. 1.2.10Foster international cooperation to promote scientific exchanges, acquisition of useful technologies including the use of renewable sources of energy for pumping ground water and assistance in other developing countries. 1.2.11Establish benchmarks and methodologies for ground water studies in coordination with the State Governments. 1.2.12 Promote environmental awareness and water quality consciousness. 1.2.13Establish a National Institute for Ground Water Research, Training & Management and organize All India Coordinated Research Projects involving appropriate institutions and universities, in order to foster the growth of a national grid of R&D institutions, covering different aspects of ground water conservation and utilization. 1.3 ORGANIZATIONAL SET UP The Central Ground Water Board is headed by the Chairman and has four full time Members namely, Member (Exploratory Drilling & Material Management), Member (Sustainable Management & Liaison), Member (Survey Assessment & Monitoring) and Member (Training & Technology Transfer). The other Members of the Board are all ex- officio being the nominees of institutions in related fields of expertise. The ex-officio members are: 1. The Joint Secretary (A), Ministry of Water Resources. 2. The Joint Secretary & Financial Adviser, Ministry of Water Resources 3. The Joint Secretary, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Paryavaran Bhawan, New Delhi. 4. The Chief Engineer, IMO (WP & P), CWC, Sewa Bhawan, New Delhi. 5. The General Manager, ONGC, Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, Dehradun. Central Ground Water Board has four main wings. Each wing is headed by a member post. The Exploratory Drilling & Materials Management Wing broadly looks after the drilling and construction of Exploratory Tubewells and other types of bore holes required for assessment of aquifer parameters during ground water exploration. Other activities of this wing include monitoring of Stores, consumption and inventory for efficient and
  • 14. economic machine utilization, Procurement of drilling equipment, vehicles, instruments etc. This wing also looks for the need of improvement in drilling technology, design of abstraction structures, improvement of efficiency of pumps and other water lifting devices, maintenance and up keeping of drilling machinery and related equipment in the Board. The Sustainable Management and Liaison Wing looks after sustainable management of ground water related policies & issues, works related to monitoring of ground water regime and development and conjunctive use of surface and ground water for the entire country. It also undertakes studies related to recycling and reuse of ground water, urban ground water management, Drought management, Regulation of ground water development and model legislation, National Information System for ground water data collection, storage and retrieval, Planning and Programme formulation for ground water development including techno-economic studies, analysis and associated aspects of ground water development and technical examination of major, medium and minor Irrigation Projects. The Survey, Assessment & Monitoring Wing has the responsibility of monitoring the works being done in ground water management studies, aquifer mapping and assessment of aquifer characteristics based on exploration and surveys, hydrochemical analysis and studies, pollution studies, short term water supply investigations, special ground water studies, preparation of hydrogeological maps, Atlases, Master plans, State reports, District reports, etc. The other activities of this wing include ground water balance studies, periodic assessment of ground water resources and potential, augmentation of ground water resources including artificial recharge and monitoring of artificial recharge studies, ground water zoning for guiding economic activity areas, rationalization of water rates, forecasting manpower, energy and financial requirements for ground water sector, site selection for Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission, dissemination of data & information to various user agencies and publication of quarterly magazine "Bhujal News" by the Board. The Training and Technology Transfer Wing of the Board is vested with the responsibility for laying the overall training policy, assessment of training needs, conceptualization of the training modules and the programme implementation strategy, identification of thrust area needing technology import from advanced sources, maintenance of effective liaison and interaction with voluntary agencies and Non Governmental Organisations and the other renowned national and international bodies for training and research purposes. The Member heading this wing also functions as the Principal of Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training and Research Institute of the Board. The administrative & financial matters of the Board are being dealt with by the Director (Administration) and Finance & Accounts Officer (FAO) respectively. In order to achieve better results in the Water Resources Sector and have better coordination with the State Government departments, Central Ground Water Board had undertaken various studies in the above mentioned fields being monitored by four wings of the Board through 18 Regional Directorates, supported by 17 engineering divisions, 11 State Unit Offices for carrying out different investigations. The Board had a fleet of 85 rigs for taking up drilling operations during 2007-2008.
  • 15. 1.4 ACTIVITIES OF THE BOARD DURING 2007-2008 The following activities had been undertaken during the period 2007-2008. 1.4.1 Ground Water Management Studies 1.4.2 Ground Water Exploration aided by Drilling. 1.4.3 Monitoring of Ground Water Observation Wells. 1.4.4 Short Term Water Supply Investigations. 1.4.5 Periodic Assessment of Ground Water Resources. 1.4.6 Technical Documentation and Publication of Maps & Reports. 1.4.7 Publication of Quarterly Journal "Bhujal-News". 1.4.8 Taking over of Wells by State Govt. 1.4.9 Organizing Exhibitions, Seminars, Workshops etc. 1.4.10 Hydrochemical Analysis. 1.4.11 Geophysical Studies. 1.4.12 Hydrological and Hydro meteorological Studies. 1.4.13 Mathematical Modeling Studies. 1.4.14 Artificial Recharge studies. 1.4.15 Organizing training of Central and State Government personnel. 1.4.16 R & D Studies. 1.4.17 Basic Research in Hydrogeology/ Special studies 1.5 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN 2007-2008 The activities of the Board are being pursued on a continuing basis as per National Water Policy (2002) and in accordance with the overall development strategy for the XI Plan. Ground Water Management studies were carried in more utility oriented way and in areas facing ground water problems like decline in water levels, water logging, salinity ingress and quality deterioration, and other problems were accorded priority. In ground water exploration, emphasis was given to carry ground water exploration activities on long-term planning and schemes were prepared for different geologic formations and areas. As far as possible, contiguous and composite areas hitherto unexplored, were selected keeping in view scientific requirements and priorities of State Governments were also taken into consideration. Thrust was given to explore areas
  • 16. having artesian flow, bouldary and hard rock formations. Ground Water Exploration in alluvial areas was done to delineate geometry of aquifer systems by constructing slim holes. During the year, special emphasis was given on tribal, drought and desert areas in exploratory program of the Board. Special studies for computation of specific yield of phreatic aquifers in different parts of the country was also the part of exploratory program. The Central Ground Water Board is implementing the Central Sector Scheme "Studies on Recharge of Ground Water". Under the scheme, recharge structures are constructed by State Government departments, local NGOs, VOs or other beneficiaries under the technical guidance of the Board. Under the scheme, funds were provided by the Board for pilot recharge projects and the implementing agencies were encouraged to replicate similar types of structures in other areas with their own funds. Conjunctive use studies were taken up with the objectives to ascertain the Hydrogeological conditions in command areas, to identify areas affected by water logging and salinity, to assess the availability of ground water. The studies provided insight of the problem and helped to formulate action plan for coordinated use of surface and ground water to ensure development on optimal level. Water logging is a common phenomenon in canal command areas, which causes serious social and economic problems. Micro level mapping of a few water logged areas were taken up to understand and mitigate the problem. Feasibility studies were also carried out to suggest anti water logging measures for reclaiming the affected areas. Remote sensing and application of GIS as supplementary tool has been considerably utilized to map geomorphological feature, change in land use, fracture zones, vulnerable areas of pollution etc which helped in locating promising areas for ground water exploration and development. These studies provided additional update scientific information in synoptic manner about land use pattern and its temporal changes to ground water exploratory programme, reappraisal surveys, ground water pollution studies, water logging condition, erosion problem and artificial recharge studies taken by the Board during the year.
  • 17. 2. GROUND WATER MANAGEMENT STUDIES Ground Water Management Studies are being carried by the Board at district level to evaluate the changes in quantity & quality in the ground water regime owing to development and also to identify related issues for future management strategies. A major part of replenishment of ground water is through infiltration from rainfall. Return flow from irrigation and seepage from surface channels and reservoirs also contribute substantially to the ground water recharge. The effect of ground water withdrawals and out-flows are directly measurable through water table. Since all these inputs and outputs frequently change with time, the ground water situation is being periodically reappraised. As the development of resource leads to changes in its regime and water quality therefore planning for further development of the resource is to be done on the basis of findings of the studies, which provide valuable information for reorienting ground water development programme keeping in view the emerging scenarios. During the year 2007-2008, an area of 1,64,087 Sq.km. have been covered by the Board under Ground Water Management studies as against target of 1,61,807 Sq km. State/District wise target vis-a-vis achievements during the year 2007-2008 is shown in Table 2.1 and fig. 2.1. Table : 2.1 TARGET AND ACHIEVEMENTS OF GROUND WATER MANAGEMENT STUDIES DURING 2007-08 Sl. No. States Districts Target (Sq. km.) Achievement (Sq. km.) 1 Jammu & Kashmir Doda 3000 3000 Baramulla & Kupwara 500 500 2 Himachal Pradesh Solan 1936 1936 3 Punjab Jalandhar 2662 2662 4 Rajasthan Alwar 8720 8720 Barmer 6616 6616 5 Gujarat Banaskantha 3000 3100 6 Madhya Pradesh Satna 7502 7502 Chhattarpur 3423 3423 7 Chhattisgarh Dhamtari 3000 3000 Kanker 3000 3000 8 Maharashtra Parbhani 6000 6173 Ratnagiri 3000 3050 Ahmadnagar 3000 3103 9 Uttar Pradesh Bijnor(N) 4561 4561 Lucknow(N) 2528 2528 Meerut 2590 2590 Hamirpur(D) 2010 2010 Badaun 2584 2584 10 Uttarakhand Dehradun 3088 3088 Hardwar 2360 2360 Champawat 1781 1781 Pithoragarh 4100 4100 11 Bihar Samastipur 3000 3000 Vaishali 2016 2016 Madhubani 2501 2501 12 Jharkhand Kodarma 1770 1770
  • 18. Sl. No. States Districts Target (Sq. km.) Achievement (Sq. km.) 13 West Bengal Barddhaman 3000 3000 Dinajpur & Malda 3000 3000 W. Bankura 3000 3000 Kochbehar & Jalpaiguri 3000 3000 14 Assam Lakhimpur & Dhemaji 3000 3000 Karimganj & Hailakandi 3000 3136 Morigaon, Western Nagaon & Kamrup 3000 3000 Nagaon 3000 3973 15 Meghalaya Jaintia Hills 3000 3000 16 Arunachal Pradesh West Kameng 3000 3000 17 Orissa Mayurbhanj 9000 10706 Sundargarh 3000 2272 18 Andhra Pradesh Prakasam 2800 2800 Anantpur 2000 2000 Nizamabad 2500 2500 Vizianagaram 3000 3000 19 Karnataka Hassan 3020 3020 Belgaum 6006 6006 20 Tamil Nadu Theni 2500 2500 Cuddalore & Villupuram 3000 3000 21 Kerala Kasargod 2000 2000 Kollam 2500 2500
  • 19. SALIENT FINDINGS OF GROUND WATER MANAGEMENT STUDIES 2.1 Jammu & Kashmir Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in two areas namely in Doda district and Parts of Baramulla and Kupwara districts. A total area of 3500 sq.km (Doda-3000 & lineation’s of aquifers for further development area. e area will get further r problems: Parts of Baramulla and Kupwara -500 sqkm) was covered during the survey 2.1.1 Doda District: - The survey was aimed at understanding the hydro-geological set up of the area, mode of occurrence of groundwater, recharge and discharge characteristics and chemical quality and de for domestic and irrigation purposes. Besides this, relevant data viz., agriculture, climate & rainfall, land utilization, discharge of river/nallas & cropping pattern etc was collected and analysed. During the course of investigation, apart from the hydro-geological traverses 10 springs and 48 hand pumps were inventoried and 73 water samples were collected to ascertain the quality of groundwater. 15 samples were analysis of iron in the groundwater. Groundwater occurrence mainly in the form of spring is observed in the Groundwater recharge in the area mainly takes place from rainfall and snow fall in the higher reaches. In the unconsolidated formation groundwater also occurs under water table conditions in the valleys. Fracture porosity rather than grain porosity is found to be an effective factor from point of view of occurrence of groundwater in the area. The occurrence and movement of groundwater in different aquifer is controlled by the structural features in addition to topography. Groundwater occurs in cracks, crevices and joints of these rocks. On the consideration of the facts mentioned earlier, it is felt that Kishtwar plateau area has groundwater potentialities. It is probable that the high level springs are not tapping the entire flow in the vicinity. It appears some water is passing away as subsurface flow along the spring line Gurdesh Nag which is a substantial source of water supply in the Kishtwar area needs further development. This particular source of water is not tapped to its full capacity, if it properly developed to the full extent. Hence this source alone is ample for water supply in the Kishtwar area. In Bhaderwah area the source of water supply is from khuls and canals. Surface flow in the area is perennial. In Doda area the source of water supply is from khuls. Ganapat spring is the only potential water supply in the Doda area. This source should be tapped for the Doda water supply and if this source is exploited to its full capacity the existing water supply of this drought pron augmented. In Ramban area the source of water supply is mainly from Sarudah Nallah. Metra spring is the potential source of water supply in Ramban area. The quality of groundwater in the area of investigation is good for domestic and irrigation purposes. It is fresh and potable. Groundwate The main source of water supply in the area is from nallahs and springs. Generally these sources are free from pollution because of hilly terrain. But the groundwater in some areas is being affected by Fluoride and iron. In Ghat area, the fluoride content is observed above permissible limits as per the standards set up by BIS. In Bhaderwah area the groundwater contains more iron than permissible limits. In these areas it requires detail sampling in future. 2.1.2: Parts of Baramulla and Kupwara Districts: The present study has been carried out with a view to ascertain the changes in ground water regime with reference
  • 20. to impact of global climatic changes as well as human impact on ground water regime in a districts. ter in different geological and geomorphological units. The surface hydrological ns Lolab, Kahmil, Pohru and Ningal basins have separate entities of their own. High these inventoried wells, data generated from the exploratory drilling is utilized for s than the 1 m below ground level all around the Wular lake. During the present study, 34 wells were inventoried and monitored. The NHNS located in the study area are and 4 % of wells are in the range of 6 to 8 m bgl. It is observed that the water levels are shallow during May-June and steadily declining up to dwater y area is generally fresh with EC ranging from 97 to 1835 µS/cm at 25° C. Ground ains iron parts of Baramulla and Kupwar The study area is divided into different hydro-geological units based on the availability of ground wa basi Karewa Plateaus have their own hydrological entity. Ground water occurs under unconfined to semi-confined conditions in fine to coarse grained sand, gravel and boulders occurring at few places in alluvial formation and silty sand to fine sand mixed with clays and at places coarse sand and gravel occurring in Karewa formations. Most of the wells inventoried are mainly dug wells and few hand pumps. Apart from preparation of ground water potential maps for deeper aquifers. Dug wells located in upper Karewas generally tap sand and silty layers and water level is generally 2 to 4 m bgl. Depth to water level becomes deeper towards higher reaches of the area falling in the depth range of 4 to 6 m bgl. Depth to water levels in alluvial areas is very shallow i.e. les also monitored after a gap of about 20 years and water levels are compared with that of earlier ones. Statistical analysis of the data shows that depth to water level (DTW) in 32% of wells fall within the range of 0 to 2.00 m bgl, maximum of them are less than 1.00 m bgl. 42% of wells fall within the range of 2 to 4 m bgl, 18% of wells fall with in the depth range of 4 to 6 m bgl November- December. It is observed that there is minor variations in depth to water levels in the area with compared to depth to water levels of 1980. Water table contours generally follow the topographic contours and they are closely spaced representing the fine grained nature of the aquifer system and low permeability. Yield characters of deep tubewells present in the area have been analyzed. Groun in stud water from deeper aquifer is generally associated with marshy gasses and cont which is basically geo-genic in nature. The ground water is fresh and potable and is fit for all purposes Ground Water Problems: Present ground water development in study area is low and only few tube wells are present in the study area. However, most of the tube wells in the n all the ground Pradesh T P 2 u a study area are artesian, auto-flowing in nature. The main problems being encountered i the development of ground water resources are- high artesian pressure, presence of marshy gasses and high iron content in deeper aquifers. The areas with water problems are demarcated and remedial measures are being recommended. Water logging is another problem which is also causing problems to the people living in the study area. 2.2 Himachal he Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in Solan district of Himachal radesh. .2.1 :Solan district :- Hydrogeologically, the area is divided into two units namely nconsolidated valley fills / alluvium occurring in the valley areas and forms potential quifers in the district & the semi-consolidated formations belonging to Tertiary and older
  • 21. c d are the main ground water structures that provide water for domestic and irrigation in major rural and urban centers. n the entire study area and in detailed study area. onsolidated hard rocks which forms the poor aquifer and occupies the hilly areas of the istrict. Springs, dug wells, hand pumps and tubewells During pre-monsoon period inventoried 49 dugwells, 81 springs and 22 hand pumps. Depth to water level was ranging from 0.56 mbgl to 49 mbgl and discharge of springs ranging from seepage to 15.36 lps. During the post monsoon period remonitoring of key wells and key springs were carried out i Annual water level fluctuation has been worked out by comparing depth to water level recorded during May 2006 & May 2007. Average fall & rise is 0.33 & 0.74 m respectively. The depth to water is deep in the vicinity of the hills and is shallower in the low lying areas mainly along or near the stream/river channels. Ground water follows the general topography of the area. Ground Water Problems: Most of the ground water issues and problems in the district are localized and need to be treated independently. Presently large development of ground water is observed in industrial belts of Nalagarh valley wherein fall of water level down to six meters have been observed in some parts. Thus, ground water level epletion and also vulnerability to ground water pollution is major issues in this industriald belt. The quality of ground water in this area is observed to be good and potable. Recommendations: The following recommendation emerged during the study In alluvial areas of Nalagarh valley, though there is scope for ground water development as stage of ground water development is only 27.6 %, however, there is need to adopt cautious and phased manner ground water development approach in view of depleting water levels in some parts. This industrial area is highly prone and vulnerable to surface & ground water pollution thus water quality monitoring at close network is essential. . The climate of the district can be classified as tropical and dry sub-humid. The drinking water supply schemes in the district are based on ground water sources through 67 tubewells (Rural Water Supply) were monitored for pre and post-monsoon period. The depth to water in varies from 6.95 m bgl at Alawalpur (block- Adampur) to 30.50 bgl at Kotla Gazar (block- Shahkot). Larger part of the district is covered under water level in the depth range of 15 to 20 m. Proper waste/effluent disposal measures are required to be adopted by industrial units. There is need to protect traditional water harvesting structures like ponds, tanks, talavs to utilize these for rain water harvesting and recharging shallow aquifers. Roof top rainwater harvesting practices can be adopted in hilly areas and urban areas, since the district receives fair amount of rainfall. Traditional water storage systems need to be revived. 2.3 Punjab During 2007-2008, the target for Ground Water Management Studies was 2662 Sq.Km covering Jalandhar district of Punjab State. 2.3.1 Jalandhar district:- The area forms a part of Indo-Gangetic Alluvial Plain. The district is drained by river Satluj, along with its tributaries. A network of canals traverses the area deep tubewells ranging in depth from 100 m 150 m. In all, 19 no. of observation wells (Dug well), 13 piezeometers and level the district area m
  • 22. Chemical quality of water from shallow aquifer reveals that by and large, the quality of ground water is suitable for domestic/drinking/irrigation purposes as all the chemical parameters are within the permissible limits set by BIS except fluoride concentrations hich has been found at three places and nitrate at six places to be higher than the some extent by Manganese. Iron concentration varies from 0.12 to 5.29 mg/l and even higher upto 13.97 mg/l and found in about 75 % of the nducted to establish unit well draft. The shallow tubewells in the district range from 20 to 130m. Tubewells ere are number of industries which discharge their effluent either in the open drain or in white Bein. The types of industries located in the nd 12 no. normal) of tubewells along the drains, white Bein, black Bein and Satluj were collected. Total of 6 treated and normal Ground Water Problems w permissible limits. The water is overall in alkaline nature. An overall review of trace element analysis indicates that the ground water is polluted/ contaminated by heavy metals like Iron and Lead and to water samples more than the permissible limit of 1.00 mg/l. The Lead concentration varies from 0.03 to 0.32 mg/l. In 70 % of water samples, it is more than the permissible limit of 0.05 mg/l. Ground water draft sample survey was carried out in the district. The major withdrawal of ground water in the district is by irrigation sector. In order to calculate the actual withdrawal of ground water for irrigation, field studies were co tapping the aquifer from 22m to 130 m yields 524 to 1188 lpm. Most of the shallow tube wells are run by electric motors. As on February 2007 there were 66149 electric motors & 3135 diesel motors working in the district. Ground water draft samples are taken from a total of 35 locations in the district. The unit well draft calculated for the monsoon period is 3.8 ham and for the non monsoon period is 0.73ham. The annual unit draft of the district is around 2.16 ham. During investigation it was observed that th city are Textile, Paint, Sports goods, Engineering goods and Leather. The tanneries have their own effluent treatment plant to remove toxic elements from waste water. The sewage water and industrial effluent are being discharged into Garha drain and Kalasingha drain. Garha drain meets the white Bein whereas Kalasingha drain meet black Bein. To know the extent of pollution cause by these drains to ground water, treated (12 no.) and normal (12 no.) water samples of drains , white Bein , black Bein ,river Satluj and ground water samples (12 no. treated a samples were also collected from Leather complex from the tubewells and treatment plant. : The main issues of concerns are over exploitation of ground d for detail hydrogeological studies. Out of this, 110 no. of new key wells were established for water water through out the district and concentration of heavy metal ions especially in Nakodar block of the district for which samples have been analysed. 2.4 Rajasthan Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in Alwar district and Sheo block of Barmer district of Rajasthan during the Annual Action Plan 2007-08 covering a total of 15336 sq. km area. 2.4.1 Part of Alwar District: Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in (Thanagazi, Rajgarh, Ramgarh,Reni, Laxmangarh and Kathumar blocks of Alwar district, covering an area of 4297 sq.km. During the pre and post monsoon studies, the target area has been covered and 185 nos. of wells including dugwell, DCB and tubewell etc. were inventorie
  • 23. level monitoring in the entire area considering the hydrogeological formation of the area. During the survey, 92 no. of water samples were collected for chemical analysis to understand the hydrochemistry of the area. One block i.e. Laxmangarh has been selected for ground water resource estimation as per GEC methodology. The climate of the study area is semi-arid type. The mean annual rainfall in the area ranges between 541.8mm (Laxmangarh) and 726.4mm (Thanagazi). Geomorphologically, the Southwest and central part is covered by continuous high ridges o artzites, phyllites with intermountain valleys, while on the eastern and south- n the alluvial formation and under water table condition in hard rocks. The major water bearing he chemical quality of ground water occurring in hard rock areas in the south and .4.2 Part of Alwar District:Area under survey covers 4423 sq.km. of Neemrana, so occurs under water table condition in weathered and actured portion of the hard rocks. In most of the area, dug cum borewells in alluvium allow in the south western, eastern parts and in Sahibi f qu eastern part , there is more or less sandy plain with isolated small hills. The area is drained by ephemeral Ruparel river and its tributaries. Agriculture activity is by and large confined to traditional Kharif cultivation depending upon monsoon rainfall. The main crops are Bajra, Gram and Mustard. Ground water occurs mainly under phreatic and confined condition i formation in the area is alluvium comprising of sand, silt, clay, kankar and gravel.The hard rock aquifer exists in the south western part of the area which is made up of quartzite, phyllite, schist and slate etc.In the hard rock, occurrence and movement of ground water is controlled by fractures and joist whereas in the alluvium it occurs in the interstices of unconsolidated sand. Depth to water level varies from 6 to 42 mbgl in the alluvial formation while in the hard rock, it ranges form 1.5 mgl to 40mbgl in the study area. The yield of wells ranges from 70 to 125 m3 /day in alluvium and 25 to 90 m3 /day in the hard rock area. T southwest parts it is generally fresh and potable. In the case of alluvium formation, it is fresh and potable except in few small localized patches which exists in the eastern part of Kathumar amd Laxmangarth block. High salinity of water is reported in and around the Khudiyana, Titpuri, Piplikhera etc. in Kathumar block where EC ranges from 5000 to 16500 ms/cm at 250 C. The fluoride content overall in the area is within the permissible limit. The maximum content of fluoride 2.4 mg/l is reported in the Hingota village of Laxmangarh block. 2 Behror, Mandawar, Bansur, Kotkasim, Tijara, Kishangarh blocks of Alwar district . The climate of the area is semi-arid type. Geomorphologically, south west and few central parts of the region are covered by Delhi Super Group of rocks with intermountain valleys. The drainage of the area is controlled by the major rivers Sahibi and its tributaries (all are ephemeral in nature) and flows from south west to north east or north. Ground water occurs under unconfined condition in the phreatic aquifer and under semi- confined condition in deeper zones in Quaternary sediment forming principal aquifer. Apart from this, ground water al fr which are very common yield 300 m3 /day to 600 m3 /day for a drawdown of a few metres. Dug wells have dried up and converted into DCB owing to incessant declining of water level attributed by over ground water for irrigation. The tube wells discharge ranges from 200 lpm to 1000 lpm. The depth to water level varies widely from 5.47 (Nimli) to 66.67 mbgl (Kankardeepa). Water level is comparatively sh
  • 24. river basin especially along the river where as it deeper in the north western and western easonal water level fluctuation (2007) data indicated that 37% ( vel. t 250 C in major part of the area. The fluoride concentration varies from .22mg/l to 4.29mg/l however, it lies within 1.5 mg/l in major part of the area. . The area falls in the arid zone of Western ajasthan which is characterized by scanty and erratic rainfall and extreme temperature 20% ccupied by Malani granites and these form poor aquifer. Depth to water level varies 2.5 Gujarat bout 1460 q.km. parts of the area. S 23no.)of wells show rise, 61% (38 no.)fall and 2% (1no.) wells no change in water le The amplitude of declining water level ranges from (-)0.08m to (-)4.20m. The study reveals that in general water is suitable for domestic, irrigational and industrial use. However, salinity has been noticed at few localities in northern part of the study area. The EC ranges from 495 to 9000 ms/cm at 250 C whereas rests within 3000 ms/cm a 0 All the blocks viz. Behror, Mandawar, Bansur, Kotkasim, Tijara, Kishangarh have more than 100% stage of ground water development ranging from 125.44% in Behror to a maximum of 220.65% in Bansur block. All blocks have been categorized under over- exploited category. 2.4.3 Sheo Block, Barmer district :Sheo block falls in drought prone zone and forms part of Great Indian Thar Desert which over the years suffering from scarcity of water. An area of 6616 sq.km. is covered under the studies. The region is covered by wind blown sand. Sand dunes form a prominent feature of topography. The drainage of the area is under developed and internal R variation. The average annual rainfall is 220 mm and repeated drought is a common phenomenon. The district is poor in forest and has sandy soil in the study area. In the study area, three aquifers have been demarcated which are Upper Tertiary sandstone, Lathi sandstone and Malani Granites. Tertiary Sandstone and Lathi Sandstone are main water bearing formation covering 80% of the area while rest of area i.e. o from 5 to 115mbgl. Ground water occurs in all the formations but the most productive are the Tertiary sandstone and Lathi sandstone. In semi-consolidated Tertiary and Lathi formations, the ground water occurs under unconfined to confined conditions and Malani granites under phreatic condition. The ground water quality in the area varies widely from potable to saline. Tertiary formation consists of alternate layers of clay and shale which are unproductive aquifers but Tertiary sandstone of this formation is productive aquifer. The Lathi formation consists of semi-consolidated, medium to coarse grained sandstone with subordinate amount of gravel is a comparatively high yielding aquifer. Malani granites are practically impervious sparingly jointed and weathered in to a impervious residium lessening the water bearing capacity of this formation, the water yielding capacity of the rock units decrease with depth. Ground Water Management studies were taken up in Parts of Banaskantha district, covering an area of about 3100 Sq. Km. 2.5.1 Banaskantha District: Ground Water Management studies were taken up in parts of Banaskantha district covering an area of about 3100 Sq. Km. Detailed hydrogeological study was carried out exclusively in Deesa taluka comprising a s
  • 25. The drainage network in the study area is constituted mainly by the Banas and its tributary Sipu. The river Banas has a wide channel and exhibits braided nature. Minor streams/rivers, viz. Rel and Ravi originate from hills of Rajsthan and flow in south esterly and westerly directions in Dhanera taluka and disappears in the sandy tracts total of 149 key wells were established and 84 water samples were collected for lls varies from 80 mbgl to 300 mbgl and the water level aries between 45 mbgl to 100 mbgl. Deeper water level is noticed particularly in the hanera taluka ground water occurs within the weathered and fractured zones under ound water potential is primarily governed by the thickness nd the extent of weathered zone. ater is potable in most part of the study area with EC varying etween 500 and 1200 µs/cm. Inferior quality of Ground water with EC greater than n and around Sihori taluka.Fluoride concentration greater than .5 mg/l has been observed in Khaprol, Kuvarla, Lelava,Thervada, Vasan villages of witnessed in the wells near to the conservation structures. w west of Dhanera town. The study area experiences an average annual rainfall of 480mm. Alluvial plain is the single most prominent geomorphic unit and covers a major part of the study area. Sand and silt covering palaeotopography and older formations are of aeolian deposits. It is a vast sandy tract characterised by gently sloping, slightly rolling to undulatory topography owing to the presence of sand dunes. The dunal landscape is more pronounced in parts of Dhanera and Deesa taluka. River alluvium is observed mainly along the river Banas and Sipu. A complete chemical analysis including fluoride. In addition to this 13 no. of ground water samples were collected for trace element analysis. Three pumping test were conducted in large diameter wells. Six number of infiltration test was conducted in the study area to ascertain the basic infiltration rate. Detailed Well inventory was carried out to assess the impact of water conservation structures (Check dams) spread over the study area. Ground water is extensively developed by dug-cum-bore wells and tube wells in alluvial area. The depth of dug-cum-bore wells in the alluvial formation varies between 60 mbgl to 180 mbgl and the depth to water level ranges between 30 mbgl to 100 mbgl. Towards the eastern part of Dhanera and Deesa taluka where the hard rock formation is encountered at a depth of 45 to 100 mbgl the depth of Dug Cum Borewells (DCB) are restricted to a depth of about 70 mbgl and the depth to water level varies between 20 to 40 mbgl. The depth of tube we v western and the south western part of Sihori taluka. The yield of the wells in general is high and ranges from 400 lpm to 900 lpm. At places where granite occur at shallow depth (Sodapur, Meda villages of Deesa taluka and Panswal (Rampura) village of D water table conditions. The gr a The quality of ground w b 2000µs/cm is observed i 1 Dhanera taluka and Mangalpura, Kasalpura, amarnesda, Kasra villages of Sihori taluka. High nitrate concentration (> 45mg/l) is noticed in Dhanera and deesa taluka. The ground water elevation gradually reduces from recharge area in NE towards discharge area in west and south and ground water level follows the general topographic slope. Since last two years owing to good rainfall and the recharge from conservation structures constructed in the study area rise of about 3 to 6 m in water level has been Detailed Study:- Deesa taluka was selected for detailed study with aerial extent of 1460 sq.km approximately. The taluka has witnessed rapid growth in population since last two decades which has led to great demand on freshwater which in-turn has added more stress on the fresh water resources and thus resulting in fast depletion in the ground ater level consistently over a period of time, compounded with intensive irrigation using heavy capacity submersible electric motor. The stage of ground water development is w
  • 26. 92.64%(GEC 2004). Taking into consideration these aspects Deesa taluka was chosen for detailed study. The detailed study area comprises of alluvium constituting sand, silt and gravel beds ew meters to hundreds of meters underlain by granite. The thickness of wal from the tube wells as irrigation water demand is met rough canals. The ground water quality in general is potable, with the EC varying stainable development. gl . The Pre- and post monsoon epth to water level range from– 4.31 to 21.23 mbgl & 1.54 to 17.34 mbgl respectively. was observed that 40% of open wells were dry during pre-monsoon period. solidated piles of ediments as alluvium restricted along the river banks in the area. Lateritic capping also rea is underlain by Vindhyan formation comprising of andstone, shale and limestone. Depth to water level ranges from 4.80 mbgl to 21.35 ranging from f alluvium is more in west and the central part where as towards the eastern part the thickness of alluvium ranges between 60 to 115 mbgl. Ground water development is mainly through tube wells. Most of the dug wells with depth range of 30-40 mbgl have gone dry since last few years. Generally the depth of tube wells range from 80 to 300 mbgl and the depth to water level ranges from between 45 to 100m bgl. Towards the southern part of the taluka namely around the villages Juna deesa, Goliya, Dhuva, Khardosan, Sodarpur, Jhabadia, Chatrala, Samdhi etc. there is a substantial rise in water level noticed in the last two to three years. This rise is attributed to the good rainfall facilitated by less withdra th between 800 and 1500µs/cm. There is a need for cautious approach for further groundwater development seeing the fast declining condition in the water level. Artificial recharge and optimized irrigated agriculture in areas of intensive irrigation is required for su 2.6 Madhya Pradesh Ground Water Management studies were taken up in Satna and Chhatarpur district covering 10925 Sqkm. 2.6.1 Satna District:- 2.6.1.1 Majhgawan, Nagod & Rampur Baghelan blocks: - An area of 3439 sq km. 110 key wells were inventoried during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon period. Water levels were measured and 50 water samples were collected from representative wells for ground water quality analysis as sulphate problem has been reported from the study area, particularly in three blocks namely Nagod, Majghawan and Rampur Baghelan. The Total depth of open well ranges – 6.20 to 23.60 mb d It Geologically, the area is covered by Vindhyan Super Group consisting of Sirbu shales, Bhander limestones, Ganurgarh shale and Rewa sandstones and uncon s observed at places. The yield of the wells ranging 1 to 3 lps & 3 to 15 lps. Special study of Rampur Baghelan Block (814 sq km) has been carried out and special recommendations on the sulphate contamination in the area have been given. Study and measurement of discharge of natural springs in karsitic terrain and sandstone area has been carried out. Six artificial recharge sites have bee selected. 2.6.1.2 Sohawal, Amarpatan, Ramnagar and Maihar blocks: The study was done in an area of 4063 sq km. The a s mbgl in dug wells. Most of the dug wells and tube wells are dry due to low rainfall in the area during the last two years. During pre-monsoon, 32 numbers of ground water samples were collected from different rock formations in the area. The pH values of the
  • 27. analysed ground water samples ranged from 7.64 to 8.52 as such they are within permissible limit. The electrical conductivity of collected water samples ranges from 202 to 3024 micro mhos/cm . 2.6.2: Chhatarpur District:- Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in Ken-Betwa basin of Chhatarpur, Nowgaon & Bijawar blocks in Chhatarpur district overing an area of 3423 sq km. The area is part of the Yamuna sub-basin of Ganga amtari district ,covers an area of about 3000 sq. km. he entire district falls under Mahanadi basin. The average annual rainfall in the district is edominantly occupied by hard rock form ext m nal c he c basin. Physiographically, the area under investigation can be divided into two physical units: The southern hill ranges and the northern plains. In the course of study, 70 key observation wells were selected and inventoried for pre- monsoon and post monsoon water levels. 45 water samples were collected from representative wells The Depth to water level Pre & Post monsoon range from 3.95 mbgl to 14.70 mbgl & 1.60 mbgl to 14.40 mbgl respectively. The general geological succession in the area is granites (basement), which in turn is overlain by Bijawars, Vindhyans and alluvium. The Bijawars and Vindhyans are confined to the southern part of Bijawar block and the alluvium is confined to river chanels. The granitic terrain is traversed by NE-SW trending quartz ridges. The aquifer occurring in the study area are not highly potential. The alluvium is of limited thickness and supports tubewells having discharge of 7 –8 lps. The weathered and fractured portion of the granite sustain tubewells of upto 5 lps discharge. The solution opening in the Bijawar limestone are promising for ground water development. 2.7 Chhattisgarh During AAP 2007-08, Ground Water Management studies were taken up in Dhamtari and Kanker districts of Chhattisgarh State covering an area of 6000 Sqkm. 2.7.1 Dhamtari district: The Dh T 1273.45 mm with 45 to50 rainy days. The district is pr where fracture and solution action dominate over primary porosity. The basement crystalline rocks occupies the southern part, where weathered and shallow fracture zone s phreatic aquifer. The sedimentary rocks constitute aquifer in large part of the district. The fractured and cavernous zone of these stratified limestones formed phreatic to semi-confined aquifers. Northern part of the district is occupied by shales and it is behaving as aquitard. The alluvium along the course of Mahanadi and between Mahanadi and Kharun River along Amdinala possess primary porosity and forms unconfined aquifer of limited areal end. The ground water level in the limestone aquifer in pre-monsoon period ranges fro 6 to 38 m bgl and during post monsoon varies from 3 to 6 mbgl. The seaso lu tuation in the bore wells varies between 6 and 30 m. The specific yield values of tf sandstone and limestone aquifers were estimated as 0.0014 and 0.021 respectively. The transmissivity values of granites remains below 100 m2 /day, whereas that of sandstone ranges from 10-56 m2 /day and remains between 4 and 450 m2 /day for imestone.l The management strategies for groundwater is suggested as follows; The low ground water development in command area needs to be enhanced conjunctively with surface water resources. The area with karstic limestone aquifer can be targeted for this purpose within particularly in command area. This area is suitable for ground water development
  • 28. through bore wells up to 150 m depth. Within the command area, alluvium aquifer is being developed extensively. In the non-command area the scope of ground water development is limited, and the aquifer here are not much productive Numbers of shallow filter point wells are being constructed for irrigation purpose along the a like of than 30m . mainly perforated pipes with thin gravel packing as a result presence of silt in the pumped water is noti design The all ea, which is a buried palaeochannel, has been identifi as potential zone for artificial recharge. An effective stop dam is already dinala at Palari village. Many more check dams and stop dams re required in this area. For effective artificial recharge to the alluvium aquifer ground area. antification of alluvium aquifer. ario the ground water draft is mainly through the hand pump and bore wells. During eloped through M hanadi and Amdinala. Though construction of this type of well is economical, the such wells are hardly 4-6 years. The maximum thickness of alluvium is more The water well construction for domestic purpose within the Dhamtari township is through rotary core type “calyx drilling” where the alluvium is taped through ced very often. For the community water supply in Dhamtari town properly ed gravel pack rotary drilling is recommended to get rid of silt problem. uvium aquifer along the Amdinala ar ed constructed across the Am a water shaft of 15 to 20m depth followed by gravity head recharge well of 50 m depth can be a useful structure in the The following recommendations are suggested: ♦ For the proper development of the available ground water resources there is a need for the regular monitoring of the resource, enhancement of permanent observation wells and qu ♦ Odex drilling rig is suitable for the construction of production wells in the area covered by cavernous limestone. ♦ Gravel packed well with suitable well assembly is the best abstraction structure for the water supply is in the Dhamtari town. ♦ Conjunctive use of surface and ground water resources may be adopted in areas with shallow water level. Artificial recharge measures may be taken to recharge the de- saturated alluvium aquifer. ♦ Roof top rainwater harvesting should be made compulsory for Dhamtari township. 2.7.2: Kanker district:- The study area is about 3000 sq km, comprise of four blocks of Kanker district, namely Bhanupratappur, Charama, Kanker and Narharpur. All the four blocks are tribal blocks. The area is mainly covered with granite and gneiss in eastern and western part respectively and are intruded by basic to ultrabasic dykes at few places. In the present cens Pre-monsoon period, water level of 122 key wells were measured which varies from 1.15 m to 19.9 mbgl. In most of the wells, water level remain between 5 and 10 mbgl. In the post monsoon period, the depth to water level varies from 0.87 to 15.75 mbgl. The Seasonal water level fluctuation ranges between 0.07 m to 14.99 m. The main observations and recommendations are as follows:- • River in the area structurally controlled. The wells constructed adjacent to river course are yielded more water as compare to wells constructed away from it. • Area in which the thickness of the weathered mantle is more than 25 meters are of good potential and in these areas ground water can be dev gravel packed well.
  • 29. • It is recommended that suitable developmental strategy may be adopted in less he area includes parts of Ratnagiri, Chiplun, Khed, Lanja and Sangameshwar talukas of ter regime. The ground water monitoring and sample collection was carried out dug wells, bore well and hand pumps. 32 shallow aquifer and 6 deeper aquifer water . infall uring the monsoon season. There is a great deviation (dispersion) in the daily rainfall in developed Charama block and suitable artificial recharge structure may be constructed using latest scientific techniques in sufficient number to improve ground water scenario in the area. 2.8 Maharashtra An area of 12326 sqkm has been covered in Ratnagiri, Parbhani and Ahmednagar districts in Maharasthra . 2.8.1 Ratnagiri District :- Ground Water Management Studies over an area of 3050.39 sq. km. were carried out in parts of Ratnagiri district falling under the Coastal basin. The theme behind RHS was ground water management studies in the hilly areas of coastal basin. T Ratnagiri district. The study was carried out based on watershed as a unit hydrological feature and seven watersheds were covered. The climate of the area is very humid. The average annual rainfall in the district is 3787 mm. Nearly 91 percent of rainfall is received in June to September. Therefore, cropping is done mainly during kharif season and there is very little cropping in rabi or hot weather season. In Study area, 57 key wells were established covering all the hydrogeological units. The depth of dug wells varies from 1.60 to 19.60 m bgl. The pre-monsoon depth to water level ranges from 0.90 to 15.12 m bgl . The EC of the ground water during pre-monsoon ranges from less than 10 to 370 micromhos/cm. The post-monsoon depth to water level ranges from 0.35 to 13.37 m bgl . The seasonal fluctuation ranged from 0.09 m to 5.13 .m The detailed hydrogeological survey was carried in watershed WF-68 covering an area of 570.96 sq. km. In this watershed, the depth of dug wells varies from 2.65 m to 19.60 m. The pre-monsoon depth to water level ranges from 1.55 to 15.12 m bgl while the post-monsoon depth to water level ranges from 1.25 to 13.37 m bgl. The seasonal fluctuation varies from 0.09 m at Nanij to 3.55 m at Kochari. Urban Hydrogeological study in Chiplun town was carried out to study the impact of urbanization over the ground wa in samples are collected in addition to 38 samples from Chiplun township. 2.8.2 Parbhani District :- An area of about 6124 sq km was covered in Parbhani district in the two parts 2.8.2.1 Purna Sub-basin part (3051Sq.Km.): The pre-monsoon DTW ranges from 1.40 m.bgl to 17.20 m.bgl, while the post-monsoon water level varies from 1.05 m.bgl to 18.80 m.bgl. The seasonal fluctuation ranged from 2.15m to – 0.30 m (Negative fluctuation) and from 0 to 9.00 m on top of dissected plateau. The cause of negative fluctuation is due to the onset of pre-monsoon rainfall in the area before the commencement of premonsoon water level measurement and less and erratic ra d the area causing lesser recharge.
  • 30. The quality of the ground water is potable. The electrical conductivity of ground water varies from 300 to 5400 micromhos/cm during the premonsoon and from 390 and 8800 micromhos/cm during post-monsoon season. During the study it was observed that the part of the area lack ground water potential such areas lack of suitable physiography opography) supporting surface water bodies. .8.2.2 Godavari basin part(3073Sq.Km.) : The area includes parts of Parbhani general, the area is undulating with isolated hills especially south of Gangakhed. Both to 13.10 m.bgl and 0.78 m.bgl to 11.65 m.bgl respectively. vely. The fluctuation of the water levels ranges between 0.5 to y area on irrigation in these areas is mainly through and borewells) and rain water abstraction structures Alluvium areas between 100 to 300 cubic meter/day where the pumping hours are in the range of 8 to 16 hours/day. A total of 90 water samples were 2.9 Uttar Pradesh (t 2 Gangakhed, Palam, Pathri and Purna talukas and 13 watersheds. In depositional and erosional features like alluvial patches, meander scars are present along the Godavari river courses and along its main tributaries. Alluvial deposits are found along the banks of Godavari river and Deccan Traps in the rest of the area. The depth of wells ranges from 2.25 to 16.30 m.bgl. The pre & Post monsoon depth to water level ranges from 0.48 The seasonal fluctuation varies from 0.27 m to 11.80 m. For assessing the ground water quality, 75 water samples from dug wells and 30 samples from bore wells have been collected for chemical analysis. The electrical conductivity in these samples ranged from 100 to 2800 micromhos /cm at 25o C. 2.8.4 Ahmednagar District :- An area of about 3103 sq. Km. was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in parts of Ahmednagar District and encompasses Akole, Sangmner, Parner, and Rahuri talukas. During Pre-monsoon 115 key wells were established. During post monsoon 300 ground water structures were examined for the detailed study of the area. The depth range of the dug wells varies from 4.0 to 30.0 m bgl. The DTW during pre-monsoon & post-monsoon range from 3.2 to 26.0 m bgl and 0.5 to 21.0 m bgl respecti 16.5 m. The area is drained by Godavari river and their tributaries namely Pravara and Mula. The handardara and Mula dam are the Major irrigation projects lying in the studB the western side and central part and these projects irrigates one third of the area under study through canals. Major part of the area is rain fed and the ground water structures (dugwells (percolation tanks, nala bunds, KT weir etc). The area is underlain by Deccan traps and Alluvium of Recent age along the river course and valley portions. At places the thickness of the alluvium cover ranges from 10.0 to 24.0 m. The alluvium and weathered, vesicular, fractured and jointed basalts forms an aquifer zones in the covered area. The yield of the dug wells in Deccan traps formations ranges between 5 to 100 cubic meter/day where the pumping hours are in the range of 2 to 8 hours/day. While the yield of dug wells in collected for the study of chemical quality of the ground water. In general the quality of water is good to brackish. Ground Water Management Studies were undertaken in an area of 14273 sqkm in Bijnor, Lucknow, Meerut, Hamirpur and Badaun districts of Uttar Pradesh.
  • 31. 2.9.1 Bijnor District :-The Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in Bijnor district, covering an area of 4561 Sq Km.The district falling in part of Ganga plain hich is underlain by thick pile of alluvial sediments consisting of sand of various grades The results of ten (10) exploratory boreholes drilled down to maximum 450.49 mbgl in be wells tapping II & III aquifers yielded between 700 and 3239 lpm at a drawdown ranging from 5.86 m to 22.70 m . ater is suitable for domestic/irrigation purposes. Ground water contributes 94% irrigatio this block. e cleaned and desilting should be done & may be used as recharge structure. llow and moderately deep tubewells. The present stage of ground water development is 80.36% (as on 31.03.04); Jalilpur block falls under w clay & kankar. In the North narrow Bhabhar belt runs all alongwith hills from West to East which is followed by Tarai belt. The average annual rainfall is 1122 mm in the district. The depth to water level varies from 3 to 19 mbgl during pre-monsoon and 1.30 to 17.50 mbgl during post-monsoon period and water level fluctuation ranges between 0.25 to 6.95 m. However, on the basis of post-monsoon trend analyses (1997-2006), out of 9 GWM wells, 6 shows declinng trend 20 to >40 cm/year. the area reveal that three tier aquifer system exists in the area and their the depth ranges are G.L. to 150 mbgl (I Aquifer), 170 to 260 mbgl (II Aquifer) and 285 to 396 mbgl (III Aquifer). Ground Water in shallow aquifer down to depth of 50 mbgl occurs under unconfined stage while in deeper aquifer reaches in semi-confined to confined stage of disposition. The exploratory tube well constructed by CGWB tapping second aquifer yielded 3266 lpm at 15.63 m drawdown. The exploratory tu 49 water samples have been collected from entire area from different depth zones. The quality of ground is good and suitable for drinking/irrigation purposes. Detailed hydrogeolgical study:- For detailed hydrogeolgical study, Kirathpur (247 Sq.km) & Jalilpur blocks (401.5 Sq.km) have been selected in Kirathpur block elevation varies between 240 to 242 m above m.s.l. the drainage of the block is controlled by Malin & Choyyia nadi. Depth to water level in the pre-monsoon between 4.67 & 18.70 mbgl and in the post-monsoon 2.70 to 17.50 mbgl. The fluctuation ranges between 0.75 and 1.91 m. The quality of ground w n in Persistent decline of water level suggest needs of Artificial Recharge measures and existing abodoned dug wells may b In Jalilpur block, depth to water level ranges from 9.31 to 21.40 mbgl while in dugwells, it is 8.69 mbgl. The ground water development for irrigation and domestic purposes takes place in the district through sha ‘Over-exploited’ category showing intensive ground water development. 2.9.2 Lucknow District :- The Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in Lucknow district, covering an area of 2528 Sq Km.The district occupies central alluvial plain and lies between major rivers Ghaghra in the North and Ganga in the South, underlying a vast sequence of Quaternary alluvial sediments consisting of mainly clay, kankar, silt and sand of various grades. Based on their topographic positions and geo- morphological characteristics, sediments are grouped in to newer and older alluvium. The general slope of the area is towards south and south east. Annual Rainfall in the district is 963 mm.
  • 32. The shallow phreatic aquifer is unconfined in nature whereas the relatively deeper aquifers are semiconfined to confined in nature. The depth to water level in phreatic aquifer ranges from 1.75 to 32.95 mbgl during pre-monsoon period whereas it ranges from 1.35 to 31.98 mbgl during post-monsoon period. Seasonal water level fluctuation ranges from (-) 0.05 to 4.20 m. Post monsoon depletion of depth to water level recorded in large areas mainly in rural areas and at few places in Urban areas as well. However, n the basis of long term post monsoon trend analysis (1997-2006), out of 16 GWM bgl. The first aquifer group exist at the depth range 00-150 mbgl with the discharge ge 260-370 mbgl with the discharge ranging from 200 to 1470 lpm nd naximum drawdown created is 32.57 m. The fourth aquifer group exist at the depth domestic purposes take places in the istrict through shallow and moderately deep tubewells. The present stage of ground elopment. area is 983 mm. The depth to water level during pre-monsoon reanges from 6.20-14.77 mbgl whereas during 0 lpm with the draw down ranging from 6.4 to 8.38 m. The Ground ater in the first aquifer group occurs under semi-confined to confined condition and s due to Ground Water exploration through closely spaced shallow private bewells and number of State Govt. tubewells. The further development of Ground District :- The Ground Water Management studies were carried out in covering an area of 2584 Sq.Km in the Central Ganga plain. The entire plain of the district is covered by alluvial soil. The area is underlain by Quaternary o wells, 12 wells were showing decling trend. The exploratory drilling carried out by CGWB in parts of Lucknow district revels that three tier aquifer system exist down to depth of 731 mbgl in the area, whereas five aquifer group exist in city areas on the basis of 29 exploratory drilling downto depth of 750 m ranging from 1130 to 1700 lpm and maximum drawdown created is 8.70 m. The second aquifer group exist at the depth range160-240 mbgl with the discharge ranging from 330 to 575 lpm and naximum drawdown created is 30.70 m. The third aquifer group exist at the depth ran a range 380-480 mbgl with the discharge ranging from 1420 to 1520 lpm and maximum drawdown created is 32.68 m. The fifth aquifer group exist at the depth range 483-680 mbgl . 37 water samples were colleted from entire area from different depth zones. Chemical analysis reveals that the quality of ground water in the district is good and suitable for domestic and irrigation purposes. The ground water development for irrigation and d water development is 81.21%. Mal block falls under ‘Over Exploited’ category showing intensive ground water dev Mal block (Area of 252 Sq.Km.) has been selected for detailed studies keeping in view the main objective to asses continuous declining trend of ground water. The major drainage is the river Gomati. The average annual rainfall in the post-monsoon it varies from 5.90-13.97 mbgl.The long term water level trend in l5 years (2003-07) showing decline i.e. from 0.07 to 0.48 cm/year. The yield of tubewell varies from 2043 to 345 w confinement are provided by the impermeable formation i.e. clay on top of the aquifer. The quality of ground water in deeper aquifer is better than the phreatic aquifer. The stage of ground water development is 102% in the block and it falls under over exploited category. At present the shallow aquifer in the block down to 40 m is much under stres tu water is to be strictly restricted and the scope of further developments through deep tubewells may be done. 2.9.3 Badaun Badaun district
  • 33. sediments comprising clay, silt, sand occasionally kankar. The major drainage system in the area through Ganga and Ramganga rivers. The average annual rainfall is 860 mm. The ground water in the area generally occurs under unconfined conditions to confined condition. Depth to water levels during pre & Post monsoon varies from 3.65 to 12.98 bgl and 2.85 mbgl to 12.98 mbgl respectively. The water level fluctuation ranges from eho aquifer group yields 2000-2250 lpm with drawdown f 5 m. Tubewells tapping deeper aquifer below 400 m yields 2000 lpm at a higher in good and suitable for drinking/irrigation purposes. than 11.50 m and most of the dug wells have gone dry. rea falls under over exploited category. Seasonal fluctuation is around 0.27 m in the he Meerut district is underlain by unconsolidated sediments, comprising of sands of wells between 147.50 (Quazipur) and 364.0 mbgl (Ganga nagar) depth range (as on 31- m 0.02 m to 1.20 m. The thickness of alluvium is yet to be established within the area. Maximum thickness of Alluvium in ONGC & CGWB bor le was found to be 750 m. Exploratory drilling carried out by CGWB in the district reveals the presence of granular horizon down to depth of 750 m. The deepest borehole was drilled down to a depth of 751.5 mbgl at Samrer and zones were tapped at 440-452 mbgl & 468-480 mbgl. The well proved to be an Artesian well with a head of 0.6 m above ground level. Shallow aquifer exists down to a depth of 180m. Tubewell constructed in this o drawdown. This aquifer ranges from 480-590 m. On the basis of long term post-monsoon trend analyses (1977-2006), out of 12 wells, 10 shows declining trend. For the assessement of quality of ground water 67 nos. of water samples were collected from the area.The overall quality of ground water in dug well zone, shallow as well as deep aquifer is In the study area Ambikapur, Jagat & Binaivar blocks falls under Over exploited whereas Miaon block falls under critical category, Dataganj and Usman blocks falls under semi critical category. Ambikapur block with an area of 292 Sq.Km was selected for detailed study. The depth to water level in the area is more A block. Detailed surveys including establishing additional keywells and collection of water samples were carried out in order to know actual problems and for suggesting remedial measures. 2.9.4 Meerut District :- The entire district forming a part Ganga-Yamuna doab consists of rich fertile soil supporting large scale development of agriculture and falls into central depression. The depression area commences from south of Sardhana and extends upto Hapur. The older alluvium generally occupies land higher than the younger alluvium. The later is confined to the river channels or in the vicinity of low land areas. Younger alluvium is generally affected by flood during the monsoon period. Fluvial landforms, like paleo channels meander scars, back swamps etc. are observed in the block. Ganga and Hindon are effluent in nature. T various grades, silt and clays of Quaternary age. The occurrence of kankar at different depths is not uncommon. The sandy horizons at different depths form the main repository of ground water in the block. CGWB has carried out ground water exploration down to 742.0 m.bgl (Ganga Nagar) and constructed 9- exploratory tube
  • 34. 3-2007) in Meerut district. The first aquifer is unconfined to semi-confined in nature while the second, third and fourth aquifers are confined. Bedrock has not been encountered in none of the exploratory boreholes. groups. The Pre & Post monsoon water level varies from 2.65 - 16.8 mbgl and 2.90– 17.15 mbgl respectively. ies from 2.90 - 17.15 mbgl. The over exploitation of ground water due to ever increasing ezometers (2003 –2007) that have been constructed in blocks previously evoid of monitoring stations in the last, say, 5- years, has indicated further declining (Jani Khurd) to - 0.87 (Meerut block) m/year (premonsoon) and 0.22 to – 1.08 m/year (postmonsoon) in Daurala, Hastinapur, Kharkhoda, Jani Khurd, he water samples collected from key wells analysed for their quality. All the major n rivers that flows through the district are the amuna, Betwa and Ken. The average annual rainfall is 863 mm in the area. The first aquifer (~Up to 100 m) is medium grained brownish sand with clay lenses admixed with kankar. Second aquifer (~ 150-250 m) is fine grained, grayish sand mixed with silt. Third aquifer (~ 300-450 m) is finer in comparison to the second and fourth (~ below 450 m) is also fine sand with occasionally medium sand. Almost all State tube wells tap first aquifer group whereas most of exploratory tube wells of C.G.W.B have been constructed tapping either I & II or II & III aquifer An area of approximately 300 Km2 was covered in and around Meerut city for detailed study of hydrogeological regimen in the area. The Pre - monsoon water level in and around city varies from 3.45 - 16.8 mbgl and Post monsoon depth to water var population and urbanization in and around Meerut city has led to formation of a ground water trough in north –eastern part of the Meerut block which attracts ground water from all directions to flow towards it. The long term ground water level trend (1998 –2007) is predominantly declining for both pre- and post-monsoon periods. It ranges from - 0.28 to - 0.50 m/year (pre-monsoon) and - 0.18 to - 0.65 m/year (post-monsoon) respectively. Analyses of water level trend data of new pi d trend ranging from 0.11 - Rohta, Sarurpur, Macchra, Mawana and Meerut blocks. T inorganic determinants are well within permissible limits as per drinking water norms. The Electrical conductivity on an average is good. The quality of ground water in deeper aquifer is also potable by and large. Overall the ground water quality in Meerut district is suitable for drinking as well as irrigation water needs. The stage of ground water development in Meerut block is 64.93 % and it falls under safe category. 2.9.5 Hamirpur District :- The Hamirpur district is located in southern part of the state and is a part of Bundelkhand Region and falls under water scarcity area. It is underlain by Granite. The Quaternary alluvial material overlies the Granite. The thickness of alluvium varies from ground level to 150 mbgl in the area. Topographically, the district is made up of flat plain land. The mai Y Ground Water development takes place through open wells, dug cum borewells and shallow tube wells constructed at favorable sites. The yield of dugwells/hand pumps drilled down to the depth between 10-20 m varies from 50 to 60 lpm. Borewells drilled down to the depth between 30-100 m with the yield ranges between 60 and 500 lpm. In the alluvium 1st aquifer exist at 30 to 70 m and yield varies from 150 lpm to 1908 lpm with drawdown ranges from 4.04 m to depth ranges from 90-120 m and yield ranges from 2800 to 2994 lpm with drawdown of 0.76 m to 2.5 m. In total, 29 key wells were established to monitor depth to water levels. The depth to water level varies from 6.55 to 23.90 mbgl during pre-monsoon and from 6.85 to 23.50
  • 35. mbgl during post-monsoon period. On the basis of long term post-monsoon trend analyses (1997-2006), out of 18 GWM wells, 16 are showing declining trends. Physiographically, district lies in the Extra eninsular Region of the Himalayan Mountain Belt. Topographically, the district presents onfined aquifer. The piezometric head of tube 23 springs and 4 exploratory wells were the first time in Doon Valley. The discharge of the from 1.10 to 122 lpm. The post-monsoon whereas the inimum rise of 0.01 m was observed in Vikas Nagar. The minimum decline has been 30 water samples were collected from the entire area from different depth zones. The quality of ground water in the study area is suitable for domestic and irrigation purpose. The stage of ground water development is 57.33% (as on 31.3.2004). Block Maudaha (945 sq.km) was selected for detailed study purposes. 9 key wells were established for monitoring purposes and water samples were also collected. During studies emphasis was given for selecting Artificial recharge sites at Kapra in the block. 2.10 Uttarakhand Ground Water Management Studies were carried by covering 11329 sqkm of Dehradun, Hardwar, Champawat & Pithoragarh Districts of Uttarakhand State. 2.10.1 Dehradun District:- Groundwater Management Studies were carried out in Dehradun district covering 3088 sq. km. P two distinct units namely, the Intermontane Doon valley and the Shiwalik Hill Ranges comprising the Sub-Himalaya or the Outer Himalaya and the Lesser Himalaya. Dehradun district is divided into three hydrogeological units viz. Himalayan Mountain Belt, Shiwalik Zone and Doon alluvial fill (Dun Gravels). Ground water occurs in two types of aquifers in the area, the shallow perched aquifer, where ground water occurs under perched conditions and the main unc wells varies from 20 m to 125 m bgl. total of 149 hand pumps, 9 dug wells,A established as “Key Observation Wells” tapping different aquifers. For the first time, discharge of springs to the north of the Main Boundary Thrust (Chakrata and Kalsi blocks) were measured. Hand pumps tapping different aquifer zones (both in Shiwaliks and Dun Gravels) were established for prings during pre-monsoon period varieds discharge varied from 1.50 to 88 lpm. The water level in the tube wells and hand pumps during pre-monsoon period varied from 2.29 to more than 100 m bgl in Doon Valley whereas during post-monsoon, the water level varied from 2.52 to more than 100 m bgl. Two areas of artesian conditions, one in and around Kaluwala (Doiwala) and the other at Lakwar (Kalsi) were demarcated for future ground water exploration. Areas in and around Nalapani, Manaksidh and Kaplani represent sub artesian conditions. The analysis of water level data of 135 key observation wells for the periods of May 2007 versus November 2007 revealed a rise in water level from 48 hand pumps. There has been a rise in water level of more than 4 m in 48 wells . The decline in water level was between 0 and 2 m in 20 hand pumps, 2 and 4 m in 5 hand pumps and more than 4 m in 19 stations . The maximum rise of 22.2 m was recorded in Gujrada m observed at Punjabiwala (0.23m) whereas the maximum decline of 27.40 m was observed at Kedarwala. The maximum decline in water level in respect of the number of observation wells in Doon Valley was observed along Jaitonwala – Guniyal Gaon section. The area falls in the Nun River Command.
  • 36. The analysis of decadal depth to water level data for 14 ground water monitoring wells of the district for average May (1997-2006) versus May 2007 indicates a decline in the water levels from 0 to 2 m at five stations whereas three (21.44%) stations showed a fall in water level ranging from 2 to 4 m. Chemical quality of ground water, in the area, was classified as good to excellent for - Groundwater Management Studies were carried out in nd pebbles. and pumps show rise in water level, 88.16% of hand pumps show rise in About 33.33% of the total number of dug wells show decline in water level. irrigati . It was also concluded that ground water in the area is suitable for drinking purposes if it satisfies the bacterial specification and can also be utilized for industrial purpose. Water samples of two springs (Sahastradhara, Barlowganj) and one hand pump (Maldeota) showed electric conductivity higher than 750 µS/cm at 25°C. The highest EC of 1669 µS/cm at 25°C was found at Maldeota. This might be due to the location of these wells in the vicinity of Tal Group of rocks. 2.10.2 Hardwar District: on Hardwar district covering 2360 sq. km. Physiographically, Hardwar district lies in the foothills of Himalaya. Topographically, the district represents two distinct units namely, Shiwaliks Hill Range and Indogangetic Alluvial Plains. The district is divided into three geomorphological units namely structural hills, piedmont plain and flood plain. The district is divided into three distinct geological units which are Siwalik Group, Bhabar and Indogangetic Alluvial Plains. Siwalik Group of rocks mainly consists of boulders, conglomerate, sandstone and claystone. Bhabar consists of boulders, sand a The Indogangetic Alluvium comprises sand, slit, clay, gravels and kankar. A sudden topographic rise of Siwalik Range demarcates the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) or Foot Hill Thrust, locally known as Mohand Thrust. During the course of present hydrogeological investigation, 80 hand pumps and 18 dug wells were monitored in pre & Post-monsoon period, addition to existing Ground Water Monitoring Wells. Eighty nine water samples for partial/complete chemical analysis and 38 acid treated water samples for heavy metal analysis were collected during the present study. The details of hand pumps and dug wells are discussed here under: Hand Pumps: Eighty-five hand pumps were selected and inventoried. The pre-monsoon water level of the selected hand pumps drilled in Indogangetic Alluvium Plains, ranges from 0.78 to 24.13m bgl and that of post-monsoon ranges from 0.64 to 21.76m bgl. The hand pumps which were drilled in piedmont (Bhabar) area shows deeper water level. The deepest water level in the hand pump is observed at Laldhang, having pre and post monsoon water level 50.20 and 49.16m bgl respectively. The present study reveals that 89.41% of the h water level between 0 and 2 m. The water level rise ranges from 0.02 to 5.63 m. About 10.59% of total hand pumps shows decline in water level. The 88.89% of total hand pumps show decline in water level between 0 and 2 m. The Decline in water level ranges from 0.11 to 6.72 m. Dug Wells: 24 dug wells were established and monitored. The dug wells are common in the district and many of them have gone dried-up. The pre-monsoon water level of selected dug wells ranges from 1.60 to 20.81m bgl and that of post-monsoon it ranges from 1.79 to 19.56m bgl. The dug wells located in piedmont (Bhabar) area show deeper water levels.
  • 37. All the hand pumps show decline in water level with the minimum decline of 0.02 m and the maximum of 0.52 m. Summary of findings: As per the pre and post monsoon data of hand pumps and dug wells, 84.40% of total structures measured during pre and post monsoon shows rise in water. Only 15.60% of total wells shows decline in water level. There is no ground water pollution reported in district. Based on the water level data, it can be concluded that multilayer aquifer system prevails in the district. 2.10.3: Champawat district: Groundwater Management Studies were carried out in Champawat district covering 1781 sq. km. The district is bounded by Nepal to the east, which also constitute the international boundary marked by River Mahakali. The annual rainfall for the year 2007 is 1747 mm. Geologically, the area comprises hiwalik Group, Ramgarh Group and Almora Group. Shiwalik Group of rocks are he ground water is developed through hand pumps. The area is yet to be explored for for Bhabar. During the course of investigations, 48 hand pumps ere and water levels were obtained from them in both pre and post monsoon periods, el changes very rapidly from lace to place. The area shows rugged mountainous terrain, the northern ost part is snow covered almost throughout the year, which makes it inaccessible. The Geologically, the present study area falls under the Greater Himalayan Belt S separated by the Main Boundary Fault (MBF) from Ramgarh Group of rocks. Shiwalik Group of rocks mainly consists of boulders, conglomerate, sandstone and clay. The Ramgarh Group consists of gneisses, chlorite schists, quartzite, metabasics, biotite schists, limestone with calc-phyllites, pegmatites etc. The Almora Group consists of augean gneiss, garnetiferous biotite mica schist ,granodiorite, granitic rocks, aplite pegmatite veins, phyllonites, carbonaceous phyllite, slate and garnetiferous mica schist etc. T tube wells except w which ranges from 4.04 to 95.72 m bgl and 3.23 to 91.72 m bgl respectively as these aquifers are localised and discontinuous so as the water lev p Similarly 16 springs/nalas were inventoried and monitored. The spring discharge measured during the study ranged from 2 to 20 lpm and 4.5 to 28 lpm. Two dug wells also inventoried in the Bhabar Formation, the depth to water level in the dug wells ranges from 7.26 to 12.43 m bgl during the pre-monsoon period and from 6.21 to 11.09 m bgl during the post-monsoon period respectively. 36 & 21 representative water samples were collected from the ground water abstraction structures during the pre & Postmonsoon period respectively. Five feasible sites in different valley portions were identified and recommended for future groundwater development and exploration in the study area. 2.10.4: Pithoragarh district: Groundwater Management Studies (by Non-conventional Method of Remote Sensing) were carried out in district Pithoragarh covering an area of 4100 sq.km.during the year. Pithoragarh district has Nepal as its eastern boundary. River Mahakali marks the International Boundary between Nepal and India (Pithoragarh district). The district is bounded by Tibet Autonomous Region (China) to the north, which also acts as an International Boundary. In present study only northern part of the district has been covered. m study was taken up by using non-conventional methods with the help of aerial photographs and satellite imageries. Ram Ganga, Gori Ganga, Dhauli Ganga and Mahakali Rivers drain the study area. The average annual rainfall in district Pithoragarh is 1454 mm.
  • 38. and Tethyan Himalayan Belt. The salient findings based on the present study by non- conventional methods are given below. The objective of the study was to prepare integrated hydrogeomorphological and hydrogeological potential/prospect maps by delineating the valley fills, lineaments, ructurally controlled zones through aerial photographs and satellite imageries. Based were entified. utaries of the river Ganga. The alluvial deposit consists of multiple sequences of lay, silt, fine to medium grained sand admixed with calcareous nodules or Kanker in b-basin. The Gandak is the ain river flowing in the southeasterly direction, which is forming western boundary of st on the available data the drainage map, lineament map, and structural map (showing major faults) were prepared by using images of IRS-1A, LISS-I, LISS-II (Path 27 and Row 47) and Land Sat TM (Path 147 and Row 039). Based on the Land sat 4, MSS-124 Bands of National Remote Sensing Agency data, land cover and vegetation cover id 2.11 Bihar Ground water management studies were undertaken in 7571 Sq. Km. area in Samastipur, Vaishali, Madhubani districts of Bihar district. 2.11.1: Samastipur district:-Ground water management study was carried out in Samastipur district and adjoining areas, Bihar covering an area of 3000 Km2 . The objective was to analyze in depth the extent of geogenic contamination of ground water with arsenic in the study area. The study area forms part of an extensive alluvial plain of the River Ganga, which is punctuated by small mounds, leeves and shallow depressions locally referred as “Tal”. It is drained by the Burhi-Gandak and the Bagmati rivers which are trib c varying proportion. Conspicuous lateral and vertical variations in lithology is observed in available borehole records of CGWB and state govt. A total of 109 key wells were inventoried (65 dug wells and 54 hand pumps). A total of 124 water samples were collected from the study area during the pre-monsoon period, out of which 62 samples were solely collected for analysis of As, Fe and Mn. Sampling was repeated during the post-monsoon period to account for the seasonal variation, if any, in concentration of chemical parameters. Water level measurements undertaken during the pre-monsoon period has shown that depth to water level rests within 7.0 m bgl and during the post-monsoon period the general depth to water level in the area remains within 3.0 m bgl. Detailed survey has been carried out in arsenic affected ‘Mohinuddin Nagar’ block of the district. Arsenic concentration in ground water has been found above permissible limit (50 ppb) from Dhobaha and Mohana villages. The concentration ranges between BDL and 389 ppb. 2.11.2 Vaishali district.:-The ground water management study was carried out in an area of 2016 km2 in Vaishali district which constitutes a part of the Ganga River Basin. The major part of the district falls under the Burhi-Gandak su m the district. It joins the river Ganga near Hajipur. A part of the district falls in the tail-end command area of Tirhut Main Canal. The area under the canal command is nearly 450 km2 . The irrigation from canal has been carried out in an area of 1558 hectares. The irrigation from tube-wells and other minor irrigation structures is 283 hectares. The average annual rainfall in the district is 1168 mm.
  • 39. Morphologically it can be classified into three broad categories:- Hazipur Surface, Vaishali Surface & Diara Surface. Quaternary Alluvial deposit consisting of alternate layers of sand, silt, clay, and gravel forms prolific unconfined and confined aquifer system. CGWB exploratory drillings down to depth range of 127 to 300.15 m at Lalganj, Hazipur, and Garoul confirm presence of highly potential and thick sand & gravel layers. The thickness of aquifer tapped at Kohnara ranges from 86 to 248 for a total drilled depth of 300 m, nd at Lalgang ranges from 141 to 220 meter for a total drilled depth of 240 m. Due to - own. monsoon period remained > 5.0 m bgl in most of the wells, and within 2.0 m bgl post-monsoon period. 7 and 8.60. pH in majority of the samples was above 8.0. The EC as found to vary between 382 and 4690 microsiemens/cm at 25o C. In majority of the within 1500 microsiemens/cm at 25o C. Chloride was found to vary between 10.6 and 745 mg/l. Concentration of major ions indicates that the water is flowing towards south and eet the river Ganga. The important rivers flowing through Madhubani district from east uring both the a impervious clay layers the aquifer disposed at greater depth are semi-confined to confined in nature. The store ativity value of the deeper confined aquifer is 0.13 x 10-7 and transmissivity value ranges between 621 and 5163 m2 /day. The piezometric head has been found to rest within 5 m bgl. A high discharge of 200 m3 /hr may be obtained from a well of 300 m tapping sufficient thickness of confined aquifer with nominal draw d In order to study the spatial and temporal variation of ground water level in the study area 65 representative dug wells were inventoried. Depths to ground water levels during pre- and post-monsoon periods, in the year 2007, were collected. The depth to ground water level in phreatic aquifer was found to vary between 3.44 m and 8.38 m bgl during pre-monsoon 2007, whereas between near-surface to 3.87 m bgl during post-monsoons 2007. Fluctuation between pre- and post-monsoon periods varied between 1.78 m and 4.51 m. In majority of the wells, the fluctuation between pre- and post-monsoon periods in the year 2007 remained in the range of 3-4 m bgl. The depth to ground water level in the pre- in The chemical analysis of 31 representative ground water samples of unconfined aquifer of pre-monsoon 2007 indicated that the water is mildly alkaline in nature. pH was found to vary between 7.7 w samples EC remained potable and can be used for industrial and irrigation purposes. The ground water of the district is by and large basic is nature and bicarbonate type. 2.11.3 Madhubani district.:-Ground Water Manage Studies was carried out in an area of 2501 km2 covering Madhubani district. The district forms a part of Mid-Ganga basin in Kamla Balan sub-basin. The district is situated to the south of Tarai region of Nepal. The rivers and the tributaries originating from the Tarai zone are m to west are the Kosi Dhar, the Bihul Nadi, the Bhutahi Balan, the Kamla Balan and the Dhaus Nadi. The study area can be sub-divided into three geomorphological units namely (i) Flood plain, (ii) Old flood plain and (iii) Older alluvial plain. The flood plains occurring mainly all along the river courses consist of sand, silt and clay. They are low lying water logged areas. The old flood plains consist of sand, silt and clay and are mostly under paddy cultivation. The older alluvial plains are generally uplands and consist of clayey silt, clay, and occasional kankars. During the Rabi season between October and April, about 113 km2 areas is sown for crops like wheat, barley and pulses etc. The crop grown during Kharif season, in an area of 180 km2 paddy, maize, jawar and pulses are sown. Sugarcane is sown d
  • 40. seasons. The main sources of irrigation in the district are shallow tube wells, tanks and anals. Tanks and canals are basically rainfed and are dried up during the Rabi season. of Ladania, Laukha, Andhratharhi and hutauna and in south-central parts covering Pandaul, Kapileswar and Bhawanipur. The rameters .13 West Bengal round water management studies were undertaken in 12000 Sq. Km. area in Western ck terrain, the effect of mining on Ground Water regime, quality of round Water due to water stored in old quarries in coal field areas, to find out the c During the field study, the pre-monsoon depth to water level has been found to be > 4 m bgl in north-central region covering the areas K remaining areas of the district record the pre-monsoon water level within 3 – 4 m bgl. In the post-monsoon period, the depth to ground water level is > 4 m bgl at Ladania. The areas covering parts of Phulparas, Babubarhi, Laukhaha and Khutauna record a post- monsoon water level of 2-3 m bgl. The remaining areas in the district show water level in the depth range of 1–2 m bgl. In parts of Madhubani proper, Rajnagar and parts of Jhanjharpur, the depth to ground water level remains within 1 m bgl in post-monsoon period. The annual water level fluctuation between pre- and post-monsoon period is maximum (2 – 3 m) in parts of Ladania, Khutauna, Phulparas Jhanjharpur, Pandaul and Babubarhi. In the remaining areas it is 1 – 2 m. In Madhubani and Jaynagar a low fluctuation of 1 m has been observed. 2.12 Jharkhand 2.12.1 Kodarma district:- Ground water management study was carried out in Koderma district, Jharkhand, covering an area of 1770 Km2 . The objective of the study was to delineate low ground water development in the area. River Barakar and its tributaries control the drainage of the area. The area is underlain by wide range of geological formations ranging from Archaean to Recent mainly consisting of phyllites, mica-schist, Granite-gneiss and other basic and metabaic intrusive. Along the course of the major rivers alluvium of limited thickness are also found. A total of 47 key wells were inventoried. The depth to water level was found to vary between 5 to 12m during pre-monsoon whereas it varies from 1 to 3m during post- monsoon. A total of 86 water samples were collected from the study area during the pre-monsoon period. The analytical results have shown that all the major pa except Fluoride are within the permissible limit set for drinking and domestic uses. Fluoride concentration above permissible limit has been found from samples of Koderma and Satgawan blocks of the district. The maximum concentration of fluoride has been found as 5.53 ppm. 62 samples were analysed for As, Fe and Mn. The averege stage of ground water development of Koderma district is 12.49% with maximum stage of development as 38.9 % in Jaynagar block. During post-monsoon water level monitoring, in about 70% of the area, the depth to water level remained between 2 and 3m indicating these areas as prone to water logging. Groundwater development in these areas needs to be steeped up to boost development in agricultural sector. 2 G part of Barddhaman, Parts of Dakshin Dinajpur & Malda, Western parts of Bankura, parts of Kochbehar & Jalpaiguri districts of the State. 2.13.1 Western part of Barddhaman district:- Groundwater Management Studies in western parts of Barddhaman district to assess the scope for Ground Water development in water scarce hard ro G
  • 41. quantum & mode of mine seepage, to critically review the chemical & bacteriological quality of ground water, water in abandoned mines & surface water & probable reasons for contamination, to assess the water supply scenario & scope of future ground water development in industrial town of Asansol-Burnpur areas, feasibility of RWH & scope for rge scale RWH as a alternate source of water supply as a mitigating measure, to assess .13.1.1 Findings: bout 70% of the study area belongs to coal bearing Lower Gondwana sedimentaries & , which is the effect of continuous pumping of mine water during ining activity. The gradient of water table in the mine area ranges from 4 m/km to 20 water onservation & artificial recharge. Impact of industry on ground water regime in Asansol- Phe Ma western parts of Dakshin Dinajpur & Malda districts to assess the are l extension of contamination, to find out the for RW for inc shin Dinajpur & 2.1 The ly by recent alluvium. The aquifer ccurs under confined to semi confined condition. The ground water is contaminated by .13.3 Western parts of Bankura district: Groundwater Management Studies in was covered and a detailed study in Gangajalghati and Saltora lock were carried out. The study was conducted through inventory of key observation s from dugwells & tube wells. la the need for further optimization of Ground Water Management Studies. An area of 3000 sq. km. including 500 sq. km in detailed study area falling mainly in western parts of Barddhaman district was covered. 2 A remaining 30% is underlain by Recent Alluvium. It was estimated by CMPDIL that daily mine water discharge from various coal mines is to the tune 0.25 MCM per day in dry period and 0.39 MCM per day in monsoon period. This indicates a huge amount of ground water is percolated into the mine from the weathered zone. In the area dug wells are the main source of drinking water. Local residents of the active mining area reported that most of the well go dry m m/km. Considering the fact a few location in the mining area were selected for rain c Durgapur were critically studied and it was found that the release of industrial waste eg. nol, Cyanide, Ammonical Nitrogen, was high in the Damodar river water. 2.13.2 western parts of Dakshin Dinajpur & Malda districts: Groundwater nagement Studies in scope for GW development in the area, to identify fluoride contaminated aquifers in the as & to establish the lateral & vertica source of fluoride contamination, to identify fluoride free aquifers in the area & the scope fluoride free ground water development, feasibility of RWH & scope for large scale H as a alternate source of water supply as a mitigating measure, to assess the need further optimization of Ground Water Management Studies. An area of 3000 sq. km. luding 900 sq. km detailed study area falling mainly in parts of Dak Malda districts was covered. 3.2.1 Findings: study area partly covered by older alluvium & part o fluoride. An area of 771 sq.km was covered under detailed study in Gangarampur & Tapan blocks where fluoride content is high in ground water. During peak summer tubewells are getting dry due to excess withdrawal of ground water for boro cultivation by submersible pump. 2 western parts of Bankura district to assess the scope for GW development in water scarce hard rock terrain, to identify fluoride contaminated aquifers & the source of fluoride, feasibility of RWH & large scale conservation structures. An area of 3000 sq.km b wells, collected water sample
  • 42. 2.13.3.1 Findings: Presence of fluoride in ground water mainly in tube well was noticed above permissible limit in Barjora- Saltora- Mejia-Gangajalghati, Chatna, Bankura II blocks. The concentration of fluoride was in the tune of 3.41-7 ppm in Gangajalghati block. In the special study area of Gangajalghati, ground water assessment has been undertaken by adopting dry season balance equation to find out the specific yield of prevailing hydrogeological units. 2.13.3.2 Based on the study the following recommendations were given: (i) In the hard rock areas of Gangajalghati-Saltora-Hirbundh blocks, ground water may ed for domestic use by deploying Indian Mark II tube wells within 50 mbgl. (ii) Sha asible in a few areas of Barjora (iii) La lley areas of the study area, may be useful for ig iv) De con irrig rogramme for sub (v) of t leve pur ana or F concentration is to be done. . km. in arts of Kochbehar-I, II, Mathabhanga-I & Dinhata-I blocks in Kochbehar district and of Kochbehar district, it has been observed that 1000 ha ultivable land along Chilkirhat-Pathchhara-Chandmari-Suktabari in the bank of ‘Saltia be utiliz llow and medium duty irrigation tube wells are fe and Onda blocks. rge dia. dug wells, particularly in va irr ation with limited command area. velopment of canal network, installation and renovation of RLI schemes, struction of check dams, nallah bundh, tank excavation, etc, can facilitate the ation as well as the artificial recharge to ground water. The p development of micro-watershed through construction of check dams, nallah bundh, -surface dykes, etc, across the small streams should be adopted. In fluoride affected areas, proper measures should be taken for periodic monitoring he quality of water of the wells. Awareness camp needs to be held at the village l to educate people about the adverse effect of fluoride in human body and to ify the F rich water for domestic use. Before installation of tube well, chemical lysis of water f 2.13.4 in parts of Kochbehar & Jalpaiguri districts:- Groundwater Management Studies in parts of Kochbehar & Jalpaiguri districts to study the aquifer disposition & its potentialities, to study the possibility for alternate irrigation techniques for more crop production considering the soil characteristics, optimum use of ground water in domestic as well as agricultural sectors. An area of 3000 sq.km was covered and a detailed study over an area of 600 sq p Nagrakata, Metelli & Dhupguri blocks of Jalpaiguri district were carried out. The study was conducted through inventory of key observation wells, collected water samples from dugwells & tube wells. 2.13.4.1 Findings In the special study area c River’ has a problem of drying up of ground water within 3 to 4 days after rain fall and a sharp decline of ground water level is observed immediately after monsoon since the rain water infiltrates quickly into the ground and percolates deeply into ground water and finally discharges at the river bed making the river an effluent one. This is due to porous sandy formation which prevents retention of water in the cultivable land. The paddy cultivation mainly has become very difficult in that stretch.
  • 43. 2.13.4.2 Based on the study the following recommendations have been suggested: • Conjunctive use of river water and ground water. • Installation of small to medium capacity RLI schemes along the perennial portion of river to irrigate river side land. • Clusters of shallow tube wells may be constructed on either side of the river (about 1 km. away from the bank), to prevent dewatering of surrounding paddy field. Clusters of medium duty tube wells may be constructed in an area little away from the river bank for increasing the inland irrigated area. • On both side of Saltia River and parallel to the river course, sub-surface check am of required length may be constructed to obstruct the base flow. 2.14 N rth Eastern States (Assam, Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya) radesh). othill region and hilly tract. The Brahmaputra is the main river controlling the drainage network of the district. Geologically the districts show ther east around Panigaon and Dhakuakhana area mono aquifer is found down the depth of 130 m. The grain size of aquifer materials increases towards north. The . d • In order to increase the moisture/ water and nutrient holding capacity and subsequent fertility of soil, the loose sandy and infertile soil of the area may be treated with (i) addition of organic matters such as farm yard manure, green manure, etc. & (ii) mixing of measured quantities of dolomite/ limestone as soil conditioner. In the special study area of Bhabar zone in parts of Nagrakata Metali and Dhupguri parts of Jalpaiguri district, a cluster of spring on the contact zone of Bhabar and Tarai may be utilized for irrigating substantial areas of agricultural land through construction of check dam, nala bundh to arrest the spring runoff and gully plug pit/ collection well may be constructed for construction and canalized the water as and when required. o Under Ground Water Management Studies an area of 19109 sq km was covered in districts of Lakhimpur & Dhemaji, Karimganj & Hailakandi, Morigaon, Western Nagaon & Kamrup, Nagaon (Assam), Jaintia Hills (Meghalaya), West Kameng (Arunachal P 2.14.1 Lakhimpur and parts of Dhemaji District, Assam: An area of 3000 sq km was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in Lakhimpur and parts of Dhemaji district of Assam. Lakhimpur district of Assam is situated on the northern bank of the mighty Brahmaputra river, has a geographical area of 2953 sq. km. Physiographically the district is divided into flood plain, fo occurrence of rocks of the Miocene, Siwalik group forms the base and is overlain by considerable thickness of alluvium that ranges in age from Pliocene to Recent. The average annual rainfall varies from 1150 to 3806 mm. Based on subsurface geology as revealed by borehole data and groundwater conditions, the aquifers of the district are classified as shallow and deeper aquifers. Groundwater occurs in phreatic to semiconfined conditions in the shallow aquifers and extends down to the depth of 30 – 50 m. The deeper aquifers in the western part of the district are mostly of multi aquifer type with 3 – 4 granular horizons separated by thin intervening clay layers. Fur to general flow direction of groundwater is from the higher elevation in north towards the plain area in the south. The northern and northwestern part of the district forms the recharge zone for the entire district while the remaining area shows recharge / discharge conditions
  • 44. These areas are also found show high iron content in ground water. is unevenly istributed over a period of 6 to 7 months from April to September / October. potential. Total non-command area is 2,83,400 Ha in the istrict. Annual groundwater recharge as per 2004 ground water estimation is 1493.41 he farmers. er water level is witnessed roughout the foothill region, groundwater development may be planned through rrest sub surface flow may become very useful in foothill area. The construction of dyke l. Depth to water level in Hailakandi district varies from .10 – 3.61 m bgl. Piezometric head in Karimganj district varies from 0.70 m bgl to Five blocks of the district, viz. Narayanpur, Karunabari, Naoboisa, Lakhimpur and Boginodi constituting 1000 sq. km. area was considered for detailed study as these areas have divergent ground water conditions. The areas in the foothill although receive plenty of precipitation and water level build up during monsoon but owing to its gradient and high permeability of underlying sediments, water flows towards south in down gradient. Premonsoon water level monitored in these areas indicate deeper water table in e.g. Rampur, Kimin and Dijoo in Naoboisa block where water level varies from 3 to 6.37 mbgl in Pathailipam area of Boginadi block it varies from 7 to 8 mbgl whereas the Premonsoon water level around Dholpur, Bhogpur Chariali, Naoboisa and Kadam varies from 0.78 to 2 mbgl. These areas become water logged throughout the year. to In the district over 90% of the population live in rural areas and most of them are cultivators or dependent on agriculture. However many parts of the district is inundated by flood during monsoon and the rainfall pattern throughout the year d As per 2004 data a total of 5394 Ha canal command area is created in the district generating 6456 Ha irrigation d MCM and the stage of development is only 10.87%. From the data of ground water reserve in the district, it can be recommended to tap this prolific reserve of groundwater for irrigation for boosting agricultural production in the district and thereby uplifting the economic conditions of t Moreover, in the detailed study area, 315 Sq. Km is marked as water logged and for lowering the water table construction of shallow tube well is essential. The irrigation canals, if planned in the area, must be lined to prevent seepage. On the other hand in the water scarce area where deep th construction or large diameter dug wells and dug cum bore wells. Construction of deep tube wells down to the depth of 100 – 150 mbgl is recommended with the deployment of combination or percussion rig or reverse rotary rig depending on nature and size of boulders. The artificial recharge technique of ground water by construction of subsurface dykes to a will result in better availability of water in dug wells for a longer period even during dry seasons. 2.14.2 Karimganj & Hailakandi districts (Assam) : An area of 3136 sq.km was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in Karimganj & Hailakandi districts of Assam. The area under study is covered by unconsolidated sediments of Quaternary and semi consolidated sediments of late Tertiary age. A total of 63 dug wells and 17 deep tube wells were monitored. Depth to dug wells varies from 2-13 m bgl. Pre monsoon depth to water level in Karimganj district varies from 0.05 –2.90 m bgl but in Chandkhira area it was found to be 5.41 m bg 0 3.15 m bgl and the same in Hailakaqndi district varies from 0.10 -4.65 m bgl. During
  • 45. post monsoon period depth to water level in Karimganj district varies from 0.35 – 3.92 m bgl and in Hailakandi district it varies from 0.95- 3.48 m bgl. Occurrence of springs are found in Kaya TE, Niskar, Nuniarkhal, Barnerpur TE, and Rupacherra TE and Sultanibazar- Ramnathpur area of Hailakandi district. Springs are available in the hilly areas stretching from Ramnathpur towards Mizoram. Springs are und in Mokamtilla, Lakhoipur and Englarbazar area of Karimganj district. sam): An area of 3000 q km was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in Morigaon, Western lain on southern part of e Brahmaputra river. nsolidated rmation comprising rocks of Archaean and Shillong Series and 2) un-consolidated .14.4 Nagaon District ( Assam): An area of 3973 sq km was covered under Ground perature and is highly humid in nature. Physiographically, the area is ivided into five major units viz. Denudational hills, Piedmont zone, Highland areas, which 25 are dug wells nd 7 deep tube wells. The depth of the dug wells varies from 4.24 to 13.60 m bgl. Pre e post monsoon water level does not show any marked rise or fall. Available statistics fo 2.14.3 Morigaon, Western Nagaon & Kamrup districts (As s Nagaon & Kamrup districts. Geomorphologically, the area has been divided into three geomorphologic units- 1) Isolated hillock or inselberg of Granitic gneiss & granite, 2) a belt of shallow weathered pediment with thin cover of older alluvials and 3) recent alluvial p th Geologically, the area comprises two distinct Geological groups-1) Archaean rocks comprising biotite-hornblende gneiss etc, with schist and pegmatite with NE-SW trend. It forms elongated hills and detached hillocks within the alluvial patch.2) Alluvial sediments comprising unconsolidated sand, silt, pebble. Sub-surface geology shows a thick clay band with alternating sand down to the depth of 300 m bgl. Hydrogeologically, the study area can be divided into two units-1) Co fo alluvial patches comprising sand. gravel and pebble beds. In major parts of the study area, water table rests within 2-4 m bgl. Shallow water table condition exists around Mikirveta- Barangabari area and deeper water table condition exists around Jagirod and Maloibari area representing discharge area of ground water flow is towards NE and NW. 2 Water Management Studies in Nagaon district of Assam. The area under study is occupied by consolidated formations belonging to Pre-Cambrian group of rocks, semi- consolidated formations of Tertiary age and overlain by unconsolidated alluvial sediments of Quaternary age. The climate is characterized by moderate tem d Flood plains, Char lands and Swampy area. The common drainage pattern in the study area is sub-parrallal to dendritic. During the course of survey, 32 key wells were established, out of a monsoon depth to water level varies from 0.82 to 8.32 m bgl. and the Post monsoon from 0.24 to 9.87 m bgl. The piezometric head varies from 0.85 to 4.19 m bgl whereas th indicate that some people suffer from severe fluorosis in areas around Haldiati, Parakhowa & Neel bagan area of Nagoan district. A preliminary survey has indicated the presence of high fluoride content in ground water in the vast belt of Hojai subdivision. 2.14.5 Jaintia Hills (Meghalaya) : An area of 3000 Sq. km was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in Jaintia Hill district of Meghalaya.
  • 46. Geologically, the study area consists of rock formation ranging in age from Archaean to Recent. The Archaean & Pre- Cambrian rocks are found mainly in the northern parts of the study area namely in Thadlasken and Laskein blocks. The Tertiary groups of rocks are represented by the Shella formation (altercation of sandstone & limestone), which cover extensive areas of Amlaren, Saipung & Khliehriate blocks. During the course of study, 31 dug wells, 29 springs & 3 bore wells were monitored. Hydrogeologically, the study area can be divided into three units-namely consolidated, semi-consolidated and unconsolidated formations. The consolidated formation includes oldest rock formation where depth of weathering varies from 15 to 20 m at places. dated formation constitutes the major part of the study area. The depth water level in this semi-consolidated formation varies from 0.20 - 1.57 m bgl. The ium plain of Bangladesh. gneissic complex and hillong group of rocks. Ground water occurs under unconfined to semi-confined e most favorable sites for ground ent. In the study area, shallow to medium duty bore/tube wells may be the rural areas. uring the course of study, it was noticed that the discharge of the springs varies from to ground water storage. Springs are the major ater supply system in the district. The discharge of springs varies from 0.076 lps to 10 aft, igh rainfall. Because of difficult terrain, no exploration activities could be taken up by the The semi-consoli to unconsolidated formation is represented by Recent alluvium occur ring near the southern fringe of the district and is a continuation of the alluv For detailed studies, Thadlaskein block was selected. Hydrogeologically, the block comprises mainly of consolidated formation consisting of Archaean S condition. The depth to water level in dug wells/seepage wells varies between 0.25 to 1.90 m bgl. Development of ground water in the study area is still in nascent stage. The peneplained surface, buried pediments and the valley fills are th water developm undertaken in feasible areas of hard rock and sedimentary terrain namely Nongbah, Wahijajer, Thadlaskien etc and Khliehriat, Bates, Munkree etc. in sedimentary terrain respectively. Springs also play a major role of water requirements for the people in D 1 - 120 lpm. In hilly areas, roof top rainwater harvesting technique may be adopted effectively to meet the demand of the people residing on hill top. 2.14.6 West Kameng (Arunachal Pradesh) : An area of 3000 sq km was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in West Kameng district, Arunachal Pradesh. Geologically the study area is of complex nature and is mainly made up of consolidated formations like gneiss, schist, phyllite, quartzite etc. of Bomdilla and Shella group of rocks. Gondwanas appear as thin patches in E-W direction and are made up of hard and compact sandstone, carbonaceous shale, slate, phyllite etc.. Geological formation ranges from Archaeans to Recent. The average annual rainfall is 2097.14 mm and the temperature ranges from 10 C – 280 C. Major part of the rainwater goes as surface run off and the remaining part infiltrate w more than 0 lps. Few dug wells were inventoried in the foothill zone of Bhalukpung area for monitoring. Depth of dug wells varies from 3.98 to 6.88 m bgl and water table ranges from 1.00 to 5.78 m bgl. No other ground water structures are available in the study area. Present ground water development is at low key. There is no change in ground water scenario of the district over last 10 years, which may be due to poor dr h CGWB/other state agencies. For exploration activities, geophysical survey has to be carried out in some approachable valley areas like Dirang, Rupa and Tenga valley etc.
  • 47. 2.15 Orissa Under Ground Water Management Studies an area of 12978 sqkm was covered in ions of Mio liocene age (Baripada Bed) except the Northern and North eastern part. The weathered ese appur & Kostha). These deeper aquifers bear the key towards solving the round water problems in the area. ahalda, Bijatola, Rairangpur, Jamda, Kusumi and Bisoi blocks of amanghati Sub-division and Saraskona, Bangriposi blocks of Baripada Sub-division. ins, upper sandy and gravely rmations of Tertiary period forms the main phreatic aquifers in the study area. Total of districts of Mayurbhanj and Sundargarh of Orissa. 2.15.1 Mayurbhanj District : An area of 10706 sq km was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in Mayurbhanj district of Orissa. 2.15.1.1 Eastern Part:- The eastern part of the Mayurbhanj district comprises of ten blocks i.e., Barasahi, Baripada, Betnoti, Gopabandhunagar, Kuliana, Khunta, Muruda, Rasgovoindpur, Samakhunta and Suliapada. It covered an area around 3282 Sq. Km. The study area is bounded between Balasore in the north and West Bengal and Jharkhand States in the East and North respectively. Physiographically the study area is characterised by a low plateau with land elevation between 30 to 80 m above mean sea level. It is bounded by the Simlipal Hill ranges on the western part from which the main drainage systems of the area emerge. The area is well drained by Burhabalanga and Jambira rivers. The drainage pattern is dendritic to sub parallel and may be developed by the slowly emergence of the plateau. Hydrogeologically most of the study area is underlain by sedimentary format P zone on th formations is lateritized and serves as the main shallow aquifer systems in the area. Under pre-monsoon survey work 112 key wells were established and EC at the field was measured and water samples were collected from selected locations. Data from key wells shows that the water level is deep with the average pre-monsoon water level data ranges between 8m to 12m below ground level. However very deep water levels are quite common and at Chuasal Village 6 km west of Chitrada,the water level is 19.52 mbgl. The ground water of this phreatic aquifer is of excellent quality with EC ranging 30- 35 µ S/cm at 250 C. Confined aquifers in the form of sand and gravel are also present at different depths and in certain places the tube wells tapping them are in auto flowing condition (Prat g 2.15.1.2 Central and Western part: The Ground Water Management Studies in the central and western parts of the district covering an area of 3410 sq.km has been carried out. This area comprises parts of Subarnarekha and Budhabalanga Sub-basins. It covers Tiring, B B The study area can be divided into three physiographic units i.e., Central Part; Simlipal Hill ranges, Western part and Eastern part ; hill slope and plain area. The western plateau (Rairangpur, Bisoi, Bahalda, Bijatola, Jamda, Kusumi and Tiring blocks) fall under Subarnarekha Subbasin and eastern part (Bangriposi and Saraskona blocks) fall under Budhabalanga Sub basin. The drainage pattern is generally controlled by regional slope and dendritic but lower order streams are controlled by structure. Budhabalanga, Subarnarekha (it’s main tributary Khadkhai river) forms the main river drainage system in the study area. Pre Cambrian hard rocks (Simlipal Group, Iron ore series rocks) comprises the major parts of the study area except the eastern part where tertiary formations are occurring. The weathered material developed over the hard rock terra fo
  • 48. ninety three number of wells (7 y wells and 16 NHS wells) are monitored both in Pre- Post monsoon period during the study. In the Pre-monsoon period the depth to water level varies from 1.83 metres below ground level to 16.7 metres below ground level; average being 7.1 metres below ground level. But in Saraskona and Bangriposi blocks average depth to water level in Pre-monsoon period is 8.56 metres below ground level. There is lot of scope for artificial recharge in these areas as in the Post-monsoon period also the average depth to water level is 6.58 metres below groun 7 ke d level. Some areas are aving depth to water level as high as 11 to 15 m below water level. In the Post jhar district in southern part. Hydrogeological onditions in different parts of the Study area shows wide variation. Based on water h monsoon period the study area shows depth to water level ranging from 1.2m to 15.52 m bgl; the average being 5.41m bgl. The seasonal water level fluctuation ranges from 0.33 to 5.17m ; average being 1.69 m. Rairangpur block is specially studied. 2.15.1.3 Southern and South Western part : The Ground Water Management Studies in the South Western part of the Mayurbhanj district covering an area of 4014 sq.km has also been carried out. This area comprises of seven blocks viz. Raruan, Sukuruli, Jashipur, Karanjia, Thakurmunda, Kaptipada and Udala. The surveyed area is surrounded by Keonjhar district in the western part, Jharkhand State and Kusumi block in northern part, Khunta, G.B.Nagar, Saraskona block of Mayurbhanj district in eastern part and Balasore district and Keon c bearing and water yielding properties, the formation can be broadly divided in two distinct units. Consolidated Formation: The major part of the study area is underlain by consolidated rocks such as granite & its gneissic varieties mica-schists, quartzites, amphibolites etc elo ng to Singhbhum Orogeny of Pre-Cambrian age. Numerous basic dykes of he ground water is stored mainly in the secondary porosities resulting from weathering weathered and fractured which form the repository of round water at shallow depth. The texture varies from coarse grained to fine grained de b ngi different trending orientation also play an important role in restoration of ground water flow movement. T and fracturing of reservoir and is the source of ground water movement through fracture zones. The thickness of the weathered residuum is generally high in topographic lows and undulating plains. Ground water occur in unconfined condition in the phreatic zone. The interconnected open joints and fractures in the underlying hard rock facilitates ground water movement and form deeper aquifers.It is observed that two to three water bearing zones occur within 100 m depth as revealed from RWS&S/PHED data (boreholes & hand pump). Granite and Granite gneisses are the major rock types occurring in the area. The rocks in places are highly g aplitic (leuco-variety) type. The pth of the open wells varies from 6.50 metres below ground level during pre-monsoon and 4.50 m to 10.00mbgl during post monsoon period. The maximum yield of the borewells range upto 5 - 6 lps. Unconsolidated Formation: Laterites and alluvium of Subrecent to Recent age capping over older formations and tapped through dugwells. Recent alluvium occurs in thin discontinuous patches as valley fills and also along the course of Baitarani river, unai river, Kalo river and Deon ala. The depth to water level ranges from 5.50 to 8.00S metres below ground level during Pre-monsoon and from 3.00 to 5.60 metres below ground level during post-monsoon period. The flood plain deposits ranging in thickness from 10 to 15m and the yield of the dug wells is 4 to 5 lps.
  • 49. The results of the study shows the scarcity of water observed in the Karanjia block, Joshipur block and few parts of Thakurmunda block . It has been suggested to go for Rain water harvesting by constructing percolation tank, dug well, recharge pit etc. 2.15.2 Sundargarh District : An area of 2272 sq km was covered under Ground Water Development & Management Studies in Sundargarh district, Orissa. The study area onsists of Bonaigarh, Lahunipara, Gurundia and Koira blocks of Sundergarh district. The of Laterites. he alluvium occurs along the river courses. The hydrogeological conditions in different ow wide variation. Based on water bearing and water yielding roperties the formation can be broadly divided in to two district units. c area consist of 2272.37 sq.km. with the population of 280001 (according to the 2001 census) are mainly depends on agriculture. Though the economy of the region is basically agrarian, the recent establishment of mining and steel plants in this area, area added to the growth of the economy. The study area is mainly consist of Granite (Bonai granite), Mica schist, Phyllites, Quartzite, Epidorite & Amphibolites (occur as patches) and a pocket deposits T parts of the study area sh p Consolidated formations: The major part of the study area is underlain by onsolidated formations, rock such as Granite (Bonai), Mica Schist, Phyllite, Quartzite granite gneiss: These are the major types occurring in Bonai sub ivision. The texture varies from coarse grained to fine grained aplitic types. These rocks ica schist: These rocks are highly weathered. The depth of the open wells varies from Uncon olidated formations c and patches of epidiorite and amphibolites belonging to the Precambrian age. The ground water is stored mainly in the secondary porosities resulting from weathering and fracturing of rocks. The weathered residuum forms the potential ground water reservoir and is the source of ground water circulation through the fractured zones. The inter connected open joints and fractures in the underlaying hard rocks facilitates circulation of ground water and form deeper aquifers. It is observed that two to three water bearing zones occur within 100 m depth, however water bearing fractures are also encountered down to a depth of 200m. Water-bearing properties of major lothological unitsfollows for consolidated rocks. Granite and d are well foliated and jointed and generally have a thick weathered zone. The depth of the open wells varies from 5.00m to 18.50 metres below ground level. The depth to water levels during the pre monsoon varies from 4.00m to `12.50 m below the ground level. The weathered and fractured granites and granite gneisses form the most productive aquifers in the terrain. The maximum yield of the bore wells ranges up to 7 lps. M 6.00 to 11.00m and depth to water levels varies from 4.89 to 10.65m during the pre monsoon period. The recorded yield of the bore well is around 3.00 lps and open wells 2 to 3.5 lps. Quartzite: The quartzite occurs mainly as bands and are resisting to weathering. These rocks have very thin weathered mantle and devoid of joints and other fissile planes. These rocks have very poor potential for ground water development except when fractured and fissured. The depth of the open wells varies from 5.00 to 11.50 and the depth to water levels during the pre monsoon period varies from 3.07 to 8.70 metres below ground level. The yield of the open well is generally less than 2 lps. s : The laterites and alluvium of sub recent age constitute the unconsolidated formations. The laterites which occur in patches as capping
  • 50. over the older formation are usually porous in nature and form very good shallow aquifers, developed through open wells. The alluvium occurs as small discontinuous patches along river courses of Brahmani and its tributaries forming flood plains deposits ranging in thickness from 10 to 15 m. The alluvium forms shallow aquifers to be eveloped through dug wells. The yield of the open well is generally 5-6lps. ur, Nizamabad and Vizianagaram istricts of Andhra Pradesh during 2007-08. Districtwise summary follows: ere inventoried. The depth range of dug well varies between 8-12 m and 35- 0 m. in borewells. The discharges varies from 56 cu.m/day in dug/dug-cum-bore wells li, Chimakurthy Mandals, Nitrate is high in dlamudi, S.N. Padu, Chimakurthy Mandals. Apart from these elements TH, EC and Cl eguntla villages. All these villages occur in the periphery f Norite Gabbro enclave which is mined extensively. Fluroide mineralised along the . d 2.16 Andhra Pradesh Total 10300 sq. km. area was covered in Anantp d 2.16.1 Prakasam District: Ground Water Management studies were carried out in Prakasam District, covering an area of 2800 sq.km. It covers 9 mandals viz., Ongole, S.N. Padu, Chimakurthy, Podili, Darsi, Mundlamarru, ”Talluru, Maripudi and Kanigiri. The study area is underlain by grey granite gneisss of Archaean age. The aquifer system in the area consists of waterhsed and semi-watershed phreatic aquifers and confined aquifers in fractured granites. The thickness of the weathered portion is upto 12 m. In order to study the aquifer system in the area, 76 Dug/Dug-cum-Borewells and 29 Boreholes w 6 and 1.5-3.5 lps in bore wells. Fracutre zones were reported between 30-60 m. The chemical qulity of the water in the area was analysed thorugh collection of 146 number of samples. The study reveals that in most of the areas, high Fluoride and Nitrates were reported. Fluoride is in more than permissible limit of BIS in 40% of area varying from 3 to 9 mg/l and Nitrate in 60% in the nine Mandals ranges from 60 to 240 mg/l. Fluoride rich aquifer are wide spread in Kanigiri, Darsi, Podi Mu are high in few samples. 2.16.1.1 Detailed Study area: For detailed studies, Chimakurty mandal, which is having high Fluoride was taken up. Fluoride is found to be in high ranges in MC Palem, Yellaiah Nagar, Budawada, Gon o contact zone of Gabbros and Gray granite gneiss could have assimilated into ground water due to hydrogeochemical processes and got enriched by evapotranspiration. The villages (Chimalamari, Manchikalapadu, K.V. Palem, Bandlamudi) reported with acute renal problems are tested for F and NO3 in almost all the domestic water supply wells (about 350) but both these parameters are within permissible limits suggesting some other reasons for prevailing ailments among the villages. The information is brought to the notice of Panchayat Raj, Rural Water Suppy’s Geologist for further action. Local authorities may nitiate suitable measures to arrest contamination of NO3, which is spreading widely due to improper disposal of organic waste and drainage along with excess application of fertilisers. Safe drinking water may be provided to Fluoride affected villages identified in current study 2.16.2 Anantpur District: An area of 2000 sq.km was covered under ground water management studies in 8 mandals (Tanakal, Amadaguru, N.P. Kunta, Ganldapenta, Nallacheruvu, Kadiri, Talapula, Mudigubba) in South Eastern part of Anantapur district falling in Pennar River Basin & part of Papgni River.
  • 51. The aquifer system in the area consists of weathered and semi-weathered phreatic aquifers and confined aquifers in fractured granites. The thickness of weathering ranges om 5-18 m bgl. In order to study the aquifer system in the study area, 72 domestic of pumping with yield range from 2 to 6 lps. The quality of round water is generally good except at Nallacheruvu Mandal where High Fluoride is lues exceeds 1.5 ppm. fall is 594 mm. Main crops in the area addy, groundnut, sunflower. res are be constructed in the area. No further drilling of bore wells should be permitted to Madnur, Jukal, Bichkunda, Birkur, Varni, Gandhari, Banswada, Nizamsagar, Yelareddy and Nagareddipet which falls fr key wells were established and 102 irrigation wells were inventoried. The depth range of dug wells range from 6.5-12 m bgl and bore wells was of 50-150 m. The depth to water levels of dug wells range from 2.8-8 m bgl and bore wells range from 9.0-20.6 m bgl. The wells sustain 7 hrs. g reported. The study revels that spacing norms between the wells should be followed for construction of bore wells. Rain Water Harvesting should be intensified in all the Mandal Headquarters to augment ground water levels. The study reveals that since the stage of development has crossed 100%, no further bore wells are to be drilled and artificial recharge methods are to be intensified in Alugonda, nallacheruvu, Samadapalle. Defluoridisation techniques are to be adopted where fluoride va 2.16.2.1 Detailed Study area: One Over-Exploited Mandal (Nallacheruvu) has taken for detailed study. The total geographic area is 154.6 sq.km. There are 11 revenue villages. The study mandal is part of Pennar river basin and as a part of Papagni river basin. The normal annual rain p The detailed study area (Nallachervu Mandal) is underlain by Peninsular Gneissic Complex, with granite gneisses. The granites are intruded by quartz reefs. The thickness of weathered zone ranges from 5-15 m bgl. Ground water occur in weathered and fractured rocks, under water table conditions and semi-confined conditions. Most of the dug wells are seen dry. The depth of bore wells range from 50-80 m bgl. The irrigation bore wells are drilled upto a depth of 80-120 m bgl. The fracture zones are confined to 50-60 m bgl. The yield of the bore well range from 3-6 lps and run for 7 hrs. daily. The total ground water availability is 992 ham and the ground water draft is 1264 ham . This shows a stage of development of 100%, which falls under over-exploited category. Ground water mining taking place in some villages i.e., Alugonda (-29), Nallacheruvu (- 274) and Shomalakdapalli (-49). The quality of ground water is fit for drinking purposes and agriculture use except at some areas viz., Nellacheruvu mandal, where the Fluoride concentration is very high. EC is in the range of 690-1280 micro mhos. But Fluoride concentration is alarming. The Fluroide values ranges from 1.3-2.6 mg/lt. Large scale artificial recharge structu to protect ground water resource. 2.16.3 Nizamabad District: An area of 2500 sq.km was covered under ground water management studies in 12 mandals viz., Pitlam, Kotagir, in Manjira river basin. The aquifer system in the area consists of weathered and semi-weathered phreatic aquifers and confined aquifers in fractured granites. The thickness of weathered portion is upto 20 m at a place. In order to study the aquifer system in the study area, 56
  • 52. domestic bore wells (hand pumps) and 150 irrigation wells were inventoried. The depth range of dug wells varies between 8-12 m (mostly dry) and that of bore well 18-70 m yielding 1-6 lps. The wells sustain 6 hrs. of pumping. The total ground water draft is in e order of 1890 ham leaving a balance of 560 ham. In the study area, one mandal falling on OE category and hence is taken up for detailed study. hree mandals i.e, Varin, Pitlam and Madnoor are falling in Semi-critical and the rest in he study reveals that, there is a need to avoid clustering of wells. Spacing norms ampanchayats and 22 revenue villages in 138 Sq.Km. The area is drained by ls of 15m are observed in Wadlaparti, Pocharam & Vingampalli villages during pre-monsoon area reveals that, there is a need to avoid clustering of bore wells. To create inwater harvesting structures like percolation tanks, check dams etc. horticultural crops total of 51 key observation wells were stablished and pre-monsoon and post monsoon water level measurements were carried ydrogeologically the area is underlain by Archaean metamorphic complex comprising mostly sed for domestic purposes. The quality of ground water is found to generally good for ssan, Holenarsipura & .R.Patna taluks, Hassan district was covered under Ground Water Management Studies. th i.e., Nagareddipet is T Safe category. T should be followed strictly. Silting up of tanks resulted in falling water levels. Desilting of tanks in all the villages under RGEGS should be intensified. Rainwater harvesting should be intensified in all the Mandal headquarters. Detailed study: Detailed studies were taken up in Nagireddipet Mandal consisting of 15 gr Major River along the Southern border of the mandal. The drainage pattern is dendritic. The total population of the area is 32,053 persons with a density of 232 persons/sq.km. The main crops grown in the area are rice, sugarcane, sunflower, maize, groundwater and grams. The entire area is occupied by granites and gneisses of Archean age intruded by dolerite dykes. The main aquifer system is in phreatic and confined conditions tapping shallow bore wells and deep borewells respectively. The deep water leve > period and post-monsoon period with a falling trend of 4-10 m (pre-monsoon period). The long term water level trend shows 0.75 m fall (2001-2008). The net ground water availability is 1446 ham and the draft is 1384 ham showing a stage of 95% development, which is falling in critical stage. The quality of ground water is good. The study ra are suggested in place of water intensive crops with drip irrigation. De-silting of tank in Jalalpur village, Ramakapally village and Achampally villages are recommended. 2.16.4 Vizianagaram District: An area of 3000 sq.km was covered under ground water management studies in 14 mandals. A e out and water samples were collected for chemical analysis. H granite gneisses and khondalite suite. The depth range of wells in crystalline formation varied from 6.16 to 13.90 m bgl. with depth to water level varying from 2.84 to 11.76 m bgl. The farmers in the study area are more dependent on rain water and canal water for irrigation. Ground water is also made use for irrigation purposes through deep tube wells. Large diameter wells are few in the area. Dug wells in the study area are u drinking water purposes in most of the area. 2.17 Karnataka An area of 9026 Sq.Km in parts farmers distress districts viz., Hassan and Belgaum was covered under Ground Water Management Studies in Karnataka. 2.17.1 Hassan district: An area of 3020 sq.km in Alur, Ha C
  • 53. The study area falls in Cauvery river basin, underlain by granitic gneiss with composition varying from quartz rich granitic gneiss to rock rich in mafic minerals to amphibolites & schist. Acidic and basic intrusive of Archaen age and recent alluvium are encountered at laces. rough the study area both in command and non-command rea. The depth to water level varies from 2.5mbgl to 38.90mbgl during premonsoon. lls, the density of which high when compared to dug wells for both irrigation and drinking water. Most of the t studied in detail. The area under special studies falls in Cauvery and total of 187 dug wells were inventoried. Sixty-six key observation wells were l during post-monsoon period. general ground water in the study area is potable, except at places in commend area p The area is characterized by undulating topography; isolated hillocks on either side of Hemavathi River and its tributaries drain the area. The highest elevation in the area is 1068 amsl and lowest elevation is about 800m amsl. The general slope of the area is towards SE direction & main soil is sandy soil seen in the major part of study area. Depth of weathering in the area varies from 5 to 15.0mbgl. The depth of weathering is more along topographic low and mostly depends on the texture of rock formations. A total 83 key observation wells were inventoried with an average density of 36.31kms, which are evenly distributed th a Similarly water level varies from 1.15mbgl to 34.30mbgl during post monsoon and annual fluctuation show a rise 0.3mbgl to 15.10mbl and fall in the range of 0.1 mbgl to 1.1 mbgl Ground water development in the area is mainly through bore we is dug wells are found to be dry/ abandoned in the study area especially in Chennarayapatna. Depth to water levels in bore well ranges from 6.9mbgl to 33.30mbgl and discharge varies from 1.76 lps to 13.88 lps. Water samples were collected from all the key wells during premonsoon monitoring and in general the quality of water is found to be within desirable limits 2.17.1.1 Special Studies: An area of 1544 sqkm falling in the taluk of Holenarsipura f Hassan districo Hemavathi sub basin. The study area is related to excess of nitrate above the permissible limits. Water samples were collected from dug well, Irrigation Borewells & Hand pumps from command and non-command area for the analysis of Nitrates and fluoride. 2.17.2 Hukkeri and Khanapur Taluks, Belgaum district: Ground Water Management Studies have been carried out over an area of 2740 sq.km in Hukkeri and Khanapur aluks of Belgaum district.t The normal rainfall for Hukkeri and Khanapur is 1780.20 mm and 730.40 mm respectively. Majority of the area forms a part of Krishna basin. Topographically the study area is moderately plain country having scattered hills at places. The dendritic drainage pattern in nature whereas in command area it is plain. A established in the area and data was collected for pre-monsoon and post-monsoon and water samples were also collected for chemical analysis from these wells. Geologically, Granites and Gneisses are predominately exposed in the Khanapur taluk and show moderate weathering. Dolerite dyke at places are predominately exposed and intrude the country rocks. Depth to water levels less than 2.0 m have been observed in the command area of Hukkeri taluk. The depth to water level ranges from 1.25 m bgl to 11.80 m bgl during pre-monsoon period, while the post-monsoon values range from 0.85 m bgl to 9.50 m bgl. There is a general rise of water leve In
  • 54. with salinity. Khanapur taluk has been classified as safe while part of Hukkeri taluk is classified as Over-exploited. 2.17.2.1 Special Study area: Special studies have been carried out over an area 991 sq.kms of Hukkeri taluk. Geologically the study area comprises of sandstone in southern part and basaltic flows in the north. Village wise hydrogeological data (111 dug wells) have been collected. Four pumping tests were conducted in detailed study area. 43% of Hukkeri taluk has been classified as over-exploited area. 2.17.3 Belgaum district: Ground Water Management studies were carried out in 3266 sq.km area in Belgaum district (1996 sq.km in Athani taluk and 1270 sq.km in Chikkodi taluk) . The area falls in Krishna river basin. The drainage pattern is dendritic and the drainage density varies from 1.50 to 3.85 km/km2. The area is covered with black soils of varied thickness. The results of infiltration tests show that the constant rate of infiltration in these soils varies from 0.71 to 2.73 cmshr depending upon the texture and type of soil. The area receives a normal rainfall of 582 mm in Athnai taluk and 635 mm in hikkodi taluk.C There is no change in area under forests since last surveys during 1994-95. The net area sown accounts for 51.2% in Athani and 65.6% in Chikkodi taluk In Chikkodi taluk, out of total irrigated area of 89,182ha, ground water contributes 35.4%i.e,31499ha and rest of the area is irrigated by Left bank Canal of Ghatbprabha and lift irrigation from Krishna river. In Chikkodi, irrigation form all sources is 34,647ha of which round water contributes 73%. Jowar, wheat, maize, pulses, tobacco and sugarcane are major crops. nd postmonsoon periods.Depth Rest of the wells shows steady trend. 1 exploratory wells were drilled in the study area. Depth of the borewells ranged form 9 to 3.40m2/day.The development of roundwater is through dug wells, dug-cum-bore wells and bore wells. The yields of dug The area is underlain by basaltic flows of deccan traps and 9 flows have been identified between elevation of 570 to 750 above mean sea level and are demarcated by red bole beds, vesicular zone and zeolitic zones.The major aquifer system in the area are basalts. Groundwater occurs under phreatic to semi-confined conditions in weathered, vesicular zones and at contact zones with underlying crystallines. otally 219 were inventoried for water level during pre aT to water level of lessthan 5.00mbgl was observed in topographic lows and along the drainage basins. Shallow water levels were observed at Manjri, Shirguppi, Savadi, Ingelgi, eksamba, Baregon, Halyal, sankratti and Bedikinal. Deep water levels of >10.00mbgl was observed at Akol, Sannday in Chikkodi taluk and Mangsuli, kalegaon, Shirnur, Hanumapura in Athani taluk. When compared to previous studies during 1994- 95, 54% wells show fall in the range of 0.152 to 2.85m and 16% show rise ranging from 0.10 to 3.015m, especially in command area which were brought under Lift irrigation cheme since then.s 1 80 to 200m and the yields vary from 0.5 to 8.22lps. Specific capacity ranged form 4.87 to 1273m3/d/m and Transmissivity ranged form 0.6 g wells vary from 12 to 40 m3 hr and can sustain pumping for 2 to 5 hrs. Pumping tests conducted on dug wells during the previous surveys show that Specific capacities ranged from 18 to 167 lpm/ mDD and the unit area specific capacities varied from 0.52 to 4.67 lpm/m/m2 . Bore wells, with wide variations in yield of 0.52 to 8lps sustain pumping of 3 to 12 hrs/day.
  • 55. The Public Health Engineering Department, Govt.Of Karnataka, has drilled 1834 bore wells in Athani and 1751 bore wells drilled in Chikkodi taluk respectively to meet drinking water supply 108 & 131 villages respectively. There are 143 & piped water supply and 270 mini water supply schemes in Athani taluk and 206 piped water supply and 364 mini water supply schemes in Chikkodi taluk. About 75% of bore wells yielding <2 lps are in the depth range of 45 –120 m. High yielding bore wells are located along the neaments, cross-joints, and in fracture zones. und at parts of Athani and Chikkodi taluk, e groundwater or chemical analysis. EC is high at cks of Theni district. Archaean metamorphic rocks underlie the order of 00.00 - 15.00 m. Fall of par f be idea r development in the study li The no.of irrigation pump sets increased form 18700 to 31094 in Athani taluk and 17900 to 28117 in Chikkodi taluk. During the time period of 1994-95 to 2005-06, unit draft of dugwell was 0.05 to 0.050mcm/yr. 80% of villages have less than 10wells/sq.km, High density of dugwells(20wells/sq.km)are fo whereas the general range of well density is 6-28/sq.km The groundwater resources are computed for the 2004, based on 1997 GEM for Athani taluk. The net annual recharge, Gross G.W. draft and balance available are 16409 ham, 21442 ham and zero ham respectively. The stage of groundwater development is safe in .0 % of the taluk and in rest of the 95% area is over exploited. Th5 resources are computed for the 2004, based on 1997 GEM for Chikkodi taluk. The net annual recharge, Gross G.W. draft and balance available are 23848 ham, 18359 ham and 6828 ham respectively. The stage of groundwater development is safe in 47.0 % of the taluk and in rest of the 53% area is over exploited. In general the groundwater quality is good for domestic and irrigation purposes in most of the villages except at a few villages which are located along Dudganga,Vedganaga and Krishna river. To assess the variation quality since last surveys, 79 water samples from dugwells and borewells were collected and submitted f Satti, Neganur, Savada, Nandeshwar, Manishwadi, Suttehalli, Halyal, Sanganahatti, Hulegasalu, Danur, Kittur, Shegunshi, Kevetokoppa, where the chemical exceeds permissible limit. 2.18 Tamil Nadu Ground Water Mangemnet studies were undertaken in Tirunamallai, Cuddalore, Nagapatnam & Salem covering 5500 sqkm of area. 2.18.1 Theni district : Ground Water Management Studies was undertaken in 2500 km area in OE/Critical blosq the study area. Groundwater occurs under phreatic conditions in the weathered residuum in crystalline rocks. The analysis of water level data of observation wells indicates considerable spatial variations. The water levels ranges from 5.49 – 41.89 mbgl during pre-monsoon and 1.65 –38.83 mbgl during post-monsoon. Decadal mean of Pre- monsoon (May) shows a rise in water levels in the order of 0.67 to 5.69 m and decline in water levels ranges from 0.17 to 1.58 m. In the post-monsoon (Jan), rise in water levels in the order of 0.06 to 3.34 m and a fall in water levels is in the order of 0.21 to 1.43 m. The study indicates that seasonal fluctuation of ground water levels are showing a rise in ater level in the major part of the study area inw 1.43 m has been observed at Rajadhani in Andipatti block. The quality of formation water is good and potable, in general except in north eastern t o Uthamapalayam block. Shallow dug wells with extension bores/ lateral bores will l for sustainable yield of wells. Status of groundwate
  • 56. area in artificia Floo augme zones. ver and the ground water potential is limited. Suitable artificial recharge structures have been recommended for augmentation in the critical area of Cumbum block in the study area. r basin . Black cotton and sandy soil are the redominant soil types in the area. The area is underlain by crystalline rocks of granite eli hydrogeological basin cluding Vanur sub-basin) in parts of Villupuram and Cuddalore districts. m at 25°C. The study area is having few overexploited blocks, several artificial recharge haft which will improve the covering 4500 sqkm of area of Kerala. dicates that there is a urgent need for augmentation of ground water through l recharge in a scientific a manner. d plains, buried pediments and valley fills are the most favorable locations for ntation of ground water. The bazada zones along the foot hills are promising Shallow pediments possess thin soil co of ground water Micro level hydrogeological studies: Chinnamanur block of Theni district is located in the southern side of Suruliyar rive p and gneisses. Depth to water level ranges from 1.56 – 27.86 mbgl during post monsoon. Recently, farmers were switched over to borewell for irrigation in view of non availability of sufficient water in the open well. The depth of bore wells ranges from 50- 100 mbgl. Generally, the quality of groundwater is good except for sporadic occurrences in the northern and central parts of the study area. 2.18.2 Cuddalore & Villupuram district : Ground Water Management Studies was undertaken in 3000 sqkm area falls (Coastal area studies: Neyv in 2.18.2.1 Villupuram area: The area is underlain by rock formations ranging from Archaeans to recent. The depth to water level in the crystalines varies from 8.5 to 10.50mbgl, where as in sedimentary formation the depth to water level ranges from 4.5 to 10.50mbgl. during pre-monsoon (May-2007). in general the ground water quality is good and potable for all purposes. The Electrical conductivity ranges from 350-750 micro-siemens/cm at 25°C. 2.18.2.2 Vanur area: The study area is underlain by rock formations ranging from Archaean to Recent. The water levels ranges from 3.23-17.00m bgl during pre-monsoon (May- 2007). The quality of ground water in general is good and potable. The EC ranges from 250 to 1469 micro-siemens/cm at 25°C.However, the ground quality is poor in the south east of the Kaluveli tank where the EC is in the order of 4350 micro-siemens/c schemes have been taken up by Central and State govt. agencies including NGOs to improve the ground water condition in the area. Based on the study the following recommendations are given for ground water management in the area: • The recharge and draft from ground water is to be balanced by proper crop selection and adoption of Modern irrigation practices. • The tanks should have recharge structures like shaft or properly designed tubewells to connect the main aquifer with harvested rain water to maximise the benefit. • Flood water should be diverted to Crystalline and Sedimentary contact zone for artificial recharge through a system of tank-canal-s groundwater potential of deeper aquifers. 2.19 Kerala Ground Water Mangemnet studies were undertaken in Kasargod and Kollam districts
  • 57. 2.19.1 Kasargod District: Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in asargod district covering an area of 2000 sq.km. The survey was completed in two – November and January months and dditional ground water abstraction structures were monitored. Midland is high lands where the hill ranges of the western ghats attain an ltitude of more than 1000 m amsl. ature ranges om 19.7 to 25.80 C. The relative humidity ranges in the morning hours from 87.1 to ind speed ranges from 2.1 to 3.3 s from 179.3 to 177.0 mm. Hydroge laterites crystalline Hydrogeo crystalline premo o fluctu o 5000 to premo o fluctu o meters. In the Cr mbgl p the flu u from 100 range r zones e The comm point l dug w s part of th area i h Kasar d sqkm. As all e condit K phases, namely premonsoon reconnaitory hydrogeological traverses (April&May) and post monsoon detailed studies (November-March). During premonsoon reconnaitory survey 190 key wells were established to study the groundwater behaviour and water samples collected for chemical analysis. During post monsoon survey water levels had been monitored from the key wells in August a Physiographically the district can be divided into three distinct units viz; the coastal plains, the midlands and the eastern high land region. The coastal plains occur as a narrow belt of alluvial deposits parallel to the coast with a maximum width of 10km. The general elevation of coastal plain in generally less than 10m amsl. The midland area is characterised by rugged topography formed by small hillocks separated by deep cut valleys. a The average annual rainfall of the district is 3500 mm. The average mean monthly maximum temperature ranges from 29.2 to 33.40 C and minimum temper fr 98.7% and in the evening hour 54.4 to 86.5%. The w km/hr. The monthly potential evapotranspiration range ology: Groundwater occurs under water table condition in the alluvium, and weathered mantle of the crystallines, whereas in the deeper fractured s ground water occurs under semi confined to semi-confined conditions. The logical units identified in the districts are coastal alluvium, laterites, and s. In alluvium formations the DTW ranges from 2.15 m to 5.60 mbgl in ns on period and 0.5 to 3.04 mbgl in post monsoon period (August) with the ati n in water level in the ranges of 0.98 to 2.16 m. The yield of wells ranges from 20,000 lpd. In the Laterites the DTW ranges from 2.50 to 23.97 mbgl in ns on period and 1.82 to 21.84 m in post monsoon period (August) with the ati n in water level in the ranges of 0.52 to 6.82m, generally in the range of 2 to 4 The yield of wells ranges from 5000 to 25000 lpd. ystalline formations, in weathered mantles the DTW ranges from 6.39 to 12.11 in remonsoon period and 3.97 to 7.86 m in post monsoon period (August) with ct ations in water level in the range of 1.02 to 4.25 m. The yield of wells ranges 0 to 10,000 lpd. In the fractured Crystallines tapped by bore wells the yield s f om less than 1000 lpd to more than 1 lakh lpd. The general potential fracture ar between 35 and 75 m depth. on ground water abstraction structures in alluvium are dug wells and filter we ls. In the laterites large diameter dugwells and tunnel wells and in crystallines ell and shallow to deep borewells are feasible. Springs are seen in the eastern e district with good discharge. One spring at Pariyaram near Panathur in forest s t e drinking water source for 23 families. go block has been assigned for detailed study with the target area of 500 th blocks in Kasargod district lies east to west and parallel, the Hydrogeological ion in all the blocks are same. Kasargod block is mainly drained by Chandragiri
  • 58. river. G weathere d in semi confined to confined conditions in deep fractured crysta e block. nu dations: last few years. As per the computation of 1999, except Kasargod block other three blocks were under safe category. As per 2004 computations, ground water development in the recent year. The potential fracture zones are generally below 75m depth. lls in slopes and m • I e d wells affecting the yield of water s • The farmers in northern part of the district is constructing temporary reducing the fertility of soil and quality of ground water. t along coastal plains and tidal planes. l area of Kasargod block along with detailed study under ground water management studies. Demarcated the area suitable for artificial recharge and identified different artificial recharge schemes suitable for the area. roundwater occurs under water table conditions is alluvium, laterite and d Crystalline an llin s. The deepest dugwells are seemed in central and eastern parts of Kasargod The net an al ground water availability of Kasargod block as on 31st March 2004 was 63.85 mcm and existing ground water draft for all uses was 78.92 mcm. with stage of development as 125.59%. Thus the block is categorised as over exploited. .19.1.1 Findings and Recommen2 • The stage of ground water development in the district during 2004 is 82.57% leaving limited scope for future development. There is a spurt in development over the Kasargod block remains in over exploited category and Manjeshwar and Kanhangad blocks fall under semi critical leaving only Nileshwar block under safe category. • The number of abstraction structures including private borewells are in the increating trend. Proper census of the abstraction structure is necessary for recommending new structures for future development. • There is a trend for going for borewells for Hence the depth of borewell may be restricted to around 100m. • The drilling of borewells in valley areas affecting the dugwe any dugwells drying up in summer. n the district many of water supply schemes depends on borewells. Th rilling of new borewells near water supply upply borewells. checkdams with their collective effect to store water for irrigating arecanut gardens. Due to this water level in the surrounding areas are increasing and getting water throughout summer. • The use of tunnel well which was quite common in midland areas are now in limited use. The use of tunnel well is to be reduced since it drains large quantity of water from the wells on slopes and hillocks. • The sand mining in Southern coastal part of the district is • The springs seen in the hilly areas can be development and put to use. • Artificial recharge schemes should be taken up in large scale along with rain water harvesting. Percoletion tank by developing abandoned laterite quarries are best suitable schemes. Vented cross Bar (VCB) also is very much suitable for the district. • The quality of groundwater is generally good excep 2.19.1.2 Artificial Recharge and Rain water harvesting studies under RHS:- Artificial recharge and rain water harvesting studies were carried out in OE & Critica
  • 59. 2.19.2 Kollam District: Ground Water Management Studies were carried out in Ithikara, Chavara, Karunagapally & Oachira blocks of Kollam district covering an area of 2500 sq.km. Physiographically the district can be divided into three well defined marks, the coastal • The Recent alluvium occurring along the coast, major rivers and valleys. dicates that the potential fracture one encountered between 40 to 100 mbgl and the potential zone located along NE-SW the water can be used for drinking, irrigation and industrial purposes. However, uality analysis in the Chavara area has shown slight abnormalities in quality in the ater is suitable for domestic purposes. ck level stage of groundwater of the is Mukhat the dis Four b structu diamet of alluv the dug wells are feasible with dep wells f 2.0 to diamet range of 5.0 to 15.0 mbgl with a diameter of 2.0 to 2.5 m. Borewells are feasible in plains in the west with an elevation ranging from mean sea level to 6m above mean sea level. The midland region in the centre, with an elevation ranging between 6-80 m agl and the high land region in the East having elevation greater than 80 m agl. The coastal plain constitutes 13% and the midland constitutes 50% of the total geographical area. The high land constituting 37% includes the eastern rugged hilly terrain .The average annual rainfall of the district is more than 2555 mm. Kollam district is underlain by geological formations ranging in age from Archaean to Recent. The important aquifer systems in the district are constituted by • The weathered, fissured and fractured crystalline formations • The semi-consolidated Tertiary formations occurring along the coastal plain • The laterites covering mid land region and Groundwater occurs under water table condition in the alluvium and weathered crystalline formation and occur under semi confined to semi-confined condition in the deeper fractured aquifer.The depth to water level varies from 1.67 to 25.40 mbgl during Pre monsoon and the post monsoon depth to water level ranges from 0.16 to 22.32 mbgl. Groundwater exploration carried out by CGWB in z E-W lineaments. The yield of dug wells range from 0.5 to 16.66 lps. The total 72 water samples have been collected from different source of water to find out quality of surface and groundwater. The results of chemical analysis reveal that in general q phreatic water zone attributed to the chemical effluents from factory. In the area the water samples have recorded EC, SO4 values above normal. There are 2 major springs in the district located in Nedumpana area which is yielding 700 LPM discharge even in summer months, the other one is located in KLD&MM Board at Kulathupuzha with an yield of 10 LPM. The w Groundwater development and management: Blo d trict (2004) ranges from 11.70 percent in Anchal block to 91.46 percent in hala block. The net ground water availability for future irrigation development in trict has been computed as 223.89 MCM. locks in the district falls under semicritical category. The groundwater abstraction res feasible in the district are dug wells in alluvium with depth of 3 to 5 m bgl and er of 1.5 to 2.25 m. Filter point wells are feasible along the coast where thickness ium is more than 6 m. In the valley fill areas th range of 4 to 8 m bgl with a diameter of 2 to 3.0 m. In the laterite terrain, dug easible in the valley portion with a depth range of 4 to 10 m bgl and diameter of 3.5 m and on hilly regions and ridges with a depth range of 10.0 to 23.0 mbgl and er of 2.0 to 3.5 m. In the crystalline formations dug wells feasible with a depth
  • 60. favoura borewell generally feasible at a depth of about 40 to 100 m bgl. The site has to be sele e The ta The pre ict is good and the rate should be i resourc increas structures is necessary for rec m The ex protect along w along the coa l regions Detail dy Area: Ithikara, Chavara, Karunagapally and Oachira blocks have been assigned for d sq km. Ground er d weathered crystalline rocks. from 1.5 to 8.39 mbgl and post monsoon water l l va indings: The following are the findings of the study:- • In the Sasthamcottah block water scarcity is observed during the summer season especially along areas where indiscriminate sand mining is taking place. Most of the wells in the adjoining area go dry during summer. • The dug wells located around the T.S. Canal and the Vatta Kayal in Chavara block show high EC, pH values. Also other inorganic constituents are on the higher side. The area also shows environmental problems attributed due the effluents released from the KMML factory. The tube wells constructed in this area tapping the Vaikom aquifer have very high discharge. • Pozhikara area in Paravoor municipality also shows quality deterioration due to the construction of the tidal regulator built for the purpose of arresting sea water ingress into the lake and paddy fields of Ithikkara Ela. The fresh water laterite aquifer became saline due to sea water ingress. The chloride and sodium concentration is exceeding the permissible limits in the water samples collected from the area. • In the general shallow and deep bore wells are success in most of the hard rock area in the district. • In general the quality of surface and groundwater is good except in the vicinity of seacoast, backwater areas and the industrial area. • The suitable structures are roof top rainwater harvesting, gully plugs, percolation tanks, check dams and sub-surface dyke. CGWB has constructed a subsurface dyke at Sadanandapuram during the year 1998. • More such schemes can be implemented in areas facing acute water scarcity. The topography of Kollam district in general is suited for construction of various recharge structures like percolation tanks, check dams, contour bunding, trenching, pitting and terrace cultivation. Moreover microwater supply schemes may be undertaken using suitable groundwater abstraction structures. • Anchal, Yeroor, Alayaman, Idamulakal, Karavaloor, Themala, Ariankavu, Chithara, Kilikollur Panchayaths are facing acute water scarcity during summer. The below ble locations in crystallines (includes crystallines covered by laterite). The ct d along lineaments, fractures, shear zones etc. s ge of development in the district is 45.82% leaving scope for future development. sent stage of groundwater development of the distr ma ntained for future use. Care should be taken for sustainable development of this e. As number of abstraction structures including private bore wells are on the ing trend, proper census of the abstraction om ending new structures for future development. isting water resources and dug wells, ponds, tanks etc should be cleaned, ed and conserved. Artificial recharge schemes should be practiced in large scale ith rain water harvesting. Rainwater in situ collection can be practiced sta region and artificial recharge to groundwater can be practiced in the midland ed Stu etailed study and the target area is 300 wat occurs under water table condition in alluvium an The pre monsoon water level varies eve ries from 0.28 to 4.40 mbgl. F
  • 61. mentioned remedial measures can be adopted to solve the water scarcity of the area. i. Maintenance and desilting of the ponds ii. Construction of check dams iii. Construction of wells, ponds etc in potential areas iv. Encourage drip irrigation v. Implementation of rain water harvesting schemes
  • 62. 3 O EXPLORATIO G nd exploration aided by d g is e of the major activities of the Board. It is a d f aquifers in d t hydrogeological condition and d ation of thei ulic parameters. The expl lling perat ns have enabled d arc quifers both in late and v tical e ension and evaluatio f various aquifer parameters, designing of suitable ructures and assess ield capabil ogeologi ting . These studies have lped entifying areas worthy for further ground ater velopment. Ground Water Exploration contrib large extent in ding Sta s to implement ground water d op D g oard carrie ut th roun ater exploration wi fleet of 87rigs (Rotary-33, DTH-41, Percussion-13) a tota of 811 463 E , 158 1 SH and 1 DW) bore holes were co tructe inst the target of 817 (443 Exploratory Wells, 179 Observation Wells, 195 Peizometers) boreh It is h n rt that out of 811 wells, 5 bore les , 9 bor holes 17 bore h w ed in hard rock uvium nd b ary f rmatio respe ly. 196 w a s were construct or ex ratio trib and ne areas r ct ard has so fa lled tal o 7567 ore ho s to i ify areas w y r development e country till March, 2008. T sta t showing State-wise distribution of boreholes drilled / completed during 2 the country is presented in Ta e 3.1 & Table-3.2. Region wise & Division wise status of bore holes drilled during 2007-2008 is shown as grap n f , 3.2 & .3 . Table 3.1 : STATE-WISE WELLS CONSTRUCTED BY Sl . State/UTs EW OW PZ SH DW Total . GR UND WATER N rou water rillin on ime at delineation o ifferen s etermin r hydra oratory dri o io em ation of a ral er xt s n o st ment of their y ities in various hydr cal set s he in id w de utes to a chemes. gui the te evel ment s urin 2007-08, the B d o e g and d w l th a OW, 188 PZ,( W ns d departmentally aga oles. earte ing to repo ere constrict 85 o ould h 20 e and oles , all a o n ctive ells nd 256 well ed f plo n in al drought pro espe ively. The Bo r dri a to f 2 b le dent orth ground wate in th he temen 007-2008 in bl h i ig. 3.1 3 CENTRAL GROUND WATER BOARD DURING THE YEAR 2007-2008 No 1. Andhra Pradesh 34 13 31 77 2. Arunachal Pradesh 1 1 3. Assam 15 8 1 24 4. Bihar 13 6 9 28 5. Chhattishgarh 33 10 7 50 6 Gujarat 11 4 38 1 54 7. Haryana 1 2 3 8. Himachal Pradesh 5 2 7 9. Jammu & Kashmir 28 1 29 10. Jharkhand 7 5 4 16 11. Karnataka 36 18 54 12. Kerala 15 4 20 39 13. Madhya Pradesh 38 17 15 70 14. Maharashtra 56 10 66 15 Meghalaya 4 2 6 16. Orissa 60 17 77 17. Punjab 4 3 7 18. Rajasthan 20 5 23 48
  • 63. Sl St No. ate/UTs S DWEW OW PZ H Total 19. Tamilnadu 23 7 23 53 20. Uttar Pradesh 26 12 9 47 21. West Bengal 24 6 30 TOTAL(A) 453 149 182 1 1 786 UNION TERRITORIES 1 Delhi 10 9 6 25 TOTAL(B) GRAND TOTAL(A+B) 463 158 188 1 1 811 Table 3.2 : DIVISION WISE WELLS CONSTRUCTED BY CENTRAL GROUND WATER BOARD DURING THE YEAR 2007-2008 Sl No. DIVISION EW OW PZ SH DW Total 1 I- AHMEDABAD 11 4 38 1 0 54 2 II- AMBALA 15 14 6 0 35 3 III- VARANASI 21 7 0 0 0 28 4 IV- CHENNAI 38 11 23 0 0 72 5 V- RANCHI 20 11 13 0 0 44 6. VI-NAGPUR 56 10 0 0 0 66 7. VII-GUWAHATI 20 10 0 0 1 31 8. VIII- JAMMU 28 0 1 0 0 29 9. IX-HYDERABAD 33 13 31 0 0 77 10. X- BHUWANESWAR 60 17 0 0 0 77 11 XI- JODHPUR 20 5 23 0 0 48 12. XII BHOPAL 38 17 15 0 0 70 13 XIII- RAIPUR 33 10 7 0 0 50 14. XIV- BANGALORE 36 18 20 0 0 74 15. XV- KOLKATA 24 6 0 0 0 30 16 XVI- BAREILLY 5 5 9 0 0 19 17 XVII- DHARAMSALA 5 2 0 0 7 TOTAL 463 158 188 1 1 811 EW - Exploratory Well OW - Observation Well PZ - Piezometers SH - Slim Holes DW - Deposit Well
  • 64. SALIENT FINDINGS OF GROUND WATER EXPLORATION STUDIES 3.1 Jammu & Kashmir Ground water exploration was carried in Jammu & Kashmir State both through deploying the departmental rigs and through outsourcing. In all 49 wells were drilled against the target of 46 EW, which includes 29 EW by departmental rigs and 20 EW by out sourced rigs. 3.1.1 Ground Water Exploration through Departmental Rigs. The summarized details of Ground Water Exploration in Jammu & Kashmir through departmental rigs are as follows:- Sl. No. District Depth drilled Zones tapped SWL Q DD Specific. capacity T (m bgl) (m bgl) (m bmp) lps m lpm/m m2 / day 1. Udhampur 62.5 27.0 – 58.0 12.47 10 1.73 346.82 660.09 2. Jammu 101.0 31.0 – 91.0 23.42 12.6 5.78 118.86 311.05 3. Samba 116.0 38.0 – 90.0 16.33 17.0 12.67 131.6 401.75 4. Kathua 65.0 25.0 – 62.0 4.32 - - - - 5. Poonch 7.5-16.6 6. Baramulla 4.0-193.0 20.0-170.0 0- 5.9-25 4.5- 19.58 28-333 32-1276 7. Kupwara 80-83 51.0 – 78.0 5.90 Upto 15 10.4 86.5 843 8. Budgam 200-202 27.0 – 94.0 10.38- 25.39 4-5 16.43- 19.82 14.6-15.14 12.5 9. Anantnag 56-168.0 34.0 –152. - - - - - 10. Pulwama 02-200 37.0 –92.0 0.68 agl- 11.80 mbgl Upto 16.6 0.41- 11.26 88.8-2980 240- 5378 Remarks- Artesian well was encountered at Trikulbal, Baramula district 3.1.2 Ground Water Exploration through Outsourcing. The summarized details of 20 Ground Water Exploratory wells drilled in Jammu & Kashmir through outsourcing are as follows:- Sl. No. District Depth drilled Zones tapped SWL Q DD Specific. capacity T (m bgl) (m bgl) (mbmp) lps m lpm/m m2 / day 1 Baramula 223-254 34-214 0.35- 21.0 2.0-28 3.8-30.1 4.15-284 4.1-379 2 Kupwara 188-241 32-156 6.74 38.3 7.88 292 353 3 Badgam 179-250 40-152 9.14 34.6 15.4 134.8 106 4 Pulwama 251 -215 0.64ma gl-18.74 10- 10.5 7.12- 23.6 26.69-85.0 29.8-95 5 Kupwara 222.0 85-140 45.0 <1 6 Srinagar 176 43-120 7.67 12.3 17.3 42.6 99
  • 65. ARTESIAN FREE FLOWING WELL’ AT CGWB EXPLORATORY WELL AT ‘TRIGAM SHADIPORA’, BARAMULLA DISTRICT (J&K) VILLAGERS DRINKING WATER FROM THE ‘FREE FLOW’ OF THE EXPLORATORY WELL AT ‘TRIGAM SHADIPORA’
  • 66. VILLAGERS OF ‘TRIGAM SHADIPORA’ AT THE EXPLORATORY WELL (J&K) LOCAL WITH STAFF MEMBERS OF CGWB RIG UNIT DURING DEVELOPMENT/ TESTING OF EXPLORATORY WELL AT GOSHBUGH, BARAMULLA
  • 67. CGWB RIG UNIT ‘DR/LMP-88/93 IN OPERATION AT GOSHBUGH, BARAMULLA DISTRICT (J&K) COMPRESSOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE EXPLORATORY WELL AT ‘GOSHBUGH’, BARAMULLA DISTRCIT (J&K)
  • 68. 3.2 Haryana Ground Water Ex (Punjab) has bee d constructed 5 EW, 5 OW(Total 10 wells) 3.2.1 District w Haryana ows:- Sl No District/ State Drilled Depth (mbgl) Granular zones Encountered (mbgl)/ Formation SWL (mbgl) Discharge (lps) Draw down (m) T (m2 /day) & Punjab ploration in Yamuna Nagar district (Haryana) & Gurdaspur & Jalandhar n undertaken an ise summarized details of Ground Water Exploration in Punjab & are as foll 1 Gurdaspur / Punjab 103 21-95 Bouldary 23 - - - 2. Jalandhar/ Punjab 172-354 21-333 Alluvium 22-27 23.8-27.1 12.45 790.15(Sarih-EW) 3. Yamuna Nagar /Haryana 87-304 8-295 Bouldary 6-7 - 1.42 1784 3.2.2 Highlights: Punjab: - Four exploratory wells and two observation wells were drilled at village Matti in Gurdaspur district, Sarih and Goraya in Jalandhar district . The exploratory wells were drilled in the depth range of 103 m bgl to 354.80 m bgl whereas observation wells were drilled in the depth range of 172.20-311.10m bgl. The sub-surface Lithology comprise of sands, clays and kankar. Well assembly in depth range of 99 to 310 m were designed and lowered in the exploratory wells and 170-307 m bgl is lowered in observation wells. Aquifers in depth range of 44-305 m bgl were tapped in exploratory wells. In observation wells aquifer in the depth range of 133-302 m bgl were tapped to monitor ground water regime in the area. Depth to water l aryana - One exploratory well and two observation wells were drilled at village Ledha hadir in Yamuna Nagar district The exploratory well was drilled down to 304.70 m bgl and observation wells were drilled down to 87 m bgl. Sub surface lithology consists of boulders, pebb s, gravels, sands and clays. Aquifers in depth range of 65-85 mbgl were tapped in explo ry wells. In observation wells aquifer in the depth range of 19 to 30 and 65 to 83 m bgl w re tapped to monitor ground water regime in the area. Depth to water level in the area is 6 m l. 3.2.3 ehabilitation of old and sick Piezometers Twenty ne piezometers in Chandigarh and Punjab were rehabilitated in AAP 2007-08. The location wise details are as follows: State/UT Location of PZ evel in the area ranges from 22 m to 27 m bgl. H K le rato e bg R -o Chandigarh Sector-44D, (Shallow), Sector-44D, (Deep), Sector-39, (Shallow),Sector-39, (Medium), Ram Darbar, Phase-II, Sector-10, (Medium), Sector-10, (Shallow) Leisure Valley, sector 10, Bhujal Bhawan, Sector 27, Bhujal Bhawan, Sector 27 ( Recharge well), C.S.I.O., PZ-I, C.S.I.O., PZ-II, C.S.I.O., PZ-III Punja Adampur- I/Jalandhar district, Adampur- II / Jalandhar district, Adampur- III / Jalandhar district D.C. office, Jalandhar PZ-I, D.C. office, Jalandhar PZ-II, D.C. office, Jalandhar PZ- III, Kartarpur PZ-I (Deep)/ Jalandhar district, Kartarpur PZ-II (Shallow)/ Jalandhar b
  • 69. Development of explorator under progress at Punjab Artesian condition at Lakhwar, Kalsi block, Dehradun district y well
  • 70. 3.3 Rajasthan Ground water exploratory drilling were undertaken in Rajasthan in order to delineate bearing formations, their geometry, potentiality, quality aspects, bridging T e details are as follows :- various water the gap of information as well as to render assistance to the State Government for mitigating the drought situations. The exploratory drilling work was taken up and constructed 21 EW, 4 OW & 23 PZ (Total-48 wells) in Alwar, Bikaner, Churu, Dausa, Hanumangarh, Jaisalmer,Jaipur, Rajsamand, SawaiMadhopur & Sikar district of Rajasthan 3.3.1 District-wise details of ground water exploration:- h Sl. District Depth Drilled(m) Zones Tapped(m) SWL (mbgl) Discharge ( lps) Formation 1 Alwar 71.55-101.5 32- 100 20.27- 48.60 0.83-9.08 Alluvium 2 Bikaner 202.2 127-186 >100 1.83 Alluvium 3 Churu 24.3-111.5 19-90 27.88- 0.5-5.1 Alluvium 39.37 5 Hanuman garh 135-201.4 108-130 19.05- 20.5 6.6-10 Palana Sandstone 6 Jaisalmer 200-201.6 120-189 96.15- 104 3.3-8.8 Lathi/Bhadesar/ Parewar Sandstone 7 Jaipur 45.07-79 29-77 26.26- 37.84 016-2.6 Alluvium 8 Rajsamand 87-199.8 Naked hole 2.1-15 0.33-18.3 Schist/Granite/Phyllite/ Pegmatite 9 Sawai Madhopur 119-200.1 Naked hole 33-36.5 0.41-4.8 VindhyanShale/phyllite/ limestone 10 Sikar 83.50 35-75 54.45 0.66 Alluvium 3.3.2 Highlights of Exploration: Alwar district:- 1 exploratory well, one observation well and 5 piezometers were onstructed in Alwar district in unconsolidated alluvial formation. Depth of the bore holes tion. Depth of the bore holes drilled varies c drilled varies from minimum of 71.55 m to 101.50m having depth of wells constructed from 71.55m to 101.50. Granular zones have been tapped between 32 and 100m. Static water level ranges from 20.27 to 42.00m b.gl. and discharge varied from 50 lpm to 545 lpm. Depth to bed rock encountered is schist/gneiss/ phyllite/quartzite/slate of Delhi Super Group and lies between 66 and 100 mbgl. Chemical quality of ground water is generally potable having electrical conductivity 790 to 2750 micromhos/cm at 250 C. Fluoride content in general is with in the permissible limit ranging between 0.79 and 1.80 and nitrate concentration lies within 26. Bikaner district:- One exploratory wells constructed at Kolayat locations tapping alluvium formation.Depth of the bore hole drilled is 202.2m having depth of well constructed as 188m. Granular zones have been tapped between 127 and 186m. Static water level is more than 100m and discharge observed is 110 lpm. Chemical quality of ground water is potable having electrical conductivity 1700 micromhos/cm at 250 C. Fluoride content is 1.90 mg/l. Churu district:- A total of 1 exploratory well and 5 piezometers were constructed in the district in unconsolidated alluvial forma
  • 71. from minimum of 24.3 to 111.5m having depth of wells constructed from 19m to 90m. wells drilled is 202.82m and static ater level is 35.15mbgl. Discharge vof bore wellis 198 lpm. Chemical quality of ground of the drilling aries from 135 m to 201.4m and depth of wells constructed is 132m. Static water level f the bore holes drilled varies from 38.87 m to 79.00m havin g epth of wells construated is from 45.07 to 79.0 mbgl.Static water level ranges from m 10 lpm. to 160 lpm. Chemical quality f groundwater is fresh and potable having electrical conductivity variation from 325 to ide content in the area varies from 0.60 to 1.41 mg/l d nitrate concentration varies from 4 to 24 ppm. Ja district:- A total of 2 exploratory wells, 1 ob tion d 2 pi ters were constructed in the district in semi -consolidated L rmation. Depth of the bore holes drilled varies from 200 m to 201.6m having depth of wells construated from 164 to 19 b ic water l from 9 104m and arge v rom 20 m . C uality o wat s bra to sali ving ele ic ivity v 0 C ride con t is more t issib it fall rang 1.91mg/ 02 mg an te concen ithin permissible lim nging 0.20 15 ppm Ir entration g/l to 6 g/l. Ra m ct:- of 7 e y we 1 ob ion w d 4 piezometers district solidated f ion v ist, gra e pegmat Depth of re we rilled s from to 199.8m. Static water level ranges from 2.1 0m b. d dis lpm to 1100 lpm. Chem ality of ground water is mostly potable having electrical conductivity variation from 580 to 2180 micromhos/cm at 250 oride in ge in the permissible limi een 0 g/l to 2.5 mg/ co betwee nd 107 ppm Sa istr A total of 2 explorator s an iezom ere constru ct in tion tapping an shale/sandstone/limestone. Depth of the bore wells drilled varies from 105.5m to 20 ater lev m 25 5m b. d dis e vari 25 lpm. to 290 lpm. Chemical quality of ground water is potable having electrical Granular zones have been tapped between 19 and 90m. Static water level ranges from 27.88 to 39.37m b.gl. and discharge varied from 30 lpm to 306 lpm. Chemical quality of ground water is brackish to saline having electrical conductivity 3220 to 47500 micromhos/cm at 250 C. Fluoride content is also more trhan permissible limit in the order of 1.07 to 12.65mg/l and nitrate concentration varies from 5.6 ppm to 256 ppm. Dausa district:- A total of 1 exploratory well has been constructed in Dausa district in consolidated quartzite formation. Depth of the bore w water is potable having electrical conductivity is 2010micromhos/cm at 250 c. Fluoride content is 0.47mg/l and nitrate concentration is 461ppm. Hanumangarh district:- In the district a total of 1 EW and 1OW have been constructed in semi -consolidated Palana sandstone formation. Depth v ranges from 19.05 to 20.50m b.gl. and discharge varied from 400 lpm to 600 lpm. Chemical quality of ground water is potable having electrical conductivity from 915 to 1000 micromhos/cm at 250 c. Fluoride content rangesfrom 0.95 to 1.50 mg/l and nitrate concentration is from 2 to 4ppm. Jaipur district:- In the district , 5 piezometers were constructed in unconsolidated alluvial formation. Depth o d 26.26 to 37.84m b.g.l. and discharge varied fro o 840 micromhos/cm at 250 C. Fluor an isalmer serva athi fo well an ezome 0m gl. Stat evel ranges 6.15 to b.gl. disch aried f 0 lp . to 528 lpm hemical q f ground er i ckish ne ha ctr al conduct eral ariation from 2770 to 11080 micromhos/cm at 25 . Fluo ten /l in gen d nitra han the perm tration is w le lim ing in it ra e of from l to 4. ppm to . on conc is found between 0.14 m .34 m jsa and distri were constructed in the A total xplorator in con lls, servat ormat ell an iz. sch nit , phyllite ite etc. the bo lls d varie 87 m to 15. gl. an charge varied from 20 ical qu c. Flu content neral is with t betw .78m l. Nitrate ncentration lies n 11 a . wai Madhopur d ict:- y well d 1 p eters w cted in the distri consolidated forma Vindhy 0.1m. Static w el ranges fro to 36. gl. an charg ed from
  • 72. conductivity variation from 235 to 0 c. Fluoride content is with in the permissible limit r 0.10 mg/l to 1.2 mg/l and nitrate concentration is also wit limi m o 44. 1 exploratory wells has been cnstructed in the district in unconsolidated lluvial formation. Depth of the bore hole drilled is 93.50 and depth of well is also atic water level is 54.45 mbgl and discharge is 40 lpm. Chemical quality of is potable having electrical conductivity value as 1160 micromhos/cm at 0 value is order of 32800 micromhos/cm at 0 given as follows:- Drawdown 1300 micromhos/cm at 25 aqnging from h permissible t ranging fro 8.58 t ikar district:-S a 83.50mbgl. St ground water 25 c. Fluoride content is 1.43 mg/l and nitrate concentration si 18 ppm. Tonk district:- A total of 4 exploratory wells and 1 piezometer have been constructed in the district in consolidated formation viz. quartzite, schist. Depth of the bore wells drilled varies from 123 m to 202.1m. Static water level ranges from 8.93 to 21.15 m.b.gl. and discharge varied from 20 lpm. to 140 lpm. Chemical quality of groundwater is generally fresh except at Shivad where EC 25 C. Fluoride content ranges from 0.88 mg/l to 2.68 mg/l and nitrate concentration varies from 3 to 51 ppm. 3.3.3 Aquifer Performance Test Results:- The details are Sl. Location District SWL Discha- Duration No (m) rge (lps) (min) (m) 1 D lm 1igari Jaisa er 14.18 6.66 600 7.66 2 Sawantapar alm 6 6.92Jais er 104.98 7.6 00 3 Kodiasar Jaisalmer 103.21 8.8 600 3.95 4 90 7.8 600 13.05Sajeet Jaisalmer 5 aSobha Jaus lmer 130 4.6 600 6.05 6 Moda Jaisalmer 1.83 600 10.0090.50 7 salLaxmansar Jai mer 129.56 4.8 600 4.78 8 Niyama uru .1Ch 38.14 5 600 2.92 9 Alwar Thanagazi 26.72 3.3 380 24.87 10 Hamirpur Alwar 12.86 3.01 500 25.59 11 Nakhnol Alwar 31.00 5.5 500 4.15 12 Kaharani Alwa 2.9r 18.82 1 300 20.13 13 Srimadhopur Sikar NA 0.66 300 17.63 14 Shekisar Sika E 4 OW-34.60 OW-0.46 r W-34.7 16.4 2200 EW-3.98 15 Chhapali ajs 2 .58R amand 9.8 1 270 44.60 16 Dewair Rajsamand 12.74 1.58 60 46.85 17 Sardargarh js .8Ra amand 9 3 7.85 600 4.12
  • 73. 3. Gr p n rried in cts Jamna r of Gujara objective of gro ater exploration ex aq ard fo of ra possibility of fresh water zones in coastal tracks of Jamnagar districts. A total no. of 11 Exploratory Wells (EW) and four Observation Wells (OW) and One Slim Hol ntha districts, while in Alluvial 4 Gujarat ound Water Ex ga loratio t. The was ca out und w the distri of Surendr was to anagar and plore deeper uifer in the H rock rmations Surend nagar district, and to to find the e (SH) were constructed with maximum depth of 502m. Piezometer construction was carried out by in Hard rock areas of Vadodara, Bharuch, Narmada, Panchmahal. Dahod, Kheda and Sabarka formations of Ahmedabad, Mahesana, Gandhinagar, Patan and Sabarkantha districts. In all 38 Piezometers were constructed tapping different Aquifer Systems down to the depth of 450 mbgl. 3.4.1 Summarized details of Ground water exploration in Gujarat The Summarised details of Ground water exploration in Gujarat are given as follows:- Sl. No District Depth Drille (mbgl) Zones/ Fracture tapped SWL (mbgl) Discharge (m3 /hr) Drawdown (m) Formation (mbgl) Ground Water Exploration 1. Jamnagar 45-204 12 to 188 3.40- 18.63 1.8- 12.9 0.8 -13.4 Lime stone 2. Surendrana gar 50.7- 450.5 11-316 6.10 - 95.0 2.71- 29.1 10.2- 100.0 Sandstone 3. Narmada 87.8 23 –87.8 12.5 79.9 10.89 Basalt ersPiezomet 1. Ahmedabad 25- 200 14-163 4.7- 74.7 5.4–10.8 02.24 to 10.02 Alluvium 2. Bharuch 38 11.8 10 0.16 14.96 Basalt 3. Dohad 38 18 10.1 0.16 18.01 Meta- sediments 4. Gandhinaga 72- r 200.7 28-198 56.0- 105.1 0.36 - 6.3 0.08 to 3.96 Alluvium 5. Kheda 44.1 21.7 5.8 0.36 34.22 Meta- sediments 6. Mahesana 33- 200.4 18-192 10.5- 135.4 0.36- 8.64 0.58- 4.65 Alluvium 7. Narmada 19.80- 10.3-48.5 2.3- 0.16 – 0.15 to 50 29.6 34.2 7.17 Basalt - Sandstone 8. Panchmahal s 38- 44.1 11-42 10- 11.53 2.88 – 14.4 0.99 to 13.96 Meta- sediments 9. Patan 226- 45 149-439 44.9- 159.9 0.36 – 8.28 0.49 to 9.69 Alluvium 10 Sabarkanth a 42.7- 200 30-66 8.8- 41.9 0.72 – 9 0.80 to 17.98 Alluvium/Met a- sediments 11 Vadodara 31-40 4.4-27.8 2.16- 0.72 – 1.36 to Basalt/Sandst 8.10 15.12 25.73 one/meta- sediments
  • 74. 3.4.2 Highlights of Ground Water Exploration 3.4.2.1 Hard Rock Areas:- The ground water exploration was envisaged in the hard rock areas of the Surendra Nagar & Narmada districts. urendranagar District:- The area explored is underlain by the Deccan traps and fratrappean Sandstone of Dhrangadhra & Wadhawan Formation. Deep Exploration was aquifers/ rap & ndstone. xp d serv lls were tructed in nd Limbdi o h range 502 m . The depth er level in p ranged 6.10 m achka OW) to 95 m bgl ( EW). The discharge of the wells var n 45 (Jepar) to 480 LPM (Liliyad EW). The EC values nged from 790 µS/cm (Chachka EW ) to 19100 µS/Cm (Khandia EW). the area explored is underlain by the Deccan trap. ydrogeologically the ground water occurs in the weathered, jointed and fractured parts In Narmada district one Exploratory Well was constructed at Wadi. The depth of the and the quality of water is good with EC ar istricts. in these formations varies with depth. ory wells and one observation well were constructed the depth of 200 mbgl. The constructed depth of the tube wells varied from 31.00 m he quality of groundwater in the wells is inferior varying from 4050 S/cm ( Vachhu EW) at shallow depth to 18400 µS/cm (Nana Bhavda EW-I)in deeper igh yielding wells were constructed at Chachka and Lilyad in drought prone areas of Surendranagar district and at Wadi in tribal area of Narmada district. The wells yielded upply to the an g ug e S In carried out with an aim to explore possibility of occurrence of deep seated e potable d su o aterFractur Infratra s having ppean Sa quality an stainable yield f groundw in Deccan T Five E loratory wells an three Ob ation we cons Chuda a Taluka f the district wit depth of 41.5 & bgl to wat the ex lored wells from ied betwee bgl (Ch Vejalka ra Narmada District:- Geologically H of the formation. The occurrence and movement of ground water is in general controlled by topography, depth of weathering, joints, fractures and dykes. borewell is 87.85 m. The discharge is 1332 lpm 564 µ S/cm.. 3.4.2.2 Soft Rock Areas The ground water exploration was envisaged in the soft rock areas of the Jamnag d 3.4.3 High yielding wells Coastal area near Dwarka was explored. The area is mainly overlain by rocks of Mio- Pliocene age consisting of Dwarka formation and is underlain by Milliolitic Formation at palces. Lithologically the formations are comprised of Milliolitic limestone, Marl, Sandy foraminifera limestone and variegated Clay. Ground water is mainly exploited through Dugwells. The quality of groundwater In Okhamandal Taluka , five explorat to (Ladwa EW) to 191.00 m (Nana Bhavda EW). The depth to water levels in these wells ranged from 3.40 mbgl (Nana Bhavda EW-II) to 18.63 m bgl (Nana Bhavda EW-I). The compressor discharge of these wells range from 18 lpm (Vachhu OW) to 216 lpm (Nana Bhavda EW-II). T µ wells. H good quality of water and water s area c be arran ed thro h these w lls.
  • 75. T Yielding Wells are en o S Location/ rillin h charg ) Formation he details of High l.No. District umerated as foll g Dept ws:- e Site D Dis (m) (LPS 1. Chachka BasaltSurendranagar 450.50 7.0 2 Lilyad .5 B. Surendranagar 100 0 8.0 asalt 3 Wadi ariya) 0 .2 B. Narmada (Jh 87.8 22 asalt 3 ion Piezometer construction was carried out in the districts of Vadodara, Bharuch, Narmada, P Ah abad he Ga aga atan S iezometers constructed in alluvial areas Mahesana, Sabarakantha & Patan districts form parts of the being exploited nd ultimately cause decline in water levels at an alarming rate in this part of Gujarat. e ed a . T it, comprising a few red metres of ing sa ar beds, form confined aquifer system and the aquifer sy been designated as ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ and ‘E’ within post Miocene s m nd ‘F’ e e Aquif favorable hydraulic parameters and contains the best quality of gro r a n east t deteri ward e same trends n ce conf a rock areas i y .4.4 Piezometer Construct anchmahal. Dahod, Kheda, med , Ma sana, ndhin r, P and abarkantha. P Ahmedabad, Gandhinagar, North Gujarat region and the future of ground water resources in this region is considered to be bleak due to recurrence of drought and excessive dependency of ground ater. For the sake of rapid economic growth ground water resources arew a en identified in Alluvial area of North Gujarat. The upperTwo major aquifer units have be t i unco and duni hund s mostly nfined alternat stem has signat ndy and s aquifer ‘A’ gillaceous he lower un edi ents a and ‘G’ in th Miocene s diments. er ‘A’ shows the most und water in the vicinity of the ech rge zone i the north . I orates to s southwest. Th oti d in the ined aquifers lso. Piezometers in Hard Piezometers in Hard rock areas were constructed to strengthen the network for groundwater regime monitoring tapping phreatic aquifers .shallow piezometers were constructed in Hard rock areas of Vadodara, Bharuch, Narmada, Panchmahal, Dahod and Kheda districts. 3.4.5 Details of Aquifer Performance Test in Exploratory wells in Gujarat are as llowsfo Depth SWL Dischar ge Drawd own Specific Capacity Transm ssivit Sl. No ay Location/Taluka/District m mbgl lps m lpm/m m2/d 1 Kochbar /Jhagadia/Bharuch 139.8 8.4 11.0 19.9 33.0 83.2 2 Lakhamachi/Than /Surendranagar 135 13.0 3.0 34.2 5.2 83.2 3 Kochbar/Jhagadia/Bharuch 138.6 8.0 2.41 14.9 9.7 38.6 4 Chittal/Amreli/Amreli 124.1 8.3 11.0 1.8 354.8 83 5 Wali/Jhagadia/Bharuch 110.1 11.9 8.8 17.5 30.1 78.4
  • 76. 6 Khakhariya/Babra/Amreli 220.9 2.5 11.0 34.7 19.0 8.1 7 Wadi (Jhariya)/Nandod/Narmada 87.8 13.3 11.2 10.8 61.7 35.8 8 Iswariya/Amreli/Amreli 154.3 12.5 7.5 41.3 10.8 55 9 Sundarpura/Nandod/Narmada 45 29.9 11.2 0.7 960 1000 10 Luvaria/Lathi /Amreli 300.8 8.15 7.5 16.2 27.7 30 3 Madhya Pr h G n en by constructi EW, 17 OW & 15 PZ (Total-70 wells) in l, & i dis of Madh esh. 3 D wise ma tails of Ground Water Exploration in the State e as follows:- S N Di th ed gl W m Discharge (m Fo n .5.1 ades round Water Exploration has bee Betu undertak Dindor ng 38 ya PradMandla tricts .5.2 istrict sum rized de (in range) ar . o. strict Dep Drill ( (m,b ) S L .bgl) 3/hr) rmatio 1. Betul 49.8-305.1 2.0-34.5 10.8-90 DeccanTrap,Gondwana sandstone,Granitic gneisses,schists 2. M 02. - 2.3 Bandla 66-2 5 -15.8 asalts, granites 3. Dindori 43.90-203.1 4.9-19. 14.4-36 B5 asalt 3.5.3 Highlights Betul district:- The ground water exploration has been done to a maximum depth of 274 m. in Dec Bas 01 gran eiss a ndwana , aquifers o ur 48- - -11 -132 9-158 m varies from 4.24 to 90 cu. M/hr. In granites, the aquifers encountered ar of 12-16, 1 26, 84-9 99 a disc aries /hr. In Gondwana sandstone, the aquifers occur between 24-30, 2-163 m and the d ha o 44 hr to um/h quality ble. M d T r has been deline flow of Mandla district along the right bank of Narmada river in k and persistence occurr pote o aq f Lam bed, th f L eta ext g t re t 0 sq. rea in on. The q d w fo is f o be po e and the yield of ation va from 1.5 lps ps. The Mandla d c dee qu lu ee w Lamet va flow t d 305 m hav x The aquifer is un nite as b m . Th ep r in basalt, o mi-confin th range of 85 and 120-134 mbgl and 145-167 depth and th e in basalt varies betwee 2.3 to 15.8 cu. M/hr. The draw-down observed between 16.6 to 23.55m e ground water exploration in younger lava flow sequence of Shahpura , 136-144m and 184-186 m. The di rge of basaltic aquifer varies from 1.5 to 36 cu m/hr. The collapsible nature of boulders of upper lava flow has also been explored in the depth range of 4-7 m. potential aquifer in the area occurs along the NE-SW lineament. The ground water quality in basalt is generally good. can Trap alt, 2 m in itic gn nd Go sandstone. In Basalt cc between 51, 83 95, 107 7, 125 & 14 . and the discharge e in the depth range 8- 50-53, 3 & -105 m nd the harge v from 1.44 to 52.2 cum 90-110, 14 isc rge varies fr m 1. cum/ 10.8 c r. The of ground water is pota an la district: he disposition of aquife ated in the oldest lava Mandla bloc ence of ntial c nfined uifer o eta e sub-surface configuration o the north wam uality aquifer of groun endin ater in o mo Lameta han 10 rmation km a ound t ard directi table for drinking purpos fluoride affeLameta fo t has got rm per a ries ifers of f to 3 l ater in cted belt of a beds. The aquifer in laistri oride fr o a ase epth of ent rock 60- e been e er aquife plored. derlain by Lameta /Gra ed nature occur in the dep e discharg e de f se n Dindori district: Th formation have been explored to a maximum deoth of 215 m. The thickness of the lava flow varies from 35-70 m. Mostly aquifers are encountered in the secondary porosity along the massive jointed fractured basalt which occurs between 32-35, 44-50, 63-78 in middle aquifer. The deeper aquifers occur in the depth range of 117-130 m scha
  • 77. 3.5.4 High Yielding exploratory Wells drilled in Madhya Pradesh are as follows Sl. N Dept Dr ( SWL / Formation o. Site Type of Well h illed m) (mbgl) Discharge (Cu. M h) District- Mandla 1. Kalpi EW 13 15.8 Basalt4.00 40.79 2 3 salt. Kalpi OW 1 5.81 39.00 15.8 Ba 3. Ni 9 twas EW 2 8.41 5.87 12.6 Basal 4 2 salt. Niwas OW 151.00 5.78 12. Ba District-Dindori 1. Shahpura EW 14 36.0 Basalt2.30 41.88 2. Shahpura OW 13 37.20 36.0 Basalt4.20 3 pur 14 .4 lt. Samna Ew 4.40 14 Basa District- Betul 1. Kanhawadi EW 203 6.12 27.00 Highly fractured granitic gneiss 2. Salaiya EW 111.6 29.18 50.4 Highly fractured granitic gneiss 3. Salaiya OW 93.6 29.33 52.2 Highly fractured granitic gneiss 4. Silpatti EW 203 37.5 10.8 Gondwana sandstone 5 Kerpani EW 190.6 72.64 54 Fractured Basalt & Gondwana sandstone 6 Kerpani OW 158.6 84.35 51.4 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 7 Sanikheda EW 186 72.35 51.4 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 8 Sanikheda OW 164.7 72.63 51.4 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 9 Sandiya OW1 158.6 86.88 27 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 10 Sandiya OW2 158.6 86.90 14.4 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 11 Sandiya EW 274.05 86.68 14.4 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 12 Prabhat Pattan EW 112.80 >50.0 90 Highly fractured Deccan Trap Basalt 3.6 Chhattisgarh Under exploratory drilling programme, 49 wells were drilled, out of which 33 were exploratory wells (EW), 10 were observation wells (OW) and 06 were piezometers (PZ) in Kanker, Dhamtari, Durg, Raigarh ditricts of Chhattisgarh state.
  • 78. 3.6.1 D strict wise Summarized details of ground water explorationi one encountered down to 75 mbgl. Yield of the formation is moderately good, fractured district, 17 wells harge of 0.5-8.5 r District: chaean age. The weathered er occu unco ed eath tle fined ined c in frac ne 20-25 , 50-55, 60-6 , 80-85, 106-110 m bgl a yi 23 lp ximum draw down of 3 . In Kanker ict, 19 we w Durg ist covered ale, limestone and dolomite. Ground wa under c ns in ant i conf d co in fractu tial zones are recorded in 17-20, 35-40 m bgl. Chandi limestone forms the the a e yield v om 0.5 –4.0 th a draw of 30 m u rilled in for the ground water monitoring of the Durg urban area in the Municipal Raigarh District: In the Bara t to behaviour of phreatic and confined aquifers and ef f the coal mi in Raigarh t. The f a d an uri . Exploration data of existing b il m e of tial granu z bgl, yiel aries from 0.5 to 4 lps with a dr down of 30m No District Depth Drilled (m Zones tapped/ Fractured encountered mbgl) (mbgl) rge m³ / hr Draw Down Aquifer parameter - /day) Sl. bgl) ( SWL Discha (m) (T m2 1 Dhamtari 39- 35-40 -58, 78-80 13 0 0 –125200 26-29, , 3- 50 .2-3 7-30 12 2 Kanker 37 -251 20-25, 30-35, -55, 60-63 0-85, 106 0 4-8 0.2-75 15-30 1-50 50 , 8 - 11 3 Durg 28- 20-25 1.6 -70 3-5 1.8-2 - 4 Raigarh 55- 0, 50-7 32 0 0.4-3200 30-4 0, 7- 110-120 0.2-1 25-50 .6.2 Highlights3 Dhamtari District: Most of the part of the district is covered by the Chhattisgarh upergroup of rocks which, mainly consists of limestone, shale and sandstone. WeatheredS z zones observed at depth of 26-29,3 5-40, 50-58, 78-80 m bgl . In Dhamtari ere drilled in hard rock area in the depth range of 29-200 and yielded discw lps. Kanke The District is covered with granite and gneiss of the Ar formed the potential aquifer in the area. Ground watmantle conditions in w rs under onditionnfin ered man recorded at and semi con to conf tu dre nd zones, potential zo eld varies from 1 to , 30-35 3 s with a ma 0 m distr lls ere drilled. D un rict: The area is onfined conditio with sh ter occurs nditionweathered m le and sem ined to confine red zones. The poten potential aquifer in rea. Th aries fr lps wi down . Fo r wells were d area of Durg city. kar forma ion six piezometer fect o s were drilled ning study the distric orm tions encountere d tapped d ore wells dr ng drilling is sand led in the area stone of Barakar arked presenc Formation poten lar ones below 100 m d v aw .
  • 79. 3.6.3 High yielding wells:- The high yielding wells in Chhattisgarh are as follows:- Sl. No. District Location Drilling depth (m) Discharge (LPS) Formation 1 Bilaspur Koni 31. 7.13 Arpa Alluvium3 2 Makri 148 9.0 Granite/gneiss 3 Kokpur 109 12.0 Granite/gneiss Kanker 4 Vyaskonger 2 5.5 nea 20 Granite/g iss 5 H uri 12.0 e/gneissarnp 110 Granit 8 Dabena 153 9.0 Granite/gneiss 9 Dabena 104 9.0 /gneGranite iss 10 Jawarra 200 8.43 teGrani 11 D 28 7.1ugli Granite 12 Girhaladih 57.7 8.0 teGrani 13 tari D rdula 170 3.6 ite Dham onga Gran 3.7 Maharasthra Ground Water Exploration was taken up in Akola, Buldhana, Beed, Sangli and Raigarh districts arasthra .1 District-wise Summarized Det ound Exploration e sum f re ound water ion is foll S etail d Water Exp Sl. No. Salient Features Akola/ Buldhan Bee and constructed 56 EW, 10 OW( Total-66 wells) in hard rock terrain of Mah 3.7 ails of Gr Water Th mary o sults of gr explorat given as ows:- ummarized D s of Groun loration Sang a Aurangabad/ d li Raigarh 1 No. of Exp Wells 10 18 loratory 16 12 2 Depth range 36.50 to 303.50 0.30 to 1 0 (m.bgl) 11 200 59.90 to 200 75 to 20 3 Depth of (m.bgl) 4 to 65. 1 to 13 5. casing 00 .20 20 to 17.60 8.50 4.00 to 4 er o nte 1 to 4 1 to 4 1 to 3 Numb encou f zones red 1 to 3 5 Thickness dual 1 to 5 2 to 1 of indivi zone (m) 0 1 to 8.20 1 to 2 6 S L rang l) 5.7 to 7 to mo n 100 GL n W e (m.bg 0 3.11 re tha to more than more tha 50 85 1.00 to 7 Yield range (lps) Less than 0.013 to 18 Traces to 17.92 Traces to 6.00 Traces to 8.75 8 No. of EW’s with yield > 3 lps 3 4 4 2 9 EC range (micromhos/cm) 850-4000 900-1400 - - 10. Formation Fractured Massive Basalt Weathered Fractured Vesicular Trap Fractured Massive Basalt Fractured Massive Basalt
  • 80. 3.7.2 High Yielding Wells Out t of 56 exploratory wells drilled, 13 EW’s (about 23 %) have yielded more than 3 lps. The rict igh ng Bo lls o Sl. No. District No. of EW Drilled No. of E with y > 3 lps of yielding Depth Range (m. bgl) Yield Range (lps) dis -wise break up of high yielding bore wells is given as follows:- . Dis isetrict-w break up of H Yieldi re we in Hard R cks W ield % High EW 1 Akol ld 0 3 30 148.10 to 281.7 7.73 to 18.00a/ Bu hana 1 0 2 Aurangabad/ Beed 4 22 110. 200.00 3.17 to 17.9218 30 to 3 g 4 200.00 00San li 16 25 4.77 to 6. 4 Raig 2 75.00 to 184.30 75arh 12 17 5.94 to 8. District- f o Yielding B ls in M arasthra Sl No Location Drilling Dep (m.bgl) Discharge ( Formation wise List o f High orewel ah . District th lps) 1 ndrai 110.30 1 Weathered Fractured Massive Basalt Do 7.92 2 e 200. 3. Weathered Fr assive Ba herwahA gaon 00 17 actured M salt 3 Bhendtakl 200. 3 Weathered Fr ssive Ba i 00 .17 actured Ma salt Be Malegaon 200.00 3.17 Weathered Fractured Massive ed 4 Basalt 5 Hatrun 281.70 7.73 Fractured Massive Basalt 6 Deagaon 190.80 18.00 Fractured Massive Basalt 7 Deagaon 190.80 18.00 Fractured Massive Basalt 8 Buldhana Bhastan 148.10 7.73 Fractured Massive Basalt 9 Talashet 184.30 8.75 Fractured Basalt 11 Raigad Shirgaon 75 5.94 Fractured Basalt 12 Ghorpadi 200.00 6.00 Fractured Massive Basalt 13 Umadi 200.00 4.77 Fractured Massive Basalt 14 Karajgi 200.00 5.00 Fractured Massive Basalt 15 Sangli Kasegaon 200.00 3.00 Fractured Massive Basalt 3.8 Uttar Pradesh Ground Water Exploration has been taken up in Lakhimpur Kheri, Ballia, Meerut, Ghaziabad,Bijnor, G.B.Nagar, Pratapgarh, Chandaluli & Sonebhadra district of U.P and constructed 26 EW, 12 OW & 9 PZ(Total-47 wells)
  • 81. 3.8.1 District wise Summarized details of Ground Water Exploration in the State as follows:- 3.8.2 HIGHLIGHTS The district wise highlights on the findings of exploratory drilling are given below.: Sl. No. District Depth Drilled Zones tapped/ Fracture encounte SWL (mbgl) Discharge (lps) Formation red Alluvial T rainer 1. Lakhimpur Kheri 361.0 296-350 - - Alluvium 2. Ballia 357.0 (Shivpur- 236-342 8.98 35 Alluvium kapoor diar) (comp) 3. Meerut 452.9 144-316 - - Alluvium 4. Ghaziabad 401.0 208-344 - - Alluvium 5. Bijnor 159.0 104-141 - - Alluvium 6. Pratapgarh 200.2 105.190 - - Alluvium Hard Roc erraink T 7. Chandauli 160.0 24-156 29.00 1320 Granite S.Stone 8. Sonebhadra (D) 199.7 13-154 20.22 270 Granite Peizometer construction 1. Ghaziabad 150.7 39-50 1.0 - 14.1 83-100 Alluvium 2. G. B. Nagar 151.7 24-52 3.3-13.3 83-116 Alluvium 3. Meerut 317.2 46-52 - - Alluvium Lakhimpur Kheri District:- Ground Water Exploration has been taken up for delineation of aquifers with arsenic free formation water for safe drinking water supply. Geologically the area is underlain by Quaternary alluvium consisting of clay, kankar, sands of various grades & gravels in different proportions. The results of exploratory bout 450 mbgl indicate the existence of mainly . The ground water occurs under water table on aq ifer it occu ion. During 07-08 02 EW tapping IIIrd aq r s ell which one Observation well at Trilokpur and another wh th a construct odhpu site is tapping IInd aquifer. The res o a ampur how ground iddle and deep aquifer are safe for drinking purposes Ballia District:- Ground Water Exploration has been taken up t problems ari i wa rad the villages located mostly in Re lood plain of Ganga and tory drilling was taken two sites viz. Haldi Rampur and Shivpur Kapoor Diar in the district and wells were constructed tapping third aquifer. At Haldi Rampur site, the observation well constructe in tapping I and II aquifer which at Shivpur Kapoor Diar it is tapping only I aquifer. The Results of chemical analyses shows that ground water from shallow, middle and deep a uifer safe for drinking purpose at both the sites i.e. at Ramgarh & at Gaighat in the district. drilling carried out down to the depth of a three tier aquifer system in the district c dition in shallow uifer and in deeper aq uife u and 03 Ob one at Lodhpurwa are tapping Ist aquifer rs in con ervation W fined condit amongst ile e 3rd observ tion well ed at L rwa ults f chemical nalyses of R wa site s s that water from m o mitigate the sing due to Arsenic contamination cent f n ground ter at spo Ghaghra rive ic spots in rs. Explora up at d q
  • 82. Meerut District:- Ground Water Exploration has been taken up For delineation of aquifer system, assessment of potentiality and sustain abililty of under utilized deeper aq a-Ya ab first in mu s/ overdeveloped. Based on the inter n of lith l and e a al hydrogeological conditions prevai area it is observed that four- ifer system exists as Aquifer-I, II, III in the depth range of 0-100m, 140-315 m, 330- 470 m & 485-600 mbgl repectively. During one e tory ta II & III one observation tapping II & III aquifer and one Piezometer tapping I aquifer were construc Sardha th rict. Gh ia strict:- d W Exploration s been t up for d tion of aquifer system, asses potentiality and sustain abililty of under utilized deeper aquifer.One EW tapping II and III aquifers. One tapping as in d one Piezometer dtapping 1 fer were constructed in the district. Pratapgarh District:- 2 exploratory well (1 abandoned) tapping II aquifer and 1 observa app I aq ere cons d. The area falling u ntral Ganga p erlain by thick piles of sediments belonging to Quaterna ium. The results of exploratory drilling reveal that broadly three tier aquifer system exist in depth of drilling of 608 mbgl. The ground water occurs under nconfined to confined conditions. hand boring set between depth 20-36 m yielded low tubewells drilled between depth 50-100 m yield 1000-1500 lpm hereas deep tubewells drilled between depth 100-150 m (basement encountered) yield 3.8.3 List of High Yielding wells:- No depth (m) (LPM) uifer (Gang muna do ) since aquifer be ologica g under lectrical logs ch stres nd the locpretatio ling in the tier aqu & IV xplora pping aquifer ted at na site in e dist az bad Di Groun sment of ater ha aken elinea OW same EW an aqui tion well t lain is und ing I & I uifer w tructe nder ce ry alluv the area to the maximum u Chandauli District:- Ground Water Exploration has been taken up and constructed, 6 EW & 3 OW. The district lies in the south eastern most corner of the state. The dug wells/hand pumps drilled manually or by 50-100 lpm. The shal w 2000-3000 lpm. Sonebhadra District:- Ground Water Exploration has been taken up and constructed 11 EW and 1 OW. The alluvial plains are underlain by thick pile of consolidated sediments down to the depth of basement which varies from 50 m to 204 mbgl . The rock types in hard rock terrain are sand stone & shales belonging to vindhyam formation. A multiple fracture encountered down to 150 m bgl in exploratory wells from promising ground water zones in hard rock terrain. Sl. District Location / site Drilled Discharge Formation 1. Chandauli Chakiya 78.00 960 Vindhayan S.St 2. Chandauli Hetampur 102.00 1320 Sand Stone 3. Chandauli RaghuNath pur 84.00 900 (PYT) Sand Stone 4. Ballia Shivpur Kapoor 357.00 2100 by Alluvium Diar compressor
  • 83. 3.8.4 Aquifer Performance Test Results Sl. No District Location / site Duration of test (minutes) Discharge (LPM Maximum Draw down) Specific Capacity lpm/m 1. Balia Ramgarh 1200 972 10.78 90.3 2. Balia Gaighat 500 1101 10.80 101.9 3. Banda Durendi 300 282 6.82 41.4 4. Banda Gudha Kalan 300 508 3.03 168 5. Banda Pahari Mafi 360 367 11.26 32.5 6. Lakhimpur Rampurwa 705 2120 11.64 182.1 7. Sant Ravi Das Nagar Kariaon 300 1024 2.27 451.2 3.9 Uttarakhand Ground Water Exploration has been undertaken by constructing 1 EW in Dehradun district of Uttarakhand. One well each in Dehradun & Hardwar district was under progress as on 31-03-200 3.9.1 Highlights: Dehradun district:- The Exploratory Well at Jamankhata was completed upto depth of 158 mbgl in Doon gravel formation. The Discharge during the compressor development was 1075 LPM and Static Water Level was 27.2 m bgl. In Bhagwanpur site, drilling was carried out down to a depth of 167.50 m bgl (as on 31st March 2008) .Subsequently Middle Siwalik Formation was encountered at a depth of 170 m bgl and the drilling was stopped at 175.10 m bgl.. Geophysical logging of the borehole was conducted. Seven potential zones were deciphered in the depth range: 34.00 to 37.00, 44.00 to 53.00, 60.00 to 64.00, 76.00 to 80.00, 88.00 to 96.00, 109.00 to 113.00 and 130.00 to 138.00 m bgl having thickness varying between 3.0 and 9.0 m. Hard In the Industrial Park, drilling has been completed down to a depth of 78.90 m bgl (as on 31st March 2008) and further drilling was under progress. 3.9.2 High Yielding Wells The well constructed at Jamankhata, district Dehradun was high yielding with compressor discharge of 1075 LPM in Doon gravel. 3.10 Bihar & Jharkhand Ground Water expl nger district in Bihar and Ranc , 11 OW, 13 PZ(Total 44 wells). Out of these 0 rilled in the Ranchi Urban area, Jharkhand, to study the piezometric level of deeper fractures. 8 war district:- oration has been undertaken in Samastipur, Buxar & Mu hi & Simdega districts in Jharkhand and constructed 20 EW 6 PZs were also d
  • 84. Artesian condition at Kaluwala, Doiwala block, Dehradun district Dehradun district Spring tapped for water supply, Hathipaon, Raipur block,
  • 85. Spring tapped for d purpose estic use, Champawat district Sub-artesian condition at Kaplani, Raipur block, Dehradun district rinking and dom
  • 86. The piezometers have also been constructed as a part of special study on arsenic ontamination in parts of Samastipur and Buxar districts, Bihar, apart from regular ground wat ribal areas imd , J ha know pot rac 1 Hi oratio har:- nd or in Bihar has bee ed stud the tural inatio quifer arsenic luvial form a ures with oride ck ion. In ial form 4 Explora ells, eizometers in Samastipur an ricts. izome e been drilled for assessing arsenic concentration in ground water of aquifers disposed at various depths. It has been observed that the aquifers are affected th ars to of 6 consideri x. permi im ppb) pth of 256 m bgl tapping sufficient thickness arsen ifers for drinki ter sup the affect calities. The aquifers ave high ground water potential and are high yielding. The transmissivity is observed to . The storativity is of the order of 10-3 to x10-5. The deep seated quifers tapped in the exploratory wells are confined in nature. mbgl. A tal of 09 EWs and 04 OWs have been drilled with an objective to tap fluoride free calities. High dis been drilled at Kabirmath and Dariyapur (Munger . Jharkhand:- Ground water exploration has been carried out in parts of Simdeg d total 0 nd 0 e b in triba rea of Sim High discha ve been drilled at Kolebira (nearly 25 lps) and Lachargarh (nearly10 lps) in Simdega district. The potential fractures have been encountered at 15-16 m and 62-83 m at Kolebira, and at 144 -146 m at Lachargarh. In Ranch a 0 eter d dy t oral variation in piezometric level of fra te de objec xplora study impact of urbanisation on existing ground water regime. 3.10.2 eldin Tube wells The discharge c ia d for high yielding wells alluvial formations and hard rock formations are >50 lps, and > 5 lps respecti e list of lding tube wells d in is given as llows:- gh yiel ng tube wells drilled in 2007-2008. Sl State Location/Sit Drilling Depth (m lps) Formation c er exploration in these arsenic affected areas. The exploration in t of S ega district harkhand s been n taken up to ential f tures 3.10. ghlights of Expl Bi The grou water expl ation state n carri out to y na contam n of a with in al ation nd fract flu in hard ro format alluv ation tory w 09 p and 02 observation wells were drilled pe d Buxar dist The ters hav wi enic down a depth 0 m ( ng ma ssible l it as 50 . The exploratory wells have of been drilled up to de ic free aqu ng wa ply in ed lo h be about 6000 m2 /day a In fluoride affected areas of Munger district, exploratory wells have been drilled in hard rock formations (mainly Pre-cambrian granite gneiss) up to a depth of 180.4 to fractures so that the wells are used for drinking water supply in the affected lo charge wells (>5lps) have district) a and Ranchi istricts. A 7 EWs a rge wells ha 5 OWs hav een drilled l a dega district. i urban are 4 piezom s have been rilled to stu he temp ctures loca d at various pths. The tive of e tion is to High Yi g riter considere in vely Th high yie drille ‘07-‘08 fo Hi di No. District/ e ) ( Discharge 1 Vidyapati Nagar 256.0 - Quaternary Alluvium. 2 Samastpur/ Kancha 200.0 - -do- Bihar 3 Arjunpur 250.2 50 -do- 4 Buxar/ manpur 249.5 - -do- Bihar Chura 5 Kolebira 83.6 25 Granite-Gneiss 6 ega/ Jharkahnd Lachargarh 146 10.5 Granite-Gneiss Simd
  • 87. 3.10.3 r st Re ram f explorat ry wells tested during 2007-2008. No. L Dis WL arge ) down T (m2 / day) S Aquifer Perfo mance Te sults Sl. Aquifer pa eters o o ocations trict S (m bgl) Disch (LPS Draw (m) 1. Manjhwe Jam 95 2.45 22.03 9.67 -ui 3. 2. Gunsagar Lakhisarai 2.67 4.40 12.05 13.10 - 3. Berhat Jamui 3.86 5.2 1.47 913.68 - 4. Anandpur Jamui 6.90 2.20 20.90 3.47 - 5. Arjunpur Buxar 8.08 50 8.50 9690 1.13x1 0-3 6. Herudiara Munger 8.54 16.9 10.00 415.36 - 7. Brahampur Buxar 2.97 55.56 7.04 1098 - 3.11 West Bengal round Water Exploration has been taken up in Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri, North 24 Parganas, aora, Malda,Bardhman, Uttar Dinajpur, Dakhshin Dinajpur, Koch behar & South 24 argana district of West Bengal and constructed 23 EW & 7 OW (Total-30 wells) .11.1 Sum G H P marized Details of Ground Water Exploration & Highlights of Sl. No rs 3 Exploration in the State District Depth drilled (mbgl) Zones tapped / fracture encountered (m bgl) SWL (m bgl) Discharge in m3 /h Draw down (m) Formation/ Aquifer Paramete (T & S) 1 D & arjeeling Jalpaiguri upto 150 granular zones 55-125 2.20-19.20 36-72 (C) - Bouldary 2 N Pa ii) 135-160 ii) 2.95-3.99 ii) 43-126 ii) 0.93 T = 3776 m2 /d orth 24 rganas Deganga block i) within 84 ii) upto 330 i) 45-80 i) 2.36-3.26 i) 36-61 (C) i) - Alluvium S = 2.8 x 10-5 3 Haora Shyampur-II & Bagnan-II blocks i) within 130 ii) within 250 37-42, 66-72 204-223, 228-238 4.15 8.55-9.65 40 36-40 9.79 5.61 Alluvium Ratua-II within 145 81-105 6.50 126.0 (C) Alluvium4 M English Bazaar Alluvium alda Within 156 83-95 1.81 120.0 (C) 5 Barddhama n Kalna—II within 156 126-150 7.32 31.32 1.10 Alluvium 6. U D 2.19 Alluviumttar Raiganj 91-109, 148- 5.03 30.42 inajpur Municipality 240 154 T = 776.79 7 D D akshin inajpur Gangarampur block 220 155-164, 173-194 Alluvium
  • 88. 8 Kochbehar Kochbehar-I 243 116-128 & 140-163 4.65 30-36 4.61 Alluvium Baruipur block i) within 100 ii) within 253 86-95 i) 130-150 7.10 35 (C) 15.30 (C) Alluvium ii) 235-250 5.18 94.0 (C) 9 So Pa Bhangar-II i) 158-176 2.85 86.40 (C) Alluvium uth 24 rganas block within 240 ii) 224-236 3.55 126.0 (C) the Cumulative thickness of s (36-72 m3 /hr. xploration, undertaken for last few years in Bhabar zone (Bouldery formation), reveals done with special emphasis on the selection of sites for construction of tube wells relatively plain land area. Depth to water level in this area is, in general, very deep, 3 /hr. nd ay layer between the 29 mbgl, which is not gionally extensive, is arsenic free and capable of yielding 30 - 50 m3 /hr. ion i –II k un e th ion uifers ( /sali the ne/coa area a senic fre area. Explorati along with electrical logging down to 250 m below the depth of 150 m are brackish in nature n his depth ntial fresh tube wells may be constructed by tapping the fresh aquifers between 200 & 250 mbgl n cement be d gainst the cla r abo e tapp fer, to prevent the vertical percolation of brackish water from the top aquifers. Ma oundwater e ation was taken up in parts of two blocks namely II & n s t occurrence, sion tentia f deeper aquifers (fr .It has been observed that: a 3.11.2 Highlights of Ground Water Exploration Darjeeling & Jalpaiguri district:- In the bouldery formation in and around Binnaguri in Jalpaiguri district and Bengdubi in Darjeeling district, potential aquifers ranging in thickness from 14 -22 m encountered within the depth span of 55-125 mbgl against the drilled depth of 150 mbgl. Suitable tube wells were constructed tapping those aquifers, and yield ranges from 10 to 20 lp E that the aquifers contain gravel, pebble and sand of various grades down to about 180 mbgl, having non-uniform potentiality due to the geomorphological set up of the area with steep hydraulic gradient. Hence, ground water development in this recharge area may be in hence during construction of the tube well, housing of the tube well may be provided accordingly. North 24 Pargana:- Groundwater exploration was taken up in parts of Deganga block to know the occurrence, extension & potentiality of deeper aquifers (free from arsenic). The present exploration reveals that two aquifer systems have been identified i) within 85 mbgl & ii) between 130 - 160 mbgl. The upper aquifer is in general contaminated with arsenic and is the most developing aquifer for irrigational use (where discharge is 35-61 m3 /hr). The 2nd aquifer, separated from the upper aquifer by a thick regionally extensive clay layer, is arsenic free and regionally extensive and capable of yielding 80 - 130m The 2 aquifer may be tapped with cement sealing against the cl two aquifers. Exploration, shows that a 3rd aquifer below 2 re Haora:- Ground wat rater explo n Shyampur bloc has been dertaken to id ntify e disposit e aquifers in the of aq fresh ne) in sali stal nd ar on ground level shows tha a t the aquifers within poted beyond t aquifers exist between 200 and 250 mbgl. The a d proper sealing may one a y laye ve th ed aqui lda:- Gr xplor Ratua- E glish Bazar block ee from arsenic o know the exten & po lity o or fluoride), if any R tua-II block: E pth of 145 mbgl and ot) of wate xplo shows gle potentia ifer e within t rilled de eyond this depth hard rock has been encountered. Analysis (sp r samples from the exploratory wells shows that arsenic concentration is ro He e well tapping aq rs wi his depth may yield arsenic rich water. ration that sin l aqu xists he d b a und 0.01 mg/l. nce, tub uife thin t
  • 89. En r blockglish Baza : Exploration in the block reveals that hard rock is encountered at 5 nd wi a number of ers a -61, 8 & 14 bgl ex res e aquifers between 83 & 95 mbgl have been tapped & 70 mbg high discharge of rs Ba ro xploration was taken up in parts of Kalna-II block to know e nti f de Arse ee aq s. In t ea, a tot e exp lls, tapping three different aquifers in the depth span of 28- 43 l, have been constructed. The cement sealing has been ap ping intermediate (126-150 mbgl) & deeper (219-249 mbgl) aq the tube wells discharge arsenic free water t been taken Raiganj Municipality area. Potential aquifers are encountered in the dep h span of 90-110 & 148-154 mbgl. ration has been take in G arampu k of a t otenti fers uoride bearing aq any. Th rs have been identified in the depth span of 155-195 mb o :- The tion in reveals that Potential aquifers are encountered in the depth span of 115-130 & 140-165 mbgl. rga ter explorat as taken in Barui ur and B s to know the oc r nce, extension & potentiality of deeper aquifers, free from arsenic, analysis of water samples collected from the exploratory well tapping ra m ows arse oncen n is around 0.01 mg l deep r aquifer in the depth span of 160-180 & 225-250 mbgl are lls tapping these aquifers, cement sealing has been e gl. Sl. No s tapped/ ( mbgl) (mbgl) e (lps) down (m) of pumping (min) (m2 / day) 1 6 mbgl, a ist. During p thin this depth ent exploration, aquif t 20 3-95 9-153 m th with cement sealing between 67 a l. The tube well yields enic free water rdhman:- G . undwater e th occurrence, e al of thre , 126-150 and plied in the tub uifers. Both xtension & pote ality o eper nic fr uifer he ar loratory we 219-249 mbg e wells, tap U tar Dinajpur:-Exploration has up in t Da D khshin Dinajpur kshin Dinajpur uifers, if gl. r :- The explo n up & to deli ang neate fl r bloc district to identify e deeper aquife he p al aqui K ch Beha Explora the district South 24 Pa na:- Groundwa ion h been up p hangar-II block cu re g nular zones betw /l. The potentia een 86 & 95 bgl sh that nic c tratio e s free from arsenic. In the tube we provid d to separate the above aquifers from the shallow aquifers within 100 mb 3.11.3 Aquifer Performance Test Results are as follows:- . Location / Block/ Dist. Aquifer Zone SWL Discharg Draw Duration T 1. Uttar Chirail, 33-54 3.28 19.05 3.02 450 1004 Kaliaganj, Uttar rDinajpu 2. Benakar Purbasthali, Barddhaman 7 72-90 .95 9.5 1.06 240 1254 3. Benakar Purbas , thali-II block. 111-1 145 7.29, 136- 73 3.4 11.88 300 15.52 4. Jahangirpur/.Gan garampur 168-180, 183- 195 3.21 10.6 6.97 1 (The 360 764.47 is) 5. Purba Kalna Sahap man m g ur/ II, 243- with ce Barddha 249 ent sealin betwee 208 mbgl. 8. 93 300 n 204- 87 5.36 8. 6. Kalna Bardd Purba Saha haman 28 7. 2 8.25 2.36 300 ( pur/ II, -43 6 435 Jacob’s) 7. Purba Sahapur/ Kalna II, 126-150 7.32 8.7 1.10 300 1529.4 (Jacob’s)
  • 90. Barddhaman 688 (Theis) 8. Naxalbari, t 60-66, 78-84, 86- 6-1 129 3. 8.10 8.59 360 98 (Theis) 80Darjeeling d . 90, 9 00 & 126- 46 (Jacob’s) 9. An anga b North 24 antapara/D lo Parganas dt. 134- em sealing between 92-95 mbgl. 2.eg ck./ with c 152 ent 95 11.93 0.93 240 T - S - 3776 2.8 x 10-5 10 Chaumoha / North 24 Parganas dt. 161 with cem sealing b 58-62 mbgl. 2.High School, Kharibari/ Barasat II block 143- ent etween 535 12.22 2.781 240 3867 11 36-50 5.51 7.25 1.11 360 1140.74 (Jacob’s) Bhaluka/ Ratua-I block/ Malda 12 Kasibati/ Raiganj 91-109, 148-154 5.03 8.45 2.19 500 776.79 (Jacob’s) 785.93 (Theis) 13 Barasat II block/ mbgl. Chaumoha High School/ Kharibari, 205-221, 242-246 with cement sealing between 194-197 2.72 7.94 12.51 240 1256 North 24 Parganas dt. 14 Harisabha/ Kochbehar-I block 145-163 4.6 8.06 4.61 300 195 (Jacob’s) 15 Sasati DEW, Shyampur Block,/ Haora dt 204-222, 229-238 8.55 11.1 5.61 300 16 Sasati SEW, 37-42, 66-72 4.15 11.03 9.79 300 Shyampur block/ Haora dt 3.12 North Eastern States( Assam, Meghalaya) round Water ExploraG w tion has been undertaken by constructing 20 EW, 10 OW & one deposit 3.12. Distr ell in Kokrajhar,Dhemaji, North Lakhimpur, Nagoan & Kamrup districts of Assam and Ribhoi district of Meghalaya. . 1 District wise Summarized details of Ground Water Exploration in the State ict/State Depth drilled Zones tapped/ fractures encountered SWL (m bgl) Dicharge m3 /hr. Drawd own (m) Aquifer parameters (T&K) Formation Kokrajhar/ Assa 67.8 56m2 / day Alluvium with 61-106 40-97 1.8 29.46- 1.78 T=2218. m K=246.5 m/day Serfanguri) bouldery formation Dhe Assa maji,/ m 11.5-109 7–106 3.1- 4.7 19.8- 35.6 Aluvium to Recent Nort Lakh pur/ Assa 200 31 – 172 Alluviumh 33- im m
  • 91. Nagoan 120-201.6 26 – 129 2.1- 3.3 23-53 3.3-6.4 Alluvium Kamrup/ Assam. 129-169 36 – 165 9.7- 11.4 3.12- 28.35 12.9- 27.1 Granite Gniess Ribh Meg m2 /day oi/ halaya. 184-199 16-179.5 5.97- 8.52 3-62.4 2.4- 43.9 T= 0.27- 86.87 Gniess & Granites IOC, Ramn Well, Cach Assa 182.0 74 – 77 103 – 115 2.03 15.67 18.29 T=17.89 K= 0.66 m/day Alluvium agar Deposit Silchar, 97 – 109 ar di m strict, 124 - 136 3.12. a ict, : A total oratory wel were constru e rthe dis n was carried out down depth of 10 he ma inly Aquife rials consist um to coarse grain gravel, pebble and boulder. The discharges of the aquifer zones tapped are found to vary om 29.46 m3 /hr to 67.8m3 /hr with draw down ranging from 2-4 m. depth. 24-34,38-44, 86-89 nd 103-106 m bgl. Granular zones consist of fine to coarse sand and are homogeneous 6 m3 /hr. pur District, Assam: Parts of North Lakhimpur district is occupied with constructe of 13 l. (04) prominent zones were tere drilling to bg ithin on od in the depth range of 42- 50 mbg ( min gra ones exist within the depth range of 80 –100 m bgl and below 10 onl ne gra lar zone exis down to 130 m bgl. The formation encountered during drilling is mainly medi sa an Static wate l ranges from 0 b ischarg from 23 –53 with draw down ranges from 3.34 to 6.41m. Kamru trict, Assam ut o fo rator (backlog of 2006-07) were constructed in Kamrup district of Assam down to the m imu h of 169 m . Th mat encoun red is mainly A ite Gniess. Water level varies from 4.21 – 11.43 m bgl. Discharge ranges from 3.12 – 28 m ving draw ran fr 91- 27.17 m. Results of pumping test reveals that transmissivity (T) ranges from 6.93- 10.30 2 /day a d chemical Quality of water is Ribhoi District, Megha A t of W and 02 O r formation encountered consists of quartzite and granite gniess. The fractures 2 Highlights: Kokr no jhar Distr Assam rict.Exploratio of 2 expl ls the cted in th rn parts of t to 6m bgl T for tion is ma bouldary. rs mate of medi fr Dhemaji District, Assam: Exploration activities were carried out in the flood plains of Brahmaputra in the southern part of the district down to 109m bgl and further drilling below 109 m could not be carried out due to encountering of boulders. During drilling it is observed that 4 (four) granular zones are present within the a in nature. A total of 3 exploratory and 3 observation wells were constructed. Static Water level varies from 3.10 – 4.72 m bgl with discharge ranging from 19.8 – 35. North Lakhim alluvium and recent formation covered under exploration down to a depth of 200m. A total of 3 exploratory and 2 observation wells were constructed. The granular zones encountered during drilling are mainly medium to coarse sand and with occasional gravel. Nagaon district, Assam: In Nagaon district 3 exploratory and 3 observation wells were d down to the depth 0m bg l. W Four 50 mencoun d while down 200 m e go granular zone exist l. Two 02) pro 0 m, ent y o nular z nu t um to coarse-grained e rangingnd d clay. r leve 2.1 to 3.31 m gl. D m3 /hr p Dis : O f ur explo y wells only two EW and one EW ax m dept bgl e for ion te rchaean Gran Static .35 3 ha/hr down ging om 12. m n good. laya: otal 04 E W we e constructed. The
  • 92. encountered in MES and Umsiang EBH proved good ground water potential. In both the we , d e is 62.3 S W el fr 97 to gl. Results est conducted at Umsiang, MES and Umsiang EBH reveal transmissivity va ing 4.4 – 86.8 day d n f .4 t Bhoirymbong EBH where transmissivity is 0.27m /day with 43.98m drawdown. The hemical analysis of water collected during pumping test reveals that the quality of water lls ischarg 7 m3 /hr. tatic ater lev varies om 5. 48.521 m b of pump t ry from 7-m2 / with rawdow ranging 2 rom 2 –19.20 m excep c is good and potable. 3.12.3 High yielding wells: Sl No District/ State Location / Site Drilling Depth (m) Discharge (LPM) Formation 1. East Khasi Hills/ Meghalaya MES, Shillong 108.8 624 Hard rock formation (Granite) 2. Ribhoi/ Meghalaya Umsiang 135.10 624 - Do --- 3. Kokrajhar/ Assam Genduguri 106.00 1130.22 Alluvium 3.12.4 Deposit Well Construction: One deposit well was constructed at Indian Oil Corporation Ltd (A.O.D), Ramnagar, Silchar, Cachar District of Assam. The pilot hole drilling was carried out down to 182 m bgl and constructed down to 139 m bgl by lowering 8’’ dia well assembly and tapping 27 meters of granular zones with Johnson slots of 1.00 mm diameter. The details of the well are as follo sw : Static Water Level-2.03 m bgl, Discharge -15.6 m3 /hr, Drawdown-18.2m, Transmissivity- 17.89 m2 /day, Specific Capacity -14.28 lpm/m, Permeability-0.66 m/day 3.13 Orissa Ground water exploration was undertaken in the hard rock areas of Angul, Nuapada, Boudh, Mayurbhanj, Deogarh and Sundargarh districts of Orissa and in the alluvial tracts of Balasore & Cuttack district of Orissa, constructing 60 EW, 17 OW(Total-77 wells) 3.13.1 District wise Summarized details of Ground Water Exploration in the State are as follows:- Sl No District Depth Drilled SWL Dischar ge Drawdo wn (T) Formation/ Aquifer mbgl mbgl m3 /hr m m2 /da y 1 Angul EW:10 OW: 3 111.2 – 200.0 0.25 – 11.1 1.8 – 39.6 4.75 - >40 2.99 Granite Gneiss, Gondwana Sandstone 2 Cuttack EW: 3 129.9 – 3.5- 43.2-108 - - Recent Al OW:4 231.7 5.8 luvium 3 Balasore- Alluvium EW: 1 84.8 8.6 54 - - Recent Alluvium 4. Nuapada EW: 5 OW: 0 104.7- 190.3 2.1- 9.7 1.8-3.6 36.7 7.76 Granite Gneiss, 5 Mayurbhanj EW: 11 OW: 2 63.0 - 175.8 1.2 - 8.8 1.8 – 34.2 6.11-9.98 12.33- 32.67 Granite Gneiss, Granodiorite, Basic Rock
  • 93. 6 Boudh EW: 11 OW::3 86.8 - 167 1 - 5.3 1.33-43.2 3.37 - 17.38 0.95 – 50.11 Granite Gneiss 7 Sundargarh EW: 25 OW:2 51.0- 166.3 3.5 - 25.0 1.8-34.2 0.36-43.2 4.46- 111.88 Mica Schist, Granite, Sandstone 3.13.2 Highlights The district wise highlights of the exploration are given below Angul District : 10 exploratory wells and 3 observation well were constructed during 007 - 08. The major formation encountered are granite, granite gneiss and sandstones. alasore/Cuttack District : In the alluvial terrain of Balasore district, only 1 drilling is 95 low ground level The formations encountered is recent alluvium. e w ring zon ered at 2 be level to 36 metres below ound level . The discharge measured there is 15 lps. luvial tr district, 7 exploratory wells and 7 observati ave been constr d. Formations encounter it ional p i con ed arena us and calcareous materials. coarse ub- unded in shap rate sorti ese are ostly omposition with ncretion a low depth On a ets of granular untered i e depth r e of metres below round level with ness of 10 es. The y f th varies from 12 s havpur .N.pur. Sta ater leve ges 3.52 metres at aghavpur to 5.2 llipur. trict ells an ation ells h he depth 100-186 m d are mainly gra anodiorite and The yield of lls varies 0. to 12 lps T o s of saturat tures zones exis th of 120 etres below gro static wa el varies f m 1.3 w ground vel at Telibandh es below d level a nda ity lues varies from ay at Rundim o 50.11 day uapada Distric y wells been dril in t 0mbgl. Format are gra granite gn ss an The yield f .35 at N ada Hospital to 1 lps at Nuapada Police ation. The stat ries from 2.1 metres w g el at Nuapada lice Station to g el at hariar Road Police Station. Singhjharani to 17.38 metres at Jaring. The average transmissivity value is 7.76 m2 / 2 The depth of drilling varies from 111.2 mbgl in Turanga to 200.00 mbgl at Phulpara, Angarbandha. The water bearing farcture-zones have been encountered from 12.10 to 146.70mbgl. The static water level varies from 0.25 metres below ground level at Benagadia to 11.10 metres below ground level at Phulpara. The cumulative discharge varies from 0.5 lps at Angarbandha, Kangula to 11.00 lps at Godisahi. The net drawdown varies from 3.80 to 4.0 lps. B exploratory well and 1 observation well have been drilled at Nuaparhi. The depth of metres be Th ater bea e encount 8 metres low ground gr In the al h act of the Cuttack ucte on well of sands and claysed are alternate layers w Sand and gravels are very fine to h occas resence of thin sem solidat in texture, angular to sub-ang ceo ular and s ro e with mode ng. Th m quartzo-feldspathic in c ferruginous co t shal s. n average three to four s zones are enco n th ang 20 – 80 g average thick metr ield o ese wells lp at Rag to 30 lps at L tic w l ran from of R 5 metres at Ma Boudh Dis : 11 exploratory w bgl. Formation encountere d 3 observ w ave been in t range of gr nite, granite gneiss, 37 at Ramgarhbasic rocks. the we from at elibandh. Tw to three set ed frac ts within a dep m und level. The ter lev ro 2 metres belo le to 33.70 metr groun t Mu para. The transmissiv va 0.95 m2 / d ahal t m2 / at Gopalmal. N t : 5 Explorator have led he depth range of 104- 19 ions encountered nite, ei d its variants. of wells varies rom 0.5 lps at 0 uap St ic water level va belo round lev Po 4.26 metres below round lev K day.
  • 94. Sund istrict oratory w 2 o ells hav d in e deth range of 50-172mbgl. Form nter mica schist, granite and ndstone. The yield of the well varie s at ad t at Tangargaon d Bhasma. Mica schists have poor yields. Granite and granite gneiss have poor to oderate yields her w are ded atite veins. In en satu ones w etres grou el are of most a currence to weath formation well llaps ic water level ries 1.15 metres below grou evel to 27. etre round level at lsara Anath Asram.. The transmiss vary f 4.4 at Kirlaga to 11.88 m2 /day at Sahajbahal. 7 Exploratory wells and4 observation wells have been drilled in ral two saturated fracture zones within 100 metres below ground level are of ost common occurrence. The static water level varies 3.02 metres below ground level alues vary 1 2 / abara to m g 3.13. ig g en ered g explor a are as foll strict Location Drilling Discharge Formation argarh D : 25 Expl ells and ation encou bservation w e been drille th ed are sa s from 0.2 lp Barg o 12 lps an m and yield is hig here granites intru by pegm g eral two rated fracture z ithin 100 m below nd lev common occurrence. oc The exploratory well at Bhagr was aba co ndoned due to the e. The statered shaly resulting in at Tudlagava nd l 10 m s below g Be ivity values rom 6 m2 /day 1 Mayurbhanj District : the depth range of 56-160mbgl. Formation encountered are mostly granite gneiss. The yield of the well varies from 0.5 lps at Kanakpara and Dharmapur i to 9.5 lps at Pingoo. In gene m at Nabara to 4.2 metres below ground level at Pingoo. The transmissivity v from 2.33 m 3 H day at N 32.67 2 /day at Pin durin oo. atih yieldin ows:- count on in Oriss Sl Di No Depth(m) (lps) 1 Talamula - EW Granit197 7 Fractured e Gneiss 2 Kangula(Godisahi) - s G neiss EW 142.7 12 Garnetiferou ranite G 3 Kangula(Godisa OW ard hi) - 141.7 11 Gneiss H 4 Turanga - EW 111.2 5 Garnetiferous Granite Gneiss 5 An Turanga - OW 11 gul 1.2 6 Garnetiferous Granite Gneiss 6 Telibandh - OW 112 12 Granite 7 Ainlapali - OW 124 5.75 Granite 8 Amruda - OW 154 5.5 Granite 9 Boudh EWGopalmal – 160.6 8 Granite 10 Sun-Bishohi - EW 86.9 9 Granite Gneiss 11 Sun-Bishohi - OW 56.4 9 Gr issanite Gne 12 Nabra - EW 135.7 5.3 G ssranite Gnei 13 Nabra - OW te Gneiss100.2 5 Grani 14 W 117.4 8 Granite GneissPedagadi – E 15 Pedagadi – OW Granite Gneiss104.2 7.5 16 Pingoo - EW te Gneiss105.3 9.5 Grani 17 Mayurbhanj Pingoo - OW 56.4 9 Granite Gneiss 1 jbahal - EW 70.0 10 Granite Gneiss8 Saha 19 - OW 70.0 9 Granite GneissSahajbahal 20 Tangargaon - EW 65 7.5 Granite 21 Tangargaon - OW 65 12 Granite 22 Sundargarh Bhasma - EW 111.4 12 Granite 23 Balasore Nuaparhi EW 94.8/36 15 Alluvium
  • 95. S N l o District Location Drilling Depth(m) Discharge (lps) Formation 24 L.N.Pur EW 153.5/147.5 30 Alluvium 25 L.N.Pur OW 155.3/147.5 30 Alluvium 2 aghavpur EW 161.2/100.0 15 Alluvium6 R 27 Raghavpur OW 162.4/121.0 12 Alluvium 28 Mallipur EW 210.4/125.0 28 Alluvium 29 Mallipur OW 129.9/126.0 26 Alluvium 30 Cuttack Taratsasan EW 231.7/133.0 30 Alluvium 3.14 Karnataka Ground Water Exploration has been undertaken in Uttara Kannada, Chitra-Durga, Kolar, Bidar, Mandya & Hassan district of Karnataka and constructed 36 EW, 18 OW(Total-54 wells). 3.14.1 District wise summarised details of ground water exploration: rict Depth Zones SWL DiscDist Drilled Tapped/ in harge m3 /hr Draw Down Aquifer Parameter (T Formation Fracture Encountered (m) mbgl m & S) Utta Kann ra ada 28.45 to 172.40 14-124 1.17 to 9.22 1.764 to 19.36 6.17 to 18.28 T-1.89 to 42.57 m2 /day. Storativity 0.00032 Schist, Granite and Granite Gneiss Chitr durg a- a 106.75 to 200 20-129 3.29 to 20.60 2.63 to 30.24 8.29m to 29.09m 1.03 to 91.76 m2 /day. Schist, Granite Gneiss &Gr. Gneiss Ko 500.70 196.51 5.12m lar 110.8 to 42-309 33.54 to Neg to 53.64 0.84m to 18-426 m2 /day Gr. Gneiss Bidar 118.00 to 308.40 16.6-47.6 213.3-215.3 16.08 to >100 0.72 to 50.4 0.47 to 24.84 T-5.77 to 221.76m2 /day 33.47 to 393.19 lpm/m.DD Basalt Mandya 120- 200 16.2-31.5 136.8-188.3 7.85- 10.03 2.08- 12.3 10.49 - Granite gneiss Hassan 86.9- 200 20-22.0 180 6.9- 33.4 7.34-25.2 3.2- 16.3 - Gr.Gneiss & Schist 3.14.2 Highlights: Chitradurga: In Hosadurga and Hiriyur taluks 12 exploratory wells and five observation wells were drilled in the depth range of 106-200m Overall static water levels ranged from 3.89m to 20.60m bgl. The fracture zones were encountered at the depth range of 20 m to 129 m. The minimum and maximum discharge while drilling was 0.73 lps and 8.40 lps respectively. The preliminary yield test conducted on EW/OW, revealed that the Drawdown is in the tune of 8.29m to 29.09m, for discharge of 0.97 lps to 3.66 lps and the specific capacity is in the range of 2.90 lpm/m dd to 86.39 lpm/m dd. The Transmissivity
  • 96. values ranged between 1.03m2 /day to 91.76 m2 /day. About 59% ( 7 out of 12) of the exploratory wells were successful with the discharge range of lps to 8.4 lps. Similarly, 0% of the observation wells (4 out of 5) were successful with the minimum and maximum assan District: 3 EW & 3 OW were drilled and the area is underlain by granite gneiss to 200 m with SWL range of 6.9 to 6 m tures were e d in th t th to180 m with range of 1.615 to 7.5 lps (5.814 to 27. ). D n of ells during PYT was in the range of 3.227to 16.322 m af pumping for 100 minutes. The quality of und e area is g ral. tara district: ter Ex n was carried o umta, nnav tkal taluk EW’s e w lled at nd OW Kum tered red S ck f ion ha discharge arou ra g tes ond n Observation well with the mp l it highe rge he EW Transmissivity was computed and it was 42.57m /day with Storativity of 0.00032. The main aquifer in e er EW dis f e ss tha or negligible. mos hich w long nhi astal l e thickness of erbu d assiv te r was en ed at shallow th ce as glig nd hence Slug test were duc nsmissivity etwe an 2 /da lar rillin e to th o 0m): number of 7 ewe year under ‘Deep Exp ory Drill e’. Of se, 4 e pleted and o tion w leted. ar h a very ground wa elop the state and the area re was u aken is tw xpl luks r) of dis red ar nderlain b tes f th ic ple one is p lly dry ex reas adjacent to existing face ke MI The depth d ra om 110.8 m in Kolar town 500 untur e, Malur t ield from igibe quantity nika 1 s (53.64m lar lar t Water yielding ture encountered ent depth between 42 and 309mbgl. Exploration cate actures occ t shallow ith gl) a r very r yi tial fract found a r d n Kolar potential fracture en m hereas it nter 0 and m roved th ence ntial w 75m own to 310m.These aquifers are found in confined condition. This is evidenced by falling to the ones below. The water levels/ piezometric heads in many ells are very deep, varying between 33.54mbgl (Arnikatta) to 196.51 mbgl(Malur). The 8 discharge of 1.78 lps to 8.40 lps, tapping the same zone, which were encountered in the exploratory wells. Mandya District: 1 EW & 1 OW were drilled in Mandya district and the area is underlain by granite gneiss and schist. Depths of the wells are 120 and 200 m respectively and the SWL are 7.85 and 10.03 mbgl respectively. Fractures were encountered at the depths from 16.28 to 188.36 m with yields of 0.58 to 3.43 lps. The drawdown of OW during PYT was 10.49 m after pumping for 100 minutes at a discharge of 12.37 m3 /hr. The quality of ground water in the area is good in general. H and schist. Depth of the bore wells range from 86.79 33.3 bgl. Frac ncountere e area a 0 m e depth range of 20 rawdowyield 3 /hr ter the borew gro water in th ood in gene Ut Kannada Ground Wa ploratio ut in Karwar, K l EW aHo ara and Bha s. Out of 8 only on ell dri t Khatga of ta Taluk encoun highly fractu chist ro orma ving higher of nd 5.38 lps. Long du tion pumpin t was c ucted i pu owering in OW as was having 2 r discha than t and this w ll is Schist. Oth ’s are having charge o ither le n 3 lps In t of the EW’s (w ere drilled a the dow ll or co ine), th ov rden is too less an hard and m e grani ock counter dep onwards and hen discharge w very ne ible a con ted and Tra ‘T’ ranges b en 1.89 d 4.39m y. Ko district (Deep d g Programm a dep f 50 A total bor lls were drilled during the lorat ing Programm the exploratory wells w re com and two bserva ells were comp Kol as witnessed high ter dev ment in whe GW exploration plo ndert o over-e oited ta (Kolar and Malu sular Gneissthe trict. The ex ea is u y grani gneiss o e Penin Com x. Phreatic z ractica cept in low lying a sur water bodies li tanks. explore nged fr to .7m in Doddak villag aluk. Y ranged negl (Ar tta, Malur taluk) to 4.9 lp 3 /hr)(Ko town, Ko aluk). frac s are at differ indi s that, fr urring a depth(w in75mb re either dry o poo elding. Poten ures are t greate epths. I was countered at 94-98 depth w in Malur is encou ed between 30 310 depth. The exploration has p e exist of pote fractures belo d of water from top zones w ‘T’ values range from 18 to 426 m2/day as computed from short duration tests (100min PYT). However, Aquifer Parameter Tests can give a more accurate idea of real potential of
  • 97. these deep aquifers. Ground water quality is good, potable and the fluoride contents are e specified limit ofwithin th drinking water standard. ar district:- G a in t Aurad, Bidar and Bhalki taluks and 08 (EW) & 04(OW) dril ep ranges of these wells was from 118.0 to 308.4 m. Promising aquifer zones were encountered in (EW (EW & OW) hi elk and om 2.70 to 50.40 for aw ge of 11. U i pot aq e in ran ncou a 196.3 m bgl with discharge of 3.47 lps(12.492m /hr) for a drawndown of 26.84m. Preliminary Yield Test of the bore wells ve the bas ife transm g 5.7 .7 and Specific capacity range of 33 to D. 3.14.3 :List of high yielding wells is as follows:- o Depth D m Di i olo y Bid round w ter exploration studies Basaltic errain was carried in thwere led. D Basalt at Mudhol W) & OW), Hokarna (E recorded discharge W & OW), Ranjol ranges were fr kheni and Met 3 rM hunda (E n m /hou dr down ra 0.47 to ntered 94 m. At only 0 to jini(OW) s te, the ential uifer zon g ite was e 3 t 195.3 re als that altic aqu rs have 393 lpm/m.D issivity ran e of to 221 m2 /day Sl. N Location District rilled scharge n lpm Major Lith g 1 U. 129.10 240.6 Schist/Granite, Granitic Gneiss Katgal EW Kannada 2 Katgal OW U.Kannada 115.00 322.8 Schist/Granite, Granitic Gneiss 3 Devigere EW Chitradurga 120.80 261.6 Gneiss 4 Devigere OW Chitradurga 110.00 504 Gneiss 5 Chikkabeladakere EW Chitradurga 130.00 412.8 Schist 6 Chikkabeladakere OW Chitradurga 136.25 412.8 Schist 7 Yalladakere EW Chitradurga 106.75 457.2 Schist 8 YalladakereOW Chitradurga 178.75 295.2 Schist 9 SoorappanahattiEW Chitradurga 172.65 180 Schist 10 Goudana Halli - EW Chitradurga 200.00 229.8 Schist 11 Adiralu EW Chitradurga 200.00 331.8 Schist 12 Adiralu OW Chitradurga 132.00 200.4 Schist 13 ShivapuraGateEW Chitradurga 129.95 504 Schist 14 Kolar-Railway station Kolar 360.9 894 Granitic gneiss 15 Malur- TB premises Kolar 311.25 459 Granitic gneiss 16 Ujini-OW Bidar 235.85 208.00 Basalt / Granite 17 Mudhol (B)-EW Bidar 175.10 600.00 Basalt 18 Mudhol-(B)-OW Bidar 223.00 404.00 Basalt / Granite 19 Hokarna-EW Bidar 132.20 840.00 Basalt 20 Hokarna-OW Bidar 137.60 594.00 Basalt 21 Ranjolkheni-EW Bidar 181.30 594.00 Basalt 22 Ranjolkheni-OW Bidar 118.00 256.00 Basalt 23 Methi Melkumdai-EW Bidar 190.00 600.00 Basalt 24 Purigali Mandya 200.00 208.20 Granite Gneiss 25 Karakere Hassan 200.00 252.00 Granite Gneiss 26 Karakere OW Hassan 200.00 360.00 Granite gneiss 27 Goremaranahalli EW Hassan 155.00 450.00 Granite gneiss 28 Goremaranahalli OW I Hassan 86.79 420.00 Granite gneiss .15 Andhra Pradesh3 Ground Water Exploration has been undertaken up in Karimnagar,Waramgal,Medak, Nizamabad,Guintur, Visakhapatnam & East Godavari constructing 33EW, 13 OW, 31 PZ(Total-77 wells)
  • 98. 3.15.1 District wise summarised details of Ground Water Exploration in the State (in range) Sl. No District Depth drilled (m) Zones / Formation/ Fracture tapped (m) SWL (mbgl) Dis- Charge (lps) Draw- Down (m) Aquifer Paramete r (T&S) 1 Karimnagar/ 51-7 Warangal gneisses 0.73 m /day 0 8.1-66 Granite 0.5-10.2 0.13- - T=0.2-12 2 2 Medak/ Nizamabad 60-200 12-129 Basalt/ Granite 3.34-16.3 0.014- 3.85 18-29 T=0.71- 22.58 m2 /day 3 Guntur 53-200 7.6-168 Granite gneiss 0.11-15.0 0.65- 13.75 1.15- 12.83 T=5.96- 570 m2 /day S=1.8x10- 2 4 Visakhapatnam / East Godavari 40-200 9.0-178 Khon- dalites, Grnites, Gneisses 0.83-20.0 0.32-4.0 1.10- 27.63 - 3.15.2 Highlights Guntur District: A total number of 22 wells viz., 10 EW, 6 OW and 6 PZs were quifer zones m depth with moderate ground potential aquifer zone has been u t 155 with isc The thickness of hered mantle hard rock i in the depth range of 10 to 15 m. The static ter nges . Generally Mi tes are or aquifers. area cup by Narj fo h sha interca ns and are intruded with shales beds also, which form moderately to high potential aquifers with discharges ranging from 2-5 lps. we h po aquifers are found a he shales with clay lumps with discharge ranging from 3 to 12 lps between the depth range of 130 and 170 . emen s not en tered to the at Gurazala. we base alline r nco ed at 2 0 m at Daida and che as, t eston most of rs are found to be betwe d 90 m depth. The weathered mantle ranges between 10 and 15 m. t ty zones ranges from 5 to 100 sq.m/day (Ipur) in hard . between 45 a .m/day. (Ka Durgi). g M izam d Districts: A to er of 17 bore wells comprising 12 Exploratory and 4 Observation Wells and 5 Piezometers were constructed Normal and drought prone areas. An area of 2000 sq.km approx. has been covered under Ground Water Exploration in granitic terrain of Archaean age and isolated patches constructed by exceeding the targets. Ground water exploration in the District was carried out in crystalline rocks of Migmatite and Granite gneiss of Archaean age at Rompicherla, Lingamguntla, Korappakonda and Ipur and in the sedimentary rocks of Shales and limestones of Kurnool group, at Garikapadu (shales), Kovampudi, Durgi, Gurajala, Daida and Dachepally (Narji) limestones. In the crystalline rocks of Migmatite and Granite gneiss, the density of a mostly occur within the depth range of 15.0 to 50.0 water potential, with an exception at Ipur where high enco eat ntered a .0 m depth drilling d s found harge as high as 5.0 lps. w in the wa level ra from 2 to 5 m gmati found to be po In sedimentary terrain most of the is oc ied i limestones. The lime stones are und wit le and clay latio Ho ver, hig tential t the crus d zones of mt The bas t rock wa coun down depth of 197 m Ho ver, the ment cryst ock is e unter 6 m and 10 Da pally are respectively. In he lim es, the aquife en 30 an The ransmissivi limestones, it ranges of the aquifer rock In the nd 700 sq rampudi & Ran a Reddy, edak and N aba tal numb in
  • 99. of Basaltic terrain of Deccan traps age. The ground water levels varied from 5.82 to 5.5. The depth of weathering was in the range of 5 m to 33 m. Most of the high have been ncoun red at 94-95 m at Gidda, Nizamabad districts with a maximum discharge of high drilling ischarge of 3.34 lps. The drilling discharg n t of H oor r vi o w io ed nes at shallow depths. The transmissivity va in ge 4 to q.m/da fluoride concentration was in the f 0.5 mg/l to 2.3 mg/l. In rest of the bore wells, Fluoride is within the permissible range. One Exploratory well at Gidda was abandoned due to boulder formations. Warangal & Karimnagar districts: 3 Piezometers in Warangal district and 13 Piezometers in Karimnagar district were co cted to decipher ater of sh low w w re d p. z sit e se in consultation with GWD. The site locations were mutually integrated with the GWD Pz network and are the representative of the a hydrogeological horizon. of the piezometer wells ranges from 51 to 70 meters. The fractures were encountered within the depth range of 11-35 mbgl. The discharge varies from Traces to 0.73 lps. The ansmissivity calculated from slug test varies from 0.2-12 m2 /day. isakhapatnam District :- In the hard rock area of Visakhapatnam district the area (m) 4 yielding potential fractures are limited within the range of 24 to 28 m depth (at Tattiannaram in R.R. District and Petasagam, Nizamabad). Fractures e te 1.79 lps whereas dyke (dolerite) fractures encountered at 131-132 m with d e was i llages sh he range w dry wells lues were 0.078 to 3.85 lps (Petasangam) except at y. The atn and Utnu ith occas the ran n chally tou of 0.71 wet zo 122 s range o nstru ried u the w es wer levels lectedal aquifers here dug ells we The P rea and The depth tr V explored is mostly underlain by Khondalite and gneissic group of rock (migmatitic). The yields are quiet low with a maximum yield around 345 cu.m/day. The low yields in the area can be attributed to low density of fractures in the country rock and also the fractures tabbed in the bore holes may not be hydraulically connected especially with a recharging boundary. The bore wells cannot stand long duration pumping. 3.15.3 List of High yielding wells are as follows:- Sl. No. District Location/ Site Drilling depth Discharge (LPS) Formation 1 Guntur Linganugunta 200 5.0 Granite gneiss 2 Guntur Ipur 155.10 6.0 Granite gneiss and Migmatite 3 Guntur Karempudi 135 6.65 Shales/ limestones 4 Guntur Durgi 123.50 10.0 Limestone/ shale 5 Guntur Gurajala 197 4.5 Narzi limestones 6 Guntur Dachepalli 173.50 10.0 Limestones 7 Visakha- patnam Uddandapuram 147.4 3.6 Khondalite 9 Visakha- patnam Mamidipudi 200 4.0 Khondalite 10 Nizamabad Petasingaram 200 3.85 Pink granite 11 Ranga Tattiannaram Reddy 200 4.58 Granite 12 Nizamabad Kondapuram 138 3.34 Dolertie/ Granite
  • 100. 3.16 Tamil Nadu G d W oration under Krish uram lur districts of adu and co cted 23 EW, 7 OW & 23 l-53 wel District wise Summari tails of Ground r Explorati he State. roun ater Expl Tamil N has been taken in nagiri, Villup & Peramba ls)nstru PZ(Tota zed De Wate on in t S No District D Drilled ( Zones racture ed (mbgl) l) Discha M3 /h Draw down (m) l epth tapped/ F mbgl) encounter SWL (mbg rge r Formatio n 1 Kri 3 232.48 8 Up to 953.2 -----shnagiri 9-235 20.1- 23.48- 55.2 8 Granite gneiss 2 Villupuram 130-200 40-170 1.19- 0 223.20 7.34- 31.50 Granite 35.4 gneiss 3 Pe 7 16.45 – 53.5 648-2 -----rambalur 5-450 340 Cuddalore sandstone 3. HLIGHTS istrict (Hard rock):- The exploration carried out in Krishnagiri district he depth of phreatic aquifer (weathered mantle) extended down to 24 0 to 3, the yield in these fractures s encountered between 200 –275 m bgl ranges from 0 to 3, anges from meagre to 8 lps. Highest e alur district established the presence of potential granular zones ing 20 – 65 lps. The thickness and number of granular zones are more when 16.1 HIG Krishnagiri D veals that tre mbgl. The exploration established the presence of potential fractures even up to a depth of 234m bgl. The number of fractures encountered within 100 m bgl ranges from 0 to 5, the yield of these fractures ranges from meagre to 1.7 lps. The number of fractures ncountered between 100 –200 m bgl ranges frome ranges from meagre to 3 lps. The number of fracture the yield in these fractures r discharge of 26.48 lps has been observed at Hosur in the bore well drilled down to a depth of 202 mbgl. Villupuram District (Hardrock):- The exploration in Villupuram district established the presence of potential fractures down to a depth of 185m bgl. The number of fractures encountered within 100 m bgl ranges from 0 to 4, between 100 –200 m bgl ranges from 0 to 2. The Cumulative yield of the fractures ranges from meagre to 3.5 lps. Comparatively the occurrence of deeper fractures and its yield potential are very less in Villupuram district. Perambalur District (Sedimentary rock):- 5 EW and 5 OW have been constructed tapping different aquifers in Perambalur district under ground water exploration in coastal tract of P rambalur district observing the scientific data gaps. The exploration in oastal tract of Perambc yield compared to Cuddalore area.
  • 101. 3.16.2 HIGH YIELDING WELLS Sl. No. District Location/ Site Drilling Depth (m) Discharge (LPM) Formation 1 Hosur 203 1589 granite gneiss 2 Thalli 235 504 granite gneiss 3 Rayakottai 145 960 granite gneiss 4 Mathigiri 202 201 granite gneiss 5 Krishnagiri Bagalur 200 201 granite gneiss 6 Elavanasurkottai 175 372 granite gneiss 7 Thirunavalur 180 210 granite gneiss Villupuram 8 m Thirumalairayapura 200 300 granite gneiss 9 900 Cuddalore dstone Melur 300 3 san 10 Mahimaipuram 50 1740 Cuddalore sandstone 4 1 Perambalur r 0 3000 Cuddalore sandstone 1 Ellaiyu 30 3.17 Ke la Ground Water Exploration has been underta in Kolla and constructed 15 EW otal-19 we add 14 PZ 06 PZ allapuram also constructed. 3.1 Highlight nd Water E Kol district:- out in central and eastern part of m district ris A an crys ting of Khondalite group te group a igm group. major rock type com garnetiferous cordierite biotite-sillimanite gneiss with occasional bands of calc granulites and pyroxene granulites pegmatite and qua are comm The t d depth of the ever Exp ory wells d with varyi pth, ranging from The EW thupuzha could not be drill ond 115m and ond 108 use of arge (11 lps EW at Nellikku one could not be drilled to th f 200 us drilling problems. The DTW ranges from 1.5m to 21.26mbgl. The yield of EW ranges from 0 to 1 The fracture s encountered are generally 30 to 120mbgl. The quality of ground water is generall eters constructed rystalline rocks which constists of hornblende biotite-gneiss, charnockites, granite gneiss etc. The targeted depth was 100 m. The Piezometers constructed to the depth varying from 67.50 to 101.0 ra ken m district of Kerala , 4 OW, T lls. In ition, in Palakkad district and in M district were 7.1 s of Grou xploration lam Kolla Groundwater exploration was carried . The area comp es of rchae talline rocks consis group is the, charnocki posed of nd m atite Khondalite . Veins of rtz on in the rock. argete EW was 200 m. How lorat were drille ng de 108 m to 200 mbgl. at Kula ed bey EW at Valiyakavu bey m beca zone y good. high disch ). The nnam and Ezhuk e target depth o m beca e of 6.66 lps (59.98m3 /hr.) 3.17.2 Highlights of peizom Palakkad district:- Piezometer construction was carried out in Western and Central part of Palakkad district. The area comprises of Archaean C
  • 102. mbgl. The potential fractures encountered between 8 to 87 meters, in particular between 35 and 65 metres. The depth to water level of Piezometers ranges from 0.85 m to 18.60 The piez g fro s tha s to 12 r). Most of the yielding e loca -W li ments. site at Shornur and Naduvattom ntersection of lineaments and y d 30 36 spect he pi lled at Thiruvengappura encountered the deepest ne am zometer e Malappuram District: ter construction was carried out in south eastern t of Ma am di comprises of chaean c stalline cks of lende gneiss 36 m to 20 hour). otent res e nt n 19 and 72 m bgl and in particular between 30 and 55 m. The deepest fractur among the piezometer constructed was encountered at Panangangara piezometer at the 3 List of High Yielding Wells Sl. No. District Location/Site Depth drilled m Discharge LPM Formation m bgl. yield of ometers varyin wells ar falls in the i m les ted in E n one lp nea 36 lps( The 9.6 m3/h s located lps and high ielde lps re potential fracture zo ively. T ezometer dri ong the pie constructed at 86-87 m tres. - 6 Piezome par lapurr strict. The area Ar ry ro hornb lps (0. biotite 3/hour a rnockites. T lps (72 m3/ nd cha he depth of pi The p ezometer ial fractu s ranges from 0.1 ncou ered betwee e zone depth of 71-72mbgl. 3.17. 1. KULATHUPUZHA 115.0 660 Khondalite 2. THOTTATHARA 200.0 180 Khondalite 3. KARAVUR 200.0 240 Charnockite/Pyroxene Granulite 4. VALIYAKAVU 108.0 1000 Khondalite with Charnockite patches 5. KOL MULLUMALA 200.0 240 Khondalite LAM 6. KALLADIKODE 100.0 600 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss 7. SHORNUR 92.0 1800 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss 8. THRITHALA 100.0 420 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss 9. THENKARA 100.0 720 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss 10. LAKKIDI 100.0 360 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss 11. NADUVATTOM 67.50 2160 Granite Gneiss 12. THIRUVENGAPPURA 100.0 420 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss/Granite Gneiss 13. KUDALLUR 86.0 1200 Charcnockite Gneiss/Hornblende Biotite Schist 14. NEDUNGOTTUR 100.0 720 Hornblende Biotite Schist 15. KONGAD 92.0 1500 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss 16. PALAKKAD KARIMPUZHA 100.0 600 Hornblende Biotite Schist 17. MANKERI 100.0 1260 Charnockite Gneiss 18. PANANGANGARA 100.0 240 Charnockite Gneiss 19. MALA AM KUTTIPPURAM 92.0 1200 Hornblende Biotite Gneiss PPUR 3.18 Himachal Pradesh Ground Water Exploration has been undertaken in Una ,Kangra, Kullu & Bilaspur district f Himachal Pradesh and constructed 5 EW, 2 PZ( Total-7) wells.o
  • 103. 3.1 ) Sl. 8.1 District wise summarized details of Ground Water Exploration (in range No District Depth Drilled (m) d/ Fracture encountered (m) WL l) char (Lpm) w n (m) fer paramete r (T &S) Zones tappe S (mbg Dis ge Dra w do Aqui 1. Kangra 21- 52-61,67-73 - - - -49.05- 75.00 30,46-49, 2. Una 36-39,57-61, 63-66, 68-74 10.8- 24.5 T= 1 to 6 2 /day 81.50-101 m 3. Kulu 68-74,77-83, - - -97.00 85-94 - 4. Bilaspur 18-24,26-29 .33 .27 2.6031.00 2 1245 T= 1218.21 m2 /day 3.18.2 hlights Kangr district comes under Beas d Basin. Geological formations encou the district are alluvium, glacial moraines, Siwalik and the basement c pr tam hics. G water ex ion a glacial depos nd Nagrota area. One exploratory well and one piezometers was c tr d one piezometers at Ocha in Nagrot il ing depth r ge bgl. The zones tapped pertai ned aquifer and 21-30,46-49, 52-61 and 67-73m bgl. Kulu ter exploration was taken up in valley fill areas of Kulu valley. One explor led in the valley at Dhalpur. The area is drained by river Beas. The valley fill deposits comp es of b cob bles d with sand and silt. The well was drilled up to a depth of 97.00 m bgl. The ground water potential zone e u 7 , 85-9 U :- under Soan drainage Basin. The area is oc and Siwalik. CGWB had drilled 2 exploratory wells in the depth range of 81.5-101 m bgl. T m q comprises of sa el, pebbles and boulders and were ntered at a d range of 36-39 63-66, 68 The transmissivity values ranges from 1 to 6m2 /day a yielding wells. ilasp 1 exploratory well was drilled upto to 31 m depth. The main water yielding quifers comprises of sand, gravel, pebbles and boulders. The static water level was bserved 2.33 m bgl. The well was tested for a discharge of 1245.27 lpm for a drawdown f 2.60 m. The transmissivity was found 1218.21 m2 /day. .19 SUO, Delhi round Water Exploration in Delhi area has been undertaken during 2007-08 and onstructed 6 EW , 6 OW & 1 PZ in North, North-west Districts, while 4 EW, 3 OW & 5 PZ South & South-West District of Delhi. Hig a:- Kangra ntered in rainage om ising of older me its in Shahpur a orp round plorat was c rried out in ons an ucted at Shahpur an 5 to 75.00 m a tehs ns to shal . The drill low unconfis from 49.0 ranges from :- Ground wa atory well was dril ris oulders, bles, peb mixe nco ntered from 68-74, 7 -83 4 m. na Una district comes cupied by alluvium he ain water yielding a encou uifers epth nd, grav , 57-61, -74 m bgl. nd are low B a ur:- o o 3 G c in
  • 104. 3.19.1 The summarized details of ground water exploration in Delhi are as follows:- Sl. No . Location/District Type of well Depth drilled/ Construct ed depth Zones tapped SWL, mbgl Formation 1. Chatrashal Stadium North Distt EW& OW 119/32 214 to 30 4.05 Alluvium 2. Delhi Univ. Near Stadium gate EW& OW 32/32 24 to 30 5.8 Alluvium Up to Bed rock 3. AshokVihar Ph-4 within park &near Gate EW& OW 53/40 26 to 30 34 to 38 9.9 Alluvium Up to Bed rock 4. Rohini ,Sect-11,DDA Park EW& OW 103/26 12 to 16 20 to 24 5.4 Alluvium 5. Pochanpur(Dwarka Smasan) P 42 to 44 7.9 Alluviumz 100 /46 28 to 30 Sect-23,near 6. Chawala (DJB ompound & near NajafgarhDrain ) Pz 75/62 50 to 54 56 to 60 17.9 Alluvium 7. Shikarpur Vill.(deep) Pz 75/72 S-W Distt 62 to 69 16.2 Alluvium 8. Shikarpur Vill.(Shallow) S-W Distt 50/40 - 38 15.9 A viumPz 32 llu 9. Ishap Distt ur Vill. S-W Pz 100/60 to 47 to 58 11.8 um43 56 Alluvi 10 Mandhela Khu 99/42 to 40 10.9 umrd S-W Pz Distt 34 Alluvi 11 Dariyapur S-W 93/38 to 36 14.1 viumDistt Pz 30 Allu 12 Sultanpur,IMS EW & OW 75/73 to 52 56 to 60 to 71 44.0 A viumSouth Distt 49 69 llu Up to Bed rock 13 Najaf garha T 100/37 -35 11.9 umown Pz STP 29 Alluvi
  • 105. 4. DEVELOPMENTS AND TESTING OF WELLS its construction to increase its specific capacity to prevent sand shing into the well and to obtain maximum well life. Thereafter, pumping tests are conducted a cs viz. sp ls, assessm he capacit e facilitie ut 400 pu t action . Howeve re develop 2008. Region wise achievement has been presente Tab ED f w ed urin -08 arc A tube well, is developed during ru for ev luating aquifer characteristics i.e. transmitivity, storage co-efficient and well characteristi ecific capacity and well efficiency, with a view to evolve efficient design for tube wel ent of yield capabilities and spacing criteria for tube wells. The Board has got t y of conducting 175 to 200 pumping tests per annum with the existing infrastructur s. With the increasing drilling activities, the Board is constructing, on an average, abo mping wells every year, which have resulted in backlog of pumping tests. Procuremen has been initiated in the Board to equip each rig unit with adequate pumping test units r, in spite of constraints faced by the Board in this aspect, a total of 244 wells we ed and tested during the year 2007- d in Table 4.1 le 4.1: REGIONWISE/STATEWISE PUMPING TESTS CONDUCT IN 08THE YEAR 2007 – 20 No o g 2007 ells test Upto Md h,2008 Sr. No. gions State/ ri E. constructed duri Re toriesUnion Ter No. of wells ng 2007-08 and tested N c d ea l No. of tested o. of E. wells onstructe rlier Year an in d Tota wells tested 1 NWH , Ja Jammu & Kashmir 13 20R mmu 7 2 NWR,Cha Haryana - - -ndigarh 2 2Punjab - 2 4Delhi 2 3 WR, ipu Rajasthan 3 17Ja r 14 4 WCR, hm t 1 10A edabad Gujra 9 5 NCR ho des 11 21, B pal Madhya Pra h 10 6 NCCR, Ra Chhattisgarh 28 28ipur - 7 CR, gp Maharashtra 33 34Na ur 1 8 NR, ck desh 4 9Lu now Uttar Pra 5 9 MER at - 7, P na Bihar 7 d - -Jharkhan - 10 ER,Kolkat est Bengal 5 15a W 10 11 NER, Guw Assam 5 11ahati 6 al Pradesh - 1Arunach 1 Meghalaya 3 3- Tripura - - - 12 SER u rissa 9 26,Bh bneswar O 17 13 SR, Hyde Andhra Pradesh 3 1 4rabad 14 SWR, Ban 7 18galore Karnataka 11 15 SEC h Tamilnadu 3 4R, C ennai 1 16 KR, Keral Kerala 3 3a - 17 NH haR, D ramshala Himachal Prad 2 7esh 5 18 UR, r Uttarakhand - - -Deh adun TOTAL 137 7 24410
  • 106. 5. TAKING F WELLS BY STATES 5.1 Exploratory Wells The exploratory drilling sites are selected in consultation with the State Government Departments considering that, successful exploratory wells would be converted into production wells once taken over by States. Till 2008, a total of 12 wells have been drilled, out h 9703 succe xplora ells h een only 5533 o far been a cepted /taken over by State hile 3355 suc well re yet to be accepted/ taken over by them and only 815 successful ls to ffered. statu ding over of e lls drilled by Central Ground Water Board to the State Government as o sented i le 5.1 1: HANDI OVER WELLS ILLED B CGWB n 31 008) No. te/ Union Territories wells drilled T succes sful Wells wells accepted wells offered but yet to be accepted No. of wells to be offered OVER O March 523 of whic wells have s ssful e c tory w ave b constructed and Governments w c ssful wel e s a be o The s of han xploratory we n 31-3-2008 is pre n tab Table 5. NG OF DR Y (As o .03.2 Sl. Sta Total otal No. of No. of States 1 Andhra Pradesh 1180 839 728 71 40 2 Arunachal Pradesh 31 27 14 2 11 3 303 252 120 65 67Assam 4 Bihar 259 212 61 122 29 5 Chhattishgarh 520 473 139 294 40 6 Goa 58 49 0 49 0 7 Gujarat 871 431555 61 63 8 Haryana 363 194 145 247 9 Pradesh 162 149 77 49 23Himachal 10 mu& Ka 296 158 50 27Jam shmir 235 11 Jharkhand 75 227 75 132 202 12 Karnataka 945 471 444 301106 13 Kerala 367 264 220 35 9 14 Madhya Pradesh 804 504 428 15 61 15 Maharashtra 1032 863 743 70 50 16 Manipur 25 15 14 0 1 17 Meghalaya 80 69 14 5 50 18 Mizoram 3 3 3 0 0 19 Nagaland 11 7 5 1 1 20 Orissa 1162 1080 402 636 42 21 Panjab 159 135 78 51 6 22 Rajasthan 1048 751 249 470 32 23 Sikkim 31 10 6 0 4 24 Tamilnadu 897 649 494 138 17 25 Tripura 60 54 36 12 6 26 Uttaranchal 51 41 23 10 8 27 Uttar Pradesh 756 610 185 334 91
  • 107. Sl. State/ Total Total No. Union Territories wells succes No. of wells No. of wells No. of wells to drilled sful Wells accepted offered but yet to be accepted be offered 28 West Bangal 379 330 128 156 46 TOTAL 12289 9542 5447 3319 776 Union Territories Andaman & 10Nicobar 46 12 - 2 2 Chandigarh 7 7 -6 1 3 Dadara & Nagar 12 8 8 - Haveli - 4 121 59 26 36Delhi 139 5 Pondicherry -30 13 13 - TOTAL 234 161 86 36 39 GRA 2523 9 5533 3355ND TOTAL 1 703 815 5.2 addition to its exploratory drilling programme, the Board also undertakes duction wells on s s for Defence and other Govt. encies to meet their immediate water supply requirements. During 2007-2008, 1 structed by the B anj district of Assam State en in table 5.2. STRUCTION OF LL DURING 2007-2008 SI. State District No. of Deposit Well Constructed Deposit Wells In construction of pro pecific request ag deposit well was con oard in Karimg giv Table 5.2: CON DEPOSIT WE No. 1 Assam Karimganj 1 Total 1
  • 108. 6. WATER SUPPLY INVESTIGATIONS he Board provides assistance to various urban, defence and public sector stablishments to solve their immediate water supply problems by selecting suitable sites for construction of ground water abstraction structures. During 2007-08, 185 Water upply Investigations were carried out and region wise/state wise status is given in table .1 and fig. 6.1 Table 6.1 : REGION/STATEWISE WATER SUPPLY INVESTIGATIONS TAKEN UP DURING 2007-2008 No. Regions States Number of Water Supply Investigations T e S 6 Sl. 1 NORTHERN WESTERN HIMALAYAN REGION Jammu & Kashmir 31 2 NORTHERN HIMALAYAN REGION Himachal Pradesh 12 Punjab 8 Haryana 02 3 NORTH WESTERN REGION Delhi 14 4 WESTERN REGION Rajasthan 0 5 WEST CENTRAL REGION Gujarat 7 6 CENTRAL REGION Maharashtra 2 7 NORTHERN REGION Uttar Pradesh 7 8 UTTARANCHAL REGION Uttaranchal 14 9 EASTERN REGION West Bengal 15 10 NORTH CENTRAL REGION Madhya Pradesh 7 11 NORTH CENTRAL CHATTISGARH REGION Chhattisgarh 1 12 MID EASTERN REGION Bihar & Jharkhand - 13 NORTH EASTERN REGION Assam,Meghalaya,A.P. 39 14 SOUTH EASTERN REGION Orissa 4 15 SOUTERN REGION Andhra Pradesh 6 16 SOUTH WESTERN REGION Karnataka 9 17 SOUTH EASTERN COASTAL REGION Chennai 5 18 KERALA REGION Kerala 2 Total 185
  • 109. 7. Hydrolo manage data c cted explorat , hy puter and analyse ollow rent reports 7.1 ound water dies. 7.1.1 The d into 17- bas ns namely Var Var The total basin area is 4357 Sq.Kms. of which 4214 Sq.Kms. lies in Tamilnadu and 143 ly, Varahanadhi and Ongur and d in between Varahanadhi and Ponnaiyar river originates on the south- eastern slopes of Chennakesava Hills, northwest d by Cauvery basin at its West, Vellar basin at south and Palar and Varahanadhi river basins at its North. The total area of the basin in Tamilnadu Parav s between Ponnaiyar and Vellar river baisns. It is a small river basin with an area of 760 sq.km. it is called Uppanar in the tail reaches before its conf ce west of ab 10 spre name Para ce water pote basin recei pumpage of Neyveli mine. HYDROLOGICAL AND HYDROMETEROLOGICAL STUDIES gical and Hydrometeorological studies play an important role in the assessment and ment of ground water resources of an area. Hydrological and hydrometeorological olle during the course of various hydrologeological surveys & investigation, drograph network mion onitoring etc are being entered into the com d f ing standard techniques. The results are incorporated suitably in diffe . Hydrological Studies : Hydrological studies are carried out as a part of gr management studies, artificial recharge studies as well as conjunctive use stu Hydrological studies with findings/conclusion state of Tamil Nadu consists of 34 large/ small basins, which are groupe in group. The Neyveli study area comprises of parts of 5 river basi ahanadhi, Ponnaiyar, Paravanar, Vellar and Tail end of Cauvery. ahanadhi Basin Sq.Kms. lies in U.T of Puducherry. Two minor basins name one small sub basin called Nallavur or Kondamur locate Ongur sub basins are in this basin. Annamangalam, Nariyar, Tondiar, Pambaiyar, Pambai channel and Chengai odai are tributaries to Varahanadhi, Kaluveli Swamp, is in the basin. Vidur is the only reservoir in the basin. The total surface water potential at 75% dependability assessed for Varahanadhi river basin is 412 MCM. Ponnaiyar Basin of nandidurg in Karnataka State at an altitude of 1000 m above M.S.L. After flowing through Karnataka, the river enters Tamilnadu near Bagalur village of Hosur Taluk. Ponnaiyar river basin is bounde State is 11,257 Sq.Kms. There are 10 tributaries Viz 1) Chinnar I ,2) Chinnar II, 3) Markandanadhi, 4) Pullampattinadhi, 5) Pambar, 6) Vaniar, 7) Kallar, 8) Pambanar, 9) Musukundanadhi & 10) Thurinjalar. Krishnagiri and Sathanur are the major reservoirs in the basin. The total surface water potential has been assessed as 1310 MCM. at 75% dependability. Paravanar Basin anar river basin lie luen with the Bay Of Bengal. Paravanar river originates in the high lands, north of Neyveli Liginite Corporation in the Semakottai Reserve Forest area at an altitude 0 meters above MSL. As iout t traverses in a flat terrain, the water that it carries ads on either sides of its course for a wide distance and hence it has derived the vanar which means ‘Spreading river’in Tamil. The available surfa ntial at 75% dependability including a contribution of 9.7 MCM. Perumal tank of this ves the
  • 110. Vell s The of Tamil Na i hills and drains Kollimalai- Pachamalai ranges in Sale m. Singipu from kolli hills; Kallar from Pachamalai hills river in Ana uvu, e reservoirs of the basin. This basin receives ater potential of the basin Cau The Ran t an elevation of 1341 m. (above MSL) and drains a total area of 81,155 SqKms. This is the only large basin in the state. The rom the origin to its outfall into the sea is 800 Kms of which 320 bet principa eding 250 Sq.Kms. ar Ba in Vellar river basin having an areal extent of 7659 sq.km is located in the northern part du. It originates from Chitter m district. The head reach is called Anaimaduvu. It descends from an altitude of 1090 ram Aru and Sweta Nadhi originating and Chinnar draining Vannadu and Kombainadu besides Manimuktha and Gomuki s dra ing eastern slopes of Kalrayan hills are all tributories of Vellar river. Kariyakoil, Gomugi and Manimuktha are thimad the surpluses of Veeranam tank. The 75% dependable surface w has been assessed as 963 MCM. very Basin river Cauvery originates at Talakaveri in the Coorg District of Karnataka in Brahmagiri ge of hills in the Western ghats a total length of the river f Kms in Karnataka, 416 Kms in Tamilnadu and 64 Kms from the common border ween the Karnataka and Tamilnadu states. The Cauvery river system consists of 21 l tributaries each with catchment area exce rometeorological Studies: Hydrometeorological Studies forms a part of ground anagement study, conjunctive use study as well as Artificial Recharge studies. 7.2 Hyd water m It p reso data be and out 7.2.1 KER During esta i has normal winter e determined, departure of the seasonal rainfall for preceding year, seasonal rainfall contributions to the total rainfall is also attempted. Various figures prepared for the different districts of Kerala by using Map Info 6.5 and Mic The climat o management st d be analysed fo 7.2.2 ENTRAL .2.2.1 CLI Clim rts were provided a) Sangli b) Sat Parbhani and Ratnagiri districts. The detailed analysis of rainfall of all raingauges rovides the various climatological data which helps in estimation of ground water urces as well as planning the development and management of ground water. The ing generated various studies through out the country entered into the database alysed using standard techniques. The various hyan drometeorological studies carried during the year in different Regional Offices is summarized below ALA REGION ( Kerala ) the AAP 2007-08, the weekly rainfall data of various rainguage stations shed by the India Meteorological Dbl epartment, Thiruvananthapuram. The data been analysed for the fourteen districts of Kerala. Monthly rainfall distribution, rainfall for various periods such as south-west monsoon, north east monsoon, and summer periods wer rosoft Excel. ol gical and hydrological data collected during district ground water u ies in Kasargod and Kollam districts by the respective officers will r their reports. C REGION ( Maharashtra ) Hydrometeorological Studies7 MATOLOGICAL INPUT FOR DISTRICT & RHS REPORTS:- atological input for the following district repo sal reports ofara c) Beed and also for Reapprai se Climatological chapters include
  • 111. in t emperature, relative humidity and wind speed and r a. b. Co- nd demarcation of drought area c. Apa Mahara ur district for Mass Aw r city DE Update include i. ii. Data received from district collectorates through field officers. iii. Statistical data received from socio-economic Reviews of Maharashtra. YDROMETEOROLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS FOR GW YEAR BOOK d for inclusion in the yearbook. HY OME L DATA ANALYSIS FOR GWRM REPORS: rts on ust 2007, November-2007 and January-2008. 7.2.3 Compil wind v of MP. that ab etwee annual rainfall takes place between ctobe to May. On the ers, a brief note on rainfall distribution and limatic ch A detailed write up on “Climatology of M.P.” has een p ompil prepar receive above 31% & maxim above he district with isohytal maps, t di ection and plates showing: Normal annual rainfall and probability of occurrence of normal annual rainfall. efficient of variation of rainfall a Rainfall trend rt from the above, analysed rainfall data for District Headquarters of shtra. Prepared hydrometeorological write up of Nagp areness programme and preparation of write up for Rainfall Analysis of Nagpu . VELOPMENT OF HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL DATA BASE:- d and maintained hydrometeorological database of Maharashtra, which s: Compilation of rainfall data of 42 IMD observatories from daily weather reports of Nagpur. H The hydrometeorological data for Ground Water Year Book for 2006-07 was ana ed a arelys nd were prep DR TEOROLOGICA Hydrometeorological data are analysed and correlated with ground water levels after monsoon hydrograph monitoring for the preparation of status repo ground Water levels during Aug NORTH CENTRAL REGION ( Madhya Pradesh ) ed normal meteorological data such as maximum and minimum temperature, elocity, relative humidity, rainfall data for all existing meteorological observatories Also calculated different seasonal rainfall for all stations. It is clear from the data out 85% to 93% of annual normal rainfall takes place during monsoon season i.e. n June to September. Only 7% to 15% of theb O r basis of normal climatological paramet anges have been prepared.c b repared for State Report. C ed monsoon rainfall for the year 2007. Isohyetal map of monsoon 2007 has been ed. It is clear from the map that Central, Eastern and Northern parts of M.P. have d below normal rainfall. Western parts of M.P. i.e. Malwa region has received normal rainfall. The minimum rainfall has been received at Panna & Tikamgarh i.e. 36% respectively. These districts come under the category of ‘scanty rainfall’. The um rainfall received was in Jhabua district where the rainfall received was 51% normal.
  • 112. 7.2.4 (i) Collected daily rainfall of CGWB raingauge station at Bhujal bhawan w.e.f. March 08. Collected & compiled monthly normal rainfall (1901-70) for all stations of 7.2.5 o May 2007: percent deviation of rainfall of June 2005 to May 2006 with rainfall of June 2006 to May 2007 and percent deviation of rainfall of Jan 2007 to May 2007 with normals of the same period. NORTH REGION ( Uttar Pradesh ) April 07 to (ii) Shrawasti disrict and interpreted for climatic classification values. (iii) Compilation and arranging the long term data for the districts falls in State. (iv) Compiled data for Hydrometerology chapter for Ghaziabad and Meerut districts. (v) Compiled meteorological data - Normal monthly rainfall of Lucknow station for Chinhat block. (vi) Compiled the meteorological data station wise for Jaunpur, Pratapgarh, Allahabad & Varanasi districts. (vii) Compiled rainfall data of Bijnor & Hardoi districts and write up of hydrometeorology chapter (viii) Progress monthly/annual rainfall values of all districts of U.P. for the year 2006 for ground water year book. (ix) Calculated the values of Departure from normal rainfall for Jhansi district for the period 2001 to 2006. NORTH WESTERN REGION ( Punjab and Haryana ) Compilation of weekly rainfall data of North Western Region comprising 17 districts of Punjab (old) and 19 districts of Haryana (old) and Chandigarh (U.T.) for the year 2007-08 and utilizing the same to estimate district mean monthly, seasonal and annual rainfall. The data is being analyzed and used to compute the following after each NHS water level monitoring: o August 2007: percent deviation of rainfall of Sep 2005 to Aug 2006 with rainfall of Sep 2006 to Aug 2007 and percent deviation of rainfall of Jun 2007 to Aug 2007 with normals of the same period. o November 2007: percent deviation of rainfall of Nov 2005 to Oct 2006 with rainfall of Nov 2006 to Oct 2007 and percent deviation of rainfall of Jun 2006 to Oct 2006 with normal of the same period. o January 2008: percent deviation of rainfall of Jan 2007 to Dec 2007 with rainfall of Jan 2006 to Dec 2006 and percent deviation of rainfall of Jun 2007 to Dec 2007 with normals of the same period. o Ground Water Year Book (2006-07): Aanalysed rainfall data along with graphs and also prepared a write up on Hydrometeorology which is used in support of Ground Water Year Book report. o District-wise annual rainfall data for the period 2007-2008 of Haryana & Punjab state with UT Chandigarh is Collected and compiled from IMD and other state Govt Deptts. 7.2.5.1 Reports: Preparation of note on Hydro meteorological studies in support of the following reports:
  • 113. i. Ground water Information booklets of each district of Punjab State, Haryana State and Chandigarh(UT) ii. District report –Rewari district, Haryana State iii. District report – Faridkot district &Tarn Taran district, Punjab State The study consists of the following: - a. Compilation of data of rainfall and other HM parameters from IMD and other state agencies b. Data entry in EXCEL package for analysis d. Probability analysis of rainfall 7.2.6 infall a number of years over taken on an annual c. Statistical analysis of rainfall e. Drought analysis of rainfall f. Preparation of isohyetal map g. Preparation of graphs showing distribution of monthly and annual rainfall both yearly and location-wise. h. Deviation of annual rainfall from normal and its classification into excess, normal, scanty and deficient. i. Climate classification using CW Thornthwaite’s precipitation effectiveness index and Moisture index and Thermal efficiency index j. Monthly water budgeting using CW Thornthwaite’s book keeping method k. Estimation of monthly potential and actual evapotranspiration using the above formula l. Graphical presentation of the above results m. Compilation and presentation of various hydrometeorological parameters like normal rainfall, normal rainy days, mean monthly maximum and minimum temperatures, mean monthly relative humidity, mean wind speed, mean sunshine hours, mean monthly potential evapotranspiration and Pan evaporation in graphical form. n. Write-up based on the analysis. SOUTH EASTERN COASTAL REGION ( Tamil Nadu ) The following district reports were assigned for Hydro-meteorological studies during the AAP 2007-08: 1) Cuddalore, 2) Karur 3) Tiruvannamalai A summary of the findings/conclusions for each district is furnished below: Classification of Ra (i) Drought conditions were experienced at all stations for e study period during the SW and NE monsoon seasons thanth basis; (ii) Taken on an annual rainfall basis, these seem to have been dampened down considerably; (iii) The above indicates that the rainfall deficits during the SW and NE monsoon seasons were compensated for during the remaining part of the year; (iv) The years with drought or excess rainfall decreased and the number of years in the “normal” category increased.
  • 114. CUDDALORE DISTRICT ontribution of Seasonal Rainfall to Annual Rainfall ) In general, NE monsoon rainfall contributes the maximum to the annual nditions were experienced r more than 20% of the years over a large area around Panruti, Portonovo and astern parts. Hence, this area of the district omes under the category “drought area”; (vi) Over the district the frequency C (i rainfall; (ii) Contribution of NE monsoon rainfall is the maximum at Portonovo (64%) and minimum at Vriddhachalam (50%); (iii) SW monsoon rainfall contribution comes next and is the maximum at Vriddhachalam (37%) and minimum at Chidambaram and Portonovo (25%); (iv) Contribution of summer season rainfall ranges from 6 to 8%; (v) Contribution of winter season rainfall ranges from 4 to 6%; (vi) In the case of the district of Cuddalore taken as a whole, this trend continues. The contributions of individual seasons are as follows: NE-57%, SW-31%, Summer-7% and Winter 5%. Annual Rainfall (i) The normal annual rainfall over the district varies from 1051.3 mm to 1402.6 mm; (ii) The chances of receiving normal annual rainfall vary from 38% to 49% over the district; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies from 14% to 23% over the district; (iv) The coefficient of variation of annual rainfall from the normal is rather high over the entire district. It ranges from 23% at Vriddhachalam to 33% at Portonovo; (v) The total drought years over the district ranged from 13% to 23% over the district. Drought co fo Cuddalore in the eastern and northe c of occurrence of drought is in the range of 4-8 years per drought. It is 6-8 years per drought over the eastern half of the district covering Cuddalore, Panruti, Portonovo, Chidambaram, Kattumannarkoil and Srimushnam. Over the remaining western half of the district the frequency is in the range of 4-6 years per drought; (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that almost the entire district experienced a decline in normal annual rainfall up to –10%. The decline was the maximum (-5 to –10%) in the northern part including Panruti. In the remaining part of the district the decline was in the range of 0 to –5%; (viii) The trend of annual rainfall ranged from 1.446 mm/year at Srimushnam to –3.507 mm/year at Panruti. The eastern part of the district around Portonovo registered a rising trend in annual rainfall in the range of 0-4 mm/year. The remaining area of the district registered a declining trend. This declining trend is the maximum (-2 to –4 mm/year) along the northern border including Panruti and Cuddalore. The remaining area experienced a declining trend in the range of 0 to –2 mm/year). Seasonal Rainfall (SW Monsoon) (i) During this season the normal seasonal rainfall over the district varies from 319.8 mm at Portonovo to 393.3 mm at Vriddhachalam and 399.4 mm Panruti; (ii) The chances of receiving normal seasonal rainfall vary from 42% at Cuddalore to 52% at Portonovo; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies over the district from 21% at Vriddhachalam to 26% at Portonovo; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from the normal is high all over the district. It ranges from 28.5% at Vriddhachalam to 42.5% at Portonovo and Srimushnam; (v) The total drought years over the district ranged from 17% at Vriddhachalam to 29% at Chidambaram and Portonovo. A large area, about half of the district, in
  • 115. the eastern part experienced drought conditions for more than 20% of the years. Hence, this area comes under the category “drought area” during the SW onsoon season; (vi) The frequency of occurrence of drought varies from 3 years 6 years per drought at Cuddalore and Vriddhachalam. The frequency is rather high (3 to 4 years per drought) over a halam to 50.9% at Portonovo; (v) The total drought years over the district ranged from 31% at Panruti and Vriddhachalam to 38% at Portonovo. ught conditions for more than 20% of the study eriod during the NE monsoon season. Hence, the entire district comes under the nce of drought is rather igh and is more or less around 3 years per drought. It is the highest in the fall ranged from –1.7574 mm/year at Panruti 0.9988 mm/year at Srimushnam. Almost the entire southern half of the district asonal rainfall in the range of 0-2 mm/year. A mall area around Kattumannarkoil in the southern part and almost the entire m per drought at Chidambaram to large area in the southeastern part of the district covering Portonovo, Chidambaram, Srimushnam and Kattumannarkoil. It is the minimum (5-6 years per drought) around Vriddhachalam in the western part and Cuddalore in the northeastern part. Over the remaining portion of the district this frequency is between 4 and 5 years per drought; (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that the variation of the seasonal normal ranged from –9% at Portonovo to 3% at Cuddalore. Only two areas, in the southern and northeastern corners of the district respectively, experienced a rise in the seasonal normal rainfall in the range of 0 to 5%. The remaining major portion of the district experienced a decline in the seasonal normal rainfall in the range of 0 to –5%. In the extreme east around Portonovo the decline is the maximum (-5 to –10%); (viii) Small areas around Srimushnam and Cuddalore experienced a negligible rising trend in seasonal rainfall. The remaining major part of the district experienced a declining trend in the seasonal rainfall in the range of 0 to –1 mm/year. Seasonal Rainfall (NE Monsoon) (i) During this season the normal annual rainfall over the district varies from 527.1 mm Vriddhachalam to 889.4 mm at Chidambaram; (ii) The chances of receiving normal seasonal rainfall vary from 44% at Portonovo to 52% at Cuddalore; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall over the district varies from 23% at Vriddhachalam to 33% at Panruti; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from the normal is very high all over the district. It ranges from 40.0% at Vriddhac The entire district experienced dro p category “drought area”; (vi) The frequency of occurre h extreme eastern and southeastern parts around Cuddalore, Portonovo and Kattumannarkoil. Over the rest of the district the frequency of occurrence of drought is in the range of 3-4 years per drought; (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that the variation ranged from 2% at Chidambaram and Srimushnam to –8% at Panruti and Portonovo. There was a rise in the range of 0-5% over an area running from west to east covering Vriddhachalam, Srimushnam and Chidambaram. The remaining part of the district experienced a decline in the seasonal normal. This decline is the maximum (-5 to –10%) in the northeast including Panruti, Cuddalore and Portonovo. Over the rest of the district it is in the range of 0 to – 5%; (viii) The trend of seasonal rain to experienced a rising trend in the se s northern half of the district experienced a declining trend in seasonal rainfall. This decline is the maximum (-1 to –2 mm/year) around Cuddalore, Panruti and Portonovo. Over the rest of the district it is in the range of 0 to –1 mm/year.
  • 116. KARUR DISTRICT Contribution Of Seasonal Rainfall To Annual Rainfall (i) In general, NE monsoon rainfall contributes the maximum to the annual rainfall; (ii) Contribution of NE monsoon rainfall is the maximum at Aravakurichi (50%) and minimum at Karur (46%); (iii) SW monsoon rainfall contribution comes next and is the maximum at Karur (33%) and minimum at Aravakurichi(26%); (iv) Contribution of summer season rainfall ranges from 16 to 20%; (v) Contribution of winter season rainfall ranges from 2 to 4%; (vi) In the case of the district of Karur taken as a whole, this trend continues and the contributions of individual seasons are as follows: NE-49%, SW-30%, Summer- 18% and Winter 3%. Annual Rainfall (i) The normal annual rainfall over the district varies over a small range i.e. from 625.7 mm to 744.8 mm; (ii) The chances of receiving normal annual rainfall vary from 45% to 51% over the district; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies from 16% to 21% over the district; (iv) The coefficient of variation f annual rainfall from the normal is rather high over the entire district. It is trict; (v) The total drought years over the district ranged from 16% to 19% over the district. Drought conditions were r a major part s of annual o uniformly around 27% over the dis experienced for less than 20% of the years over the entire district. Hence, no area of the district comes under the category “drought area”. (vi) Ove of the district the frequency of occurrence of drought is in the range of 5-6 years per drought. It is 6-7 years per drought over a small area in the northern and northeastern parts. (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normal rainfall were compared, it is observed that the entire district experienced a decline in the normal annual rainfall. Over a major part of the district this decline was in the range of –4% to –2%. In the southwestern part around Aravakurichi the decline was in the range of –2% to 0%. (viii) The entire district experienced a declining trend in the annual rainfall. The trend of annual rainfall ranged from – 0.517 mm/year at Aravakurichi to –1.130 at Kulittalai. Seasonal Rainfall (SW Monsoon) (i) The normal seasonal rainfall over the district varies over a small range i.e. from 163.2 mm to 229.4 mm; (ii) The chances of receiving normal seasonal rainfall vary from 43% to 69% over the district; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies from 25% to 51% over the district; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from the normal is very high all over the district. It ranges from 43.8% to 57.9%; (v) The total drought years over the district ranged from 13% at Kulittalai to 41% at Aravakurichi. A small area around Aravakurichi in the southwestern part of the district, which experienced drought conditions for more than 40% of the study period during the SW monsoon season, comes under the category “drought-prone area”. A major portion in the central, western southern and northern part of the district, which experienced drought conditions for 20-40% of the years, comes under the category “drought area” during the SW monsoon season; (vi) The frequency of occurrence of drought varies from 2 years/drought at Aravakurichi to 8 years/drought at Kulittalai. The frequency is rather high (2 to 4 years per drought) over western half of the district covering Aravakurichi and Karur. It is the minimum (8-10
  • 117. years/drought at Kulittalai. Over the remaining portion of the district this frequency is between 4 and 8 years/drought during the SW monsoon. (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is bserved that the variation of the seasonal normal ranged from –1% at Kulittalai to 5% at Karur. The eastern-most part of the district around Kulittalai experienced decline in the normal annual rainfall (0 to –2%). In the remaining portion of the to 30%. (viii) The trend of seasonal rainfall ranged from –0.5512 m/year at Karur to 0.0244 mm/year at Aravakurichi. Only the area in the xperienced a rising trend in the seasonal rainfall (0-1 mm/year). The remaining major part of the district experienced a LAI DISTRICT al Rainfall avasi (42%); (iii) NE monsoon rainfall contribution comes next; Following Wandavasi (47%) it is the maximum at Cheyyar (42%) and minimum (41%) at all the other four stations i.e. Anri, Chengam, Polur and Tiruvannamalai; (iv) Contribution of summer season rainfall o a district including Aravakurichi and Karur there is a rise between 0 and 6%. In the northernmost part around Karur the rise is maximum (4-6%). (viii) The trend of seasonal rainfall ranged from –0.0761 mm/year at Kulittalai to 0.2701 mm/year at Aravakurichi. The easternmost part of the district around Kulittalai experienced a declining trend in seasonal rainfall (–0.1 to 0 mm/year). A rising trend (0 to 0.3 mm/year) in seasonal rainfall was observed in the remaining portion of the district. Seasonal Rainfall (NE Monsoon) (i) During this season the normal annual rainfall over the district varies over a very small range. It varies from 281.8 mm to 366.0 mm; (ii) The chances of receiving normal seasonal rainfall vary from 46% to 61%; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies from 25% to 44% over the district; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from the normal is very high all over the district. It ranges from 38.6% to 45.3%. (v) The total drought years over the district ranged from 14% at Kulittalai to 30% at Karur. The western 2/3rd of district, which experienced drought conditions for more than 20% of the study period during the NE monsoon season, comes under the category “drought area” during the NE monsoon season. (vi) The frequency of occurrence of drought is high (3-5 years per drought) in the western 2/3rd of the district around Aravakurichi and Karur. In the extreme east this frequency is comparatively low (7-9 years per drought). Over the rest of the district the frequency of occurrence of drought is in the range 5-7 years per drought during the NE monsoon season. (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that the variation of the 100-year seasonal normal from 50-year seasonal normal was rather high over a major part of the district. An area around Karur experienced a decline in the seasonal normal rainfall (0 to –1%). The remaining major part of the district experienced a rise in the seasonal normal rainfall up m extreme southwest around Aravakurichi e declining trend in seasonal rainfall in the range of 0 to -1 mm/year during the NE monsoon season. TIRUVANNAMA Contribution of Seasonal Rainfall to Annu (i) In general, SW monsoon rainfall contributes the maximum to the annual rainfall, except at Wandavasi, where the contribution of NE monsoon is greater than that of SW monsoon; (ii) Contribution of SW monsoon rainfall is the maximum at Arni (47%) and minimum at Wand
  • 118. ranges from 7 to 12%; (v) Contribution of winter season rainfall ranges from 3 to 4%; (vi) In the case of the district of Tiruvannamalai taken as a whole, this trend continues. The contributions of individual seasons are as follows: SW-44%, NE- 42%, Summer-10% and Winter 4%. (i) The normal annual rainfall over the district varies from 950.0 mm to 1117.3 ove 13% the Wa Che t Arni. Drought conditions were experienced for more than of t the the ught) in the northernmost part aro ngam and Tiruvannamalai. Over the remaining parts of the district the freq 100 dep rmal fro the 50-year normal ranges from –4% at the exp fall up to 5%; (viii) The trend of mm aro (0 t he remaining major area of the district registered a declining Sea onsoon) (i) a sm to 486.5 mm at Arni; (ii) The chances of receiving normal seasonal rainfall vary from 44% at Wandavasi to 52% at Chengam; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies over the district from 18% at Chengam to 27% at Wandavasi; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from the normal is quite high and ranges from 30.6% at Tiruvannamalai to 38.6% at Arni. It is the minimum (30-32%) in the southwestern part of the district around Chengam and Tiruvannamalai. It is the maximum (38-40%) in the extreme northern part around Arni. Over the rest of the district it is between 32 and 38%; (v) Overall, the total drought years over the district ranges from 19% at Chengam to 28% at Polur. A major area covering Tiruvannamalai, Polur, Arni, Cheyyar and Wandavasi experienced drought conditions for more than 20% of the years. Hence, this area comes under the category “drought area” during the SW monsoon season; (vi) The frequency of occurrence of drought varies over a very small range i.e. from 4 years per drought at Arni, Cheyyar, Polur and Wandavasi to 5 years per drought at Chengam and Tiruvannamalai. It is observed that the frequency of occurrence gam dna Tiruvannamalai. Over the Annual Rainfall mm; (ii) The chances of receiving normal annual rainfall vary from 43% to 51% r the district; (iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall varies from to 24% over the district; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from normal varies over a small range i.e. from 23% at Chengam to 27% at ndavasi; (v) The total drought years over the district ranges from 13% at ngam to 32% a 20% of the years over an area around Arni in the northern part. Hence, this area he district comes under the category “drought area”. (vi) Over the district frequency of occurrence of drought ranges from 3 to 8 years per drought over district. It is the maximum (3-5 years per dro around Arni and minimum (7-9 years per drought) in the southwestern part und Che uency is in the range of 5-7 years per drought; (vii) When the 50-year and -year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that the arture of 100-year no Tiruvannamalai to 4% at Arni. The southern half district experienced a decline in normal annual rainfall up to –5%. The remaining northern half of the district erienced a rise in the normal annual rain annual rainfall ranges from –1.9329 mm/year at Tiruvannamalai to 1.4739 /year at Arni. Only an area around Arni in the northern part and a small area und Wandavasi in the eastern part experienced a rising trend in annul rainfall o 2 mm/year). T trend in annual rainfall in the range of 0 to –2 mm/year (Plate-2.5). sonal Rainfall (SW M During this season, the normal seasonal rainfall over the district varies over all range i.e. from 425.3 mm at Chengam of drought is minimum (5 to 7 years per drought) over an area in the southwestern part of the district covering Chen
  • 119. remaining major portion of the district this frequency is high and is between 3 and 0-year normal fro m –3% at Tiruvannamalai to 8% at Arni. Two large stern and southeastern parts of the district respectively, al rainfall (0 to –5%). The remaining e in the seasonal normal rainfall in the the (5 to 10%); (viii) The trend of seasonal rainfall ranges from – 0.8410 mm/year at Tiruvannamalai to 1.2820 mm/year at Arni. A large area 42% at Wandavasi to 50% at Tiruvannamalai; iii) The probability of receiving excess rainfall over the district varies from 22% yyar, Tiruvannamalai and Wandavasi to 4 years per drought at Polur. It is the highest in the northeastern 00-year normal fro e 50-year normal ranges from -2% at Cheyyar to 5% at Polur. Chengam normal. An area around Cheyyar in the northeastern part and a small area in the extreme southwestern part stern part experienced a declining trend in easonal rainfall (0 to –1 mm/year). The remaining major part of the district experienced a rising trend (0 to 1mm/year) in the seasonal rainfall during the NE monsoon. 7.2.7 SOUTH EASTERN REGION ( Orissa ) 5 years per drought; (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that the departure of 10 the 50-year normal ranges fro areas, in the southwe experienced a decline in the normal annu portion of the district experienced a ris range of 0 to 10%. The area around Arni in the northern part experiencing maximum rise comprising almost the entire southern half of the district covering Chengam, Tiruvannamalai, Polur and Wandavasi experienced a declining trend in the seasonal rainfall. The remaining part of the district experienced a rising trend in seasonal rainfall in the range of 0 to 2 mm/year; Seasonal Rainfall (NE Monsoon) (i) During this season, the normal seasonal rainfall over the district varies from 399.5 mm at Chengam to 527.1 mm at Wandavasi; (ii) The chances of receiving normal seasonal rainfall vary from ( at Chengam to 26% at Polur; (iv) The coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall from the normal is very high (>40%) all over the district ranging from 40.8% at Polur to 45.4% at Wandavasi; (v) The total drought years over the district ranges from 28% at Polur to 35% at Tiruvannamalai. The entire district experienced drought conditions for more than 20% of the study period during the NE monsoon season. Hence, the entire district comes under the category “drought area”; (vi) The frequency of occurrence of drought is rather high over the district ranging from 3 years per drought at Arni, Chengam, Che and eastern parts beyond Arni, Cheyyar and Wandavasi and in the southwestern part beyond Chengam and Tiruvannamalai. Over the rest of the district the frequency of occurrence of drought is in the range of 3-4 years per drought during the NE monsoon season; (vii) When the 50-year and 100-year normals of annual rainfall were compared, it is observed that the departure of 1 th experienced a negligible rise in the seasonal experienced a decline in the seasonal normal rainfall. The remaining major part of the district experienced a rise in the seasonal normal up to 4%. This rise is the maximum (4 to 6%) around Polur; (viii) The trend of seasonal rainfall ranges from –0.4787 mm/year at Chengam to 0.6163 mm/year at Wandavasi. A large area around Chengam and Tiruvannamalai in the southwestern part and another area around Cheyyar in the northea s Block wise monthly rainfall data for all the 30 districts were collected and compiled upto 2005. The exixting database is updated and strengthened for use
  • 120. by various users. Also rainfall data of IMD stations from IMD office, Bhubaneswar were collected. e agency (Directorate of Economics and Statistics, Govt. of Andhra Pradesh) and central agency (India te compared to last year. b) Rainfall departure map: mean of June-May (1997-2006) w.r.t June-May 2007. June2006-Aug2006 w.r.t June2007-Aug 2007 Most parts of the Telangana region, southern parts of Chittoor, North and western Telangana, Parts of East Godavari, Visakhapatnam and nd the rest of the state fall. est rainfall of 415mm and Tirupathi 7.2.8 SOUTHERN REGION ( Andhra Pradesh ) Collected and compiled daily rainfall data from stat Meteorological Department) for 1127 mandals and 32 IMD stations for the period 2007-08. Updated the data into GEMS database. Daily – mandal-wise rainfall data of Srikakulam b) Adilabad c) Kurnool c) Anantapur d) Chittoor e) Kadapa Districts was updated up to 2006 since inception in GEMS software. Compiled and analyzed rainfall data in support of Ground Water Regime Studies during the months of May 2007, Aug 2007, November 2007 and January 2008. The analysis involved preparation of following eight maps. a) Rainfall departure map: June2005-May2006 w.r.t June2006-May 2007 Deficient rainfall observed in almost entire sta Deficient rainfall observed in the entire state compared to last decade except in the northern Telengana and northern part of coastal Andhra parts of eastern coastal Andhra. c) Rainfall departure map: Visakhapatnam and Srikakulam districts have received less rainfall compared to last year and rest of the state more rainfall. d) Rainfall departure map: mean of June-Aug (1997-2006) w.r.t June-Aug 2007. Chittoor received less rainfall compared to last year a received more rainfall. e) Rainfall departure map: June2006-Oct2006 w.r.t June2007-Oct 2007 Entire state received more rainfall compared to last year except in the northern Telangana region. f) Rainfall departure map: mean of June-Oct (1997-2006) w.r.t June-Oct 2007. Parts of northern Telangana, parts of Kadapa, Prakasam, Chittoor,Mahabubnagar have received less rainfall and the rest of the state more rain g) Rainfall departure map: Jun2006-Dec2006 w.r.t Jun2007-Dec 2007 Except northern parts of Telangana ,entire state received more rainfall compared to last year. h) Rainfall departure map: mean of Jun-Dec (1997-2006) w.r.t Jun-Dec 2007. Except parts of Prakasam, Kadapa , Chittoor and North-Telengana, entire state received more rainfall. Monthly, seasonal and annual rainfall of 2007 compiled from daily weather reports of India Meteorological Department and its analysis. The annual mean rainfall of the state is 994mm (9% more than normal), of which state mean seasonal rainfall during the southwest monsoon is 755mm (76% of annual) and northeast monsoon is 215mm(22% of the annual). The variation of the annual rainfall is 29%, which is high. Kadapa recorded low
  • 121. recorded highest rainfall of 1492mm. The annual rainfall in Coastal region is 1131mm(12% more than normal), Telangana region is 877mm (11% less than normal) and Rayalaseema region is 912mm(23% more than normal). The southwest monsoon season rainfall, from June to September, in Coastal region is 782mm, in Telangana region 766mm and in Rayalaseema region 678mm. It is 40% more than normal, 4% less than normal and 74% more than normal nt studies in The annual normal rainfall is the district is 1153mm, of which southwest monsoon contributes 784mm(68% of annual) in 57 rainy days. The rainfall increases from 852mm in Dendaluru to 1393mm in Achanta mandal. Annual rainfall at Nidadavolu ranges from 463mm (-59% of normal) in 2002 to 1508mm(+34%) in 1994. The area is not drought prone as per the analysis. Compiled the rainfall and analysis in support of Anantapur, Nalgonda, Kurnool, West Godavari, Medak, Rangareddy, Mahabubnagar districts. The analysis involved a) Mandal-wise normal rainfall and its statistical analysis, b) Table giving mean monthly normal values of hydrometeorological parametersand c) Brief write-up on climatic and the area is 618mm, of which 444mm is contributed by the southwest monsoon and 142mm is by northeast monsoon. The monthly rainfall distribution in Midjil mandal for the period 1987 to 2007 is analysed and the average rainfall for the period is 636mm with slandered deviation 164mm and coefficient of variation 26%. During this period drought conditions prevailed in 5years only i.e.1993, 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2006.Normal rainfall occurred in 8 out of 21years. in the office premises to record rainfall. 7.2.9 ll, data pertaining to the year 2007 was collected from various central and state departments. The same is compiled and respectively. Analysis of rainfall data in support of district ground water manageme West Godavari district. The analysis involves: a) Mandal-wise annual rainfall and its statistical analysis b) Monthly, seasonal actual rainfall of the district (2000-2006) c) Isohyetal map – normals d) Drought analysis e) Nidadavolu rainfall analysis with graph f) Narsapur rainfall analysis with graph g) Bar diagram with mean monthly normal hydrometeorological parameters h) Write-up. rainfall conditions in the district. Analysis of Midjil micro-watershed rainfall data in support of ground water resource estimation studies was carried out. The annual normal rainfall in Analysis of hydrometeorological data in support of Reappraisal survey reports of a) Parts of West Godavari district b) Parts of Khammam district, c) Parts of Guntur district d) Rajendranagar mandal – special study. Prepared site for Hydrometeorological Observatory in the office premises. Installed one Self- Recording Rain gauge SOUTH WESTERN REGION ( Karnataka ) Planning and execution of hydrological and hydro meteorological work is basically undertaken. The work involved collection, compilation, analysis and interpretation of all relevant data. During this year rainfa
  • 122. computerised with a view to efficient management and retrieval. Presently rainfall data is available from 1901 to 2007. Draft Guidelines on Hydrometeorology were finalised and the same are being one Water Management Training Programmes organised. Papers were presented relevant to 7.2.9.1 Koppala, Raichur, Belgaum, Bagalkote, Bijapur, Gadag, Haveri and Dharwad districts and normal in Gulbarga and Bidar districts. Among the 69 Northeast Monsoon Season (October – December) ks and scanty in 2 taluks. Last year for the same period Koppala, Raichur, Gadag, Haveri and Dharwad districts and scanty in Gulbarga, scrutinized. In addition data analysis and interpretation was carried out for periodic NHS reports, Hydrogeological survey reports and resources estimation reports. During the year participated one Mass Awareness programme and the districts where the programmes were held. Participated in various in house discussions on the application of hydro meteorological studies in relation to Hydrogeological studies. RAINFALL DISTRIBUTION DURING 2007 South west Monsoon Season (June – September) South Interior Karnataka : The South-West monsoon rainfall was excess in Bangalore urban, Kolar, Tumkur, Chitradurga, Davanagere and Mysore districts and normal in Bangalore rural, Chamarajanagara and Mandya districts. Among the 63 taluks, rainfall was excess in 41 taluks and normal in 22 taluks. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 1 taluk, normal in 19 taluks, deficit in 37 taluks and scanty in 6 taluks. North Interior Karnataka : The South-West Monsoon rainfall was excess in Bellary, taluks, rainfall was excess in 44 taluks, normal in 24 taluks and deficit in one taluk. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 7 taluks, normal in 30 taluks, deficit in 31 taluks and scanty in one taluk. Malnad Region: The Cumulative rainfall was excess in all the 4 districts of this region. Among the 25 taluks, rainfall was excess in 22 taluks, and normal in 3 taluks. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 8 taluks, normal in 14 taluks and deficit in 3 taluks. Coastal Region: The Cumulative rainfall was excess in Uttara Kannada district and normal in Dakshina Kannada and Udupi districts. Among the 19 taluks, rainfall was excess in 7 taluks and normal in 12 taluks. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 2 taluks, normal in 16 taluks and deficit in one taluk. South Interior Karnataka: The Cumulative rainfall was excess in Chitradurga district, normal in Bangalore urban, Bangalore rural, Davanagere, Chamarajanagara, Mysore and Mandya districts while it was deficit in Kolar and Tumkur districts. Among the 63 taluks, rainfall was excess in 12 taluks, normal in 31 taluks, deficit in 18 talu rainfall was excess in 5 taluks, normal in 16 taluks, deficit in 38 taluks and scanty in 4 taluks. North Interior Karnataka : The Cumulative rainfall was deficit in Bellary,
  • 123. Bidar, Belgaum, Bagalkote and Bijapur districts. Among the 69 taluks, rainfall was excess in one taluk, normal in 6 taluks, deficit in 25 taluks, scanty in 36 taluks and no rainfall in one taluk. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 5 ulative rainfall was excess in Udupi district, deficit in Dakshina Kannada and Uttara Kannada districts. Among the 19 taluks, rainfall mpared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. reservoir decreased by 0.49 foot servoir during 8 days under onsideration was highest on 2nd Oct’ 07 i.e. 2183 Cusecs. ls at Harangi and Hemavathi reservoirs have all these reservoirs are higher compared a e h taluks, normal in 13 taluks, deficit in 34 taluks and scanty in 17 taluks. Malnad Region : The Cumulative rainfall was excess in Hassan district and normal in Shimoga, Chikkamagalur and Kodagu districts. Among the 25 taluks, rainfall was excess in 7 taluks, normal in 14 taluks and deficit in 4 taluks. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 3 taluks, normal in 7 taluks, deficit in 12 taluks and scanty in 3 aluks. Coastal Region : The Cum was excess in 2 taluks, normal in 8 taluks, deficit in 8 taluks and scanty in one taluk. Last year for the same period rainfall was excess in 11 taluks, normal in 3 taluks, deficit in 4 taluks and scanty in one taluk. YDROLOGYH Major Reservoir levels in the state (June –September 2007) : Hydroelectric generation reservoirs: The levels at Linganamakki and Varahi reservoirs have decreased since last 8 days. The level at Supa reservoir is less hen cow The level at Linganamakki reservoir decreased by 0.30 foot since last 8 days. The present level is higher by 13.05 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 0.20 foot compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 2nd Oct’ 07 i.e. 10477 Cusecs. The level at Supa reservoir increased by 1.34 feet since last 8 days. The present level is more by 50.48 feet compared to 10 years average level and less by 8.33 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 1st ct’ 07 i.e. 7586 Cusecs. The level at VarahiO since last 8 days. The present level is more by 17.39 feet compared to 10 years average level and higher by 0.85 foot compared to the previous year level for the orresponding period. The inflow of water into the rec c Reservoirs of Cauvery Basin: The leve decreased since last 8 days. The levels in to verage levels and previous year levels for the corresponding period. The KRS reservoir level has remained same (Full) since last 8 days. The present lev l is more by 5.53 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 4.28 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 5th Oct’ 2007 i.e. 7012 Cusecs. The Harangi reservoir decreased by 0.93 foot since last 8 days. The present level is igher by 4.34 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 2.48 feet
  • 124. compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of er into the reservoir during 8 days under considewat ration was highest on 1st Oct’ he The was highest on 2nd Oct’ 07 i.e. 8470 Cusecs. The Hemavathi reservoir level decreased slightly by 0.99 foot since last 8 days. The present level is more by 13.25 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 0.69 foot compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 1st Oct’ 07 i.e. 4031 Cusecs. The level at Supa reservoir is less compared to previous year levels for the corresponding period. Almost all the major reservoirs in the State have reached their respective maximum levels. Major Reservoir levels in the state (October –November 2007): Hydroelectric generation reservoirs: The levels at Supa, Linganamakki and Varahi reservoirs havedecreased since last 8 days. In Linganamakki reservoir level is more when compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The level at Linganamakki reservoir has decreased by 1.29 feet since last 8 days. The present level is higher by 11.63 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 0.21 foot compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 2nd Dec’ 07 i.e. 1508 Cusecs. The level at Supa reservoir decreased by 3.97 feet since last 8 days. The present level is more by 43.74 feet compared to 10 years average level and less by 3.61 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on on 2nd Dec’ 07 i.e 609 Cusecs. The level at Varahi reservoir decreased by 1.90 feet since last 8 days. The present level is more by 10.69 feet compared to 10 years average level and less by 1.94 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. Reservoirs of Cauvery Basin: The levels at K.R.S., Kabini, Harangi and Hemavathi ays. The levels in all these reservoirs are higher compared to average levels and previous year levels for the corresponding t KRS reservoir decreased by 1.08 feet since last 8 days. The present level is more by 5.62 feet compared to 10 years average level and more 07 i.e. 1716 Cusecs. The Kabini reservoir level has decreased by 0.65 foot since last 8 days. T present level is more by 2.46 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 0.33 foot compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration reservoirs have decreased since last 8 d period. The level a by 8.04 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 29th Nov’ 07 i.e. 2694 Cusecs. The Harangi reservoir decreased by 5.04 feet since last 8 days. The present level is higher by 7.70 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 7.88 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of
  • 125. water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 27th Nov’ 07 i.e. 591 Cusecs. Reservoirs of Krishna Basin: The levels in the reservoirs of Krishna basin i.e., nce last 8 days. The levels in these reservoirs are higher compared to the average levels for the corresponding period. In Bhadra esent level is higher by 12.84 feet compared to 10 years average level and more by 4.23 feet mp year level fo low of ter into the reservoir during 8 days under hest on 26th ’ 7 i.e. 1050 Cusecs. Tu voir, level decreased by 1.09 feet since last 8 days. The rese 4.60 feet compared to 10 years average level and more y 4 compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. he of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was ighe ’ 07 i.e. 2701 Cusecs. G abha reservoir, level decreased by 2.88 fe ince last 8 days. The rese is more by 0.47 foot compared to 10 years average level and also ore feet compared to the previous year l for the corresponding rio M , there was decrease in leve 1.17 feet since last 8 ys. t level is more by 12.44 feet compared to 10 years average level d by 5.91 feet compared to the p year level for the rre g period. In Almatti reservoir, there was ease in level by 1.11 et s ays. The present level is less by eet compared to the evi or the corresponding period. Na ra reservoir, there was decrease in leve 0.17 foot since last 8 ys. t level is less by 0.43 foot compared to 10 years average level d l 9 foot compared to the previous year or the corresponding rio nflow of water into the reservoir during under consideration as highest on 29th Nov’ 07 i.e. 10113 Cusecs. e l Varahi, Almatti and Narayanapura reservoirs are less compared pr ar levels for the corresponding period. The Kabini reservoir level decreased by 0.59 foot since last 8 days. The present level is higher by 2.93 feet compared to 10 years average and more by 2.47 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 27th Nov’ 07 i.e. 1678 Cusecs. The Hemavathi reservoir level decreased by 2.18 feet since last 8 days. The present level is more by 14.88 feet compared to 10 years average level and higher by 9.69 feet compared to the previous year level for the corresponding period. The inflow of water into the reservoir during 8 days under consideration was highest on 29th Nov’ 07 i.e. 1387 Cusecs. Bhadra, Tungabhadra, Ghataprabha, Malaprabha, Almatti and Narayanapura reservoirs have decreased si reservoir, level decreased by 0.02 foot since last 8 days. The pr co ared to the previous r the corresponding period. The inf wa consideration was hig Nov 0 In ngabhadra reser p nt level is higher by b .37 feet T inflow h st on 26th Nov In hatapr et s p nt level m by 2.78 evel pe d. In alaprabha reservoir l by da The presen an also more revious co spondin decr fe ince last 8 d ous year level f 1.97 f pr In rayanapu l by da The presen an ess by 0.9 level f pe d. The i 8 days w Th evel at Supa, to evious ye
  • 126. 7.2.1 E jasthan) Compilation and interpretation of hydrometeorological data of Dausa district completed. C d interpretation of hydrometeorologi ata of Dholpur district co C interpretation of hydrometeorolog l data of Sirohi district completed. Compilation and interpretation of rainfall data for the period 1971-2006 of all the rainguage stations in Rajasthan state completed. • Computerised monthly rainfall data of all raingauge stations of the State for the period June2006 to May2007. • Compiled short note on the hydrometeorological aspects of Sheo block of Barmer district, Bhinmal block of Jalore district. • Compiled a note on the hydrometeorology of the Rajasthan State for in corporation in the Ground Water Year Book 2006-07. • Updated rainfall data of all the raingauge stations of Rajasthan up to 2006. • Compiled note on the hydrometeorology of reappraisal area of Sirohi district. • Compiled note on hydrometeorology of Jaipur, Dausa, Jhunjhunu, Bhilwara, Jhalawar, and Chittorgarh districts for brochures of the respective district. 0 W STERN REGION (Ra • • ompilation an cal d mpleted. • ompilation and ica •
  • 127. 8. GROUND WATER LEVEL SCENARIO .1 INTRODUCTION: onitoring of ground water regime is an effort to obtain information on ground water levels and chemical quality through representative sampling. The primary objective of stablishing the ground water monitoring network stations is to record the response of round regime to the natural and anthropogenic stresses of recharge and discharge ology, climate, physiography, land use pattern and ydrologic characteristics. The natural conditions affecting the regime involve climatic arameters like rainfall, evapotranspiration etc., whereas anthropogenic influences nitored. Ground water samples are collected from these bservation wells once a year during the month of April/ May to obtain background ality changes on regional scale. The database thus enerated forms the basis for planning the ground water development and management e in coa l interfa is used ground water resources and changes in the regime consequent to v io The t and gr TAB E Sl Name of the State Total No. of Observation Wells 8 M e g parameters with reference to ge h p include pumpage from the aquifer, recharge due to irrigation systems and other practices like waste disposal etc. Ground water levels are being measured four times a year during January, April/ May, August and November. The regime monitoring started in the year 1969 by Central Ground Water Board . At present a network of 15640 observation wells located all over the country is being mo o information of ground water qu g programme. The ground water level and quality monitoring is of particular importanc sta as well inland saline environment to assess the changes in salt water/fresh water ce as also the gradual quality changes in the fresh ground water regime. This data for assessment of ar us development and management activities. S ate-wise distribution of the ground water observation wells is given in table 8.1 aph is given in fig. 8.1 & 8.2. L 8.1 : STATEWISE DISTRIBUTION OF OBSERVATION WELLS No. (as on 31.03.2008) States 1 Andhra Pradesh 981 2 Arunachal Pradesh 19 3 Assam 381 4 Bihar 373 5 Chhatishgarh 516 6 Delhi 87 7 Goa 53 8 Gujarat 966 9 Haryana 426 10 Himachal Pradesh 85 11 Jammu & Kashmir 206 12 Jharkhand 208 13 Karnataka 1499 14 Kerala 864 15 Madhya Pradesh 1325 16 Maharashtra 1496
  • 128. Sl Name of the State Total No. of Observa ells (as on 31.03.20 ) tion W No. 08 17 Manipur 25 18 Meghalaya 38 19 Nagaland 17 20 Orissa 1214 21 Punjab 261 22 Rajasthan 1373 23 Tamil Nadu 906 24 Tripura 42 25 Uttar Pradesh 1218 26 Uttaranchal 44 27 West Bengal 909 UTs 1 an & Nicober 63Andam 2 Chandigarh 16 3 Dadra & nagar Haveli 10 4 Daman & Diu 4 5 Pondicherry 15 Total 15,640
  • 129. 9. L S UDIES Application of geophysical techniques is essential for adequate understanding of the sub- surfa cal characters. As such, the board undertakes geophysical inves rt and supplement hydrogeological surveys, ground water explo upply investigations as an integral part of its activities. Besid hysical techniques wer ertaken to demarcat -fresh water terface, thickness of overburden, favorable sites for artificial recharge studies and edrock configuration etc. Cell • progress of geophysical work. • Acquisition of s and organizing performance testing of Geophysical equipments. • Co ordination of Geophysical Surveys and relate ties. Preparation of i f equipments ifferent Re ffces and A ent of present capability of Board as regards instrumentation. During estigations, many assignments/wo 9.2. GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS Central Ground Water Board was entrusted wit S and 10 LKm of Resistivity Profiling. Against this target a total no. of 1834 VES and 147.275 LKm of Resistivity profiling were carried out. Apart from this a total no. of 154 boreholes were logged cally rent pa eters viz. SP, PR, 16” Natural Gamma. Details of Geophysical surveys & geophysical bore hole logging carried out in th ional of rnished below in Table 9.1 and Table9 GEOPHYSICA T ce hydrogeologi tigations to suppo ration and short term water s es, geop e also und e saline in b 9.1 Central Geophysical The Central Geophysical Cell undertook the following works during year 2007-2008: Planning & Programming of Geophysical surveys in CGWB, Finalization of AAP of different Regions for Geophysical investigation and monitoring of geophysical equipments, drawing of Specification d Activi nventory o in d gional O ssessm • Co-ordination of Training Activities for personnel in geophysical Survey and related items. the period under review, in addition to the routine field inv rks were attended by the Geophysical Section. AT A GLANCE h a target of 2145 nos. of VE geophysi with diffe ram & 64” Normals and e reg fices are fu .2. Table 9 FACE GEOPHYSICAL STU RING 20 008 REGION NO. OF VES RESISTIVITY PROFILES ) .1: SUR DIES DU 07-2 (Line Km NWHR, Jammu -44 NWR, Chandigarh -89 WR, Jaipur 99 - WCR, Ahmedabad 52 24.72 NCR, Bhopal 127 63.9 NCCR, R 0aipur - CR, Nag 52pur - NR, Luc 57know - MER, Pa 156tna 3.480 ER, Kolk 100ata 29.7 NER, Gu 64wahati -
  • 130. SER, Bhubneswar 100 - SR, Hyderabad 305 22.9 SWR, Bangalore 270 - SECR, Chennai 151 60.4 KR, Trivendrum 115 2.115 NHR, Dharamshala 0 - UR, Utterakhand 53 - TOTAL 1834 147.275 Table 9.2: BOREHOLE LOGGING DURING 2007-08 REGION No. of Boreholes logged Total meterage logged (m) NWHR, Jammu 36 6032 NWR, Chandigarh 19 2201 WR, Jaip 1720ur 12 WCR, Ahmedabad 284814 NCR, Bhopal 08 1209.93 NCCR, Raipur -0 CR, Nagpur 0 - NR, Lucknow 09 2151 MER, Patna 09 1313 ER, Kolkata 09 2096.5 NER, Guwahati 02 310 SER, Bhubneswar 07 1128 SR, Hyderabad 36 - SWR, Bangalore 0 - SECR, Ch 06ennai 1910 KR, Trive 0 -ndrum NHR, Dha la 0 -ramsha TOTAL 167 9.432291 9.3 N urface geophysical surveys were mostly carried out with an objective of selection & for ground water exploration and short term water supply vestigations. Borehole geophysical loggings were also conducted by measuring the 4 Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) have been carried out in 9.3.2. OLE LOGGING: A l of 36 Electrical loggin re conducted in 36 boreholes drilled in the Kashmir Valley, with total depth logged being 6032m. The district wise details of boreholes logged along with the depth drilled and depth logged is given in Table 9.3 WHR, Jammu S pinpointing the sites in Spontaneous Potential (SP), Single Point Resistance (SPR), Short Normal Resistivity (N16”) and Long Normal Resistivity (N64”) parameters for deciphering the thickness of water bearing granular zones, demarcating clay horizons etc. for recommending the well assembly design for the boreholes drilled in Kashmir Valley. 9.3.1. Resistivity Surveys: A total of 4 the Jammu district. BOREH tota gs we .
  • 131. Table 9.3: District-wi etails of Boreholes Lo in Jammu & Kashmir State. se D gged Sl. No. DISTRICT NUMBER OF BOREHOLES LOGGED DRILLED DEPTH m DEPTH LOGGED m 1. ANANTNAG 2 286.00 284 2. BARAMULLA 11 2111.93 2023 3. BUDGAM 7 1483.44 1169 4. KUPWARA 5 1111.14 924 5. PULWAMA 10 1844.97 1450 6. SRINAGAR 1 176.00 172 TOTAL 36 7013.48 6032 9.4 NW digarh 9.4.1 Resistivity Surveys: In total 89 Schlumberger Vertical Electrical Soundings ducted, out of which 84 VES were conducted in Punjab and Y SURVEYS STATE/ UT DISTRICT NO. Of Profile (Line Km.) Area covered (sq.Km) R, Chan (VES) were con remaining 5 VES were observed in Haryana around Kund as part of short term special studies. Details of surface geophysical studies are described in the Table 9.4: Table 9.4: DISTRICT WISE DETAILS OF RESISTIVIT VES Punjab ndhar Distr 26621.Julla ict 84 - - Haryana 1. Kund, (Kalayat block, di thal) 5 1strict Kai - Total 89 - 2663 .4.2. BOREHOLE LOGGING: A total of 19 explor9 atory/ piezeometers boreholes were d during the AAP 2007-08 out of which two boreholes each are located in Haryana and Punjab and thirteen boreholes in Delhi. The total metrege Table 9.5: District wise details Borehole Logging geophysically logge of all the boreholes logging conducted in entire North Western Region is 2201 m which are given in table 9.5. District No. of Boreholes logged Total meterege of borehole logged Punjab State 1. Jalandhar 2. Gurdaspur 1 1 442 Haryana State 1. Yamuna Nagar 3902 Delhi State 136915 TOTAL 19 2201
  • 132. 9. Ahmedabad 9. ity Studies: A total of Vertical Ele undings ( 24.72 Km profiling under the re vity survey w ucted du 7-08 in Junagarh district of Gujarat State. The details are given in table 9.6. able 9.6: District-wise details VES Surveys 5. WCR, 5.1. Res Line istiv 52 sisti ctrical So ere cond VES) and ring 200 T District No. of VES Lines Kms Area covered (Km)2 Junagadh 52 24.72 1200 9.5.2 Borehole Logg in the State 7-08. Total meterage was 2848 km in var t wise Electrical Logg ed by the Departmental and State Govt. r through outsourcing en in table 9.7 & table 9.8. Table 9.7: District wise details of Borehole Logg (Departmental Logger) e Distr pth Drilled ) Meterage of bor es ing: A total 14 boreholes were geophysically logged during 200 s of ious districts. Distric detail Logge in uctgs cond are giv ing Sit ict No. of Boreholes De (m e hol logged logged Vachhu Jamnagar 1 150.00 115.00 Palaj G.Nagar 1 202.40 201.00 Navi revad Ja 135.00mnagar 1 140.00 Dh TOT 40 451AL 3 492. Table 9.8: Dis ct-wise detail rehole Logging tate Govt. Logger) trict No Boreholes logg Depth D m) Meterag bore holes logged tri s of Bo s (S Dis . of ed rilled ( e of Jamnagar 3 605.3 600.00 Gandhinagar 2 403.40 401.00 Sabarkantha 2 348 348 Patan 1 450 450.00 Mahesana 2 400 398.00 Ahmedabad 1 200 200.00 TOTAL 11 2406.70 2397 9 al Findin 52 VES were conduct d around the area of Keshod and M ol talukas consisting an approximate area of 1200 sq km. Preliminary study of field data reveals depth wise va in variable layers of resistivity indicating presence of brackish/saline water p to 10-18 km form the coast. .5.3 Geophysic gs ed in an angr riation below fresh water u
  • 133. 9 aipur 9.6.1.Resistivity Surveys: ical Elect l Sounding and one profiling under the resistivity survey was conducted during the A. - 08, details of which are given in table 9.9 Table 9.9: District wise break – up of surface Resistivity surveys State District No. of VES Area covered under (Km)2 .6. WR, J A total of 99 Vert rica A.P. 2007 . Rajasthan Alwar 82 70 Jaipur 15 15 Churu 2 2 TOTAL 99 87 9.6.2 ole geop Dur 07- measuring cummulative depth of 1720 m gged in rts of Rajasthan. The district wise geophysical bore hole logging details are given Table 9.10. Table9.10:D – up of Geophysical boreholes ing District No. of boreholes logged Total depth of eholes logged . Boreh hysical logging: ing A.A.P. 20 eters were lo 08 twelve pilot boreholes different pa in istrict wise break logg bor Alwar 3 272 Bikaner 1 200 Churu 1 78 Dausa 1 203 Hanum 1 197angarh Jaipur 2 173 Jaisalmer 3 597 TOTAL 12 1720 9.7. NCR, Bhopal 9.7.1. Resistivity Surveys: Surface resistivity surveys were conducted to unravel the subsurface hydrogeological condition in par Gwalior, Betul, Bhopal Satna, Mandla, to support the groundwater exploration programme and ts of and Chhattarpur districts augmentation of water supply to various government agencies. In total 127 Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) and 3.96 line-km Gradient Resistivity Profiling (GRP) were conducted which are given in table 9.11. Table 9.11: District Wise Details of Resistivity Surveys: District No. of VES Profiling line/km Gwalior 25 1.8 Betul 16 0.2 Bhopal 03 - Satna 49 - Mandla 26 0.16 Chhattarpur 08 1.8 Total 127 3.96 9 al Lo phy ogging of borehole was conducted in Shahpura, Bargawan an wan explor bservation borehole sites in Dindori di al 5 boreho dis he depth of boreholes were logged in the Dindori district is 813.59 m bgl. Three boreholes drilled at Beeja dandi and Phool .7.2. Geophysic gging: The geo sical l d Cherga atory/o strict. In tot les logged in the trict. T
  • 134. S ct w gged. Th mulative depth of boreholes logged in the Mandla district is 396 ich are described in table 9.12 . 12 ophisical boreholes logging agar in Mandla distri ere also lo .34 m bgl wh e cum Table 9. : District wise Ge District Nos. of boreholes logged Total depth of boreholes logged in (m) Dindori 05 813.59 Mandla 03 396.34 Total 08 1209.93 9. , Nagpur 9.8.1. Resistivity Surveys: Electric surv carried e potential water bearing zones to esti alluvium thickness and for ex drilling f Buldha istrict. In to rtical Ele Soundings (V uldhana Schlumberger configur e carried out against the istrict No. of VES Area covered in sq.km 8 CR al resistivity mate the eys were out to delineat to select sites ploratory in parts o na d tal 52 Ve ctrical ES) in B district with ation wer target of 50 VES. The district wise details are given in table 9.13. Table 9.13: District wise details of VES D Buldhana 52 1300 Total 52 1300 9.8.2. Findings of the Geophysical studies: Preliminary interpreted results from Buldhana district show that the alluvial thickness in the northern parts of the district extends up to 100 m and at places it extends up to even 300m. 9.9 NR, Lucknow 9.9.1 y Surveys: Geophysical surveys we of river Gomti, Gosaiganj block, Lucknow rict - to delineate fresh water aquifers and define t yer characteristics for the purpose of artific harge over an area measuri and 57 VES were taken. 9.9.2 G gging: Borehole geophysical logging 9 boreholes, as per regular exploration programme, was done for the delineation of fresh ground water zones and demarcation of thick clay zones for the purpose of cement sealing in the Arsenic ffected area / districts (to prevent hydraulic continuity of overlying brackish / saline Table 9.14: Details of Borehole logging Distri drilled in m Depth Logged (mbgl) Resistivit re carried out on the Right Bank dist he top la ial rec ng 50 sq. kms eophysical Lo of 0 a formation water), if any, for successful construction of tubewells. The details are given in table 9.14. Geophysical logging was also undertaken in Balia district for a depth of 350m bgl by MER, Patna. ct No. of Boreholes Depth logged Ghaziabad 401.9 401.001 Gautambuddh 05 754.5 749a nagar Lakhmiapurkheri 01 361.0 360 Meerut 01 452.9 5.044 Pratapgarh 01 196.0 196 TOTAL 09 2166.3 51.021
  • 135. 9.10 ER, Kolkata .10.1 Resistivity Surveys: A total of 100 Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) and 5 ct No. of VES Profiling Line kms 9 profiling under the resistivity survey was conducted during 2007-08, details are given in table 9.15. Table 9.15: District wise details of VES Distri North 24 34 VES 20.4 Parganas 35 VES 1 Bardhaman 11 VES & 2 profiling 6.6 Puruliya 20 VES & 3 Profiling 1.7 TOTAL 100 VES & 5 Profiling 29.7 9.10.2 Bore hole logging:A total of 9 nos. of borehole were electrically logged in West Bengal. Electrical logging details and findings are given in table 9.16. District No. of b electrically logged Depth d (mbgl) tera Table 9.16: Details of Borehole logging orehole rilled Me ge logged (m) Malda 2 201 195 Haora 2 598.6 588.5 Dakshin Dinajpur 1 No 222 222 Nort anas 2 Nos. 675.6 531h 24 Parg Sou Paraganas 2 Nos 568.31 560th 24 TOTAL 09 2265.51 2096.5 9.11 MER, Patna 9.11.1 Resistiv ys: A total of 156 Vertic ical So ) and 3.5 line km of profiling have been cond the 7-0 etails of VES conducted in Bihar & Jharkhand are given in table 9.17. 7: District wise details of VES conducted States District S Pr in Line m ity Surve al Electr undings (VES 8. District wise ducted during AAP 200 Table 9.1 No. of VE ofiling Bihar Patna Rajgir Vaishali and Saran 14 01 43 - 600 200 Jehanabad Munger Jamui 08 09 12 - 600 Jharkhand Ranchi Koderma Simdega 41 14 14 - 1100 980 - TOTAL 156 3480
  • 136. 9.11.2 Borehole logging: A total of 9 nos. of borehole we lectrically log an tta c ndings ar Table 9.18 e logg States District/Location No. of bore wells logged otal th of bo ell ged (m) re e ged in Bihar d U r Pradesh. Electri al logging details and fi e given in table 9.18. :Location and depth of the bor hole ed T dep re w log Biha uxar a. Ar b. Chu r 02 180 140 r B junpur ramanpu 01 Bihar Samastipur a. Kancha b. VidyapatiNagar 02 01 165 232 Bihar Jamui a. Gunsagar 02 126 120 Uttar Pradesh Balia a. Balia 01 350 TOTAL 09 1313 9.11.3. Salient findings based on geophysical survey: The surveys carried out along the banks of rivers Gandak and Ganga. The study reveals that on either side of the river courses, the lithology is non homogeneous at shallow depths, while it is homogeneous at larger depths. 9.12 NER, Guwahati 9.12.1 Resistivity Surveys: A total of 64 Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) have been conducted. All these 64 VES have been taken up under short-term water supply investigation and for pinpointing of exploration sites to facilitate the construction of tube wells for augmentation of drinking water. The details are given in table 9.19. Table 9.19: District wise details of Surface Geophysical Surveys States District No. of VES Lines Kms Assam Kamrup 18 Assam Rangia 02 Assam Udalguri 03 Assam N.Lakhimpur 02 Assam Dhemaji 06 03 Profiling (230 m each) Meghalaya East Khasi Hills 05 Meghalaya Ribhoi 02 Meghalaya West Garo Hills, Tura 03 Arunachal Pradesh Itanagar, Papumpare 14 Arunachal Pradesh Rowing,Est Siang 09 9.12.2 Bore hole logging : The geophysical logging of boreholes were conducted in achar and Nagoan districts of Assam State. A total 2 boreholes were logged in different epths in Cachar and Nagoan districts which are given in table 9.20. C d
  • 137. Table 9.20: District wise details of Borehole Logging State District No. of boreholes Depth drilled ) Total depth of boreholes logged (m)logged (m Assam Cachar 2 18001 18 Assam Nagoan 01 200 130 9.12.3 Salient findings of geophysical studies: In soft rock areas, a sequence of sand e as in hard rock areas, compact fo been ti 9.13 SR, Hyderab 9.13.1 Resistivity Surveys: Over all, 305 Vertical Electrical Soundings (including 18 eep VES) and 22.9 line km of Gradient Resistivity Profiling, were conducted in parts of Table 9.21: District wise details of Surface Geophysical Surveys No. of VES Profiling in Line Kms and clay with varied thickness has been identified wher weathered and fracture zones, semi-compact and rmations have iden fied. ad D Guntur, Kurnool, Nizamabad, Visakhapatnam, West Godavari, Ranga Reddy and Mahaboobnagar districts. The details are given in table 9.21. District Guntur 54 0.9 Kurnool 34 19.0 Ranga Reddy 53 - Visakhapatnam 3 - West Godavari 51 2.0 Nizamabad 85 - Total 305 22.9 9.13.2 Borehole logging: A total o wells (23 exploratory wells and 1 ti un exp ry w nga R ict and 9 piezometer wells in Medak district covering hard rock areas were logged. The details are en in table 9.22. Table District wise tails Borehole logging District No. of borehol logge l depth of bore les logged ) Parameters logged f 36 bore loratoobserva on well in G tur district, 2 ells in Ra eddy distr giv 9.22: de es Tota ho d (m Medak 9 563 SP ”x64” Normals and Natural Gam , 16 ma Guntur 24 4049.6 S &64” Norm d Natural Gam P, 16” als an ma Rangareddy 2 341 SP, 16 ” Normals, tural Gamma ”&64 and Na TOTAL 36 4953.6 9.13.3 Other Activities: The data collected from Guntur district to study the major thrust zone that was deciphered the eastern margin of the Cuddapah basin is being interpreted and analysed and the report is underway. The report on the studies to elect sites for deep inal stage for submission. s boreholes in the Cuddapah basin, is also in f
  • 138. Southern Region conducted a course thods for Ground W ration Envi g Surface Resistivity Surveys” at Hyderab 9.14 eswar 9.14. ty Surveys: Resistivity Surveys comprisi 100 Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) were conducted with different objectives 2007-08. The details re given in table 9.23. t-wise details of Surface Geophysical Surveys District No. of VES Lines Kms Area covered training on “Advanced Geophysical Me ronmental Problems includinater Explo and related ad. SER, Bhuban 1 Resistivi ng of during a Table 9.23: Distric under (Km)2 Mayurbhanj 8 - 90 Nuapada 20 - 100 Cuttack 14 - 100 Puri 30 - 150 Ganjam 14 20 TOTAL 100 - 460 9.14.2 Borehole logging: The geophysical logging of boreholes Balasor stricts of Orissa State. A total 7 boreholes were logged in d e-Nauparhi a Cuttack districts wh given in table 9.24. Table 9. wise deta orehole Loggin No. boreholes logged Depth Drilled (m) B le Logging Depth (m) were conducted in e-Nauparhi and Cuttack di ifferent depths in Balasor nd ich are 24: District District ils of B of g ore Ho Balasore-Nauparhi 1 95 94 Cuttack 6 1060.79 1034 Total 7 1155.79 1128 T r 9.15.1 Resistivity S 270 Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) were con objectives during 2007-08. The details ar le 9 le 9.25:Di t Wise Det Of Geophysical S ys I. G ploration l.No Location Taluk Type of No. No. of sites d he logging results have deciphered the granular zones and suitable zones were ecommended for well assembly on the basis of log interpretations. 9.15 SWR, Bangalore urveys: Resistivity Surveys comprising of ducted in Karnataka State with different e given in tab .25. ailsTab stric urve round Water Ex : S District soundin g VES recommende for drilling 1. Uttara Kannada Honnavar, Ankola and VES 21 05 Kumta 2. Bidar Humnabad, Basavakalayan VES 48 09 and Bhalki 3. VES 32 08Chitradurga Hiriyur 4. Kolar Srinivasapura VES 55 06 5. Arsikere 0 -Hassan Chennarayanapatna and VES 9
  • 139. Logging at Balasore District Resistivity Survey at Puri District
  • 140. II.Sh Sl. No Locat Distri sounding VES profiles sites for drilling ort–term Water supply investigation: ion ct Taluk Type of No. No. of Recommended 1. South Bangalore Bangalore North and VES 24 - 10 9.15.2 Borehole logging: One exploratory well at malur in Malur taluk of Kolar district was el c and 64” and 9.16 SECR 9.16.1 Res the AAP 2007-08, the Surface geophysical target was 150 (V geophysical ctrical Soundings were conduc d in locations selected on the basis of hydrogeological studies. The geophysical District-wise details / break-up are furnished in Table 9.26. Sl.No ST VES LINE KM AREA COVERED (SQ.KM) ectri ally logged up to 360 m depth for Point Resistance, Normal Resistivity 16 “ Self potential. , Chennai istivity Surveys: During ES) Vertical Electrical Soundings under different heads of studies. Surface surveys comprising of 151 (VES) Vertical Ele te target had been achieved in time. Table 9.26: District-wise details / break-up. ATE/UT DISTRICT NO. Of 1 Villupuram 97 38.8 145.5 2 Vellur 6 2.4 9 3 Chennai 4 1.6 6 4 Tamil Nadu Cuddalore 3 1.2 4.5 5 Puducherry Puducherry 41 16.4 61.5 Total 151 60.4 226.5 9.16.2 Bo deploy n of Sponta sedimentary strata encountered in mud filled boreholes. District-wise details / break-up are furnished in Table 9.27. D rehole Logging: Electrical logging of pilot boreholes was carried out by ing i digenous UPTRON logging unit for recording the basic geoelectric parameters neous potential, Point Resistance and Normal / Lateral Resistivity of various Table 9.27:District-wise details of Borehole Logging ISTRICT NO.OF BOREHOLES LOGGED TOTAL DEPTH OF BOREHOLES LOGGED IN METERS Perambalur / Ariyalur 4 1127 Nagappatinam 1 448 Cuddalore 1 245 TOTAL 6 1910
  • 141. 9.17 KR, Trivendrum 9.17.1 Resistivity Surveys: Resistivity Surveys comprising of 117 Vertical Electrical oundings (VES) and 2.115 line kms were conducted in Kerala with different objectives uring 2007-08. The details are given in table 9.28. Table 9.28: District Wise Details Of Resistivity Survey District No. of VES Line Kms of Resistivity Profiling S d 3THIRUVANANTHAPURAM KOLLAM 114 2.115 TOTAL 117 2.115 9.18 UR, Dehradun 9.18.1 Resistivity Surveys:A total of 53 VES were carried out in parts of Dehradun and Pauri districts of Uttarakhand. Out of these, 14 VES were carried out for short term water supply investigation for agencies like Uttarakhand Jal Sansthan, Central Public Works Department (CPWD), Medical College Srikot (Srinagar), Dehradun Township and 39 VES were carried out in the Asan and Song Catchments for systematic coverage of Doon Valley in grid pattern. The details are given in table 9.29. Table 9.29: District-wise details of VES District No. of VES Lines km Area covered under (km2 ) Dehradun 50 -- 900 Pauri Garhwal 03 -- 2.25 9.19 Geophysical Reports Published: The following geophysical reports have been ublished by various Regions 5. Report on Electrical Logs of Exploratory Boreholes Drilled During AAP 2006-07 & in Ka hmir V NW : Entire Surface geophysica ta per g to B oab ( b) and ther areas where surface resistivity surveys were conducted during AAP 20 -08, were p 9.19.1 NHWR, Jammu: 1. Geophysical Resistivity Surveys for Ground Water Exploration at Sumbli, Tehsil: Samba, District: Jammu (J&K) - ISSUED. 2. Hydrogeological and Geophysical Surveys for Ground Water Feasibility at BOP Alla Mai Kothi, Tehsil: R. S. Pura, District: Jammu (J&K) - ISSUED. 3. Resistivity Surveys for Ground Water Feasibility at Birpur Army Area, District: Jammu (J&K) - ISSUED. 4. Compilation of Electrical Logs of Kathua and Udhampur Districts of J&K- SUBMITTED. 2007-08 s alley (J&K)-SUBMITTED. 9.19.2 R, Chandigarh 1. l da tainin ist D Punja o 07
  • 142. processed. Detailed report on surface geophys Bist Doab b was prepared and subm Fin of R ity Su eys under specia dies i nd in Haryana was prepared and submitted. 9.3 NC opa . Characterisation of Aquifer and Lit its through Surfa esistivi in Jaora Over- ited Bl stric dhya sh. . Geophysical chapter of MP ate groundwater r t. 3. Hy logi Geo for Augmenta of Wat Supply Morar Cantt, Gwalior I. Hy logi Geo for Augmentation of Water Supply to Morar Cantt, Gwalior II. 5. Hydrogeologic d Geo cal survey for Augmentation of Water Supply to Air F ation M jpur, ior. 9.19.4 C pur: 1. Submitted the report entitled “Report on electrical resistivity surveys in the over 2. s Report for the geophysical Surveys from 1976 to 2007 in d. District, 9 (i) Report in connection with geophysical studies carried out in and around ort Term Investigation and submitted. Report on Geoelectrical investigations for the delineation of fresh water lenses in the coastal areas of West Godavari district. 2. Report on geophysical logging of Piezometers, Medak district. ical studies in of Punja itted. 2. dings esistiv rv l stu n Ku 9.1 R, Bh l: 1 ho-Un tlam Di c Re ty Technique Explo ock of Ra t, Ma e r Prade 2 st po drogeo cal and physical survey tion er to 4. drogeo cal and physical survey al an physi orce St ahra Gwal R, Nag exploited areas of Morshi and Warud talukas, Amravati district (AAP 2006-07)” Preparation of Statu the Central Region, Nagpur. Two reports on Geophysical Surveys were issue 3. Electrical Resistivity Surveys in parts of Akola District. 4. Electrical Resistivity Surveys in parts of Washim 5. Compilation of surface geophysical data collected from Buldhana district is underway. Recommendations were given for selected sites in connection with the exploratory drilling. .19.5 NR, Lucknow: 1. Aquifer Geometry along Ganga River from Buxar – Mokama Section, Bihar. 2. Inland Groundwater Salinity in Uttar Pradesh. 9.19.6 ER, Kolkata: Pakdah, Barasat II, North 24 Parganas district under specisl study and submitted. (ii) Report of geophysical investigation carried out at DVC area, Andal, Barddhaman in connection with Short Term Investigation and submitted. (iii) Report of geophysical investigation carried out at Thermal Power Plant, Raghunathpur, Purulia in connection with Sh (iv) Report of surface geophysical investigation carried out at Bishnupur, Bankura in connection with Short Term Investigation and submitted. 9.19.7 SR, Hyderabad: 1.
  • 143. 3. Report on geophysical surveys carried out in parts of Nizamabad district. 4. Report on selection of suitable sites for Exploratory wells in Guntur district for the AAP 2007-2008. 5. Geophysical status report comprising activities, achievements and future plan of field studies in respect of Southern Region. 9.19.8 SER, Bhubaneswar: 1. All the three Short-term water supply investigation reports on the Resistivity surveys in Bhubaneswar and Ganjam districts were prepared with recommendations etc and submitted. 2. All the seven reports on the Geophysical logging of the exploratory bore holes in Balasore and Cuttack dis cts were prepared and submitted for construction of production wells. 9.19.9 SWR, Bangalore: 1. Interim report on Geophysical surveys carried out in Hiriyur taluk of Chitradurga district. 2. Interim report on Geophysical surveys carried out in Srinivaspur taluk, Kolar district. 3. Interim report on Geophysical surveys carried out in Bhalki, Humnabad and Basavakalyan taluks of Bidar district. 4. Report on Geophysical survey carried out in Challakere, Chitradurga and Holalkere taluks of Chitradurga district(AAP-2005-’06) 5. Interim Report on Geophysical survey carried out in Uttara Kannada district. 6. Interim Report on Geophysical survey carried out in Malur taluk, Kolar district. 7. Report on Geophysical survey carried out in Air Force campus, Chimni hills, Bangalore. 8. Interim Report on Geophysical survey carrie dout in CR Patna taluk of Hassan district. 9. Report on Geophysical surveys carried out under water supply investigation programme in the premises of BSF, Karahalli, Bangalore district. 10. Report on Geophysical survey carried out in Davanagere district. 0 SECR. Chennai: Reports on surface geophysical surveys conducted in parts of Karur, Dharmapuri and Krishnagiri districts as well as surveys conducted in Vellore and Chennai districts as part of Short-Term Investigations had been submitted and issued. tri 9.19.1
  • 144. 10. HYDROCHEMICAL STUDIES Central Ground Water Board has 16 well-equipped Regional Chemical Laboratories to carry out chemical analysis of major and minor inorganic constituents in water samples. All the Chemical Laboratories are well equip ed to carry out Basic analysis & Heavy and Toxic elements determinations using soph ticated instruments like Digital PC based Spectrophotometer, Flame Photometer, pH meter, Conductivity meter, Ion meter, Nephelometer and Atomic Absorption S eter (AAS). Laboratories are provided with Electronic Monopan and Top Loading Balances, Deionizer, Double Distillation Plant, Hot Air Oven, Water Bath, Magnetic Stirrers and hot plates. Four Regional Laboratories at Kolkata, Hyderabad, Lucknow and Raipur are also equipped with Gas Chromatograph (GC) to undertake the analysis of organic pollutants (Pesticides) at µg/l level and Chemical Laboratory at Hyderabad is additionally equipped with Inductive Coupled Plasma Spectrometer (ICPS) to undertake sequential analysis of the multiple toxic elements with high accuracy. The Laboratory at Kolkata also has Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyzer. Some laboratories are equipped with equipment to carry out biological and bacteriological analysis. The chemical data generated by these laboratories is utilized for monitoring and evaluating th nd water quality in compliance with National Standards for designated use to study the impact of anthropogenic activities on ground water quality to demarcate critical reas where water quality deterioration has been observed & areas vulnerable to quality deterioration and to assess point and non- point sources of ground water pollution for taking necessary action for management of ground water resources. uring 20 sic, 643 e Heavy metals such as As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, n nic analysis. In addition to analytical work, chemists from various Laboratories have participated in mass awareness rogramme and Trade fairs and have prepared posters, handouts and diagrams on water quality for display. They have demonstrated the testing of various chemical parameters present in water and their impact on human body. The importance of water quality in artificial recharge to ground water through rain water harvesting and water quality for drinking, agricultural and industrial purposes have also been explained to progressive farmers, visitors and students. The details of water samples analyzed by different Chemical Laboratories are given in table 10.1. able 10.1: Region wise Water Samples Analysis Basic Analysis Specific Analysis Heavy Metals Organic p is pectrophotom e grou a D 07-08, about 17566 ground water samples have been analyzed for Ba sampl s for Specific analysis, 2341 samples for e, M , Ni, Pb and Zn and 104 samples for orgaF p T Sl. No. egion Samples Constituents Samples Constituents Samples Constituents Samples Constituents R 1. NWHR 542 6258 80 960 96 740 - - 2. NWR 1426 19302 - - 175 975 - - 3. WCR 1285 20560 - - 215 313 - - 4. WR 1221 19246 49 577 - - - - 5. NCR 1394 18122 - - 148 1332 - - 6. NCCR 624 8112 - - 206 270 - - 7. CR 1628 15898 - - 150 750 - - 8. NR 1201 16454 - - 430 1697 100 1496 9. ER 1244 16754 - - 360 360 - - 10. MER 627 6152 195 1830 11. NER 575 6325 8 8 445 445 - - 12. SER 349 3379 - - - - - - 13. SR 1934 20012 - - 102 180 4 80
  • 145. Basic Analysis Specific Analysis Heavy Metals OrganicSl. No. Region Samples Constituents Samples Constituents Samples Constituents Samples Constituents 14. SWR 630 8294 - 860 - - - - 15. SECR 1336 17368 - - - - - - 16. KR 802 7524 14 98 17. UR* 279 2358 67 402 - - - 18. NHR* 199 2078 - - - - - 19. SUO, Delhi* 270 4320 244 - - - - TOTAL 17566 218516 643 46371 2341 7160 104 1576 R don’t have their own chemical laboratory* egions , samples analyzed at other Regional egion, Jammu Jammu, Kathua, Udhampur & Rajouri districts is having low mineralization ith Electric Conductance less than 1000 micro mhos / cm at 250 C. Ground water is ral ground water of the area is generally fresh with EC & ther parameters falling within permissible limits assigned by BIS (IS:10500:1991) for drinking water standards. r m hak in Kathua district & Bareri in Rajouri Nitrate in ground water at Pangli Colony (62 mg/l), Dhanpur (54 mg/l), Devipura (66mg/l), Salehar (49 mg/l), Bishnah (68mg/l), Nagrota chemical laboratories Hydrochemical studies carried out in Regions with findings / conclusions 10.1 North Western Himalayan R On the basis of chemical data generated by analysis of water samples collected from National Hydrograph Stations, Reappraisal Hydrogeological Surveys, Exploration, Pollution & Other Investigations, it is found that ground water of Jammu province comprising of w generally fresh. Bicarbonate & Calcium are dominating among anions and cations respectively making water Ca-HCO3 type, but at certain places Na-HC03 type waters are also found in the area. In gene o Ground water is slightly alkaline in nature. It is of low salinity in all the districts with EC less than 1000 µS/cm at 250 C except at few places viz, Senth (1196 µs/cm), Salehar (1400 µs/cm), Bishnah (1260 µs/cm), Nagrota (1175 µs/cm), Suchetgadh (3410 µs/cm), Ghobrahmna (1580 µs/cm). Nandpur (1132 µs/cm) in Jammu district and Nagrota-gujroo (1320 µs/cm), Dulmi Chak (1680 µs/cm), in Kathua district, Bareri (1029 µs/cm) in Rajouri district, higher values of EC have been observed. According to plot on US salinity laboratory diagram (1954) used for the classification of irrigation waters, it is found that in Jammu, Kathua, Udhampur & Rajouri districts ground water is suitable for irrigation purposes except at places where high salinity has been observed such as Senth, Salehar, Bishnah, Nagrota, Suchetgarh, Gaobrahmna, Nandpu in Jam u district, and Nagrota-Gujroo, Pulme C district. Nitrate concentration has been observed within permissible limited (<45 mg/l) in Jammu area. But at some places high (66mg/l), Suchetgadh (76 mg/l), in Jammu District and Didyal (58 mg/l), Bengular (48 mg/l), Nandpur (80 mg/l), Ghobrahmna (163 mg/l), Samba (61mg/l), Nud (66mg/l), Sallan (77 mg/l), Nagrota Gujroo (90 mg/l) Dulmechak (94 mg/l), Jandi (63 mg/l), Kootah (68 mg/l) in Kathua and Jhangar (61 mg/l) in Rajouri district has been found. Low fluoride contents are observed with maximum value 1.02 mg/l at Londi in district Kathua.
  • 146. Collection of water samples for Isotope study in Bist Doab Area of Punjab Spot analysis of water sample from Naini Lake near the sewage,Dehradun
  • 147. 10.2 North Western Region, Chandigarh 10.2.1 Ef of Fertilizer on Ground Water Quality in District Jalandhar, Punjab In district Jal ndhar, ground water is the main source inking r. Agriculture is the major occupation and most of the land is used for cu ion o d Kharif crops. Th tube wells and canal but large part of the district is ed ated consumption hemica izers (NPK) was 100373 tones during 2005-06 and it is on the rise every year. Samples from shallow (98) and deeper (15) aquifers, covering all the blocks uniform , were c ed and analyzed for detaile Findings Based on e wat ta, it is observed that a laces g water contains nitrate content abo issible levels of 45 mg/l, mos parts landhar East and Jalandhar West, Noormahal, Phillaur and rka Kal locks. Maximum concentra of /l has been found at Mian li in block Noormahal. The occurrenc hig can be attributed to the essive u f fertilizers and esticides. weve portion of Nitrate concentra coming from use of fertilizer soils for growing salt tolerant ley and maize etc. However, at few places where EC µS/cm and SAR is more than 10, such waters are not mary irrigation. round water quality is evaluated on the basis of chemical analysis of 297 water samples tations of Haryana during May 2007. It is water occurring in northern parts are suitable uitable for irrigation on well-drained soil for salt tolerant crops such as wheat, maize, fect a for dr ltivat wate f both Rabi an e main sources of irrigation are irrigat by tube wells. Estim of c l fertil ly ollect d chemical parameters. th er quality da t p round ve perm tly in of Ja Nakodar, Ru an b tion 197 mg wa e of Ho h nitrate r, the pro exc tion se o p could not be quantified. In general, ground water is fit for drinking purposes. 10.2.2 Ground Water Quality of Punjab Ground water quality is evaluated on the basis of chemical analysis of 259 water samples collected from water quality monitoring stations of Punjab during May 2007. It is observed that in Punjab Ground water is generally suitable for drinking uses except at a few places in the southern and south western parts where it is not suitable due to high EC or high fluoride or nitrate or combination of all. lmost all waters are suitable for irrigation on well-drainedA crops like wheat, mustard, rice, bar f ground water goes beyond 5000o suitable for custo 10.2.3 Ground Water Quality of Haryana G collected from water quality monitoring s observed that in Haryana. Shallow ground for drinking as well as for irrigation. Shallow ground water occurring in central parts has intermediate quality and can be permitted for drinking uses in case there is no alternate source of water supply. It is s barley etc. Shallow ground water occurring in southern and western parts is not suitable for drinking due to salinity or nitrate or fluoride, it is also not suitable for irrigation because of high salinity, SAR and RSC values.
  • 148. 10.2.4 Ground Water Quality of UT of Chandigarh sis data indicates that ground water is fresh and hydro chemically, it is of er is generally suitable for domestic use as all le limits of drinking water quality standards ay be due to local factors. suitable for customary irrigation for semi-salt tolerant m etc without any fear of salinity hazards to the crops. 15000, is water and > 15000 is considered as saline water. A total number of 83 samples have EC > 3000 uS/cm, out of 496 samples analyzed from GWMS. igh salinity problem is observed in western parts of the state, with EC > 15000 µS/cm, t places in Surendranagar, Junagadh districts. High EC, in the range of 10000 µS/cm- is also observed at Bherai, Bhuva (Amreli), Motichander (Patan), Oddar, ad (Junagarh), Miyani, Bharpura (Porbander) and Kumarkhan erved in parts Patan, Porbander, Amreli, edabad, Rajkot, Junagarh, Surendranagar and Jamnagar districts. Nitrate: High concentration of Nitrate (>45mg/l) is found in 164 water samples indicating its contamination of ground water due to use of nitrogen containing fertilizer, domestic and agriculture waste and due to anthropogenic activities. Nitrate value as high as 760 mg/l at Kavi and 640 mg/l at Badkodra have been observed in Bharuch District. Further, nitrate values, in the range of 200 mg/l – 500mg/l, have been found at places in Surendranagar, Dahod, Rajkot, Bhavnagar, Amreli, Jamnagar, Panchmahals, Ahmedabad and Narmada districts. h fluoride content (>1.5mg/l) in ground water is mainly attributed to Quality of shallow ground water of Chandigarh is evaluated through three ground water monitoring stations and water sample were collected during May 2007 The perusal of hemical analyc Na +K - HCO3 type. The ground wat arameters are within the permissibp prescribed by BIS-1991. However, the concentration of nitrate at Maloya is found to be 70mg/l that is beyond the drinking water limit of 45 mg/l (BIS). The deterioration of round water quality due to increased nitrate concentration mg Ground water of Chandigarh is crops like wheat, rice, maize, gra 10.3 Western Central Region, Ahemdabad Based on hydrochemical studies on samples collected from GWMS, the ground water quality findings are as under: - Electrical conductivity/ TDS/ Salinity- It is the major quality parameter, representing total concentration of cations and anions present in ground water, indicating ionic mobility of different ions, total dissolved solids and saline nature of water. In eneral water having EC < 1500, is considered as fresh water, EC 1500 –g considered as Brackish H a 15000uµS/cm, rena, ChorwA (Ahmedabad). Further EC values ranging between 3000µS/cm –10000µS/cm have been observed at places in Bharuch, Bhavnagar, Jamnagar, Kacchh and Rajkot districts. In rest of the districts water is almost fresh with respect to EC. Chloride: Out of 496 samples, 215 samples exhibited high content of Chloride (>250mg/l) content indicating saline nature of water in most part of the state. Maximum content of Chloride (>5000 mg/l) is observed in western parts of the state showing high salinity problem at Adriwan, (Surendranagar) and Shardagram (Junagarh). Chloride content ranging between 2500 –5000 mg/l is obs Bhavnagar, Ahm Fluoride: Hig geogenic conditions. High concentration of Fluoride (> 1.5 mg/l) is observed in 40 samples. High concentration of Fluoride in the water samples occurred at places in Kachcch, Surendranagar, Bhavnagar, Sabarkantha, Banaskantha, Surat, Amreli and Mahesana districts.
  • 149. Iron: Out of total 194 water samples from selected GWMS, collected separately after filtration and hydrochloric acid treatment, 36 samples contained high concentration of Iron concentrations at 10.164 and 1.170 mg /l are observed 0.4.1Geochemical mapping of geogenic fluoride contamination in M.P.) During pre-monsoon season 47 and post monsoon season 48 groundwater samples (hand pump & dug well) were collected from Mohgaon block of Mandla district. The chemical analysis of premonsoon and post monsoon water samples reveals that pH, and alkalinity values in general fall under maximum permissible limit for drinking water recommended by BIS amended up to date. Electrical conductance values observed generally indicated low to medium salinity groundwater. A preliminary hydro-chemical study in the area reveals that more than 40 percent groundwater samples contain fluoride concentration more than 1.50 mg/l. High concentration of fluoride in drinking ater may cause fluorosis. 0.5 North Central Chhattisgarh Region, Chhattisgarh Water Management Studies and Exploration. Out of 830 samples 624 ere analyzed for 13 major parameters and the concentration range of various Table 10.2: Concentration of the Major ions in Ground Water Iron (> 0.3 mg/l). Very high at Laji in Rajkot district and at Kerala in Amreli district respectively. 10.4 North Central Region, Bhopal 1 Narmada basin, Mandla district ( w 1 A total 830 water samples were colleted during May 2007 from Ground Water Monitoring Stations, Ground w constituents analyzed are given in table 10.2. Range in mg/l Sl. No Constituent Min Max 1 pH 7.7 8.2 2 EC µs/cm at 25° C 52 2230 3 Total hardness 10 800 4 Calcium 2 264 5 Magnesium 1 65 6 Sodium 5 231 7 Potassium 2 52 8 Carbonate 0 0 9 Bicarbonate 12 439 10 Choride 4 291 11 Fluoride 1 2.6 12 Nitrate 0 205 13 Sulphate 0 480 The perusal of analysis results shows that the chemical quality of ground water is good in Chhattisgarh. The pH value shows that the ground water is neutral to alkaline in nature. he electrical conductivity value in most of the samples are less than the 1000 µs/cm at district (2230 µs/cm at 25° C) where as the lowest value is recorded at Hatti (52 µs/cm T 25° C, which indicates that the ground water is of low mineral content in Chhattisgarh. Relatively higher value of EC is recorded in samples from Dhardei in Janjgir Champa
  • 150. at 25° C) in Raigarh district. Total hardness is observed within the permissible limit except in few locations of Bilaspur, Durg, Janjgir- Champa and Raigarh districts. The oncentration of nitrate is found to be less than 100 mg/l in majority of the samples. The , it is more than the 1.5 mg/l. l Region, Nagpur GROUND WATER QUALITY DATA BASE Wells - 2007(partly) were carried out. ace water. The quality of shallow ground water in phreartic zone is in the State of UP varies from 7.75-8.25, which is within he Electrical Conductance of ground water is a measure of various chemical constituents t Baad, Maura, ligate Chande with a value of 8331, 8365, 4228, 5886 & 5223 s/cm at 25o C respectively and in district Agra at Mursan 4891 µs/cm at 25o C . igh values ~8000 µs/cm at Baad & Maura indicating c Fluoride concentration in the ground water of Chhattisgarh State is generally below the recommended limits of BIS i.e. 1mg/l. In few water samples of Bastar, Raipur, Kanker, Jashpur and Surguja districts 10.6 Centra QUALITY MAPS Water quality maps for EC, Cl, NO3, and F of Maharashtra and Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli were prepared based on GWMS-2006 data. Compilation, Validation, Computerisation and Manual entry into ledger of all ground water quality data generated in Chemical Laboratory were carried out. The data entry and validation checks in GEMS/GWDES software for updating ground water quality data f Monitoring Wells - 2006 (partly) and Monitoringo 10.7 Northern Region, Lucknow Ground water due to its continuous contact with minerals and rocks is generally more ineralized than surfm further affected by anthropogenic sources at the land. Human activities like domestic, agricultural or industrial also affect the natural quality of ground water. In general, shallow ground water in the State of Uttar Pradesh is fresh except for a few places where concentration of ions has been found above permissible limits (BIS: IS: 10500:1991) Hydrogen Ion Concentration (pH): he pH value of ground waterT permissible limits, and the water is slightly alkaline in nature. Electrical Conductivity (EC): T present therein. It gives as overall quality of ground water for its use for drinking, irrigation and other purposes. EC ranges from 280-1390 µs/cm at 25o C in Bundel Khand region, 250-1560 µs/cm at 25o C in Central region, 195-2270 µs/cm at 25o C in Eastern region and 170-8365 µs/cm at 25o C in Western region of the state. High values of EC above 4000 µs/cm at 25o C are observed in Western region, at Gursoti & Maho (4805 s/cm at 25µ Chhatikara, Bari Atus & Ho o C), Hathras city (4637 µs/cm at 25o C) in district Hathra; a µ District Mathura exhibits extremely h occurrence of saline water in the area.
  • 151. Chloride (Cl) The concentration of Chloride ranges from 7.0-542, 3.5-468, 14-213 & 7.0-3049 mg/l in parts ras district nd at Baad, Khamini, Maura, Chhatikara, Bari Atus & Holigate Chande. 3049, 1078, s been found vary widely in the state. It ranges from level to 1154 mg/l. High values of N03 are associated with well waters all tern Region Hathras, Mathura, Bulandshahar & Meerut districts are very much affected by nitrate with a maximum of 1154 mg/l at and even uorosis. Fluoride values range from nil-2.6 mg/l in the state. Western region of the /l at Jahangirpur. limit of 600 mg/l has been set in the absence of alternate source. Western gion is associated with higher values of total hardness particularly Hathras, Mathura, Region, Kolkata Chemical analysis of ground water samples, collected during AAP 2007-08, revealed that fluoride content above permissible limit (1.5 mg/l) found in some isolated patches of Nadia, Malda, Uttar & Dakshin Dinajpur, Murshidabad districts. Maximum value of 5.36 mg/l fluoride is observed at Gangarampur Municipality of Dakshin Dinakpur district. Similarly concentration of Iron above permissible limit (1 mg/l) is found in isolated patches covering all districts of West Bengal. Maximum value of 1.55 mg/l iron is tions of Puruliya district. Bihar Based on hydrochemical studies on samples collected from GWMS, the quality findings are as under: - Central, Eastern, Bundelkhand and Western region of the state respectively. Some of the Central & Eastern region show values above 250 mg/l (B15-1991) whereas Agra, Mathura & Hathras districts of western region exhibit quite high chloride values. Extremely high values >1000 mg/l are observed at Gursoli-1113 mg/l (Hath a 2765, 1205, 2021 & 1772 mg/l respectively (Mathura District). Such high values of Cl contribute to the saline nature of ground water. Nitrate (N03) The concentration of Nitrate ha below detection over the state in a scattered form and thus are indicative of point source pollution. Very high values 720 mg/l nitrate are observed in central region, distt. Auraiya – 304 mg/l (Bandhermau), 583 mg/l (Auraiya); distt. Kanpur-203 mg/l (Ghatampur) & distt. Unnao-277mg/l (Bangarmau). In Wes Najteela tiraha in Mathura district. Fluoride (F) Small quantities of Fluoride are beneficial in reducing tooth decay, whereas excess concentration (>1.5 mg/l) is harmful and causes staining of tooth enamel fl state shows considerably high value (>1.5 mg/l) of fluoride. In district Agra, fluoride at 6, 1.67 & 1.55 mg/l is found at Samai, Biswar & Baldeo respectively and in district Gautambudhnagar, it is 2.6 mg Total Hardness as CaCO3 The total Hardness of ground water ranges from 80-1660 mg/l in the state. Higher permissible re Shahjahanpur & Agra districts with a maximum value of 1660 mg/l in Mathura. 10.8 Eastern observed at Bandoan of Puruliya district. Maximum concentration of Nitrate of 87 mg/l is observed in few loca 10.9 Mid Eastern Region, Patna
  • 152. The groundwater in the state of Bihar is mildly alkaline in nature. Most of the samples do not contain carbonate but are characterized by the presence of bi-carbonate. wide variation in dissolved constituents in groundwater of Bihar. The maximum conductivity value (2500 micro Siemens/cm) has ater in terms of Total Hardness as CaCO3 has been centration of Ca has been found as 156 minimum concentration of Mg has been und as476 mg/l at Bhagwanpur, Vaishali district. The concentration of Na ranged from 3.9 mg/l at Galgalia (Kishanganj district) to 340 mg/l at Bhagwanpur Chowk (Muzaffarpur district), and of K ranged from 0.4 mg/l at Gobiganj (East Champaran district) to 339 mg/l at Rupau (Nawada district). on concentration in majority of the ground water samples was found less than 0.3 Fluoride concentration has been found more than 1.5 mg/l in about 30% of the groundwater samples analysed from special study at Munger, Lakhisarai and Nawada district. In 58% of the ground water samples the concentration was found less than 1.0 g/l. collected from GWMS, the quality findings are as under: - icroSiemens/Cm, has been found at Hata/Tirin, alue was found at Murhu, Ranchi district (170 total hardness of CaCO3 has been found as hard to very hard. The value of electrical conductivity indicates been observed at Mahnar, Vaishali district whereas minimum conductivity value (130 micro Siemens/cm) has been observed at Galgalia, Kishenganj districts. n general, the quality of groundwI found as hard to very hard. The maximum con g/l at Manihari, Katihar district, whereas them observed as 2.4 mg/l at Koari, Sitamarhi district. The concentration of Chloride in majority of the ground water samples has been found to be within the desirable limit for drinking purpose (250 mg/l, IS: 10500: 1991). The maximum concentration of chloride has been fo Ir mg/l. m Ground water in major part of the state has been found suitable for irrigation, however, high values of EC > 2250 micro Siemens/Cm, RSC > 2.5, and % Na (61-80%) has been bserved at some locations.o Jharkhand Based on hydrochemical studies on samples The groundwater in the state of Jharkhand is mildly alkaline in nature. Most of the samples do not contain carbonate but are characterized by the presence of bi-carbonate. The maximum concentration of HCO3 was found as 756 mg/l at Basia (Gumla district). The maximum conductivity value, 2400 m inghbhum district, whereas minimum vS micro Siemens/Cm). The value of electrical conductivity indicates wide variation in dissolved contents in groundwater of Jharkhand. The concentration of chloride in majority of the groundwater samples has been found to be within the desirable limit for drinking purpose (250 mg/l, IS: 10500: 1991). Its concentration ranged from 7.1mg/l at Burmu, Ranchi district to 433 mg/l at Hata/Tirin, Singhbhum district. Generally, the quality of ground water in terms of
  • 153. The maximum concentration of Ca has been found 156 mg/l at Ghagra, Gumla district, whereas the minimum concentration of Mg has been reported as 2.4 mg/l at Burmu, Ranchi district. The concentration of Na ranged from 13 mg/l at Burmu, Ranchi district to 163 mg/l at Topchachi , Dhanbad district. he concentration of K in groundwater samples varied from 0.6 mg/l at Dalbhumgarh, Singhbhum district to 73 mg/l at Basia, Gumla district. 0.10 North Eastern Region, Guwahati eventy-Eight water samples of NER, Guwahati were analysed for Fe & As. Highest iron and As concentration were found to be 49 mg/l and 109µg/l respectively. 69% of the samples had Fe more than 1 mg/l and 41% of the samples had arsenic concentration bove 10µg/l. High As and Fe mostly occurred in Hand Pump (Shallow) water rather an in Deep Tube wells water. High As & Fe coexisted with each other. 0.11 Southern Region, Hyderabad indings of the Organic Analysis oil samples were collected from 4 locations in Karimnagar district to analyse for 20 Organo Chloride pesticides. Soil sample from Kolleda has been found to contain 0.589 µg/Kg of Endosulfhon. Soil collected from Chillapally contains beta, gama-BHC and gama respectively). Soil from Garepalli fields contains beta, gama-BHC, alfa endosulphan and Dieldrin (0.126, 0.038, 0.099 and 0.352 µg/K Exce High 6900 (Gun High (Niza (Guntur dist.)-3.00 mg.l, Vavilala (Karimnagar dist)-2.4 mg/l, Calcutta Garden (RR dist.)-2 (Mahaboobnagar) – 2.24 mg/l. High te values were observed at Durgi, (Guntur dist._-438 mg/l, Rachalapalli (Mahaboob 40 g/l Kanna Reddy (Niamabad dist.)-356 Kharampudi (Guntur dist.)-273 mg/l. Excerpts of chemical analysis car Surveys Samples during RHS were collected from Visakhaptnam and Prakasam districts an gh fluoride and Nitrate are the main water quality problems observed. T 1 S a th 1 F S Chloride (0.0168, 0.117 and 0.251 µg/Kg g respectively). rpts of analysis of samples carried out for Ground Water Exploration: Electrical Conductivity values were observed at Nakkapally (Visakhaptanm dist.) – µS/cm, Calcutta Garden (Ranga Reddy dist.)-5670 µS/cm, Chikatigalapalem tur dist)-5350 µS/cm and at Rachalapalli (Mahaboobnagar)-5000 µS/cm Fluoride values were observed at Chikatigalapalem (Guntur dist)-8.8 mg/l, Gidda mabad) – 3.3 mg/l, Kothakonda (Karimnagar dist) – 3.19 mg/l, Rompicherla .53 mg.l, Rachalapalli (Mahaboobangar) – 2.37 mg/l and at Ramreddypalli Nitra nagar dist) - 0 m , Madharam (Mahaboobnagar dist)-372 mg/l, mg/l, Enugupalem (Guntur dist.)-276 mg/l, ried out for Reappraisal Hydrogeological Guntur, Anantapur, Nizamabad, West Godavri, d analysed. Salinity, hi
  • 154. In West Go % of the samples were found to be above 5000 µS/cm followed by 35% samples have Nitrate above 45 mg/l and 26% samples with Chloride more than 1000 mg/l. In Guntur district, 26% of the samples w 49% samples have Nitrate above 35 mg 1000 mg/l. In Prakasam district, 16% of the by 28% samples with Fluoride of more th Excerpts of chemical analysis carried out The highest Electrical Conductivity was o district. Total hardness of 2470 mg/l a district. The highest Nitrate concentratio 6 mg/l) decreased as compared to Nitrate value observed in 2006 (1300 concentration of 7 mg/l was observed at Majority of waters were of Cl-SO4 type dominating cations. 10.1 Sou Eastern Region , Bhuban The Parameters determined during t Bicarbonate, Chloride, Sulphate, Nitrate, Sodium, Potassium, Phosphate and Iro Stations were analysed for pH, E.C., Flu total Iron analysis in all the acidified sam Hydrograph Network Stat 10.13 South Western Region, Bangalore In the South Western Regional Chemical Laboratory, a total of 810 ground water samples were analyzed for 9154 constituents during the AAP. The samples were analyzed for major, minor and trace elements. 10. 14 South East Coastal Region, The quality of shallow ground water in and analysis of water sample collecte ground water monitoring wells (GWM 2007 representing pre-monsoon wate In general, the ground water quality i indicated by the EC value less than 75 EC varies between 751- 2250 and 1 ating that the gro e than 3000 µs/cm at 25 C indicating th The Chloride content is less than 250 of the samples are between 251-1000 are from the districts Viz., Che davari district, 24 ere found to be above 5000 µS/cm followed by /l and 26% samples with Chloride of more than samples were found to be above 5000 µS/cm followed an 1.5 mg/l. for Ground Water Monitoring Stations bserved (12000 µS/cm) at Bapuram of Kurnool s CaCO3 was observed at Mylaram of Warangal n (108 mg/l) at Kondrapolu of Nalgonda district. Fluoride Podili of Prakasam district. followed by HCO3 type with Ca and Na as the 2 th eswar he year 2007 were - pH, E.C., Carbonate, Fluoride, Total Hardness, Calcium, Magnesium, n. Samples from National Hydrograph Network oride, Chloride, and Nitrate contents apart from ples from National Chennai Tamil Nadu state has been evaluated by sampling d from Ground water monitoring wells. About 417 Ws) were monitored for water quality during May r quality. n the state is fresh in about 14% of the GWMWs as 0 µs/cm at 250 C. In about 50% of the GWMWs the 3% of GWMWs are between 2251-3000 indic und water is slightly 0 min ralized and about 23% of GWMWs, the EC is more at the ground water is highly mineralized mg/l in about 2% of the sample analyzed and 38% mg/l and 10% shows more than 1000mg/l, which nnai, Cuddalore, Pudukottai, Ramanathapuram,
  • 155. Nagapattinam, Thiruvarur, Tuticorin and small patch s Viz., Tirunelveli, Dindigul, Namakkal and Coimbatore. The Fluoride content is less than 1.5 mg/l in about 92% of the sample analyzed and 8% of the sample shows more than 1.5 mg/l, which are from the districts Viz., Dharmapuri, Salem, Namakkal, Erode, Coimbatore, Pudukottai, Sivagangai, and Virudhunagar 10.15 Kerala Region, Trivendrum Water Quality Maps Water Quality Map for Electrical Cond in shallow ground water of Kerala St based on April 1997 Data and Aresnic 10.16 Uttaranchal Region, Dehrad The physico-chemical characteris studied to evaluate their suitability samples, both from tube wells (hand for pH, E.C., chloride, bicarbonate, nit sodium and potassium. It has been o the area is suitable for both drinking at present free from any major pollution problem, suitable measure should be taken to prote and e this p The chemical quality of ground water widely, depending upon the physiogr The shallow aquifer is mostly dominat general chemical quality reflects that content, which brands the ground w h in Uttarakhand except some samples in Udham Singh Nagar f be utilized for irrigation after taking so es in district uctivity, Chloride, Fluoride and Nitrate parameters ate based on GWMS April 2006 Data, Iron content content based on April 2003 Data are prepared. un tics of ground water in Uttarakhand State have been for domestic and irrigation uses. Ground water pumps) and dug wells were collected and analyzed rate, fluoride, total hardness, calcium, magnesium, bserved that the quality of ground water of most of and irrigation purposes. Though, the entire area is ct efficiently utiliz recious resource. of shallow aquifers in Uttarakhand is found to vary aphy, soil texture and underlying soil formations. ed by Ca-Mg-HCO3 and CaHCO3 type of waters. The most of the wells contain low dissolved minerals ater as quite fres alling in slight to moderate restriction category, should me precautionary measures.
  • 156. 11. HIGH YIELDING WELLS DRILLED oard as explored high yiel Country under its scientific exp studies and utilizing remote sen with discharge ranging from 1 states of Andhra Pradesh, Hima Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Mahara identifying ground water sources on ith gard to ground wa demands. High Yielding Wells Table 11.1: HIGH YIELDIN Sl. No. Name of States B h ding aquifers during 2007-08 in the various states of the loratory drilling programme, based on hydrogeological sing and geophysical techniques. High yielding wells 20 LPM to 3900 LPM have been constructed in the chal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir, Gujarat, Karnataka, shtra, Orissa and Tamil Nadu. The study will help in and in guiding the states to adopt follow up acti w re ter development for drinking water supply and other constructed during 2007-08 is given Table 11.1 . G WELLS CONSTRUCTED DURING 2007- 2008 Description 1. Andhra Pradesh i. An exploratory well drilled in Ipuru village, Guntur district down to the depth of 150.0 m bgl has yielded 294 LPM during drilling. The potential fracture zones were encountered at 30m and 154m depth. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 2950 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ii. An exploratory well drilled at Karempudi village and mandal, Guntur district has yielded a high discharge of 540 LPM during drilling . The productive aquifer, encountered at 135.0 m bgl is in Pre-cambrian limestone. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 5400 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area iii. en hours of pumping a day) in the Exploratory well drilled at Durgi (V) and Mandal, Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh has yielded 600 lpm at depth of 123.50 m in limestone of Kadapa formations. This borewell can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 6000 (@ 60 lpcd for t area. iv. ing a day) in the area. An Observation well drilled at Durgi , Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh has yielded 510 lpm in limestone / granitic formation. This borewell can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 5000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pump v. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 197.0 m. bgl. at Gurajala, Guntur district piercing through Narzi Limestone has yielded a high discharge of 270 LPM. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 2700 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 157. Sl. No. Name of States Description i. An exploratory well drilled at Nandod Taluka, Narmada district has yielded a high discharge of 1320 LPM and potable quality of ground water has been encountered in fractured Basalt aquifer. The SWL is at 12.50m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 9050 (@70 LPD per person @ 8hrs 2. Gujarat pumping per day.) in the area. 3. Himachal Pradesh i. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 99.0 m and constructed down to 97.50m bgl at Dhalpur ground, Kulu district has yielded a high discharge of 480 LPM for 2 m drawdown during drilling. Groundwater potential zones were encountered at a depth range of 68-74, 77-83 and 85-94m and were tapped. The quality of ground water is potable. It is expected to augment W/S of Kulu town to a large extent as this bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 4800(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. 4. Jammu& Kashmir i. on up to the depth of 62.50 m bgl has yielded a high discharge of 720 LPM during drilling in limestone aquifer. The drilling was under progress. Assembly lowering is at final stage. This bore well can An exploratory well drilled at Vashno Devi Shrine, Syaldabri site, Jammu Regi cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 7200 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ii. An exploratory well drilled through departmental rig at Trikul Bal in Baramula district down to the depth of 147.50m bgl has yielded a high discharge of 3600 LPM under free flowing condition. The quality of water is fresh and this is a second highest yielding auto flow well not only in Kashmir Valley but in the entire Jammu & Kashmir State. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 36000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. iii. rge of 1000 LPM under 10.66m draw down An exploratory well drilled at Deva in Pulwama district of Kashmir Valley has yielded a high discha condition during the pump test. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 10000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. iv. ploratory well drilled at Dussoo in PulwamaAn ex district has yielded a high discharge of 900 LPM under 10.00m draw down condition during the pump test. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 9000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 158. Sl. No. Name of States Description v. An exploratory well drilled at Trigam Shadipora Baramula district of Kashmir Valley has yielded a high discharge of 2300 LPM under 5.00m draw down in Artesian conditions. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 23000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vi. drilled in Khanpora, DistrictExploratory well Baramulla Kashmir Valley drilled down to a depth of 40m is yielding a high discharge of 1200 lpm. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 12000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. 5. Karnataka i. 12.47m bgl. This bore An observation well drilled down to a depth of 110.0 mbgl at Devigere, Hosadurga taluk of Chitradurga district has yielded a high discharge of 180 LPM. The SWL is at well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 1800 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day.) in the area. ii. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 134.0 m bgl at Chikkabyaladakere, Hosadurga taluk of Chitradurga district has yielded a high discharge of 413 LPM during drilling. The Casing of the well is 20.00m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 4100(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day.) in the area. iii. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 360.90 m bgl at Kolar, Kolartaluk of Kolar district has yielded a high discharge of 900 LPM during drilling. The Casing of the well is 42.60m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 9000(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day.) in the area. iv. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 106.75 m bgl at Hiriyur taluk of Chitradurga district has yielded a high discharge of 492 LPM during drilling. The Casing of the well is 7.50m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 4900(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day.) in the area. v. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 200.0 m bgl at Chennrayapatna taluk, Hassan district has yielded a high discharge of 225 LPM during drilling. The Casing of the well is 28.60m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 2250(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day.) in the area.
  • 159. Sl. No. Name of States Description vi. ter requirement of An exploratory well drilled in Gneiss formation down to a depth of 200.0 m bgl at Karakere, C.R. Patna taluka of Hassan district has yielded a high discharge of 480 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking wa a population of about 4800 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vii. An exploratory well drilled in Gneiss formation down to a depth of 311.25 m bgl at Malur taluka of Kolar district has yielded a high discharge of 459 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 4600 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. viii. Drilling was completed to complete depth of 500.70 m bgl. by deep drilling rig at Doddakuntur in Malur taluk of Kolar district. Casing depth was 15.72m bgl and discharge was 120 lpm. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 1200 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ix. of An exploratory well drilled at Hiriyur Taluk, Chitradurga district has yielded a high discharge of 332 LPM. The well was drilled down to a depth 200.0 m. bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 3300 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. x. An exploratory well drilled at Bhalki Taluk, Bidar district has yielded a high discharge of 600 LPM. The well was drilled down to a depth of 190.0 m. bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 6000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. xi. ploratory well drilled at C.R.Patna Taluk,An ex Hassan district has yielded a high discharge of 990 LPM. The well was drilled down to a depth of 155.0 m. bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 10000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. 6. Kerala i. An exploratory well drilled at Kulathupuzha Kollam district down to the depth of 105.00 mbgl has yielded 662 LPM in khondalite rock . The drilling is under progress . This well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 6600 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 160. Sl. No. Name of States Description ii. hest in the State. This well can cater to A Piezometer drilled at Shornur, Palghat district down to the depth of 92.0 mbgl has yielded 1800 LPM in Hornblende Biotite Gneiss rock . This is the highest discharge encountered so far during Piezometer construction in Palghat district and second hig drinking water requirement of a population of about 18000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. iii. for ten hours of pumping a day) in the A Piezometer constructed at Thenkara in Palakkad district with high discharge of 720 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 7200 (@60 lpcd area. iv. Exploratory well drilled at Naduvattom site of Palghat District has yielded 2160 lpm. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 21000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. v. ss with patches of Exploratory well drilled at Valiakavu site of Kollam District drilled down to a depth of 108.0m bgl has yielded a high discharge of 996 lpm. The formation encountered during e drilling is Garnet biotite gneith Charnockite. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 9900 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vi. d Biotite schist. This bore well can A Piezometer well drilled at Mankeri site of Malapuram District drilled down to a depth of 100.0m bgl has yielded a high discharge of 1260 lpm. The formation encountered during the drilling is Charnockite gneiss an cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 12500 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vii. f 1200 lpm & 720 lpm respectively. The formation encountered both the sites during the drilling Two Piezometer wells drilled at Kudallure and Nedungottur sites of Palaghat district drilled down to a depth of 86.0m bgl and 100.0m bgl. has yielded a high discharge o were Charnockite gneiss. These wells can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 12000 and 7000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. viii. a high discharge of 600 LPM . The formation One Piezometer at Karimpuzha sites of Palaghat district drilled down to a depth of 100.0m bgl has yielded encountered at the site during the drilling was Hornblende biotite schist. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 6000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 161. Sl. No. Name of States Description ix. lled down to a depth of 70 mtrs bgl One Piezometer at Kuttippuram in Malappuram district dri (drilling continuing) has yielded a high discharge of 1200 LPM . The formation encountered at the site during the drilling was biotite gneiss. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 12000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. 7. Madhya Pradesh i. tory well drilled in Deccan Trap down toAn explora a depth of 192.0 m bgl at Kerpani, Betul district has yielded a high discharge of 900 LPM during drilling. The zone tapped is from 148 to 155m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 9000(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ii. tory well drilled at Maneri village, DindoriAn explora district has yielded a high discharge of 643.2 LPM. The well was drilled down to a depth of 158.80 m. bgl. The aquifer zone was encountered between 147 – 158 m. bgl and the aquifer material was Lameta Sandstone. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 6400 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in e area.th 8. aharashtraM i. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 145 m bgl at Karanjadi village in Mahad Taluka of Raigarh district has yielded 356 LPM in Deccan Traps. Three Water bearing zones have been encountered at 13.00 and from 62- 64 and 139-142 m bgl. The SWL is at 10.30 m bgl. The formation is highly fractured vesicular basalt. ii. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 200.00 m bgl at Ghorpadi village, Kawathe Mahankal Taluka, Sangli district has yielded a high discharge of 360 LPM during drilling in Deccan Trap formation. Two water bearing zones encountered were 140.00-141.00 m bgl, 161.00-163.00 m bgl. The SWL is at 4.80m bgl. The formation is fractured massive/vesicular basalt. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 3500 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. iii. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 159.9 m bgl at Valsang village, Jath Taluka of Sangli district has yielded a high discharge of 466 LPM during drilling in Deccan Trap formation. Two water bearing zones encountered were at 92.8-101.0 m bgl and 141.0-142.0 m bgl. The SWL was at 35m bgl. The formation is vesicular basalt and highly fractured massive basalt. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 4500 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 162. Sl. No. Name of States Description iv. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 200.0 m bgl at Malegaon (KD) village, Gevrai Taluka of Beed district has yielded a high discharge of 190 LPM during drilling in Deccan Trap formation. Two water bearing zones encountered were at 18.8- 21.8 m bgl and 34.0-37.0 m bgl. The SWL was at 3.1m bgl. The formation is fractured massive and vesicular basalt. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 1900 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. v. angli district has yielded a high nt of a population of about 2850 (@60 An exploratory well drilled in Deccan Trap formation down to a depth of 200.0 m bgl at Umadi village in Jath taluka of S discharge of 286 LPM during drilling . Two water bearing zones have been encountered in the depth range of 111.11 – 112.10 m bgl and 184.0 – 185.0m bgl. The SWL was at 15.20m bgl. The formation is fractured massive basalt. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requireme lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vi. 183.00 m bgl. The SWL was at An exploratory well drilled in Deccan Trap formation down to a depth of 184.30 m bgl at Talashet village in Mangaon taluka of Raigad district has yielded a high discharge of 525 LPM during drilling . One water bearing zone was encountered in the depth range of 182.0 – 5.60m bgl. The formation is vesicular basalt/ fractured basalt. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 5250 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vii. riwahegaon village, Beed District, An Exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 200.00 mbgl at Ahe Maharashtra has yielded 190 lpm in fractured massive basalt . Water bearing zones encountered at 70.50-73.60 mbgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 1900 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. viii. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 200.0 m. bgl at Kasegaon village in Walva taluka of Sangli district has yielded about 180 LPM in deccan traps. Three water bearing zones were encountered i.e. 19.00-20.00, 84.00 – 85.00 and 156.80 – 157.80 m.bgl. The formation is highly fractured basalt. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 1800 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 163. Sl. No. Name of States Description 9. Orissa i. An exploratory well drilled in Bargaon block down to the depth of 70.00 m bgl in Granite Gneiss aquifer at Sundargarh district has yielded 600 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 6000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ii. An exploratory well drilled in Kaptipada block, Mayurbhanj district down to the depth of 86.90 m bgl in Granite Gneiss aquifer has yielded 600 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 6000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. iii. An exploratory well drilled in Remuna block, Balasore district down to the depth of 94.85 m bgl in Alluvium area has yielded 600 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking ater requirement of a population of about 6000 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the w (@ area. iv. An observation well drilled in Bargaon block, Sundargarh district down to the depth of 70.00 m bgl in Granite Gneiss aquifer has yielded 540 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 5400 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. v. ell drilled in Bargaon block,An exploratory w Sundargarh district down to the depth of 115.0 m bgl in Granite Gneiss aquifer has yielded 300 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 3000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vi. An exploratory well drilled in Bargaon block, Sundargarh district down to the depth of 130.0 m bgl in Granite Gneiss aquifer has yielded 180 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 1800 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vii. An observation well drilled in Granite Gneiss down to a depth of 132.0 m bgl at Udala block, Mayurbhanj district has yielded a high discharge of 360 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 3500(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 164. Sl. No. Name of States Description viii. An exploratory well drilled in Granite Gneiss formation area down to a depth of 197.0 m bgl at Banarpal block in Angul district has yielded a high discharge of 420 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 4200(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ix. An exploratory well drilled in Granite formation area down to depth of 112.0 m bgl at Boudh block in Boudh district has yielded a high discharge of 720 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 7200(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. x. An exploratory well drilled in Alluvial area down to depth of 153.50 m bgl at Salepur block in Cuttack district has yielded a high discharge of 600 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a opulation of about 6000(@60 lpcd for ten hours ofp pumping a day) in the area. xi. Exploratory well drilled at Ainlapali site of Boudh district has yielded 225 lpm from Granite aquifer. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 2200 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. xii. 80 An exploratory well drilled at Pedagadi site Udala block of Mayurbhanj district drilled down to a depth of 117.40m has yielded a high discharge of 4 lpm from Granite Gneiss aquifer. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 4800 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. xiii. a day) in the area. An Observation well drilled at Godisahi site Kaniha block of Angul district drilled down to a depth of 141.70m has yielded a high discharge of 300 lpm from Granite Gneiss aquifer. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 3000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping xiv. An Observation well drilled at Amurada site Boudh block of Boudh district drilled down to a depth of 154.50m has yielded a high discharge of 360 lpm from Granite aquifer. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about in3600 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) the area.
  • 165. Sl. N Name of States Description o. xv. Observation well drilled at Udala block site of Mayurbhanj district drilled down to a depth of 104.20m bgl. has yielded a high discharge of 480 lpm from Granite Gneiss aquifer. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 4800 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. n exploratory well drilled at Panchayat Office, Bhasma, Sundargarh district down to a depth of xvi. A 111.40 m bgl has yielded a high discharge of 630 LPM in Granite Gneiss formation. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 6300 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. xvii.An exploratory well drilled Banarpal block, Angul district down to a depth of 110.0 m bgl has yielded a high discharge of 300 LPM in Granite Gneiss formation. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 3000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. Mayurbhanj district down to a depth of 105.4 m bgl xviii. An exploratory well drilled at Kaptipada block , has yielded a high discharge of 570 LPM in Granite formation. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 5700 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. l has yielded a high discharge of 540 LPM in Granite 400 xix. An exploratory well drilled at at Kaptipada block , Mayurbhanj district down to a depth of 55.40 m bg Gneiss formation. This well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 5 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. 10. Tamil Nau i. An exploratory well drilled down to a depth of 450.0 m bgl at Terkalathur, Nagapattinam district has yielded a high discharge of 480 LPM during drilling . The well has been handed over for supplementary drinking water supply, which can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 5000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. ii. An exploratory well drilled in Granite Gneiss down to a depth of 175.0 m bgl at Elavarasanoorkottai, Villupuram district has yielded a high discharge o 372 LPM during drilling . The high yielding fractures was encountered in the depth range of 55 – 56 m bgl. This bore well can cater to the drinking water requirement of a population of about 3700 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. f
  • 166. Sl. Name of States Description No. iii. An exploratory well, drilled in hard rock area of Granite Gneiss down to a depth of 235.0 m bgl at Thalli in Krishnagiri district has yielded a high discharge of 504 LPM during drilling. The high yielding fracture was encountered in the depth range of 231 – 232 m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 5000(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. iv. By deploying high capacity compressor at exploratory well at Melur, Neyveli area, a very high 00 LPM is recorded thereby giving this discharge of 39 scope for meeting higher water demand from deep aquifer. v. An exploratory well drilled in hard rock area of Krishnagiri district has revealed the presence of high yielding fractures. A bore well drilled in Granite Gneiss down to the depth of 140.0 m bgl at Royakottai in Krishnagiri district has yielded a high discharge of 960 LPM during drilling. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 9600(@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vi. An exploratory drilling in hard rock areas of Krishnagiri district of Tamil Nadu has revealed the presence of high yielding fractures. A bore well, drilled in Granite Gneiss down to the depth of 203 m bgl at Hosur in Krishnagiri district has yielded 1480 lpm during drilling. The high yielding fractures were encountered in the depth range of 169-202.16 m bgl. This bore well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 15000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. vii. An exploratory tube well, constructed in unconsolidated formations down to the depth of 225.60 mbgl at Elaiyur in Perambalur district of Tamil Nadu has yielded 3000 lpm This tube well can cater to drinking water requirement of a population of about 30,000 (@60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area. viii. Exploratory drilling in soft rock area of Perambalur district has revealed the presence of high yielding zones. A tube well, constructed in unconsolidated formations down to a depth of 450.0 m. bgl at Mahlmalpuram of perambalur district has yielded 1560 LPM during development. This tube well can cater to drinking water requirements of a population of about 16000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumping a day) in the area.
  • 167. Sl. No. Name of States Description ix. vealed the presence of A tube well, constructed in unconsolidated formations down to a depth of 120.0 m. bgl at Mahimaipuram-OW II in Perambalur district has yielded 900 LPM during development. This tube w an cater to drinking water re irem ts of a tion of about 00 (@ 60 or o pumpin An ex Peramb high y plorato alur d ielding zones. ry dr istrict ell c pop illing in has re soft rock area of qu en ula 90 lpcd f ten h urs of g a day) in the area. An exploratory drillin hard rock area of Villupuram district has revealed the presence of high g ure ones. A b unconsolidated formati s 200.0 m. bgl at Tirum r district has yielded 300 LP pumping test. tu w an at requirements of a popu tio of about 3000 (@ 60 lpcd for ten hours of pumpin x. g in yieldin fract z ore well constructed in down to the depth of ayapuram in Villupuram M during on ala This be ell c c er to drinking water nla g a day) in the area. PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING HIGH YIELDING PIEZOMETERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT MANKERI IN MALAPPURAM DISTRICT KERALA (DISCHARGE 21.00 LPS)
  • 168. 12. HYDROLOGY PROJECT PHASE –II The Hydrology Project - Phase –II (HP-II) is a follow up project of HP-I. Its major thrust is to use Hydrological Information System (HIS) data effectively and efficiently for water resources planning and management. A longer-term aim of the project is to assist the Governments at both Central and State levels to address the issues of intra-sectoral demands and overall resource planning and management through the establishment of core hydrological organizations serving all specialized water agencies. The Project will further extend and promote the sustained and effective use of the HIS by all potential users concerned with water resources planning and management, including both public and private, thereby contributing to improved productivity and cost-effectiveness of water-related investments in the 13 states and eight Central agencies. The coverage of existing states under the project is to help these agencies from moving over from development of HIS (as in HP-I) towards use of HIS in water resources planning and management. The project objectives will be achieved by: (a) Strengthening the capacity of hydrology departments to develop and sustain the use of the HIS for hydrological designs and decision tools thus creating enabling environment for improved integrated water resources planning and management; (b) Improving the capabilities of implementing agencies at state/central level in using HIS for efficient water resource planning and management in reducing v ion o (c) Establishing and e esponsive and easily accessible HIS to improve shared vision and transparency of HIS between all users; and (d) Improv ganizations and the private sector thro supporting outreach services. Greater use impact on the planning a the rural and urban poor will have secure and sustainable access to water for multi-purpose livelihood uses. CGWB is participating agency in HP-II and has a budget provision of Rs 27.8 Crores and project has duration of 6 years staring from May 2006 to 2012. The revised provision for the year 2007-08 is Rs 2.05 Crores. H-P-II has two major components i.e Horizontal Expansion in three new States covering Goa, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab and Vertical Extension in the 9HP-I peninsular States. Under Horizontal Expansion, HP-I type of activities and facilities will be extended to new states, however, under Vertical Extension special knowledge enhancement type of activities such as Hydrological Design Aid, Decision Support System and Purpose Driven Studies would be taken up. In this year of the project domain specific training would be imparted, Awareness raising program are being held, tender documents for procurement/upgrading of the equipments have been prepared and construction of the piezometers is being taken up. Tender document for procurement of consultancy is being taken up. The expenditure incurred on the project till March, 2008 is Rs 114.10 lakhs. ulnerability to droughts and thereby meeting the country’s poverty reduct bjectives; nhancing user-friendly, demand r ing access to the HIS by public agencies, civil society or ugh awareness building of an oad but definiteimproved HIS is expected to have a br nd design of water resources schemes, from which
  • 169. 13. STUDIES ON ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND WATER 13.1 DEMONSTRATIVE PROJECTS ON "ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE TO GROUND WATER & RAIN WATER HARVESTING" A demonstrative scheme on “Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Recharge to Ground Water” for 2006-08 has been taken up. These schemes are being implemented in the following areas. i. Lingala, Pulivendula Vemula and Vemalli blocks in Kadapa district, Andhra Pradesh. ii. Gangavalli block in Salem district, Tamil Nadu iii. Mallur block in Kolar district, Karnataka iv. Bel watershed, Amla & Multai blocks in Betul District, Madhya Pradesh. v. Upper reaches of Chhoti Kali Sindh river in parts of Sonkatch & Bagli blocks in Dewas district, Madhya Pradesh. Under the scheme, recharge schemes in over-exploited assessment units were approved for implementation by the respective state departments under the overall technical guidance of CGWB with 100% funding by the Government of India. The approved cost of construction of recharge structures in cluster mode is Rs. 5.95 Crores. The norms adopted in implementation of National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS) by the Ministry of Rural Development are bein lowed in implementation of civil works under the present scheme The details of demonstrative recharge projects on Artificial Recharge to Ground Water and Rain Water Harvesting being implemented in the states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh are given in Table 13.1. Impact assessment studies are also incorporated to assess the efficacy of artificial recharge and rain water harvesting structures taken as in cluster mode in the above mentioned sites. Success of demonstrative recharge projects completed in different hydrogeological conditions would encourage the states to replicate the same in the similar hydrogeological settings elsewhere in the states. 122 artificial recharge structures have been completed during the year and total 160 artificial recharge structures have been completed against the project target of 200 structures. g fol
  • 170. Table 13.1 Details of Demonstrative P ects on Artificial Recharge to Ground Water and Rain Water Harvesting in Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh (2006-08) State (Number of structures) District Blocks (Number of structures) Project proposals approved (Number of structures) Amount Sanction ed (Rs. in lakhs) Amount Release d (Rs. in lakhs) Balance amount yet to be release d as 2nd installm ent Physical progress Financial Progress (in Lakhs) roj 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Malur Check dam -23 16 Percolation tank-3 2 Karnataka Kolar (28 Structures)Sub Surface Dyke-2 92.19 64.53 27.66 0 Rs. 31.626 lakhs utilised . Gangavalli Check dam-23 22 Desiltation of tanks-2 2 Tamil Nadu Salem (41 Structures)Percolation tank -16 223.15 223.15 0 15 UC has been received for 111.22 Lakhs.Balance amount of Rs.66.94 Lakhs has been released as 2nd installment in May 2007 Check dam -5 5 Mini Percolation Tank -1 0 KadapaLingala -(9 Structures) Percolation Tank -3 59.71 41.8 17.91 2 Check Dam -2 2KadapaPulivendla -(3 Structures) Mini Percolation Tank -1 11.82 8.27 3.55 0 Check Dam -5 5KadapaVemula -(6 Structures)Percolation Tank -1 38.79 27.15 11.64 1 Check dam -3 3 Mini Percolation Tank -1 0 Andhra Pradesh KadapaVempalli - (5 Structures) Percolation Tank -1 20.14 14.1 6.04 0 A sum of Rs. 90.96 lakh utilized . Civil work under progress at remaining sites. RCC check Dam -18 23 Masonry Check Dam -5 0 Recharge Shaft-3 3 Percolation Tank -1 0 Bet of Amla and Multai blocks (67 ized, Workul Bel Watershed 99.81 69.87 29.94 Rs. 69.78 Lakhs util under progress. Structures) Piezometers-40. 40 Stop dam-11 6 Gabion structures-10 0 Piezometers-15 9 Sub surface Dyke -1 0 Roof top rain water harvesting - 2 2 Percolation Tank -1 1 Madhya Pradesh Dewas Sonk and Bagli blocks -(41 Structures) Recharge shaft-1 49.06 34.3 1 1.55 lakhs utilized and Civil work under progress. atch 4 14.72 Rs. 3 GRAND TOTAL 200 594.67 483.21 111.46 160
  • 171. Inauguration of Artificial Recharge Scheme at DC office Complex Jalandhar, by Deputy Commissioner, Jalandhar Nalla bundh across the trunk streamin the watershed, Bankura, West Bengal
  • 172. Photographs of Artificial Recharge structures constructed under Demonstrative Projects at Betul
  • 173. Photographs of Artificial Recharge structures constructed under Demonstrative Projects at Dewas SANWER _ Recharge Shaft SANWER – Recharge Shaft ( Under Construction) ( After Completion)) GHATIYABHANA- Stop Dam GHATIYABHANA- Stop Dam (Under Construction) ( After Completion) SARKHEDA- Stop Dam DUDHALAI- Stop Dam ( Under Construction ,) ( After Completion)
  • 174. Demonstrative Artificial Recharge Project, CGWB, SECR, Chennai Percolation pond with recharge bore well for more injection and less evapo-transpiration, Naduvalur, Salem district, Tamil Nadu
  • 175. Percolation Pond at Naduvallur, Salem district, Tamil Nadu
  • 176. 13.2 "ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE TO GROUND WATER & RAIN WATER HARVESTING" UNDER SURVEYS, EXPLORATION & INVESTIGATION SCHEME OF CGWB Demonstrative projects on Artificial Recharge to Ground Water and Rain Water Harvesting are proposed to be taken up during XI Plan under central sector scheme of “ Ground water Management Regulation “by CGWB, at an estimated cost of Rs.100 Crores with 100% funding by the Central Government. Under the scheme, it is proposed to construct structures for artificial recharge and rainwater harvesting through implementing agencies / beneficiaries and Panchayats. The scheme will demonstrate the efficacy of artificial recharge and rain water harvesting techniques in identified areas selected on scientific basis in different hydrogeological situations and encourage implementing agencies to replicate successful models in similar set ups. It will result in capacity building of the various agencies involved in ctures Central Ground Water Board, in coordination with concerned State Government departments will take up recharge and rain water-harvesting projects in following areas on priority: i. Over-exploited / Critical Blocks ii. Urban areas showing steep decline in ground water levels iii. Drought prone & water scarcity area iv. Coastal areas v. Sub-mountainous / hilly areas vi. Area with geo-genic contamination of ground water. Sites for construction of feasible artificial recharge structures would be identified by taking into consideration Watersheds / Talukas / Block / Mandal on compact area basis. Computation of surplus runoff and hydrogeological conditions need to satisfy the pre-requisites for recharge projects. The implementing agency would be responsible for preparation of Detailed Project Report for the recharge projects and may take technical guidance from regional office of CGWB. ented in coo er technical und During 2 Ground Water and Rain Water Harvesting are being carried out by the Board in parts of OE & Critical areas falling in 13 States. 3.3 DEMONSTRATION OF RAINWATER HARVESTING AND ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE TO GROUNDWATER STRUCTURE AT 78, LODHI ESTATE, NEW DELHI As per the advice of Parliamentary Forum on Water Conservation and Management practical demonstration of Rainwater Harvesting and Artificial Recharge to ground water structure and demonstration of live working models of Rainwater Harvesting and Artificial Recharge to groundwater was held on 6th September 2007 at 78 Lodhi Estate, New Delhi, residence of Dr. Vallabhbhai Kathiria, MP and Member- Convener of the Parliamentary Forum. The occasion was graced by Shri Somnath Chatterji, Hon’ble Speaker, Lok Sabha, Shri K. Rahman Khan , Deputy Chairman, Rajya Sabha, Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon,ble Dr. V of the Parliamentary Forum, Smt. Gauri Chatterji, Secretary to the Minister of construction of such recharge stru for optimum benefits. Schemes would be implem ing agency und rdination with the State Government by supervision of Regional office of theimplement Central Gro Water Board. 007-08, a total of 21 studies on Artificial Recharge to 1 Minister of Water Resources, allabhbhai Kathiria, MP and Member- Convener
  • 177. Water Resources and Shri B.M. Jha, Chairman, CGW B along with Hon’ble Members of Parliament. The dignitaries and invitees to the function were given practical demonstration at the site and the different working models in the exhibit was explained to them. Hon’ble speakers desired that this type of Rainwater Harvesting structures should be installed in each and every house. The function was given wide coverage in media including the Lok Sabha Channel of Doordarshan.
  • 178. 14. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING STUDIES A model is any device that represents an approximation of a field situation. A ground water model can be defined as a simplified version of a real ground water system. Ground Water simulation models provide a platform to study that problems in broader perspective and resolve solution for the optimal benefit taking into considerations the simplest and complex aspects along with economic, social and environmental aspects. The Central Ground Water Board has undertaken two studies in Ranchi and Patna urban area on ground water modeling during the year. Mathematical modeling have been taken up in Madaram watershed for creating the data base for simulation of mathematical model and Kottukal thodu water shed of Neyyar basin for groundwater flow and the impact of various stresses on the flow regime. Concept note has been prepared for comprehensive modeling studies in Yamuna Flood Plain Delhi in progress. The brief finding of the study are described in the following paragraphs: 14.1 Ranchi Urban Area: Under Ground water modeling study of Ranchi Urban area 30 key wells were established and monthly water level has been monitored. Ten piezometers were also monitored on monthly basis. Depth to water level in the key wells during pre-monsoon period ranges from 2.1 to 12.3 m and during post- monsoon it ranges from 0.9m to 5.03 m where as in case of piezometers during pre-monsoon it ranges from 1.56 to 14.9 m and 1.54 to 12.63 m during post- monsoon. Study is continuing in AAP 2008-09. 14.2 n carried out from these locations. Groundwater in the topmost sand lens in the condition in the und oundwater level in the area varies from 1.17m to 8.32m bgl oon period and 0.26m to 5.08m bgl in the post monsoon period. Study is continuing in AAP 2008-09 14.3 Madaram watershed : During the year, Madaram watershed has been taken up for creating the data base for simulati n of mathematical model. Under the study, 11 key wells were established and water level monitored on monthly basis. Village- wise ground water resources were estimated based on GEC 1997. Tentative sites for selected for ground water exploration for computation of various hydraulic parameters. Sites were also identified for carrying out the geophysical survey to delineate the depth of weathering. 14.4 Kottukal thodu water shed of Neyyar basin: The Kottukal thodu watershed of Neyyar basin is being modeled for groundwater flow and the impact of various stresses on the flow regime. It is a s all watershed of about 35 sq.km. comprising Precambrian crystallines, Tertiary se iments and coastal alluvium. An aquifer continuity is observed in the phreatic aquifer and the same is being modelled in the present study. As part of the study detailed field work is being carried and established key wells for water level monitoring, collected data on lithology of well sections, rainfall, groundwater structures, groundwater draft, soil etc. The infiltration characteristics and aquifer characteristics are to be identified in the ensuing studies. 14.5 Yamuna Flood Plain Delhi: C note has been prepared for co oftware awaited from NWR,CGWB, Chandigarh Patna Urban Area: Under Ground water modeling study of Patna Urban area 34 key wells were established and monthly monitoring of water level has bee aquitard occurs under water table condition and under semi-confined to confined erlying sand aquifer. The depth to gr in the pre mons o m d oncept mprehensive modeling studies in Yamuna Flood Plain in progress , s
  • 179. 15. CENTRAL GROUND WATER AUTHORITY ( CGWA) Central Ground Water Authority was constituted vide notification no. S.O. 38(E) dated 14. 01.97 with the mandate to regulate and control ground water development and management in the country under Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. Activity wise achievements during the period of 1st April 2007 to 31st March 2008 are summarized below. 15.1 Regulation of Ground Water Development: During 2007-08, CGWA has notified 43 Blocks/ Mandals / Talukas etc. in the country for regulation of groundwater development in the states of Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, West Bengal, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, NCT Delhi and Union Territory of Diu. This is in exercise of powers under Section 5 of Environment Protection Act, 1986. 15.2 Registration of Ground Water Structures: So far, 65 Blocks/ Mandals / Talukas in the country have been notified for registration of groundwater structures in the states of Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Taminadu, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, NCT Delhi and Union Territory of Pondicherry till 31st March 2008. 15.3 Regulation of Ground Water Withdrawal by Industries A list of over exploited /critical areas have been circulated to statutory organizations like State Pollution Control Boards, Ministry of Environment and Forest etc., which refer applications of new industries/projects to CGWA for NOC/ permission to withdraw ground water. The proposals received are evaluated on case to case basis, based on site specific recommendations of Central Ground Water Board. During the period (April 2007 to March 2008) Forty four (44) industries have been accorded for NOC’s. 15.4 Registration of Drilling Agencies: Registration of water well drilling agencies is being undertaken by CGWA to develop micro level data base on ground water development and to control indiscriminate drilling activity in the country. The registration certificates which were issued earlier to drilling agencies expired on 31.03.2007. The fresh / renewal of registration is presently being done for a period of 5 years and the registration fee which was being charged earlier has been waived. During the period April to March 2008, 142 drilling agencies were registered with CGWA including renewal of registration certificates. 15.5 Mass Awareness and Training programmes: Mass Awareness and Training Programs are being conducted by CGWA as part of the Annual Action Plan. During the period (April to March 2008 ) 20 Mass Awareness and 22 Water Management Training Programmes have been conducted by the Regional Offices of CGWB. The programmes were attended by representatives from Government Organizations, Voluntary Organizations, local Govt. departments, Panchayats, farmers, school students etc. These programmes had focus on water conservation and artificial recharge to ground water. Apart from these, the following activities were also carried out.
  • 180. Mass Awareness Programme at Khandagiri, Bhubaneswar Inaugural Function Mass Awareness Programme at Khandagiri, Bhubaneswar Participation of Students in Mass Awareness Programme Quiz Competition in Mass Awareness Programme ting in Quiz Competition The Teachers Participating in Mass Awareness Program Mass Awa aneswar Students Participa reness Programmes at Khandagiri, Bhub
  • 181. MASS AWARENESS PROGRAMME AT NIRMAL, ADILABAD A view Addr egional Director Presenting a Momento of the venue Lighting of the Lamp by the Chief Guest ess by Sri G.D.Ojha, Regional Director View of section of the audiance R View of the Trainees to Chief Guest
  • 182. Inaugural function on the o of Mass Awareness Programm arrapur, d (M.P) ccasion e at K istrict Sagar A view of Participants at the Mass Awareness Programme at Karrapur, Sagar (M.P)
  • 183. Shri A. K. Ghosh , Sc ‘B’ delivering lecture in Water Management Training Programme in Puruliya district, West Bengal Field demonstration of Geophysical t hnique during Training Program on Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Recharge for Defence Personnel 29/02/2008 ec
  • 184. Training Programmes at Bhubaneswar Water Manageme R ation Traini Progra Addres Training Programme e Stude participated in e Training Programme Lecture delivered at Training Programme Certificate distribution tyo the trainees at Training Programme nt Traning Programme at Utkal University, Bhubaneswar egistr at ng mme s of the Chief Guest at inaugural function of the Th nts th
  • 185. i. CGWB, WR, Jaipur organized an exhibition for 5 days in Bharat Nirman Mela at Nimbahera, district Chittorgarh to create awareness among common people. Large a seminar was organized by the Chief Engineer, Siliguri Zone of Military Engineering Service, Siliguri on 13th July 2007. ound water management and scope of augm ntation of ground water through artificial recharge, utilizing surplus rain water. iii. W at Kendriya Vidhy ar, Lodhi Road for sp wareness am s and all staff. The model was appreciated. 15 r Ra ter Harvesting Du CGWA provided technical designs dividuals, RWA’s, In etc, for Rai rvesting to encourage artific arge to ve b by CGWA in 839 over-exploi 226 cr ry to promote rain water harvesting for aug g the grou sources through artificial recharge. 15 of Authori s by CGWA CG ercise of powers unde tection 1986 appointed district level Authorized f regulation an trol of ground water development and management in areas where ory di s are in t Collecto sioners have been a d as au during 2007-08. 15.8 Updating of web site of CGWB Th d various proforma pertaining to CGWA have been pos the general public and can be downloaded f om the sit number of people from the town and nearby village visited the exhibition. District Ground Water Brochure (Chittorgarh district) was released during the inaugural function. Jaipur District Ground Water Brochure was also released in the conference hall of CGWB, WR, Jaipur office. ii. As part of observance of Water Year 2007, On this occasion, a team of Scientists from Central Ground Water Board, ER, Kolkata delivered technical lectures on various aspects of gr e orking models on Rain Water Harvesting was put on display alaya, Pragati Vih reading a ong the student .6 Technical Designs fo in Wa ring 2007-08, to in frastructure projects ground water. Directions ha ross the count n Water Ha een issued ial rech ted and itical blocks ac nd water re mentin .7 Appointment zed Officer WA in ex r section 4, of Environment Pro Act, Officers for the purpose o d con regulat rection force. So far 35 Distric rs / Deputy Commis ppointe thorized officers e details of the activities an ted in the web site for use by r e www.cgwb.gov.in. 15.9 Meeting of CGWA Important decisions on various issu to regulation and contro ound w elopment and manageme ed / deliberated in regular gs of CG . The 23rd meeting of CGWA w on 28.08.2007. es pertaining l of gr ater dev nt are discuss meetin WA as held
  • 186. 16. GROUND WATER MANAGEMENT STU IES IN DROUGHT PRONE AREA The Central Ground Water Board covered an area of 48534sq. km. categorized as drought prone in Gujarat, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Kerala States of the country u d water management studies. In addition to this, 256 bore holes (149 EW, 48 OW, 1 SH & 58 PZ) by departmental rigs were drilled in drought prone areas of Gujarat, Kar taka, Kerala, Maharashtra, Orissa, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. Details of area covered under ground water management studies and status of exploration in drought prone areas are shown in Table 16.1 16.2 & Fig 17.1 & 17.2 respectively. Table 16.1 : AREA COVERED UNDER GROUND WATER MANAGEMENT STUDIES IN DROUGHT PRONE AREAS DURING 2007-2008 Sl. No Regions/ State Districts Achievement Sq.Km. D nder groun na , 1. WEST CENTRAL REGION Banaskantha 3000 Gujarat Total 3000 2. WESTERN REGION Ba er 6616rm Rajasthan Total 6616 3. CENTRAL REGION Ahmednagar 3103 Maharashtra Total 3103 4. NORTHERN REGION Hamirpur 2010 Uttar Pradesh Total 2010 5. MID EASTERN REGION Madhbani 2501 Bihar Total 2501 6. SOUTH EASTERN REG 10706ION Mayurbhanj Orissa derga 2Sun rh 227 1 8Total 297 7. SOUTHERN REGION Anantapur 2000 A kasam 2ndhra Pradesh Pra 800 Total 4 008 8. S WESTERN RE Hassan 3020OUTH GION Karnataka Belgaum 0660 Total 9 260 9. K RALA REGION Kasargod 00E 20 K Kollam 00erala 25 Total 4500 GRAND TOTAL 48534
  • 187. Table 16.2 : EXPLORATORY WELLS DRILLED IN “DROUGHT PRONE” AREA DURING 2007-2008 (By Departmental Rigs) Sl. No States Districts EW OW PZ SH DW Total 1 Gujarat Ahmedabad - - 3 - - 03 Gandhinagar - - 6 - - 06 Jamnagar 5 1 - - - 06 Patan - - 5 - - 05 Mehsana - - 4 - 04 Sabarkantha - - 3 03 Surendernagar 5 3 - 1 09 Total 10 4 21 1 - 36 2 Karnataka Kolar 4 2 - - - 06 Bidar 8 5 - - - 13 Chitraddurga 12 5 - - - 17 Total 24 12 - - - 36 3 Kerala Kollam 15 4 - - - 19 Palghat - - 20 - - 20 Total 15 4 20 - - 39 4 Maharashtra Sangli 16 4 - - - 20 Total 16 4 - - - 20 5 Orissa Angul 10 3 - - - 13 Balasore 1 - - - - 01 Boudh 12 3 - - - 15 Cuttack 3 4 - - - 07 Mayurbhanj 7 4 - - - 11 Nuapada 5 - - - - 05 Sundergarh 22 3 - - - 25 Total 60 17 - - - 77 6 RAJASTHAN Hanumangarh 1 1 - - 02 Churu 1 - 5 06 aisalmer 2 1 2 - - 05J kaner - - - - 01Bi 1 ikar -S 1 - - - 01 lwar 1 - 07A 1 5 - pur - - 5 - 05Jai - Total 7 3 17 - 27- 7 Uttar Pradesh Chandauli 6 3 - - 09- Sonebhadra 11 1 - - - 12 Total 4 - 117 - - 2 GRAND TOTAL 48 1 - 6149 58 25
  • 188. 17. GROUND MANAGEME IN TRIBAL AREAS The Central Ground Board, in its 2 8 ve sis Ground Water Ma t Studies an di fa under tribal areas o ntry. An area of 39402 sq. km. wa Tribal areas the country and 1 es (EW- 107, OW-43 & PZ-46) we Tribal areas explore the possibility tapping potential aqu rs. T f coverag r Ground Water gement Studies a rat illing t are show ables & 17. Fig 17 7.2 re vely. e 17.1 : AREAS COVERED UNDER GROU ATER MANAGEMENT STUDIES IN TRIBAL AREAS DURING 2007-2008 Reg state Di Achievement .) WATER Water nagemen f the cou 96 bore hol NT STUDIES 007-200 d exploratory Annual Acti drilling pro on Plan ga gramme in s covered in re drilled in empha stricts to lling of to of ife he status o e unde Mana nd explo ory dr in ribal areas n in T 17.1 2. and .1 & 1 specti Tabl ND W Sl. No ions/ strict (Sq.Km 1. NORTH CENTRAL REGION Satna 4351 Madhya Pradesh Total 4351 2. NORTH CENTRAL HATTIS REG Dh ri CH GARH ION amta 1000 Chhattisgar Kah nker 3000 Total 4000 3. EASTERN REGION Bankura 4256 West Beng B n 1005al ardhma Malda & Dakshin Dinajpur 2888 Coochbehar & uriJalpaig 846 Total 7303 4. SOUTH ERN REGION Vi aram 0zianag 300 Andhra Pradesh Total 3000 5. MID EAST EGIO Ko aERN R N darm 1770 Jharkhand Total 1770 6. NORTH EASTERN REGION Arunachal W engPradesh est Kam 3000 Meghalaya Ja ills 3000intia H Total 6000 7. SOUTH EA RE Mayurbhanj 6STERN GION 1070 Orissa Sundergarh 2272 T 8otal 1297 GRAN L 2D TOTA 3940
  • 189. Table 1 2 : EXPLORATORY WELLS DRILLED IN “TRIBAL” AREA DURING 2007-2008 (by Departmental Rigs) Sl. No States Districts EW OW PZ SH DW Total 7. 1. Andhra Pradesh Vishakhapatanam 11 3 3 - - 17 Total 11 03 03 - - 17 2. Arunachal Pradesh West Kameng 1 - - - - 01 Total 01 - - - - 01 3. Assam Dhemaji 3 3 - - - 06 Kamrup 4 - - - - 04 Kokrajhar 2 - - - - 02 Total 09 03 - - - 12 4. Bihar Munger 9 4 - - - 13 Total 09 04 - - - 13 5. Chattisgarh Champa 1 - -- 01 Kanker 13 6 - - 19 Raigarh - - 7 - -- 07 Total 13 07 07 - - 27 6. Gujarat Dahod - - 1 - - 01 Bharuch - - 1 - - 01 Narmada 1 - 4 - - 05 Kheda - - 1 - - 01 Sabarkantha - - 1 - - 01 Vadodara - - 6 - - 06 Panchmahal - - 3 - - 03 Total 01 - 17 - - 18 7. Jharkhand Ranchi - - 4 - - 04 Simdega 7 5 - - - 12 Total 07 05 04 - - 16 8. Madhya Pradesh Betul 14 8 7 - - 29 Dindori 12 2 3 - - 17 Multai - 1 - - - 01 Mandla 12 6 5 - - 23 Total 38 17 15 - - 70 9. Maharashtra Raigarh 12 2 - - - 14 Total 12 2 - - - 14 10. Meghalaya Ri-Bhoi 4 2 - - - 06 Total 4 2 - - - 06 11. We - 01st Bengal Darjeeling 1 - - - 1 - - - 01Jalpaiguri - 02 - - - - 02Total Grand Total 107 43 46 - -- 196
  • 190. 18. M SED ON GEC - 1997 HO As per a und water resource potential need to be re- assess i , the ground water resource of the entire countr e l Ground Water Board and the States ed on the Ground water resources estimation methodology, (GEC – 97) . The T reasse is esti bcm. 8%. The state – wise availability of nd water resources is given in Table 18.1. The development untry has not been uniform. Highly intensi over – exploitation ater resources out of 5723 ssment units (Block/Mandals/Talukas) in the country, 839 units in various States have categorized as ‘ over-exploited’ i.e. the annual ground water draft exceeds the annual enishable ground water resources and significant decline in long term ground water level d has been observed either in pre-monsoon or post-monsoon or both. In addition 226 re ‘Critical’ where the stage of ground water development is 100% of annual plenishable ground water resource and significant decline is observed in the long term r level trend in both pre-monsoon and post-monsoon periods. There are 550 semi- ritical units, where the stage of ground water development is between 70 - 90% and gnificant decline in long term water level trend has been recorded in either Pre-monsoon or nsoon. The state – wise status of over – exploited and critical and semi-critical areas iven in Table 18.2. ESTI ATION OF GROUND WATER RESOURCE BA MET DOLOGY the N tional Water Policy 2002, the gro ed per odically on scientific basis. Accordingly y is b ing re-assessed jointly by the Centra bas otal Annual Replenishable Ground Water Resources of the Country have been ssed as 433 Billion Cubic Metres (bcm) and the Net Annual Ground Water Availability mated as 399 bcm. Annual Ground Water Draft as on March, 2004 for all uses is 231 The Stage of Ground Water Development is 5 grou of ground water in different areas of the Co ve development of ground water in certain areas in the country has resulted in . As per the latest assessment of ground w asse been Repl tren units a re wate c si Post-mo is g
  • 191. Table 18.1: STATE-WISE GOUND WATER RESOURCES AVAILABILITY, UTILIZATION AND STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT Annual Ground Water DraftSl. No. States/ UTs Annual Replenis- hable Ground Water Resource Natural Discharge during non- Monsoon season Net Annual Ground Water Availability Irrigation Domestic and Industrial uses Total Stage of Ground Water Develop ment (%) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 States 1 Andhra Pradesh 36.50 3.55 32.95 13.88 1.02 14.90 45 2 Arunachal Pradesh 2.56 0.26 2.30 0.0008 0 0.0008 0.04 3 Assam 27.23 2.34 24.89 4.85 0.59 5.44 22 4 Bihar 29.19 1.77 27.42 9.39 1.37 10.77 39 5 Chattisgarh 14.93 1.25 13.68 2.31 0.48 2.80 20 6 Delhi 0.30 0.02 0.28 0.20 0.28 0.48 170 7 Goa 0.28 0.02 0.27 0.04 0.03 0.07 27 8 Gujarat 15.81 0.79 15.02 10.49 0.99 11.49 76 9 Haryana 9.31 0.68 8.63 9.10 0.35 9.45 109 10 Himachal Pradesh 0.43 0.04 0.39 0.09 0.02 0.12 30 11 Jammu & Kashmir 2.70 0.27 2.43 0.10 0.24 0.33 14 12 Jharkhand 5.58 0.33 5.25 0.70 0.38 1.09 21 13 Karnataka 15.93 0.63 15.30 9.75 0.97 10.71 70 14 Kerala 6.84 0.61 6.23 1.82 1.10 2.92 47 15 Madhya 37.19 1.86 35.33 16.08 1.04 17.12 48 Pradesh 16 14.24 0.85 15.09 48Maharashtra 32.96 1.75 31.21 17 Manipur 0.38 0.04 0.34 0.002 0.0005 0.002 0.65 18 8Meghalaya 1.15 0.12 1.04 0.00 0.002 0.002 0.1 19 Mizoram 0.04 0.004 0.04 0.00 0.0004 0.0004 0.90 20 Nagaland 0.36 0.04 0.32 0.00 0.009 0.009 3 21 3.01 0.84 3.85 18Orissa 23.09 2.08 21.01 22 Punjab 23.78 2.33 21.44 30.34 0.83 31.16 145 23 Rajasthan 11.56 1.18 10.38 11.60 1.39 12.99 125 24 Sikkim 0.00 0.01 0.01 160.08 - 0.08 25 Tamil Nadu 23.07 2.31 20.76 16.77 0.88 17.65 85 26 Tripura 2.19 0.22 1.97 0.08 0.09 0.17 9 27 Uttar Pradesh 76.35 6.17 70.18 45.36 3.42 48.78 70 28 Uttaranchal 2.27 0.17 2.10 1.34 0.05 1.39 66 29 West Bengal 30.36 2.90 27.46 10.84 081 11.65 42 Total States 432.43 33.73 398.70 212.38 18.04 230.44 58 Union Territories 1 Andam Nicoba an & r 0.330 0.005 0.320 0.000 0.010 0.010 4 2 Chandigarh 0.023 0.002 0.020 0.000 0.000 0.000 0 3 Dadra Haveli & Nagar 0.063 0.003 0.060 0.001 0.007 0.009 14
  • 192. Annual Ground Water DraftSl. No. States/ UTs Annual hable Natural Discharge during Net Annual GroundReplenis- Water Availability Irrigation Domestic and Industrial Total Deve men Ground Water Resource non- Monsoon season uses Stage of Ground Water lop t (%) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 4 Daman & Diu 0.009 0.0004 0.008 0.007 0.002 0.009 107 5 Lakshdweep 0.012 0.009 0.004 0.000 0.002 0.002 63 6 Pondic 0.151 105herry 0.160 0.016 0.144 0.121 0.030 Total Uts 0.597 0.036 0.556 0.129 0.051 0.181 33 Grand Total 433.02 33.77 399.25 212.51 18.09 230.62 58 able 18.2: CATEGORIZATION OF BLOCKS/ MANDALS/ TALUKAS IN INDIA AS ON 31 T Semi- l Critical Over- exploited Remarks st MARCH, 2004 Critica Sl. No. States /Union Te Total No. Assessed rritories of Units Nos. % Nos. % Nos. % Nos. States 1 Andhra Pradesh 1231 175 14 77 6 219 18 - 2 Arunachal Pradesh 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 3 Assam 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 4 Bihar 515 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 5 Chattis 146garh 8 5 0 0 0 0 - 6 Delhi 9 0 0 0 0 7 78 - 7 Goa 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 8 Gujarat 223 69 31 12 5 31 14 Rest 14 talukas Saline 9 Haryana 113 5 4 11 10 55 49 - 10 Himachal Pradesh 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 11 Jammu & Kashmir 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 12 Jharkhand 208 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 13 Karnataka 175 14 8 3 2 65 37 - 14 Kerala 151 30 20 15 10 5 3 - 15 Madhya Pradesh 312 19 6 5 2 24 8 - 16 Maharashtra 318 23 7 1 0 7 2 - 17 Manipur 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 18 Meghalaya 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 19 Mizoram 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 20 Nagaland 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 21 Orissa 314 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rest 6 blocks Saline 22 Punjab 137 4 3 5 4 103 75 - 23 Rajasthan 237 14 6 50 21 140 59 Rest 1 block Saline 24 Sikkim 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 25 Tamil Nadu 385 57 15 33 9 142 37 Rest 8 blocks Saline 26 Tripura 38 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 27 Uttar Pradesh 803 88 11 13 2 37 5 - 28 Uttaranchal 17 3 18 0 0 2 12 - 29 West Bengal 269 37 14 1 0 0 0 - Total States 5705 546 10 226 4 837 15 - Union Territories 1 Andaman & Nicobar 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
  • 193. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 -2 Chandigarh 3 Dadra & Nag Haveli ar 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 4 Daman & Diu 2 1 50 0 0 1 50 - 5 Lakshdweep 9 3 33 0 0 0 0 - 6 Pondicherry 4 0 0 0 0 1 25 Rest 1 Region Saline Total UTs 18 4 22 0 0 2 11 1 Grand Total 5723 550 10 226 4 839 15 30 Blocks- Biha Haryana, Jharkhand, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Manipur, Mizoram, Orissa Mandals (com Talukas - Go ra Districts - Ar Districts (Va State – Sikki Islands – La UT - Andama & Diu, Pondicherry. r, Chhattisgarh, , Punjab, Rajasthan, Tamilnadu, Tripura, Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal , West Bengal mand/ non-command) - Andhra Pradesh a, Gujarat, Karnataka, Maharasht unachal Pradesh, Assam, Delhi, Meghalaya, Nagaland lley) - Himachal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir m kshdweep n & Nicobar, Chandigarh, Dadra & Nagar Haveli,Daman
  • 194. 19. TECHNICAL EXAMINATION OF MAJOR AND MEDIUM IRRIGATION SCHEMES As per th directives of the Planning Commission, the Board is scrutinizing the major and medium i gation project reports/proposals from the point of view of their impact on ground water reg e and specific recommendations are being made to protect quality and quantity of ground water. During the year 2007-08 , Nineteen major irrigation project proposals of Centr l Water Commission listed below were examined and area specific recomme dations were made. i. Nanak Sagar Irrigation Project, U.P. ii. Ambala- Naraingarh Irrigation Scheme, Haryana iii iki-Sarovar, Chitrakoot iv Krishna – Koyna, Sangli, Maharastra v Lower Pedhi, Maharashtra v Lendi Major Irrigation Project, Maharashtra v Malprabha Irrigation Project, Karnataka v Tembu Lift Irrigation Project, Maharashtra ix. Upper Wardha Project, Maharashtra x. Indira Sagar ( Polavaram), A.P. x pargi Major Irrigation Project, Karnataka x Bhadra Reservoir Project, Karnataka x Harrangi Major Irrigation Project , Karnataka xi . Hemavati Major Irrigation Project , Karnataka . xv. Yagachi Major Irrigation Project, Karnataka . x . Malampuzha Irrigation Project, Kerala x Badaun Irrigation Project (U.P.) x Polavaram Irrigation Project (A.P.) xix. Vamsdhara Irrigation Project (A.P.) The Board is also scrutinizing Research & Development proposals submitted to Indian National Committee on Irrigation and Drainage (INCID) for funding from the point of v w of its necessity, quality and cost. During the year, following 2 R&D proposals e rri im a n . Walm . . i. ii. iii. i. Hip ii. iii. v vi vii. viii. ie were received from INCID and were examined. i. “Estimation of Irrigation Return Flow in parts of the selected Canal Command areas in Uttarakhand & Haryana” ii. “Environment impact, Socio-economic aspects and Policy issues for managing water resources in hot arid region”.
  • 195. 20. REMOTE SENSING STUDIES Satellit Ground ground use stu studies during The following Application sensing and conventional methods pact a ng Artifi Recharge structures in Hosadurga taluk, Chitradurga district, Karnataka ; Remote sens stud ibility studie r reclam Ravines using remote sensing techniques in Sawai Madhopur district, Rajasthan ; Demarcation of younger alluvium (Vu tamination) along Ganga iver, Bi ion with BIT Mesra ; Hydrogeomorphological mapping and delineation of grou ntial areas using remo niques in Ganjam district, O sa ; ies for dema ting rt of Sengar river watersh Kanpur D , Uttar Pradesh; Ground Wat Management using Remo g Pithoragarh di ; Remote Sensing Studie in Lakh ; Remote Se thern parts of Vizianag m dist esh ; Feas ity stud of Ravines using remote sing saur and in d e images/ aerial photographs / remote sensing soft ware are being utilized by Central Water Board for Ground Water studies . These studies provide S&T back up to water exploratory drilling programme, ground water management studies, conjunctive dies, mathematical modeling, ground water pollution studies and artificial recharge . Central Ground Water Board has taken up the following Remote Sensing studies 2007-08. studies were initiated during 2007-08 of Remote in Im ssessment of existi cial ing ies in Neyyar basin in Kerala; Feas s fo ation of lnerable to arsenic con R har in collaborat nd water pote ility studte sensing tech Ravines area in pa ris ed, Feasib ehatrca er Development and strict, Uttarakhand te Sensin s and GIS Techniques in impur district, Assam nsing Studies in Nor ies for reclamation ara sen rict, Andhra Prad chniques in Mandibil te Ujja istricts, Madhya Pradesh .
  • 196. 21. It is the earnest endeavor of Central Ground Water Board to keep its technical personnel rilling techniques. The Board also i andidates from abroad for different training programmes. 21.1 RAINING PROGRAMME ON “AR IAL RECHA O GROUND WA VESTIN Tra rtificial Recharge t nd Rain Water Har d on 22nd Nov. 2 7 a As a part of creating in Ban 5th Nov. 2007, three school longwith volunteers of CMCA (Children’s Movement for Civic Awar ited regional office at Bangalore. They were briefed about the activities of the department. Related bro on rainwater h esti on of ground water were distributed. A Popular write up entit d “ Prasangya Bhujal” (About Gro Hydroge CGWB, Eastern Region , Kolkata , was published in local language (Bengali) in Oct.’07 publication of Y & Br cas 21.2 HYDROLOGY PROJECT • ne aising Programme” for Hydrologi Group (HDUG) under Hydrology Project-II was organized on 10 th March, wan, Chandigarh. cr wer), Govt. of Punjab had pr gural session. • Awareness training programme on HIS has been orga Goa under Hydrology oj 08. Regional Director, Suptd. Hydroge am of officers from SWR & WKSU attended the training programm s from State epa stitution and Centra ate fited from the technical presentations by SWR officers and certificates were also distributed. • ne e on “Hydrogeologi l Informatio nder Hydrology Project-II was organized at Lecture Hall, Inspectorat oilers, Altino, Panji, oa . Sh. A.M. Wacha Sund Prin er, PWD, Govt. of Goa was the chief guest. Sh. P.S.Nadkarni, Chief En ources Department, n . Shri T.M. Hunse, D. h e Function. 21.3 NT ri ptdg. Hydrogeologist An h. ak, Scientist successfully completed the International Training & Research course on Ground Water ov Theory & Practice org International Water Management Institute (IWMI) as Senior Fellow a ior Fellow respectively. 21.4 RAJIV GANDHI NATIONAL GROUND WATER AINING AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE g courses including one special training course were conducted during 2007 - 08 under Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training and HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT apprised with the latest development in all aspects related to ground water and d ncludes trainees from State Departments and c T TIFIC RGE T TER AND RAIN WATER HAR G ♦ ining Programme on “A o Ground Water a vesting” was conducte civic awareness on water 00 t Srikakulam, Andhra Pradesh. conservation by children galore city, on students a eness), an NGO vis chures and postures arv ng and conservati le und water) by shri A. Ray, Suptdg ologist and HOO, ojana by Ministry of Information oad ting. TRAINING UNDER O Day “Awareness R cal Data User 2008 at Bhujal Bha ided over the inauSe etary (Irrigation and Po es nized at Panji, ologist along with tePr ect II on 12-03-20 e. A total 26 trainee ssion had bened rtments, Educational In l W r Commi O day Training Programm ca n System” u e of Factories & B ipal Chief EngineG on 12 th March, 2008 ar, c gineer, Water Res d presided over thPa ji was the Guest of Honour R. a I ERNATIONAL TRAININGS Sh K. C. Naik, Su d S N.C.Nay G ernance in Asia: anized by nd Jun TR Seventeen trainin Research Institute. The details of training courses are given below - ♦ A special training course for Mechenical Staff of CGWB was conducted from 25-28th June 2007 at M/s Eicher Motors Limited, Faridabad.
  • 197. ♦ A 12 weeks “Induction Level Training Course “ was started from 15th November, 2007 and it is to be completed on 8th February , 2008 at Faridabad/Jaipur. 11 trainees from Central Ground Water Board are ♦ Eight weeks training course on “Water Well Drilling – Techniques, Principles and Practices” was th . 20 trai A ing course on ement for Store d during 1 Region, Divis the trai ♦ A training course on “Artificial Hydrogeological Conditions ” was 2007 at Faridabad. 17 officers attended the training course and wer o plan design and implement the artificial recharge schemes. A g course for drafts man ter Aided Drawing, D ng and Digitization” was December 2007 at NITTTR, Chenn m Central G Board and o er / State Govt. organizations at the training. ♦ A Refresher course on Surface Res Hydrogeologists was conducted during 03-14th December 2007 at Hyderabad. 20 trainees atte ed nd State D . ♦ Administrative Training for staff o December 2007 – 4th January 20 , New Delhi. 25 trainees attended the training course. ♦ A Refresher course for Chemi ation, Graphical p ality co ol during 03-1 th December 2007 at Kolkata. 20 fr of CGWB and St De ♦ A two weeks Refresher course on Management Software (GEMS) was cond th January 2008 at Faridabad. 17 trainees at emists of CGWB and State Departments. A trai course on Application of W oration and Ma gem 21st Ja to 2nd February 200 from S rs of CGWB and te A one wee G was conducted during 11-15th Februa attended the training course. ♦ A one week training course on Gro on & Control) was successfully organized during 3 March, 2008 to 7 March 2008 at Central Ground Water Authority, New Delhi which was attended by 12 trainees of the Board including State departments. ♦ A training course on Administrative & Financial matter for Senior Officers of Central Ground Water Board was successfully conducted from 10 - 14th attending the course. Equipment and Management” was conducted during July 02-August 24, 2007 at Bhopal. 18 trainees from Regions and Division offices of CGWB have attended the course. ♦ A two weeks training course on “Man gementa th conducted during 30 July to 10 August 2007 at ASCI, Hyderabad nees have attended the training course. ♦ one week train ficers” was conducte “Material Manag st of 17-21 September,2007 at Bhopal. Total 9 trainees from ning course. ion and Unit Offices of CGWB have attended Recharge Techniques in Different conducted from 19th to 23rd November, from various Regions and Unit offices e trained t ♦ trainin on “Compu esigni conducted during 26th November to 7th ai. Total 20 officials fro round Water th Central tended istivity Surface for Geophysicists/ nd the training from CGWB a epartments f CGWB was conducted during 31st 08 at ISTM sts on Interpret resentation and qu ntr of water quality data was conducted 4 om Chemists trainees attended the training partments. Ground Water Estimation and ate ucted during 07-18 tended the training from Ch ♦ ning Geophysical Techniques for Ground ater Expl na ent was conducted during l 26 traineesnuary 2008 8 at Patna. Tota cientific Office k Refresher course on Sta Departments attended the course. round Water Resource Estimation ry 2008 at Faridabad. 17 trainees have und Water Management (Regulati rd th ♦
  • 198. March 2008 at IIPA, New Delhi which was attended by 16 trainee officers of the Board. ♦ A Two weeks training course on “Mathematical Modelling of Ground Water System” was inaugurated on 25th March 2008 and successfully completed on 5th April 2008 at IIT, Roorkee. 15 trainees have been attended the course. ♦ A Two weeks training course on “Application of Remote Sensing & GIS in Ground Water System was successfully conducted during 25th February 2008 to 7th March 2008 at IIRS, Dehradun. 17 trainees have been attended the course. Total 305 trainees from various disciplines have been trained in the above training courses conducted at various places during the year.
  • 199. 22. TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION AND PUBLICATION Results of i stig s rrie out by T Ce l G und Wate ar er bly docum nted e form of reports and ma All he fie d off s ha e be ro d with port processing sections, which are responsible for the scrutiny and issuance of reports of arious assignments carried out by its officers. rious type rts issued by ional offices of the Board were as follows: 22.1.1 State Reports State Reports containing complete details of ground water surveys, exploration and other ground water related information are compiled and prepared for the status of ground water development in the State. Based upon reports, ground water development perspectives are worked out and future strategies are planned. During 2007-2008, State Reports of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar , Meghalaya and Puducherry UT were prepared. 22.1.2 District Reports The Central Ground Water Board is piling and issuing district reports of each district from time to time containin all the results of ground water surveys, exploration and other related studies. Further, groundwater development perspectives are also worked out for the benefit of State and other users agencies. The reports have been found very useful for their s ategies for future. During 2007-08, 30 district red and submitted. Region wise status of preparation of District Reports are presented in Table 22.1 Table 22.1: STATUS OF DISTRICT REPORTS COMPLETED Sl No nve ation ca d he ntra ro r Bo d w e suita e in th ps. t l ice v en p vide re v 22.1 REPORTS Details of va of technical repo respective reg com g tr reports were prepa DURING 2007-2008 . Regions Nos. Name of District Report 1 North Western Himalayan Region 1 Rajouri 2 North Western region 3 Sangrur, Jind, Chandigarh 3 Western Region 1 Dausa 4 West Central Region 2 Navsari submitted & Valsad 5 North Central Region 2 Katni, Anuppur 6 North Central Chhatisgarh Region 3 Kawardha, Bastar & Kanker 7 Central Region 1 Sangli 8 Northern Region 1 Lakhimpur Kheri 9 Eastern Region 3 Hugli, Murshidabad & Bankura 10 & Pupumpare North Eastern Region 3 Kokrajhar , Chirang
  • 200. Sl No . Regions Nos. Name of District Report 11 South Eastern Region 3 Nowarangpur, Deogarh & Phulbani 12 Southern Region 1 Vizianagaram 13 3 U.Kannada, SouthSouth Western Region Goa and Chikamagalur 14 Thissur, Thiruvananthapuram . Kerala Region 2 15. SUO, Delhi 1 North Delhi Total 30 22.1.3 h in Table 22.2 2007-08 Water Year book prepared Ground Water Year Book The Central Ground Water Board is compiling ground water year books to elucidate the changes in ground water levels and water quality. The accurate monitoring of the ground water levels and its quality both in space and time are the main requisite for assessment, scientific development and planning of t is vital resource. During 2007- 08, 23 reports were prepared . Region wise status of preparation of ground water year book are presented Table 22.2: STATUS OF GROUND WATER YEAR BOOKS COMPLETED DURING GroundSl No Nos. State . Region 1 North West Himalayan Region 1 Jammu & Kashmir 2. North Himalayan Region 1 Himachal Pradesh 3 North Western region 3 Punjab, Haryana & Chandigarh 4 Western Region 1 Rajasthan 5 West Central Region 1 Gujarat 6. tral region 1 Madhya Pradesh North Cen 7. North Central Chhatisgarh Region 1 Chhattisgarh 8. Central Region 1 Maharashtra 9. Northern Region 1 Uttar Pradesh 1 . Mid Eastern Region 2 Bihar, Jharkhand 0 11. Eastern Region 1 West Bengal 12 North Eastern region 1 North Eastern States
  • 201. Ground Water Year book preparedSl. Region Nos.No State 13 South Eastern region 1 Orissa 1 gion 14 Andhra Pradesh Southern Re 15 ataka, Goa South Western Region 2 Karn 16 South Eastern Coastal Region 1 Tamilnadu 17 Kerala Region 1 Kerala 18. Uttaranchal Region 1 Uttarakhand 1 . SUO, Delhi 1 Delhi 9 23Total BHUJAL NEWS22.3 oard e ical notes, news items , and regular columns. The journal has o 20 hand een printed and issued. Vol. No. 22, 2007 issue is under finalization. 22.4 he states of aka, adu Bhujal News, is a quarterly journal being published by Central Ground Water B highlighting the latest advances in ground water research. Besides scientific papers, th journal also contains techn more than 1500 readers from all over the country. During the year 2007-08, the Vol. N (3 & 4), special issue on Rajasthan State and Vol. No. 21 special issue on Uttarak state has b Ground Water information Booklets During 2007-08, 79 Ground Water information Booklets have been released in t Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Karnat Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Meghalaya, Orissa, Punjab, Rajsthan, Tamil N and West Bengal. . The details are given in Table 22.3. Table 22.3 :GROUND WATER INFORMATION BOOKLETS RELEASED DURING 2007-08 Sl. No. Name of States Nos. Name of Districts 1. Andhra Pradesh 16 farmers distress districts of Guntur, Prakasham, Nellore, Chittoor, Kudapa, Anantpur, Kurnool, Mehboobnagar, Ranga Reddy, Medak, Nizamabad, Adilabad, Karimnagar, Warangal, Khammam, Nalgonda 2. Assam 1 Dhemaji district 3. Bihar 5 Aurangaba, Jamui (Hindi), Vaishali(Hindi), Munger & Lakhisarai districts 4. Chhattisgarh 1 Kanker 5. Haryana 7 Ambala, Panipat , Rohtak, Hissar, Kurukshetra, Yamunanagar and Karnal districts 6. Himachal Pradesh 3 Solan, Mandi and Una districts
  • 202. 7. Karnataka 6 farmers distress districts of Belgaum, Kodagu, Hassan, Chikmanglur, Shimoga, Chitradurga 8. Kerala 3 farmers distress districts of Palaghat, Kasargod & Wyanad 9. Madhya Pradesh 4 Dewas, Chhindwara, Anuppur and B districts 10. Maharashtra 6 farmers distress districts of Akola, Amravati, Washim, Buldhana, Yavatmal & Wardha 11. Meghalaya 1 East Khasi Hills district 12. Orissa 2 Bhadrak and Bolangir districts 13. Punjab 5 SAS Nagar, Hoshiarpur, Ropar, Nawanshahar and Bhatinda districts 14. Rajasthan 3 Chittore, Jalore and Jaipur districts 15. Tamil Nadu 1 Thiruvalore district 16. West Bengal 15 Birbhum, Murshidabad, Darjeeling, Purba Medinipur, Uttar Dinajpur, Bankura, N24 Parganas, Puruliya, Haora, Bardhaman, Dakshin Dinajpur, Malda,S24 Parganas, PaschimMedinipur, Hugli districts Total 79
  • 203. 23. IM ANNUAL R Progress PLEMENTATION OF RTI ACT-2005 ETURN INFORMATION (2007-08) during 2007-08 up to March, 2008 Particula rejected accepted rs Opening balance as on 01.04.2007 Received during the year(including cases transferred to other public No of cases transferred to other public Decisions where requests/ Decisions where requests/ Authority Authorities Requests 02 123 - 1 124 First Appeals 3 3 No. of ca taken ag ses where disciplinary action ainst any officer NIL No of CAPIOs designated No of CPIOs designated No. of AAs designated 16 20 1 No of times various provisions were invoked while rejecting requests Relevant Sections of RTI Act 2005 Section –8(1) Sections a b c d e f g h i j 9 11 24 other 1 Amount of charges Collected(in Rs) Registration fee amount Additional fee & Any other charges Penalties Amount 1270=00 18805=00 NIL
  • 204. 24. 24.1 • WR) regarding • andigarh attended meeting on Minister, Hon’ble Finance • – D, NWR, • P. Srivastava, Regional Director, NWHR, Jammu attended meeting with Hon’ble Union Minister of Water Resources at Shram Shakti Bhawan on iscussed regarding progress of exploration in Kashmir Valley. • Chairman, CGWB and Regional Director (I/C), NWHR, Jammu attended briefing • on’ble Minister (WR) in his • nal Director, NWR, Shri S.Marwah, Scientist – D and Shri ion • NWHR, Jammu attended meeting with 24.2 AMMING BOARD • Secretary, SGPAB requested GWB to take up investigation in the Coalfield area, mainly along NH – 2 to find idence and development of cracks on the road network in area probably due to decline in ground water level. This • t attended the meeting of the 41st State Geological Programming • erintending Hydrogeologist attended 49th State MEETINGS MEETINGS WITH HON’BLE MINISTER/VIP Chairman,CGWB attended meeting Chaired by Hon’ble Minister ( National Ground Water Congress at Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 29.08.2007. The Regional Director, North Western Region, Ch 14.02.2008 at Chandigarh under the Chairmanship of Hon’ble Chief Minister of Punjab to review the work in water logged areas of Muktsar district, Punjab. The meeting was also attended by the Hon’ble Irrigation Minister, Punjab and Principal Secretary (Irrigation & Power) along with other officers from Punjab Government. Shri Sushil Gupta, Regional Director and Shri S. Marwah, Scientist assisted Chairman, CGWB in a meeting with the Hon’ble Chief Minister of Punjab regarding “Water Logging problem in Muktsar district, Punjab. Shri C. 10.10.2007 and d meeting with the Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources in his Chamber at Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 22.06.2007 regarding progress of work in Kashmir. Chairman CGWB attended 1st Meeting of Advisory Council of the International Seminar on Water Management taken by the H Chamber of Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 11.07.2007. Shri Sushil Gupta, Regio S.K. Saigal, Scientist – B attended a meeting taken by Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources at Haryana Bhawan, Chandigarh on 8th September 2007. During the meeting various issues relating to groundwater in the states of Punjab and Haryana were discussed. The meeting was also attended by Hon’ble Irrigat Minister of Haryana, Principal Secretary, Power and Irrigation Haryana and Engineer in Chief, Haryana. Shri C.P. Srivastava, Regional Director, Hon’ble Union Minister of Water Resources in Kashmir on 14.10.2007 and discussed regarding working of State Unit Office, Srinagar. MEETING OF GEOLOGICAL PROGR The 35th meeting of State Geological Programming and Advisory Board (SGPAB) held on 20th June, 2007 at Kolkata, the Member C out the possible reason for localized land subs work, forms part of GWMS for AAP 2007-08. Shri K. C. Naik, Suptdg Hydrogeologist and Shri. G. C. Pati, Suptdg. Hydrogeologis Board organized by Directorate of Geology, Govt. of Orissa on 20.07.2007 at Hotel Marrion, Bhubaneswar. Shrii E.Sampath Kumar, Sup Geological Programming Board meeting at Chennai on 22.06.2007 and presented the progress of work during AAP 2006-07.
  • 205. • Chairman attended 42nd Meeting of Central Geological Programming Board (CGPB) by GSI held on 27.09.2007 at New Delhi. 24.3 WATER THROUGH DUG WELLS t presentation before the Hon’ble Minister (WR) on “CCEA note on formulation of • l Region participated in First Meeting of the 24.4. • an and Member (SML) attended briefing meeting in connection with • fing meeting taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) regarding • fing meeting of Lok Sabha Parliament • n’ble Minister (WR) in his Chamber on 10.08.2007. • Chairman and Member (SML) attended briefing meeting on Lok Sabha Starred • nd Member (SML) attended briefing meeting on Lok Sabha Starred question taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) in his Chamber, Shram Shakti Bhawan, • • • estion taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) in his Chamber on 15.11.2007, 16-11-2007 & 19- MEETING ON ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND • Chairman, CGWB and Superintending Hydrogeologist made a powerpoin scheme on Artificial Recharge of Ground Water through Dug Wells” at New Delhi on 6.07.2007 . Scientist of CGWB, West Centra State Level Steering Committee on “Artificial Recharge to Ground Water through Dug Wells” under Chairpersonship of Chief Secretary, on 18th March 2008 at Gandhinagar. PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEE MEETINGS Chairm examination of Demand for Grants 2007-2008 of Ministry of Water Resources in Parliament Annexe, New Delhi taken by Parliamentary Standing Committee on 04.04.2007. • Chairman and Member (SML) attended briefing meeting of Parliamentary Standing Committee on Water Resources at Parliament Annex, New Delhi regarding Oral evidence of Ministry of Water Resources on 10.04.2007. • Chairman attended briefing meeting on Starred Parliament Question due on 8.05.2007 by Hon’ble Minister (WR) in his Chamber on 4.05.2007. • Chairman attended briefing meeting on Parliament Question by Hon’ble Minister of State (WR) in his Chamber on 10.05.2007. • Chairman attended briefing meeting taken by Hon’ble Minister of State (WR) regarding Rajya Sabha Starred Parliament Question in his Chamber on 12.05.2007. Chairman attended brie Parliament Question in his Chamber on 14.05.2007. Chairman and Member (SML) attended brie question taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) in his Chamber New Delhi on March10 and March18,2008. Chairman and Member (SML) attended briefing meeting on Lok Sabha Starred question taken by Ho question taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) at his residence on 12.08.2007. Chairman a New Delhi on 13.08.2007. Chairman attended briefing meeting on 30.08.2007 & 31.08.2007taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) regarding Lok Sabha Starred Parliament Question due on 3.09.2007 at Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi. Chairman attended meeting with Hon’ble Prime Minister regarding Lok Sabha Starred Question of Ministry of Environment and Forests at Parliament House, New Delhi on 5.09.2007. Chairman and Member(SML) attended briefing meeting on Parliament qu 11-2007.
  • 206. • • • • • Secretary (WR) on Parliament tanding Committee on Water Resources in his chamber on 25-03-2008. • 24.5 • • done during AAP 2007-08, Annual Action Plan 2008-09, llow up action on decisions taken in previous meeting, Administrative & 24.6 • atory Action Research Programme at Sewa Bhawan, R.K. Puram, New Delhi on 28.06.2007. • 24.7 • hairman attended Meeting of the Consultative Committee of Ministry of Water Res 17.0 Chairman and Director (Admn.) attended the Second subcommittee of Committee of parliament on implementation of Rashtrabhasha on 31.01.2008 held at CGWB, South Western Region, Bangalore. Regional Director and Supddtg. Hydrogeologist, Hindi officer, Administrative Officer also attended the same. Chairman attended briefing meeting of Rajya Sabha Parliament question taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) in his chamber, New Delhi on March03-04,March07 and March11,2008. Member and Senior Officers attended briefing meeting on Rajya Sabha, Parliament question taken by JS (A) in his Chamber, New Delhi on 06-03-2008. Chairman and Member (SML) and other Senior officers of the Board attended briefing meeting of Lok Sabha Starred question taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) in his Chamber, New Delhi on 9 & 17-03-2008. Chairman attended briefing meeting taken by S Chairman, Member (SML) and Regional Director (HP) attended Meeting on 26-03- 2008 regarding Parliamentary Standing Committee on Water Resources for oral evidence of Representative of Ministry in connection with examination of Demand for grant 2008-09 at Parliament House, New Delhi. REGIONAL DIRECTORS MEETING OF CGWB A Review meeting for Regional Directors was held during 13-14th September 2007 at CGWB, Bhujal Bhawan, Faridabad. Chairman CGWB, Members, Director (Administration), FAO , Regional Directors, Executive Engineers and other senior officers of the Board attended the meeting . The various items like Progress of work done during AAP 2007-08, follow up action on decisions taken in previous meeting, Administrative & Financial matters were discussed during the meeting. A Review meeting for Regional Directors was held during 15 – 16th February 2008 at CGWB, Bhujal Bhawan, Faridabad. Joint Secretary (A) MOWR, Chairman CGWB, Director (Admn.) MOWR, Members, Director (Admn.), Consultant MOWR, FAO , Regional Directors, Superintending Engineers and other senior officers of the Board attended the meeting . The various items like Progress of work fo Financial matters were discussed during the meeting. MEETING ON FARMER’S PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH PROGRAMME On the behalf of Chairman, CGWB, Scientist – D attended 3rd Meeting of Project Implementation Team (PIT) constituted by the Ministry of Water Resources for operationalization of Farmer Particip Chairman attended Review meeting of (FPARP) Farmer’s Participation Action Research Programme taken by Additional Secretary (WR), Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 19.02.2008. CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE ON HYDROLOGY PROJECT C ources in Parliament Annexe regarding Role and Functions of NIH on 5.2007.
  • 207. • Chairm officers Project Shakti 19.06.2007. 24.8 CONSU • Chairm Chairm action of the Consultative Committee Meeting of MoW Arti a • Chairm Resour Annexe 24.9 STATE CIENTIFIC SOURCE FINDING COMMITTEE MEETING • Cha meetin the Sec • Sh. An Ahmea Water nt, Monitoring and Conservation of Water” held on 26th June 2007 at Gujarat Jal Sewa Training Institute, GWS and SB, Gandhinagar. The meeting was Chaired by Secretary, Water Resources, Govt. of Gujarat. Total 13 proposals were discussed in this meeting. West Bengal was held at Kolkata on 8th June 2007 under the Chairmanship of the clearance and necessary comments were given. In the meeting of Fluoride Task Force, Govt. of West Bengal, it was decided that CGWB, ER will amination study in ground water in Dakshin Dinajpur district where Ground Water Management Study and Ground Water • ing committee meeting • eeting of the State Level Scientific Source Finding Committee, ngal. the Regional juvenation of old an CGWB, Member (SML), Regional Director (HP) and other Senior attended briefing meeting of Consultative Committee on “Hydrology ” in the Chamber of Secretary (WR), Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Bhawan, New Delhi on LTATIVE COMMITTEE MEETING ON MOWR an CGWB attended meeting at Roorkee on 23.06.2007 taken by an, CWC as a follow up R held on 17.05.07 to discuss about the techniques for the “Creation of fici l Rain”. an attended a meeting of the Consultative Committee of Ministry of Water ces on Role and Functions of CSMRS on 21.11.2007 in Parliament House , New Delhi. LEVEL S irman CGWB, Regional Director (HP) and other Senior officers attended g regarding issues raised by Secretary (DWS) on Source Finding taken by retary (WR) in his Chamber on 12.06.2007. oop Nagar, Scientist – D, Shri P.K.Jain, Scientist – D CGWB, WCR, bad attended meeting of the committee on “Scientific Source Finding – Quality, Quantity Assessme • The 55th meeting of the State Level Scientific Source Finding Committee, Technology Mission on drinking water and related water management in Principal Secretary, PHE department, Govt. of West Bengal. The Regional Director, CGWB, Eastern Region, Kolkata is the Member Secretary of the Committee. In this meeting , technical and source clearance were accorded for 26 and 45 (including 44 nos of PWS & 1 no. for hand pump fitted rig bored tube wells) nos of schemes respectively. The officers of CGWB, ER scrutinized the schemes related to source take up the work on fluoride cont Exploration is in progress during current AAP 2007-08. Shri R.P. Gupta, Scientist – B attended the 14th Source find on 11th September 2007 at GJTI, Conference Hall, conducted by Gujrat Water Supply and Sewerage Board, Govt. of Gujarat, Gandhinagar. The 58th m Technology Mission on drinking water and related water management in West Bengal was held at Kolkata on 16th October 2007 under the Chairmanship of the Principal Secretary, PHE Department, Govt. of West Be Director, ER, is the Member Secretary of the Committee. Shri A.Ray, Supdtg. Hydrogeologist attended the meeting. In this meeting , technical source clearance were accorded for 36 nos of new PWS schemes & 63 nos for re schemes. The officers of CGWB, ER , scrutinized the schemes related to source clearance and necessary comments were given.
  • 208. 24.10 • • • • • • 24.11 • • • • • • 24. • • R S S ADVISORY COMMITTEES ON GROUND WATER Chairman, CGWB and Superintending Hydrogeologist attended meeting with Dr. M.S. Swaminathan in the Chamber of Hon’ble Minister (WR) regarding Ground Water Advisory Council on 17.05.2007. Chairman CGWB attended 89th meeting at the Advisory Committee on Irrigation, Flood Control and Multipurpose Projects in the Committee Room of Ministry of Labour, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 27.06.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting with Principal Advisor, Water Management and Member, Artificial Recharge Council on 14-03-2008. th Chairman attended 90 Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Irrigation, Flood Control and Multipurpose Project under Chairmanship of Secretary (WR) in Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 26.09.2007. OIC, SUO, CGWB attended 26th meeting of Technical Advisory Committee of Irrigation and Flood Control Department, Government of NCT Delhi in the Chamber of Principal Secretary, (I& FC Deptt.), Delhi. Chairman CGWB attended 89th meeting at the Advisory Committee on Irrigation, Flood Control and Multipurpose Projects in the Committee Room of Ministry of Labour, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 27.06.2007. MEETING ON YAMUNA DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY Chairman CGWB attended a meeting on 12.10.2007 regarding Yamuna Development Authority taken by the Hon’ble Lt. Governer of Delhi wherein a presentation on “Ground Water Development in Yamuna Flood Plain Delhi” was made by CGWB. OIC,SUO, New Delhi attended on 21.11.2007 Preliminary meeting of Yamuna River development authority – First Meeting of Tech. Advisory Group taken by Member, CWC at CWC’s Committee Room, R.K.Puram, New Delhi. Member (SML) and OIC, SUO, New Delhi attended meeting on 22.11.2007 of Yamuna River Development Authority –First Meeting of Tech. Advisory Group taken by LG at IP Estate in LG’s Office, New Delhi. OIC, SUO Delhi attended meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee of Yamuna River Development Authority on 7.02.2008 in the Chamber of Principal Secretary, Urban Development, Govt. of NCT of Delhi, New Delhi. OIC, SUO, CGWB attended meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee of Yamuna River Development Authority in the Chamber of Principal Secretary, Urban Development, Govt. of NCT of Delhi, New Delhi on 12.02.2008. Member (SML) & OIC, SUO, CGWB attended meeting in the office of Lt. Governor regarding Yamuna River Development at Raj Niwas Bhawan, New Delhi on 7-03- 2008. 12 TCC MEETINGS Chairman CGWB, Member (SML) and Supdtg.Hg. attended 4th TCC meeting for sanction of release of 2nd installment in respect of demonstrative project on artificial recharge on ground water and RWH in Madhya Pradesh at Central Ground Water Authority , New Delhi on 26.04.2007. egional Director, CGWB, SECR, Chennai attended a district level TCC meeting at alem on 20.07.2007 and reviewed ongoing and proposed Artificial Recharge chemes in the district.
  • 209. • S T C 1 • R opal attended the 4th State Level T R • S D 2 i • C M W 18-03-2008. 24.13 • • D of Central Ground Water Board attended the Crop Weather Watch • • roup Meeting held in Ministry of 24.14 MEETING ON COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL CONGRESS ON GROUND WATER • Member(SML) and Superintending Hydrogeologist attended 1st meeting of Organizing Committee of National Congress on Ground Water taken by Chairman • New • ken by Additional Secretary (WR) in hiis Chamber, Ministry of Water • g. Hydrogeologist attended third • GWB attended meeting taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) regarding • Water Resources regarding National Ground Water Congress on 23.08.2007. hri N.Varadaraj, Regional Director, SECR, Chennai attended the District Level CC meeting along with Shri K.A.Nambi, Asstt. Hydrogeologist at Salem ollectorate on 10.10.2007, 14 schemes proposals at an estimated cost of Rs. 05.75 lakhs has been recommended to place the proposals at State Level TCC. egional Director, North Central Region, Bh echnical Coordination Committee meeting for Demonstrative Projects on Artificial echarge to Ground Water on 18.02.2008. uperintending Hydrogeologist, South Western Region attended TCC meeting on emonstrative artificial recharge scheme at Kolar district under CSS at Malur on 2.02.2008. It was also decided during the meeting that fund will be released to mplementing agency at an early date. hairman, Member (SML) and other Senior officers of the Board attended 6th eeting of TCC (CHQ) for Demonstrative Schemes on Artificial Recharge to Ground ater 2006-08 at CGWA New Delhi on CROP WEATHER WATCH GROUP MEETING Scientist – D of Central Ground Water Board attended the Crop Weather Watch Meeting in Ministry of Agriculture, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi on 20.04.2007 and 27.04.2007. Scientist – Group Meeting held in Ministry of Agriculture, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi on 8.06.2007 and 22.06.2007. Scientist – D attended the Crop Weather Watch Group Meeting held in Ministry of Agriculture, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi on 13.07.2007. • Scientist – D attended the Crop Weather Watch Group Meeting held in the Ministry of Agriculture, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi on 20.07.2007. Scientist – D attended the Crop Weather Watch G Agriculture, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi on 17.08.2007. at CGWA, New Delhi on 9.04.2007. Chairman CGWB, Member (SML), OIC, SUO and other Senior officers of the Board attended second Meeting of the Sub-Committee for organizing the National Congress on Ground Water at CGWB, Jamnagar House, New Delhi on 21.06.2007. • Chairman attended a briefing meeting on 6.07.2007 taken by the Hon’ble Minister (WR) regarding review of National Congress on Ground Water at Delhi. Chairman CGWB, Member (SML) attended meeting on National Ground Water Congress ta Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 10.07.2007. Member (SML), Regional Director (HP) and Supdt Meeting of Sub-Committee for organization of National Congress of Ground Water taken by Chairman, CGWB at Bhujal Bhawan, Faridabad on 26.07.2007. Chairman C National Congress on Ground Water in his chamber on 3.08.2007. Chairman and OIC, SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by JS(A), Ministry of
  • 210. • by the Chairman which was attended by the Member • tional Ground • National Ground Water Congress in the 24.15 T ploited’, ‘critical’ and ‘semi-critical’ blocks/talukas/mandals as brought out eed for addressing this problem in the context of rainwater ural masses. While allocating water, priority should be Resources has circulated a Model Bill to the states to enable ore Crop and Income per Drop of Water’ initiative. He ssemination of ment has helped in members of Advisory Council might visit Hiware Bazar village in Ahmednagar Fourth meeting of sub-committee on organizing the National Congress on Ground Water 2007 was taken (SML), Regonal Director(HP) and OIC SUO, Delhi, other Senior officers of the Board on 28.08.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting taken by JS (A) regarding Na Water Congress on 28.08.2007. Chairman CGWB, Director (Admn.), OIC SUO Delhi and other Senior officers attended curtain raiser function of chairmanship of Hon’ble Miinister (WR) at Conference Hall, Shastri Bhawan, New Delhi on 3.09.2007. MEETING OF ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND WATER ADVISORY COUNCIL he 2nd meeting of the Artificial Recharge of Ground Water Advisory Council was held at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi on 12.09.2007. Smt. Gauri Chatterjee, Secretary, Ministry of Water Resources welcomed the Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources, Hon’ble Minister of State for Water Resources, and all other participants to the meeting. She gave a brief account of the progress made on various recommendations made during the 1st meeting of the Council. Further, she also mentioned that the points emerged during the just-concluded National Ground Water Congress may also be deliberated upon during the meeting. Shri. Jai Prakash Narayan Yadav, Hon’ble Minister of State for Water Resources and Vice Chairman of Advisory Council, in his opening address, expressed concern over the declining ground water levels and the increasing number of ‘over-ex in the recent assessment of dynamic ground water resources of the country. While expressing concern over the health hazards being posed by water pollution, he emphasized the n harvesting and artificial recharge. While stressing the need for conservation of ground water in rural areas and for creating awareness among the stakeholders in the country, he mentioned that awareness programmes be taken up in mission mode to reach the r given to agricultural sector and interest of farmers should be taken care of. No industry should be allowed at the cost of agriculture. He also mentioned that the Ministry of Water them to enact suitable ground water legislation. Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources Prof. Saifuddin Soz released the Manual on Artificial Recharge of Ground Water prepared by CGWB. He expressed happiness on the rapid strides made by the Council during the last one year in addressing various issues related to ground water and stressed the need for tapping the expertise available in various parts of the country. He also mentioned that 5000 ‘Demonstrative Centers for Farmers Participatory Action-oriented Programme’ have been set under the ‘M informed the Council that the Ministry of Telecommunications is in the process of setting up 1 lakh ‘Knowledge Centers’ throughout the country for di information and increase water literacy. He mentioned that the idea of giving away awards for excellence in water conservation and manage creating a lot of enthusiasm among the stakeholders and appreciated the pivotal role of Dr. M.S.Swaminathan for this initiative. He desired that a committee of
  • 211. District, Maharashtra, which has won the National Water Award and also some of the villages/urban local bodies that have been awarded Bhoomijal Samvardhan money for ground water development and all by the Ministry B for making sincere efforts in implementing various recommendations of the 1st meeting of the Council and appreciated the way the National Ground water Congress was organized. Further, he emphasized the following points during his nd Map. Further, he also desired that the next Ground Water Congress farmers who have committed suicide due to wells/tube wells. he efforts made by them so that other rojects taken up under “More Crop and ojects. There is a need to bring borehole Puraskars to see the actual work being carried out by them. He also mentioned that in view of the importance of popularization of innovative techniques of rainwater harvesting, the Ministry might consider doubling the prize National Award. During his address, the Hon’ble Minister informed the Council that CGWA has notified 24 areas during this year for regulating efforts are being made to persuade the States concerned for enacting ground water legislation. He mentioned in this regard that encouraging response has been received from the States. He appreciated the efforts made and CGWB for timely preparation of the ‘Ground Water Information Reports’ of 31 ‘Farmers Distress Hotspot Districts’. Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Hon’ble Member of Parliament and Member, Advisory Council, in his opening remarks, congratulated the officials of MOWR and CGW address. o He expressed concern regarding the deteriorating ground water quality a related health problems. In this context, he mentioned that CGWB should give greater attention to water quality issues in order to have focused interventions and should come up with ‘National ground water quality hot spots’ should be held with focal theme on ground water quality issues and should have 2 days duration. o He informed the house that in the ‘farmers’ distress hot spot districts’ in Vidarbha region, widows of crop failure are the worst sufferers. Being a dry farming area, they are dependent on ground water and hence there is an urgent need to take up special programme for providing technical guidance in locating sites for water o In the context of awareness raising and information dissemination, he suggested that regional meetings of Panchayats might be arranged. To start with, meetings in the Awardee Panchayats should be arranged as a lesson and replication of t stakeholders get requisite motivation and can benefit from their success stories. In this regard, help of Ministry of Panchayati Raj may also be sought. o Based on the monitoring of 5000 p Income per Drop of Water”, success stories should be disseminated to increase water literacy. Linkages should be established with organizations of Ministry of Agriculture and National Rainfed Area Authority, which are implementing similar pr revolution in Eastern India where adequate ground water resources are available for development
  • 212. 24.16 e methodology proposed for the Punjab State was 24.17 ORTANT MEETINGS • Board for solution to • ssion, New Delhi on • • ken by Additional Secretary (WR) • . CGWB attended 50th Governing Body meeting of • briefing meeting taken by Additional Secretary (WR) regarding Sustainability of Drinking Water Supply Project in the Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 25.04.2007. • Supdtg. Hg.. attended meeting taken by Joint Secretary (WR) in his Chamber • Co-ordination Committee meeting at Lib. Hall of • sue of Ownership of Ground • n 16.05.2007) taken by Secretary, Deptt. of Drinking • • D attended meeting about presentation of • tended meeting taken by Additional Secretary • Department of Agriculture and Cooperation, Ministry of Agriculture, Govt. of India was held on 25.05.2007 at Room No. 249, THIRD MEETING OF THE WORKING GROUP ON METHODOLOGY FOR ASSESSMENT OF DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL OF DEEPER AQUIFERS Third Meeting of The Working Group on Methodology for Assessment of Development Potential of Deeper Aquifers was convened by CGWB and members of Govt of Haryana, Punjab & U.P on 16-11-2007 at New Delhi. In the meeting a model case study for th presented and it was decided to take up a case study in Upper Yamuna basin of U.P also. OTHER IMP OIC, CGWB, SUO attended the meeting held in Delhi Jal improve the Delhi stretch of river Yamuna on 10.04.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting on Ground Water and related issues taken by Principal Adviser (Water Resources), Planning Commi 11.04.2007. Chairman , Member (SML) and Supdtg. Hg. attended meeting taken by Additional Secretary (WR) in his Chamber to discuss the Media Plan for 2007- 2008, Ministry of Water Resources, New Delhi on 16.04.2007. Chairman and Supdtg. Hg. attended meeting ta in his Chamber for finalization of Guidelines for Bhoomi Jal Samvardhan Puruskar, Ministry of Water Resources, New Delhi on 17.04.2007. Chairman and Supdtg. Hg NWDA in the Committee Room of Ministry of Labour, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 20.04.2007. Chairman and Member (SML) attended regarding Policy for large industries, Ministry of Water Resources, New Delhi on 25.04.2007. Chairman CGWB attended Central Excise Office, CGO Complex, Faridabad on 27.04.2007. Chairman and Scientist – D attended meeting taken by Dr. K.S. Parikh, Member, Planning Commission – Expert Group to review the is water in the Country on 4.05.2007. On the behalf of Chairman, CGWB Regional Director(HP) attended meeting regarding sustainability of water supply project for (which a National Workshop held in Vigyan Bhawan o Water Supply, Ministry of Rural Development at Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi on 11.05.2007. OIC, SUO, Delhi attended Workshop on “Infrastructure Development vision and Direction for Growth” Chaired by Ex. Chief Secretary at Indian International Centre, Conference Hall, New Delhi on 18.05.2007. Chairman, CGWB and Scientist – redesigned web site on Ministry of Water Resources taken by Secretary (WR), Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 21.05.2007. Superintending Hydrogeologist at in the Chamber regarding Media Plan 2007-08 on 22.05.2007. 36th meeting of the Central Insecticides Board (CIB), Directorate of Plant Protection, Quarantine & Storage,
  • 213. A wing, Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi. Dr. S.K. Jain, Scientist – D attended the meeting on the behalf of Member (SAM), CGWB, Faridabad. Dr. S.K. Jain, Scientist – D attended meeting• regarding discussion organized on ater Resources Data bases” on 23rd May, 2007 in • • eting held at Department of • lhi attended 1st meeting of the committee constituted for Expo-Jaragoza – 2008 at WAPCOS (I) Ltd., Kailash Building, K.G.Marg, New Delhi on 8.06.2007. • Chairman, CGWB attended meeting on 12.06.2007 for finalization of Terms of akti Bhawan, New Delhi . Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi on • tor (WR), Jaipur and other ficulties being • Chairman CGWB attended meeting taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) regarding to discuss Industrial Policy in his chamber on 22.06.2007. fed Area Authority, Delhi to make presentation in the Planning • • ency by NIH and CGWB. The meeting was held in • “Requirement and long term arrangement for generation of RS & GIS based periodic dynamic National W Committee Room , 3rd floor, Sewa Bhawan, New Delhi. OIC, SUO, Delhi attended 85th meeting of Delhi Jal Board at Conference Hall, Level 2, Delhi Sachivalaya on 1.06.2007. Chairman, OIC, CGWB, SUO Delhi, Director (A), Assistant Director (OL) and Senior officers of CGWB attended the me Telecommunication, Ministry of Telecom and Information Technology, Delhi regarding Inspection Tour programme of the 2nd Subcommittee of Committee of Parliament on Official Language of the Central Govt. Offices located at Delhi, Jammu, Katra, Srinagar from 5.06.2007 to 13.06.2007. OIC, SUO, CGWB, De Reference – proposed studies to examine various issues related to gap between irrigation potential created and utilized and for suggesting measures for reducing the gap, at Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Sh • OIC, SUO, CGWB, New Delhi attended meeting with Additional Director General and Chief Engineer, CPWD regarding construction of Rain Water Harvesting Structure at the residence of Dr. Kathiria, Hon’ble Convenor, Parliamentary Forum on Water Conservation and Management at 14.06.2007. Chairman CGWB, Member (SML), Regional Direc Senior officers of the Board/ Authority attended meeting on 19.06.2007 taken by the Additional Secretary (WR) in his Chamber to discuss the dif faced by the State Govt. of Rajasthan in the implementation of various directions issued by Central Ground Water Authority. • Chairman, CGWB attended meeting on 29.06.2007 regarding Role of Watershed & Minor Irrigation in Flood and Livelihood Securities taken by Dr. J.S. Samra, CEO, National Rain Commission, Yojna Bhawan, New Delhi. Chairman, CGWB, Member (SML) and Senior Scientist attended meeting regarding Water Year 2007 taken by the Secretary (WR) at Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 29.06.2007. Shri G.D. Ojha, Regional Director, Dr. P.N.Rao, Scientist – D attended meeting in New Delhi on 20.06.2007 in respect of training to be imparted to farmers in Nandyal Parliamentary Constitu response to the concern expressed by the Parliamentary Consultative member and Hon’ble Member of the Parliament Shri S.P.Y. Reddy, Dr. K.D.Sharma, Director NIH, Dr. N.C.Ghosh, Scientist – F, NIH , Roorkee also participated in the meeting. Shri C.P. Srivastava, Regional Director (I/C), CGWB, NWHR, Jammu attended meeting with Hon’ble Union Ministry of Water Resources on 6.06.2007 at Srinagar. The list of sites for further drilling was finalised. in consultation with Superintending Engineer (Irrigation and Flood Control), J&K Govt.
  • 214. • • • • an CGWB, Regional Director (HP) and other Senior officers of the Board Governance: Ownership of Ground Water and its pricing held in November, 2006. • Chairman CGWB, OIC SUO and other Senior officers of the Board attended • on in States and Union Territories on • mmission held at New Delhi. • akti Bhawan, New Delhi on • ttended meeting on 6.07.2007 regarding , New Delhi. • Chairman, CGWB attended 1st meeting of the Organizing Committee for International Seminar on Water Management in the Chamber of Additional Secretary (WR), Shram Shakti Bbhawan, New Delhi on 19.07.2007. • Chairman attended meeting with the Additional Secretary (WR) to take preparatory meeting regarding presentation to be made by Secretary (WR) on SAARC relating issues on 24.07.2007. • Chairman attended meeting regarding Artificial Recharge taken by the Member, • d on 26.07.2007. • 2007. • or providing rain water harvesting structures on 13.07.2007. f Action Plan to combat Arsenic contamination in West Bengal at • l Secretary (WR) to discuss issues relating to Regional Director, CGWB, NER, Guwahati attended a meeting with Secretary, Gauhati Development Department regarding regulation to control / regulate / construction of deep tube wells in Guwahati area. Regional Director, CGWB, NER, Guwahati attended a meeting with Additional Chief Secretary, Govt. of Assam regarding implementation of World Bank Project. Chairman CGWB attended meeting in chamber of Commissioner (PP) on 3.07.2007 regarding Finalizing specific items of work, which can be allotted to Dr. S.K. Sharma, appointed as Consultant, Ministry of Water Resources. New Delhi. Chairm attended wrap up meeting on 3.07.2007 with Director (NIH) and other officers from NIH regarding the 12th National Symposium on Hydrology with focal theme on Ground Water Inaugural function of Exhibition at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi on 3.07.2007. Chairman, CGWB attended Inaugural function of Conference of State Ministers, In-charge of Rural Water Supply and Sanitati 4.07.2007. Chairman and Superintending Hydrogeologist attended meeting on 5.07.2007 regarding 6th Pay Co Chairman and Superintending Hydrogeologist attended meeting on National Project taken by Hon’ble Minister (WR) at Shram Sh 5.07.2007 . Chairman, CGWB and Scientist – D a “International Seminar on Water Management” being organized by Ministry of Water Resources and taken by Shri S.K. Sinha, BPMO, Central Water Commission Planning Commission, New Delhi on 20.07.2007. Member (SML) and Supdtg. Hydrogeologist attended Meeting of Screening Committee regarding International Training and Research Course on Ground Water Governance in Asia : Theory and Practice taken by Chairman, CGWB at Bhujal Bhawan, Faridaba The Officer In-charge attended meeting of the Consultancy Review Committee for the study on water supply and its management in NCR, New Delhi on 11.07. The Officer Incharge attended meeting of the Committee set up by Urban Development Department, Government of NCT of Delhi regarding grant of financial assistance f • Regional Director (HP) and Regional Director (I/C), ER, Kolkata attended Meeting of Task Force set up by Planning Commission 16.07.2007 in connection with formulation o Yojna Bhawan, New Delhi. On the behalf of Chairman, CGWB, Scientist – D attended meeting on 17.07.2007 in the Chamber of Additiona
  • 215. participation by Ministry through Tableau in Republic Day Parade – 2008 and IITF – 2007. • chaired by • on 19th July and PS to awan), sign of tubewell, • • India and Bangladesh at • oding” organized by National Disaster Management Authority under the Chairmanship of Shri M. Shashidhar Reddy, Hon’ble MLA, Member, NDMA at Centaur Hotel, New Delhi on 8.08.2007. • Director (A) and OIC SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by Sh. Ballabhbhai • stainable • from Colombia University • • , Delhi attended meeting taken by Sh. Vallabhbhai Kathiria, Hon’ble on 14.08.2007. • of Water Resources regarding organizing practical demonstration on Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Recharge at Banglow No. 78, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi on 16.08.2007. • n Water Member and Scientist attended 36th TAC meeting on National Water Development Agency in the Conference Room of Central Water Commission, R.K. Puram, New Delhi on 19.07.2007. • Scientist – D attended meeting on Draft alternative formulation on regularization of potable water and setting up drinking water standards in the country Secretary, Drinking Water Supply at Paryavaran Bhawan, CGO Complex, New Delhi on 18.07.2007. Regional Director(I/C) meeting with Chairman, CGWB Minister on 20th July, 2007 and discussed regarding field problem at Goshbug site in Kashmir Valley. • Shri A. Ray, Suptdg. Hydrogeologist accompanied Sh A. R. Bhaisara, Member (IC) and delivered a presentation on Arsenic Mitigation Approaches as undertaken by CGWB, ER in West Bengal at the Planning Commission Office (Yogana Bh New Delhi on 16.07.07. He also participated in the discussion on various measures that need to be considered to prepare an action plan on the issue. Optimum utilization of deep arsenic free aquifer with proper de that was highlighted by Shri Ray, was well taken and appreciated by Prof. V.L.Chopra, Member (E&F), Planning Commission and other officer from WBPCB, CPCB, MRD, AIH&PH etc. Chairman attended meeting with Secretary, NEC regarding Ground Water Development at Vigyan Bhawan Annexe, New Delhi on 3.08.2007. Chairman attended the Secretary Level meeting between Hotel Taj Palace, Sardar Patel Marg, New Delhi on 7.08.2007. On the behalf of Chairman, OIC, SUO, Delhi attended the Brainstorming session on “Management of Urban Flo Kathiria, Hon’ble M.P. regarding progress of construction for Rain Water Harvesting at Banglow No. 78, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi on 9.08.2007.. Shri G.D. Ojha, Regional Director and Shri B.Jaya Kumar, Supdtg. Hydrogeologist have attended the Steering Committee meeting on “Integrated and Su Water Resources Management” organized by Department of Rural Development, Government of Andhra Pradesh on 12.07.2007. Chairman attended Presentation by Sh. Upmanu Lall regarding Sustainable Development and Management of Indian Water Resources in the 21st Century to the Secretary (WR) on 10.08.2007. Regional Director (HP) attended Water Quality Monitoring Committee Meeting at Ministry of Environment and Forest, Govt. of India, New Delhi on 10.08.2007. OIC SUO M.P. regarding organizing practical demonstration on Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Recharge at Banglow No. 78, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi • Chairman, CGWB and Supdtg. Chemist attended meeting taken by Secretary (DWS) regarding preparation of draft legislatiion on regulation of potable water in Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi on 16.08.2007. OIC SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by JS (A), Ministry OIC SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by Additional Secretary (WR), Ministry of Water Resources regarding organizing practical demonstration on Rai
  • 216. Harvesting and Artificial Recharge at Banglow No. 78, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi on 16.08.2007. Chairman attended meeting taken by Secre• tary (WR) regarding briefing ew Delhi on 21.08.2007. arge at Banglow No. 78, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi on • al Ground Water Training & Delhi • er course of action by Ministry of • ry of Water • (WR) to identify and • , CGWB • Water Resources like • ding progress of organizing practical demonstration on Rain Water arvesting and Artificial Recharge at Banglow No. 78, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi on 29.08.2007. regarding Samvardhan Puruskar Award at Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 29.08.2007. Hall of FSIDC Ltd. Delhi Transco Ltd. Sakti Sadan, New Delhi on 31.08.2007. Bangalore and discussed about the National Seminar to be held during August 2008 at Bangalore by Indian • ti Bhawan, New Delhi on 7.09.2007. meeting of SFC regarding Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute in her Chamber, Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, N • OIC SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by Shri Vallabhbhai Kathiria, Hon’ble M.P. regarding progress of organizing practical demonstration on Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Rech 21.08.2007. Chairman attended meeting taken by Secretary (WR) regarding briefing meeting of SFC regarding Rajiv Gandhi Nation Research Institute in her Chamber, Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 23.08.2007. • Member (SML) taken a meeting with Regional Director CGWB, Chandigarh, Director, Water Resources Punjab at Central Ground Water Authority, New regarding Model Bill of Ground Water for Punjab State and notification of areas for ground water withdrawal on 23.08.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting to discuss furth Water Resources to assess the contribution of snow and glaciers to river system and the need for consolidated action programme for research in the Chamber of Secretary (WR) on 27.08.2007. OIC SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by AS (WR), Minist Resources regarding participation in IITF – 2007 in November 2007 in Pragati Bhawan, New Delhi on 27.08.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting in the Chamber of AS finalise the display material for IITF – 2007 at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi on 28.08.2007. 23rd meeting of CGWA was held under the Chairmanship of Chairman which was attended by the Members of the Authority and other Senior offiicers of CGWB at Curzon Barrack, New Delhi on 28.08.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting taken by JS (A) to discuss sustainability of drinking water supply system, management of surface water / ground water and discuss activities of CWC, CGWB and PSU’s of Ministry of WAPCOS on 28.08.2007. OIC SUO, Delhi attended meeting taken by Sh. Vallabhbhai Kathiria, Hon’ble M.P. regar H • Chairman attended meeting taken by AS(WR) • Member (SML) attended meeting to discuss progress related to development and integrity of municipal waste processing units in the Conference • Shri T.M. Hunse, Regional Director SWR and Dr. K.Md. Najeeb, Supdtg. Hydrogeologist and TS to Regional Director attended a meeting on 17.08.2007 called by Vice Chancellor of Agricultural University, Geological Congress in association with CGWB. Chairman and Regional Director (HP) attended wrap up meeting of Mission of World Bank Team under chairmanship of Secretary (WR), Shram Shak
  • 217. • Regional Director attended meeting on 14.09.2007 under the Chairmanship of Secretary (WR), to discuss sustainability of drinking water supply system and management of surface and ground water. • On the behalf of Member (SAM), Scientist – D attended Second meeting of • • • te Artificial Recharge Design. • The 2nd meeting of the Calcutta Corporation Level Ground Water Resources Development Authority was held at th Chamber of the Municipal Commissioner of Kolkata Municipal Corporation on 19.09.2007 to discuss the policies and guidelines for issue of permit and registration of ground water structures to control the ground water use. Dr. A.K. Misra, Scientist – D from CGWB, ER, Kolkata participated in the meeting. • Member (SML) attended meeting with Joint Secretary (A), Ministry of Water Resources, regarding information Management about Water Bodies and Ground Water at New Delhi on 3.10.2007. • Member (SML) attended the inaugural function of DST on Planet Earth, celebrating water sanitation week at Lady Irwin College (International Platinum ster Management deliberate upon the Recommendations of the Expert Group constituted by Planning Commission on Ground Water Management and Ownership and that of the Sub Committee on Policy for Water and Industries with the Honn’ble Minister (WR) at CGWB , CHQ Faridabad on 11.10.2007. • Member (SML) attended a meeting on 11.10.2007 taken by the Joint Secretary (A), Ministry of Water Resources regarding working out various Modalities for setting up of a Water Resources cell within the National Institute of Rural Development, Hyderabad to provide training support to the District Level Water Resources Societies. • Chairman and Senior Officers of CGWB and IIT New Delhi attended meeting with se, New Delhi on 17.10.2007. Member (SML) attended meeting with Joint Secretary (A), Ministry of Water regarding Shram Shakti Bhawan, • On the behalf of Chairm 18.10.2007 to 19.10.2007 to evolve research programme on “Restoration of s and Their Management “ held at India International Centre organized by Global Hydrogeological Solutions. Hydrological Information Management Group – Date Use & Date Dissemination (DD) H.P. II at CWC, R.K.Puram, New Delhi on 14.09.2007. Member (SML) attended Second meeting taken by Secretary (DWS), regarding Preparation of Draft Legislation on regulation of potable water at Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi on 17.09.2007. Officer Incharge, SUO, New Delhi attended meeting held in DRDO on 28.09.2007 regarding proposed participation by the Ministry of Water Resources, Republic Day Parade 2008 through Tableau on Theme of “Water” . Shri N.Varadaraj, Regional Director, SECR, Chennai attended the first meeting (HP II) of the sub group on purpose driven studies at CHQ, Faridabad on 31.08.2007and presented the proposal on specific yield studies to facilita e Jubilee Conference) on 4.10.2007. • Chairman, CGWB attended meeting on Draft National Disa Guidelines , Management of Cyclones at Centaur Hotel, Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi on 9.10.2007. • Member (SML) attended 27th meeting of the Working Group of NIH at Roorkee on 9.10.2007 and 10.10.2007. • Chairman, Member(SML) and Senior officers of the Board attended workshop to Veolia Water Germany in the Chamber of Chairman, CGWB, Jamnagar Hou • Resources, presentation on Water Resources Information System at New Delhi on 17.10.2007. an, CGWB, Scientist – D attended interactive meeting on Village Pond
  • 218. • Chairman, Member (SML) of CGWB attended the meeting at Belgaum on 25.10.2007 organized by CGWB, SWR, Bangalore. • Chairman attended 68th Governing Body meeting of NIH, Roorkee chaired by WR) at Shra • Chairman made a pres Minister (WR) Member 3.10.2007. • Chairman, Member(SM office Council Meeting a • OIC, SUO, CGWB, N Exhibition of IITF, Pr of CSMRS, New Delhi on 07. • Central Ground Water and Sanjay Pandey, AH a, Regional Director accompanied ef Minis assess the ground situa The suggestion/remedi team in the field wer Secretary, Irrigatio and • The 2nd meeting of Authority was held on of West Bengal and the Shri A. Ray, Supdtg. H the meeting. In the of f the 1st certificate of registrati certificate of registratio than agriculture sector. • eeting of the as held on 12.10.2007 at hri B.B. Bhattacharya, Sc ttended the meeting. A presentation on ahi of NEERI, Nagpur. While reviewing the ongoing programme related to Fluoride study in wanted to know the progress of work from each department. Shri A. Ray, Supdtg. Hydrogeologist, ER, has • • awan, New Delhi. UO, Delhi attended meeting held in DRDO on 2.11.2007 regarding • • • Council Secretary ( m Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 18.10.2007. entation on Dug Well Recharge in the office of the Hon’ble (SML) also attended the presentation on 2 L), Member (SAM) and Director (Admn.) attended 78th t Belgaum on 24.10.2007. ew Delhi attended Core Group Meeting for organizing agati Maidan in the office 19.10.20 Board, NWR team comprising Shri S.Marwah, Scientist – D G led by shri Sushil Gupt the Hon’ble Chi ter of Punjab and other senior officers of Punjab State to tion of water logging to propose an action plan for district. al measures suggested by the Central Ground Water Board e highly appreciated by the Hon’ble Chief Minister and Power. the State Level Ground Water Resources Development 16th October 2007 in the Chamber of Director, SWID, Govt. Chairman of State Level Authority, Sech Bhawan, Kolkata. ydrogeologist, and Shri A.K. Misra, Scientist – D attended meeting, discussion was held regarding Confirmation proceedings o meeting of SLA, district wise progress on issuance of on & permit and framing up of guidelines for issuance of n & permit under Kolkata Corporation area and areas other The 3rd m Committee on Fluoride Task Force in West Bengal w Kolkata. Shri A. Ray, Supdtg. Hydrogeologist and S ientist – D a Integrated Fluoride Mitigation was delivered by Dr. Sadhana Ray West Bengal, the Chairman of the Committee informed that at the request of the Committee, hydrogeological survey and exploration programme have already been taken up in Dakshin Dinajpur district in order to demarcate lateral as well as vertical extension of high Fluoride in ground water. Shri R.P. Mathur, Regional Director, Central Ground Water Board, Western Region, Jaipur attended consortium meeting on ONGC Project Saraswati on 26th October 2007 at New Delhi. Member (SML) & scientist ‘D’ attended meeting taken by Secretary (WR) on 1.11.07 to review revised estimates at Shram Shakti Bh • OIC, S proposed participation by Ministry of Water Resources in Republic Day Parade 2008 through Tableau on ‘Theme of Water’. Chairman and Member (SML) attended meeting taken by Secretary (WR) on 5.11.2007 regarding Revamping the River conservation Strategy in Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi Member (SML) attended meeting taken by JS(A) on 7.11.2007 regarding SAARC in Ministry of External Affairs, South Block, New Delhi. Chairman attended 57th meeting of Tech. Advisory Committee of NIH at CWC, Sewa Bhawan, New Delhi on 12.11.07.
  • 219. • • ral function of Training Programme of International Management Institute at ICAR, Pusa on 13.11.2007. • • • ttended meeting of Hindi Salahakar Samiti of Ministry • • • • • Bhawan, New Delhi on 2.02.2008. • Member (SML) Chaired VIIIth meeting of INCOH for Research Committee on Ground Water held at Central Ground Water Authority on 4.02.2008. • OIC, SUO Delhi attended meeting taken by Chairman, Central Water Commission on the Hon’ble Supreme Courts Order dated 23.01.2008 in the Writ Petition (Civil) No. 537 of 1992 at R.K. Puram, New Delhi on 4.02.2008. • Scientist of Central Ground Water Board attended 1st Meeting of Experts Group on Drinking Water at BIS, Manak Bhawan, New Delhi on 5.02.2008. • OIC, SUO Delhi attended the training programme on Urban Rain Water Harvesting for Macro Catchments in a city with Special thrust on Road and Flyovers at C.S.E. Tughlakhabad Industrial Area New Delhi on 8.02.2008. • Scientist CGWB attended meeting in Ministry of External Affairs regarding Artificial Recharge Pilot Project Schemes in SAARC Country taken by Joint Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs, New Delhi on 8.02.2008. • Chairman attended meeting regarding World Water Day celebration on 20.03.2008 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi taken by Secretary (WR), Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 19.02.2008. • Regional Director, SECR, Chennai attended the 2nd State Level Monitoring Committee on 19th February 2008 at Agricultural Engineering Department, Secretariat Chennai and participated in the deliberations. • Scientist CGWB, Southern Region, Hyderabad attended the SLSC meeting (Hydrology Project II) at Hyderabad on 22.02.2008 organized by I&CAD, Govt. of Andhra Pradesh, Hyderabad. Chairman, CGWB convened a meeting on 12.11.07 with Technical Adviser, Deptt. of Drinking Water Supply, Ministry of Rural Development, at Jamnagar House, New Delhi. Chairman attended the Inaugu Water Chairman and Sr. Officers of the CGWB attended on 15.11.2007 the inauguration of the Pavilion of Ministry of Water Resources at IITF – 2007 by Hon’ble Minister (WR) Scientist ‘D’ attended meeting on 16.11.2007 at Ministry of Commerce and Industry regarding permissions issued to industries at Udyog Bhavan, New Delhi. Regional Director, CGWB, CR attended the third meeting of Monitoring Committee constituted by MOWR for monitoring of irrigation projects included in the packaged announced by Hon’ble Prime Minister of India for Vidarbha Region of Maharashtra, held at Nagpur on 20-11-2007. Status of different projects under package was discussed. Chairman and Director (A) a• of Water Resources on 21.11.2007 in Parliament House Annexe, New Delhi. OIC, SUO, New Delhi attended on 21.11.2007 2nd meeting of Jury regarding Chief Minister’s Best Rain Water Harvestor Award, 2007 at Delhi Jal Board, Varunalaya Bhawan, New Delhi. Chairman attended meeting taken by Secretary (WR) to discuss ‘UN International Law commission - Draft article on Transboundary Aquifers’ in her Chamber on 22.11.2007. OIC, SUO attended meeting on 23.11.2007 held in DRDO regarding proposed participation by Ministry of Water Resources in Republic Day Parade 2008 through Tableau on Theme of ‘Water’. Chairman attended meeting regarding presentation on rural drinking water supply at Planning Commission, Yojna Bhawan, New Delhi on 2.02.2008. Regional Director (HP) and Senior officers of the Board attended 3rd meeting for Expert Group on Pricing Policy on Water Data in Central Water Commission, Sewa
  • 220. • Scientist CGWB, South Western Region, Bangalore attended the Stake holders meeting on 12.0 t Institute, Hyderabad which was held at • The Regional Director, West Central Region, Ahmedabad participated in the meeting on “Utilization of surplus flood water of Tapi River for ground water recharge and quality improvement” presided over by Shri B.L. Navlawala, Advisor to Chief Minister, Govt. of Gujarat on 21st February 2008 at Gandhinagar. • Scientist – D from Central Ground Water Board, Faridabad and New Delhi office participated in the meeting on IWRM in the Chamber of Joint Secretary (A), Ministry of Water Resources, New Delhi on 27.02.2008. • Regional Director (HP) Chaired the BIS meeting of technical committee on Ground Water and related Investigations (WRD 03) at Manak Bhawan, BIS, New Delhi on 29.02.2008. Dr. S.K. Jain, Scientist – D and Member of the Committee also participated in the meeting to finalize the BIS documents put up under Agenda items. • Regional Director (HP) attended a meeting convened by World Bank in connection with Hydrology Project, Phase-II in New Delhi on 04-03-2008. • Member (SML) attended meeting with Joint Secretary (A) regarding DPC of AEE at Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 10-03-2008. • Regional Director (HP) attended a meeting convened by World Bank in connection with Hydrology Project, Phase-II in New Delhi on 13-03-2008. • Chairman attended meeting taken by Secretary (WR) regarding Expenditure in Ministry of Water Resources, New Delhi on 14-03-2008. • Regional Director (HP) and Scientist ‘D’ attended 58th TAC meeting of National Institute of Hydrology, Roorkee at CWC, New Delhi on 18-03-2008. • Chairman and RD (HP) and other Senior officers attended meeting taken by Secretary (WR) regard wrap up meeting of HP-II to discuss Mission’s findings at Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 18-03-2008. • Member (SML) attended meeting on Draft Model Legislation on Regulation of potable water taken by Secretary (DWS), Nirman Bhawan, New Delhi on 19- 03-2008. • Chairman and Member (SML) and other Senior officers of the Board attended World Water Day Celebration by Ministry of Water Resources at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi on 20-03-2008. • Officer Incharge, SUO, New Delhi attended meeting on implementation of E- Governance under the Chairmanship of AS (WR), Ministry of Water Resources, Shram Shakti Bhawan, New Delhi on 24-03-2008. • Member (SML) attended BIS meeting at Manak Bhawan, New Delhi regarding Standardization of specification on Ground Water on 27-03-2008. • Regional Director, Mid Eastern Region, Patna attended first meeting of CSIR monitoring committee on network project on 11-3-08 at NGRI, Hyderabad. • Regional Director (I/C), Uttaranchal Region, Dehradun attended a meeting with the Secretary, Minor Irrigation, Govt. of Uttarakhand regarding implementation of Artificial Recharge Projects in Uttarakhand State. • Regional Director, West Central Region, Ahmedabad attended the meeting on “Utilization of Surplus Water of Tapi River for Ground Water Recharging and Improvement of Ground Water Quality” organized by Narmada, Water Resources, Water Supply & Kalpsar Department, on 10-11th March 2008 at Surat. • Regional Director, West Central Region, Ahmedabad attended in the discussion with the Committee of Parliament on Official Language on some aspects of the progressive use of Hindi on 26th March 2008 at Ahmedabad. 2.2008 of International Water Managemen Richmond Hotel Bangalore.
  • 221. • Regional Director & Suptd. Hydrogeologist, South Western Region attended State 03- • Regiona ion attended meeting on 7-03-2008, convened by Geological Society of India regarding forthcoming National Seminar on Drinking water and food security in Hard rock areas through optimal use of Ground water, Rainwater harvesting and crop water planning with special reference to Gadag district, Karnataka. • Suptdg. Hydrogeologist attended the 1st meeting of CSIR Monitoring Committee of Network Project on Ground Water from 10 – 11th March, 2008 at NGRI, Hyderabad 24.18 VISITS BY INTERNATIONAL DELEGATIONS • The representatives from UNESCO visited Central Ground Water Board and discussion was held with the Chairman CGWB on 23.05.2007. • A delegation from Department of Water Affairs and Forestry from the Republic of South Africa visited CHQ, Faridabad and held discussion with the Chairman and other Senior Officers of the Board on 11.05.2007. • An official delegation from the Republic of Ethiopia visited CGWB during September 2007 and discussed various issues related to bilateral co- operation in the field of ground water development and management. • Central Ground Water Board participated in the discussions with an official delegation from the the Republic of Ghana during November 2007 on various issues related to ground water management. • rogram”. Thereafter a presentation was made by Dr. T.P. atesan, Senior Hydrogeologist, TWAD Board on “Artificial Recharge Schemes by tate and coordination of work with CGWB”. After the interactive sessions on the site in premises of Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai level empowered committee meeting on Rural Water supply on 1- 2008 a aka.t Bangalore. Meeting was convened by RDPR, Govt. of Karnat l Director & Suptd. Hydrogeologist, South Western Reg Mr. Mahindra Amaraweera, Hon’ble Minister of Water Supply, Govt. of Sri Lanka along with his team members visited the office on 26.12.2007 for technical interaction. Dr. N. Varadaraj, Regional Director, SECR, Chennai made a presentation in “Artificial Recharge to Ground Water: An overview with case studies from CGWB P N S various Artificial Recharge methods for different Hydrogeological terrains, the team visited where percolation ponds were constructed under Central Sector Scheme. A demonstration on down loading of data from DWLR also made to the delegates.
  • 222. 25. During the IX Plan, scheme for acquisition of land and construction of various offices of CGWB was approved. Under this scheme, CGWB has completed construction of office buildin quired ready office buildi a Plan. Under f office building at Hyder d t Bhopal (Divi Ambala, Jodh A taken up durin The d il ilding of Central Ground Wate a given in Table 25.1 DINGS DURING 2007-2008 Sl. Construction work Status CONSTRUCTION / ACQUISITION OF OFFICE BUILDINGS th gs at Jaipur, Bhubaneswar, Lucknow and Kolkata. The Board has also ac -built accommodation at Trivendrum, Patna and Bhopal. The construction of ng t Chandigarh, Faridabad, Guwahati has been completed during the Xth the scheme of “Infrastructure Development” the construction o aba and Bangalore is completed whereas construction of office building a sion office) is under progress. The acquisition of land for office building at pur, hmedabad, Nagpur, Chennai, Dehradun and Kangra has been g Xth Plan. eta s of following construction work for own office bu r Bo rd have been carried out during the year 2007-20078 is Table 25.1 : CONSTRUCTION OF OFFICE BUIL No. during 2007-2008 1 Bangalore The construction work of office building of CGWB in respect of SWR and Division XIV, Bangalore is completed. The amount sanctioned against the project has been fully released. 2 Hyderabad The construction work of building of CGWB in respect of SR an Division IX, Hyderabad is comple d ted. The amount sanctioned against the project has been fully released. 3 e f Guwahati The construction work for two RCC culverts and stor building at Guwahati office is to be started after release o required funds as submitted by CPWD. 4. is n from the Ministry. The EFC Memo for XI Plan is under Bhopal The construction work of the Division building at Bhopal likely to start after administrative approval and sanctio consideration of the Ministry. 5. yAmbala The land for Division-II Ambala of the Board is allotted b HUDA in Sector-10, Ambala. Possession of the land from HUDA is under process. 6. rn sa d Bhubaneswar The Possession of the land for Staff Quarter at South Easte Region, Bhubneshwar has already been taken from the Oris Govt. Proposal for construction of boundary wall around the lan has already been sent to the Ministry for administrative approva and estimate sanction. The E.F.C. Memo for XIth Plan is unde l r consideration of Ministry. In the mean time CPWD has submitted their requirement of funds to the tune of Rs 15 Lakh t for 2007-08 for starting construction of boundary wall. The CPWD has also submitted preliminary estimates for an amoun of Rs.24,89,46,000/- . The P.E. is under examination. 7. .RGI building The land for RGNGWT&RI, Raipur has already been acquired A provision of Rs 15 Crore for construction of RGI building a Raipur has been made in EFC Memo which is under consideration of the Ministry. t 8. ssion of land from JDA is under process. Jammu The land for construction of building at Jammu has been purchased from JDA . The posse
  • 223. 26. 26.1 round Water Board organized a National Ground Water Congress 2007 t Plenary Hall, Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi on 11th September 2007 under the India. National Ground nt in the National Ground Water Congress . Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources in his welcome address said that the objective of the Congress is to facilitate sharing of information, knowledge dissemination and also stressed the need for sustainable development of ground water. He spoke on National Water Award and Bhoomijal Samvardhan Puraskar instituted by Ministry of Water Resources to recognize the grass root organizations for successfully demonstrating the best water conservation practices. He also categorically emphasized that conservation of ground water is in sharp focus of the Ministry of Water Resources and mission of sustained ground water can be accomplished through association and involvement of various Stakeholders. He was confident that the Congress will create conditions of complete synergies of all organizations and stakeholders in addressing the critical issues. Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Eminent Scientist and Hon’ble Member of Parliament in his address congratulated the Ministry of Water Resources for organizing National Ground Water Congress- 2007 and said that the Congress will help to elevate the sustainable management of our ground water resources to a national ethic which should evolve concurrent attention to conservation, sustainable use and equitable sharing of benefits of ground water. He spoke on implementation of 5000 field action programmes involving various expertise at different location under the ambit of “More Income Per Drop of Water” mission. He suggested to restructure the cropping pattern of flood prone areas by citing some glaring examples of crop varieties. Dr. Manmohan Singh, Hon’ble Prime Minister of India in his inaugural address at the National Congress on Ground Water 2007 said that it is now widely recognized that water, especially potable water is finite and a vulnerable resource. There is also a wide consensus that water development and management should be based on a participatory approach, involving all stakeholders. He opined that, we cannot continue to subsidize the economic and commercial use of water. There are related policies that must also be corrected to ensure adequate emphasis on water conservation, especially ground water. For example, providing free power to farmers has encouraged excessive use of pump sets and excessive drawing of ground water. If there is economic pricing of power, there would be some incentive for conserving ground water. Water conservation and management an be better served through appropriate incentives and penalties. He appealed to ea efforts DISSEMINATION AND SHARING OF TECHNICAL KNOW-HOW National Ground Water Congress – 2007 entral GC a auspices of Ministry of Water Resources, Government of Water Congress – 2007 was inaugurated by Hon’ble Prime Minister of India Dr. Manmohan Singh. On this occasion, welcome address was given by Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources. Key note address was delivered by Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Hon’ble Member of Parliament. Around one thousand of eminent scientists, farmers, school children, NGO’s organizations re presewe c ch and every citizen of the country to make genuine and wholehearted
  • 224. National Ground Water Congress - 2007
  • 225. National Water Award and Bhoomijal Samvardhan Puraskar during National Ground Water Congress - 2007
  • 226. to conserve water, prevent over exploitation and pollution of ground water, and adopt measures both individually and collectively, as a family, as a community, as a village and locality. He hoped that deliberations at the Conference will contribute to the promotion of more effective strategies towards these national 26. ijal Samvardhan s he prizes were given away by Hon’ble President of India H.E. ol children, NGO’s organizations were present in the tation to each i. n ii. iii. Gopa iv. Shre d Training Institute,Kutch, Gujarat. v. vi. Dilas vii. Deol Municipal Council, District Ahmednagar, Maharashtra. viii. Chief F A, Jagjit Nagar, Solan, Himachal Pradesh. desh. 26. at 26. goals and objectives. 2 Presentation of National Water Award and Bhoom Puraskars Ministry of Water Resources ha first time instituted the National Water Award and Bhoomijal Samvardhan Puraskar for the innovative practices of Ground Water Conservation and augmentation . The impressive award ceremony was held at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi in the valedictory session of National Ground Water Congress 2007. T Smt. Pratibha Devisingh Patil. Shri Sharad Pawar, Hon’ble Minister of Agriculture, Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources, Shri Jai Prakash Narayan Yadav, Hon’ble Minister of State for Water Resources and Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Hon’ble Member of Parliament and 1000 of Eminent Scientists, farmers, scho historic event. The National Water Award has been conferred to the Hiwre Bazaar Gram Panchayat of Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra consisting of Rs. 10 lakhs and citation. Bhoomojal Samvardhan Puraskars of Rs. 1 lakh and a ci were given to 14 Gram Panchayats/Municipality/NGO’s namely. Chil ala Watershed Development Association, District Nuapada, Orissa. Holy Cross Social Service Centre, Hazaribag, Jharkhand. lpur Gram Panchayat, Gopalpur, District Bankura, West Bengal. e Vivekanand Research an Gram Vikas Navyuvak Mandal, Laporia, Jaipur , Rajasthan a Janvikas Pratishthan, MIDC Area Railway Station, Aurangabad. ali Pravara unctionary SUTR ix. NARDEP, Vivekananda Kendra, Kanyakumari. x. Madhanagopalapuram Gram Panchayat, Cuddalore District, Tamil Nadu. xi. Uthanur Gram Panchayat, Kolar District, Karnataka. xii. Madikkai Gram Panchayath, Kasargod district, Kerala. xiii. Gorwa Gram Panchayat, Dewas, Madhya Pra xiv. Bethany Society, Laitum Khrah,Shillong. 3. Workshop Organized by CGWB The following workshops were organized by Central Ground Water Board Faridabad. 3.1Workshop on “Ground Water Management and Ownership” & Sub committee on “Policy for Water for Industries” The Central Ground Water Board organized a workshop for discussions on recommendations of the Expert Group on “Ground Water Management and Ownership” & Sub committee on “Policy for Water for Industries” at Faridabad on 11th October 2007. Workshop was held at the directions of Ho’ble Minister for
  • 227. Water Resources to discuss the recommendations of the Expert Group and the Subcommittee. Ground water is playing major role to meet our irrigation, drinking water and industries requirements. Off late issues of declining ground water levels and deterioration In its quality have been In focus. The midterm appraisal of Xth plan, carried out by the Planning Commission has expressed concern about these issues d Water The workshop was organized to elicit views of experts preset In the and 2 2 and suggested setting up of an Expert Group to review the whole issue of ground water management and ownership. Accordingly, the group was constituted under the chairmanship of Dr. Kirit S. Parikh, Member (Energy & Water), Planning Commission. The Expert Group has submitted its report during September, 2007. The Sub-committee on Policy for Water for Industries was constituted during October, 2006 as per the recommendations of Artificial Recharge of Groun Advisory Council constituted by the Ministry of Water Resources. The Sub- committee, under the Chairmanship of Additional Secretary (Water Resources), was to suggest a policy for water for industries, which will provide the framework for regulation as well as inceptives for economic use for large users of ground water. The Sub-committee has submitted its report to the Ministry of Water Resources. workshop on the recommendations of above reports. The participates expressed their views for further updating the recommendations of the reports. It was followed by the presentations of the relevant recommendations of the Expert Group on “Ground Water Management Ownership” & Subcommittee on “ Policy for Water for Industries” and discussions thereon. 6.3.2 Workshop on Ground Water Glossary in Hindi Two day workshop on ‘Ground Water Glossary in Hindi” was held during 5-6th November 2007 at CGWB, Faridabad. The workshop was organized by Commission for Scientific and Technical Terminology, New Delhi. 60 Officers/staffs of CGWB attended the workshop. This will help the organization to work in Hindi more effectively. 6.3.3 Workshop on Conjunctive use of Surface and Ground Water The Central Ground Water Board and Central Water Commission, jointly organized a workshop on “Conjunctive use of Surface and Ground Water” on 17th March, 2008 in the Auditorium hall in CSMRS, New Delhi. Shri B.S.Ahuja, Chairman CWC Shri B.M.Jha, Chairman CGWB and Dr. S.C. Dhiman, Member (SML), CGWB, Dr. S.K. Sharma, Consultant ,MoWR. graced the occassion. The Theme papers were presented during the two Sessions.
  • 228. Artificial Recharge of Ground Water Advisory Council 12th September 2007 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi
  • 229. eptember 2007 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi Artificial Recharge of Ground Water Advisory Council 12th S
  • 230. 26.4 Seminar/ Symposium/ Workshop/ Conferences attended or participated A two days National Seminar on “Ground Water 2007” with the focal theme ory function. Shri Sushil Gupta, Regional Director, NWR Chandigarh, Smt Anita Gupta, Supdtg Hg, S/Shri S.Marwaha, Scientist – D & , S.K. Saigal, Scientist – B, attended Western Command Ecological seminar for the year 2007 organized at Amritsar, Punjab on 18th and 19th April 2007. Shri Sushil Gupta, Regional Director delivered a rtment of Environment, Govt. of West Bengal, at and Smt. Anita Gupta Supdtg. Hg. on “Emerging trends in Urban Hydrogeology – A case study in the Seminar. Four scientific papers were presented by S/Shri G. Sudarshan, B.U. Rao, Dr. AGS Reddy, AHG, K.Dwarkanath and Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Scientists SR, Hyderabad in griculture Development and Rural Drinking Water - Ground Water 2007” at Bhopal on 4th & 5th April 2007 organized by AICGWBOA. S/S Aru Sem 200 Dr. Hyd Apr Cha rogeologist attended National Workshop on sustainability o rganized by Department of Drinking Wat Bhawan, New Del Dr. Sci Mu wor by ing officers. Shr the org tive Assembly and State Planning Board. The Two in org “Agricultural Development & Rural Drinking Water” was organized at Bhopal on 4th & 5th April 2007. Shri S.K. Sinha, Director (Admn.) CGWB, CHQ attended the inaugural programme of the Seminar, while Shri B.M. Jha, Chairman, CGWB and Shri C.S. Ramashesha, Member (SML) CGWB attended the validict lecture on Ground Water Conditions of Punjab & techniques of artificial recharge and rain water harvesting. Shri S. Marwah, Sc-D delivered a lecture on “Artificial Recharge Project in Punjab – case Sstudies”. A Project Preparation Launch Workshop on Integrated Coastal Zone Management, proposed to be taken up with the help of World Bank in the coastal zone of West Bengal, was organized by Depa Conference Hall, Paribesh Bhavan, Salt Lake, Kolkata on 23rd April, 2007. Sh. A.Ray, Suptdg. Hydrogeologist & H.O.O., and Dr. A.K.Misra, Sc-‘D’, attended and actively participated in the discussion. Shri Sushil Gupta, Regional Director, NWR, attended National Seminar on “Agriculture Development and Rural Drinking Water - Ground Water 2007” at Bhopal on 4th & 5th April 2007. Shri Sushil Gupta RD presented a paper the National Seminar on “A hri B.Umapathi, Sc-B, K. Ravichandran, Sc-B, G.Y. Setty, Sc-B and V. lprakasam, Sc-B and J. Benjamin Vedanayagam, AHG attended a National inar on “Agriculture Development and Rural Drinking Water - Ground Water 7” at Bhopal on 4th & 5th April 2007 and presented the papers. S. Suresh, Sc-D attended a Workshop on “Application of tracer techniques in rology” organized by Department of Earth Sciences, Annamalai University on 10th il, 2007 and delivered a lecture. irman, CGWB and Superintending Hyd f Ground Water held in Vigyan Bhawan o er Supply, Ministry of Rural Development at Nirman hi on 16.05.2007. D.K. Goel, Scientist – D, Shri S.S.P. Mishra, Scientist – D and Shri S.K. Verma, entist – B participated in a workshop on Rain Water Harvesting organized by nicipal Corporation, Bhopal, Chaired by Commissioner, Bhopal Division. In the kshop, various technical issues relating to rain water harvesting were highlighted the participat i T.M. Hunse, Regional Director and Dr. K. Md. Najeeb Supdtg. Hg. participated in two days workshop on “Impending Water Crisis and Possible Solutions” which was anized by Karnataka State Legisla workshop was held on 17 – 18th of May, 2007 at Bangalore. papers are forwarded to National Seminar on Changing Geohydrological Scenario Hard Rock Terrains of India to be hold on 29-30th April 2007 at Bangalore anized by Geological Society of India. The papers are as follows:
  • 231. a) “Role of integrated watershed development programme inaugumentation of ground water and solving the water crisis in draught affected Sh. participated in zonal workshop under “Jal Abhishek” campaign organized by Bhopal Municipal Corporation on 15.06.2007. Shri S.S.P. Mshra highlighted water conservation and rain water harvesting techniques in the programme which was attended by Municipal Cor Shr the tion of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) which was conducted at Goa on 12.06.2007. One day workshop of usage of Hindi for the official work was organized at Seminar Hall of CGWB, MER, Patna. Shri V.K. Singh, Deputy Director (Rajbhasa), CGWB had delivered a lecture in the workshop on 18th June 2007. Shri K.C. Naik, Supdtg. Hg. and Shri P.K. Mohapatra, Scientist – D attended one day “First State Level Interactive Workshop on Development of Decision Support System for Dev Ori Dr. “Wa Har at on Shr Cha on rol Board, Shr 2.0 Ow ld at Hotel Grand Ashok, Vis Sem Shr cha Shr h, Scientist – D and Shri Con Deh (En Man Gro Inte to , Jaipur from 11th to 14th March, 2008. Nawapada District of Orissa” – P.K.Naik, G.C. Pati, P.K. Mohapatra, A.Choudhury. b) “Occurrence of high concentration of nitrate and fluoride in groundwater in hard rock terrain Kalahandi district, Orissa” – R.Nayak, N.C. Nayak and G.C. Pati. S.S.P. Mishra, Scientist – D and Shri S.K. Verma, Scientist – B porators and prominent citizens of Bhopal City. i T.M. Hunse, Regional Director, SWR, Bangalore delivered keynote address in seminar on Rainwater Harvesting conducted by Federa Water Resources Planning and Management” organized by Water Resource elopment, Govt. of Orissa on 6th June 2007 under Hydrology Project Phase II of ssa. D.K. Goel and Shri S.S.P. Mishra, Scientist – D participated in workshop on ter Scarcity Problem and its management with emphasis on Rain Water vesting Techniques” on 3rd June 2007 organized by “Satya Sai Seva Organisation” Sarvadharm Colony, Bhopal. Shri S.S.P. Mishra, Scientist – D gave presentation roof top rain water harvesting techniques in this workshop. i Supriya Brahma, AHG participated in the National Seminar on “Global Climate nge : Issues and Challenges for India” to commemorate World Environment Day 5th June 2007 at EZCC, Kolkata organized by West Bengal Pollution Cont Govt. of West Bengal, Jadavpur University and Indian Chambers of Commerce. i T.M. Hunse, Regional Director, SWR, Bangalore delivered keynote address on 7.2007 in the seminar on Rainwater Harvesting conducted by Karnataka nership Promoters Apartment association which was he Bangalore. On 3rd July Dr. K.Md.Najeeb, Supdtg. Hydrogeologist and Shri K.M. hwanath, Scientist – D as resource persons delivered talk on the theme of the inar and Shri M.A. Farooqi, AHG delivered talk on Ground Water Legislation. i N.Varadaraj, Regional Director, SECR, Chennai attended the seminar on “Climate nge and adaption” at Department of Environment, Chennai on 22.09.2007. i A.K. Bhatia, Regional Director (I/C), Dr. R.P. Sing RaviKalyan Bussa, Scientist – B attended the seminar on “Ground Water servation” on 17th September 2007 organized by Military Engineer Service, radun on the occasion of 58th Raising Day of Indian Defence Service of Engineers gineers Day) Dr.R.P. Singh delivered a lecture on the topic “Ground Water agement”. i A.K. Bhatia, Regional Director (I/C), DehradunShr and Dr. S.K. Srivastava, Scientist – B have submitted a technical paper on “Impact of Industrialization on undwater quality in Faridabad – Ballabhgarh Region, Haryana” for presentation in rnational Ground Water Conference on Ground Water dynamics and global Change be organized by University of Rajasthan
  • 232. a te stu Gro mics and global Change to be Nor n “Water Resources Har exh sem Cen Wo Asu organized by Water Resources Investigation The Hon’ble Governor of West Bengal Shri Gopal Krishna Gandhi had inaugurated the Workshop. Various models were displayed by Central Ground Water Board, Eastern Region at the workshop and appreciated by the visitors. Reg Atm 200 Wa Bro r Resources in India” during 18-19 October 2007 on 18th cha ove RCD Hyd Regional Director, CGWB, We e n: Strategies and Policy Options with special arch Institute, Jaipur on 4 – October Rajasthan” was presented by Dr. L.N. Mathurr, Scientist B. s in Ground Water anagement at Madurai organized by TWAD Board on 20.11.2007. and its impact on the Life” on 01.12.2007 at Centre for Environmental Science, University of Madras, Chennai. fi rkshop on Sensitization-Cum- ilitation Programme (TIFP) at NEERI, Nagpur on 19th December 2007. Dr. R.P. Singh, Scientist – D and Shri Ravikalyan Bussa, Scientist – B have submitted chnical paper on “Impact of Industrial Wastes on Groundwater Environs – A case dy, Satpur area, district Nasik,Maharashtra” for presentation in International und Water Conference on Ground Water dyna organized by University of Rajasthan, Jaipur from 11th to 14th March, 2008. th Western Region, Chandigarh participated in the seminar o and its Future Management” organized by Asia Pacific Jurist Association, Punjab and yana Chapter, Chandigarh on 8.09.2007 at Punjab University, Chandigarh and also ibits like charts, posters showing water conservation techniques were put up in the inar. tral Ground Water Board, Eastern Region actively participated in State Level rkshop on “Crisis of Water Resources and its Management” at Indian Museum, tosh Birth Centenary Hall, Kolkata to observe Water Year 2007. The workshop was and Development, Govt. of West Bengal. ional Director, CGWB, Central Region attended a workshop on “Impacts of ospheric Brown Clouds (ABC) on Water Resources in India” during 18-19th October 7 at NEERI, Nagpur. Shri. P.K. Parchure, Sc-D made a presentation on “Ground ter Resources of India over the years” in a workshop on “Impacts of Atmospheric wn Clouds (ABC) on Wate th October 2007. On 19th October, deliberations were held on impacts of ABC nges in ground water and surface water quality, water demand and availability r the last few decades etc. dtg. Hydrogeologists, CGWB, SER attended a WorkSup shop on Fluoride and Fluorosis Mitigation – The Strategies for Orissa Organized by Centre for Water for Life (Under C, Orissa) 6th and 7th October 2007 at Bhubaneshwar. Shri G.C. Pati, Supdtg. rogeologist presented a paper entitled “Fluoride Endemicity in Orissa”. stern Region, Jaipur attended National Seminar on tlands and their Conservatio“W reference to Rajasthan” organized by Social Policy Rese 5th 2007. Technical Paper on “Conservation of Sambhar Wetlands in Regional Director, SECR, Chennai attended the Workshop on “Climate change and adoption strategies” conducted by Department of Environment at ITC Hotel, Chennai on 4.10.2007and presented a paper. Scientist – D & H.O.O presented a paper on “Hydrogeology of Soft Rock Aquifers in Gujarat with special reference to North Gujarat” in Workshop on Lignite Mining in Aquifer Condition – Problems and Solutions” organized by GMDC at Ahmedabad on 27th October 2007. Sh. N. Varadaraj, Regional Director presented a paper on “Tank/ Oorani modernization” in one day workshop on the role of tank M Dr. N. Varadaraj, Regional Director, SECR, Chennai participated and presented a paper on “Impact of Coovam river and Bukingham Canal on Ground Water Regime” for the one day workshop on “Importance of Coovam River Of cer of Central Region, Nagpur attended a wo Awareness Programme for Technology Information Fac
  • 233. Scientists of SECR, Chennai attended one day Workshop on “Isotope trace techniques for water resources development and management” on 17.12.2007 organized by Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Madras, Chennai and participated in the deliberations. Superintending Hydrogeologist of CGWB, South Eastern Region, participated two days Workshop of “Safe Drinking Water in Rural Areas- Community participation” organised by Water Aid India at Konark, Orissa on 17th January 2008. i layan Region, attended Seminar on ‘’Water Management and Sewage Disposal at High Altitude Area” organized by thern Region, Hyderabad attended one day Workshop on Southern Region Hyderabad ad on 23.02.2008. Superintending Hydrogeologist, Southern Western Region Bangalore attended the on “Ground Water Regulation & Management” on 13th March, 2008 in the Auditorium hall in CSMRS, New Delhi. The Central Ground Water Board and Central Water Commission, jointly organized a r Ground Water” on 17th March, 2008 in the Auditorium hall in CSMRS, New Delhi. Shri B.S.Ahuja, Chairman CWC 28-29 February 2008 at NEERI, Nagpur. Regional Director(I/C) also Chaired the First Technical Session as the Cha Regional Director, WR,WCR and CR , Scientists from WR,SR,UR,SER, SWR NER, ER, HQ Gro Uni tec Reg Wa at N Sc entists of CGWB, North Western Hima Defence Authority at Udhampur, J&K and presented a technical paper on Ground Water Exploration in parts of Ladakh area during January,2008. Regional Director, Southern Region, Hyderabad Chaired a session during the National Workshop on Applied Geochemistry in Environment Studies organized by University of Madras, Chennai on 8.02.2008. Regional Director, South Eastern Coastal Region, Chennai attended the State Credit Seminar 2008-09 on 22nd February 2008 at NABARD, Chennai and participated in the deliberations. Scientist , North Central Region , Bhopal attended the State Credit Seminar 2008-09 organized by NABARD at Bhopal on 1.02.2008. The seminar focused on finance proposed for year 2008-09 by BABARD for different sectors including minor irrigation and Rural Infrastructure Building. Scientist CGWB, Sou “Isotope Tracer Techniques for Water Resources Development and Management organized by JNTU, Hyderabad on 12th February 2008. Regional Director and Superintending Hydrogeologist, attended a Workshop on “Water Resources: Issues and Options for Judicious Management” along with Director (GW) and Director (Admn.) at Centre for Water and Land Resources, NIRD, Hyderab “State Credit Seminar on State Focus Paper 2008-09 on 13.02.2008 which was organized by NABARD, Karnataka. The Ministry of Water Resources and Central Ground Water Authority, jointly organized a workshop wo kshop on “Conjunctive use of Surface and Shri B.M.Jha, Chairman CGWB and Dr. S.C. Dhiman, Member (SML), CGWB, Dr. S.K. Sharma, Consultant ,MoWR. graced the occassion. The Theme papers were presented during the two Sessions. Regional Director(I/C), Central Region, Nagpur attended a International Conference on “Water Crisis – Challenges & Opportunities” during th irman on 28th February 2008. and SUO, Srinagar ,attended in International Ground Water Conference on und Water Dynamics and Global Change organized by Department of Geology, versity of Rajasthan at Jaipur during 19-21st March 2008. RD, WCR chaired the hnical session in the conference. ional Director (I/C), Central Region, Nagpur attended a Workshop on “Ground ter Regulation” organized by Central Ground Water Authority on 11th March 2008 ew Delhi.
  • 234. Reg Gro Sup ttended the workshop on Conjunctive use wat at New Delhi on 17th Reg A decision reg . Scientists of CGWB, SECR, Chennai presented a paper in National Seminar on “Advances in Hydrosciences” held from 10 –11th March 2008 at Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati and participated in the deliberations. Regional Director, SECR, Che val The d Scheme on “Artificial Recharge of Ground Water through Dug Wells” organized by NABARD, on 14th March 2008 at Ahmedabad. Regional Director & Suptd. Hydrogeologist, attended workshop on Ground water Legislation & Management, which was organized by CGWA at CSMRS, at New Delhi on 13-03-2008. Suptd. Hydrogeologist, attended workshop on “Conjunctive use of Surface and Ground water” on 17-03-2008 organized by jointly by CGWB and CWC at CSMRS, New Delhi. Regional Director and Scientists from CGWB, Southern Region attended the International Workshop on a Decision Support for Ground Water Management in hard rock Aquifer in Semi arid region under the project “SUSTWATER” from 3 – 5th March, Regional Director and Scientists from CGWB, Southern Region attended the Workshop on Del Sci of pow Nag Regional Director, NWR, Chandigarh delivered lecture on “Water Conservation, Rainwater Harvesting etc. including involvement of Industries & Institution in Drive” on BBM Reg “Na heldd at Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati from 10-11th March, 2008. ‘D water” on 25th March, 2008 during DRUM Training Program at Bhakra Beas Training Centre, BBMB, Nangal Township. A Paper on “Water Crisis in Punjab – Solution through Innovative Techniques of rth 8 at Punjab University, Chandigarh. esented technical papers in the “National Seminar 11 Marc ional Director, South Eastern Region, Bhubaneswar attended the workshop on und water regulations and management on 13th March, 2008 held at New Delhi. tdg. Hydrogeologist, SER, Bhubaneswar a of surface & ground water and presented a lecture on conjunctive use of Surface er & Ground water in Hirakud Canal Command Area, Orissa March, 2008. ional Director, SECR, Chennai attended the International workshop on “ support tool for Ground Water Management in hard rocks aquifers in Semi arid ions” conducted at NGRI, Hyderabad during 3-5th March, 2008 nnai was the chief Guest for the Valedictory function and delivered the edictory address. Regional Director participated in State Level Workshop on Centrally sponsore 2008 at NGRI, Hyderabad. “Ground Water Regulation and Management” on 13.03.2008 at New hi. entists from CGWB, Southern Region attended the Workshop on “Conjunctive use Surface and Ground Water” on 17.03.2008 at CSMRS, New Delhi and made a er point presentation on Conjunctive utilization of Surface and Ground Water in arjunasagar Canal Command Area, Andhra Pradesh. 25th March 2008 during DRUM Training Program at Bhakra Beas Training Centre, B, Nangal Township. ional Director delivered the Key Note address in the inauguration function of tional Seminar on Advance in Hydroscience” Scientist- ’, NWR, Chandigarh also delivered a lecture on “Mapping of Underground Ground Water Aquifer Recharge” by Shri Sushil Gupta, Regional Director, No Western Region, Chandigarh was presented at Chandigarh Science Congress on 15th March, 200 Scientists from SR, Hyderabad pr on Advance in Hydroscience” heldd at Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati from 10- th h, 2008.
  • 235. 26.5 1. Shri S.Marwaha, Scientist – D of Central Ground Water Board, Chandigarh delivered a lecture on Ground Water Recharge Studies in the state of Punjab in Extension Education at Punjab Agriculture University, Ludhiana, Punjab. 2. Shri Sourabh Gupta, Scientist round Water Board, State Unit Office, Pune delivered the following two lectures at National Water Academy, 3. Shri A.K. Agrawal, Scientist – D Central Ground Water Board, MER, Patna delivered a lecture on “Activities and Achievements office CGWB” in the 1st session of the seminar organized by a NGO VISWASH on “Coping with Water R.K.S.Gavai, Governor of Bihar was the Chief Guest of the ter Board, MER, Patna delivered a lecture on “Application of Remote Sensing and GIS in Ground Water Development in the 2nd Session of the Seminar. 5. Shri T.M. Hunse, Regional Director , SWR, Central Ground Water Board, Bangalore ater conservation”. The seminar was organized by Govt. of Karnataka at Legislative hall, Bangalore on 19.07.2007. Shri tg. Hydrogeologist also attended the seminar. g Programme at Chennai on 22.08.2007. ing for ground water recharge and Ground Water Recharge techniques respectively in ICAR sponsored 21 days Summer School on Excess Rainfall Management for Sustainable Agriculture in Vertisols organized by es 9 velopment Authority, Haryana on 10th August 2007. 10. Regional Director, NWR delivered on the theme “Water Conservation, Rainwater Harvesting etc including i volvement of industries and institutions in the drive” and “Mapping of under ground water” respectively on 26.09.2007 during training programme conducted by Bhakra Beas Management Board at Nangal under Distribution Reforms, upgrades and Management (DRUM) aided by USAID and monitored by Ministry of Power and Power Finance Corporation. 11. Regional Director, SECR delivered a lecture on “Various measures for Ground Water Potential” at Meenakshi Sun ar Rajan Engineering College, Chennai on 8.09.2007. 12. Officers of CGWB, UR, Dehradun deli ered a lecture at Indian Institute of Remote Sensing, Dehradun to the M.Tech and P.G. diploma students on the topic of “Ground Water Management in Mountainous Terrain” on 19th September 2007, Delivered Lectures the workshop for Soil & Water Conservation organized by Directorate of – D Central G Pune for the Short Term Training Course on “Rain Water Harvesting and Ground Water Recharging” on 25th May 2007. i. Planning for Artificial Recharge Projects. ii. Monitoring Mechanism for Artificial Recharge Projects. Scarcity and Sanitation Facility the rural Scenario in Bihar” on 19th June, 2007. His Excellency Shri Seminar. 4. Dr. S.S. Vitala, STA (HG) , Central Ground Wa delivered theme related invited talk in the Seminar on “Role of elected representatives and Govt. in w Yediyurappa, Hon’ble Deputy Chief Minister was the chief guest. Dr. K.Md. Najeeb, Supd 6. Shri N.Varadaraj, Regional Director delivered lecture on Ground Water Management in TWAD Board Trainin 7. Ms. Anuradha Bhatia, Scientist – B & Dr. L.K. Mathur, AHG delivered lectures on Roof Top Rain Water Harvest Central Institute of Agriculture Engineering, Bhopal on 23.08.2007. 8. Shri S.Marwaha, Scientist – D delivered a lecture on Artificial Recharge techniqu to the Panchayat Heads from the State of Himachal Pradesh at Central Soil & Water Conservation Research Training Institute on 23rd August 2007. . Shri S.Marwaha, Scientist – D delivered a lecture on Artificial Recharge techniques and Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting to the officers of Command Area De lecture n d v
  • 236. “Geophysical Exploration for Ground Water Prospecting” on 21st September 2007 and “Hydrogeochemical Analysis and Interpretation” on 21st September 2007. 13. Four technical papers were prese ed in National Symposium on “Applied Geochemistry of Energy Resources and Precious Metals” from 19th to 20th September 2007 at Hyderabad by S of CGWB, SR, Hyderabad. 14. Scientist – D delivered lecture on “Water Quality of West Bengal” at the Workshop on “Crisis of Water Resources and its Management” at Indian Museum, Asutosh Birth Centenary Hall, Kolkata w ich was organized by Water Resources Investigation and Development, Govt. of West Bengal. 15. Regional Director, SECR, Chennai delivered lecture on the theme Groundwater discharge and recharge in Chennai in the training workshop for school students on “Application of Science, geography a e Education for flood management in Chennai” at Anna University, Chennai on 24.10.2007, 6 nos. of working models have been temporarily issued to Centre for Water Resources, Anna University and explained the working of models to participants. 16. Regional Director, SECR, Chennai delivered lecture on the theme Groundwater discharge and recharge in Chennai in the training workshop for school students on “Application of Science, geography and Value Education for flood management in Chennai” at Anna University, Chennai on 24.10.2007, 6 nos. of working models have been temporarily issued to Centre for Water Resources, Anna University and explained the working of models to participants. 17. Supdtg. Hydrogeologist, SECR, Chennai delivered a lecture on “Planning and Management of Ground Water Sources” on 6.12.2007 in National Refresher Course on “Maintenance and Management related to Municipal Water Works” organized by TWAD Board at Chennai. 18. Scientist – D of SECR, Chennai delivered a lecture on “Isotope studies in ground e Trace Techniques for Water Resources Development and Management” conducted by Centre for Environmental Science, ati at training rogramme on “Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting, management, conservation and Rainwater Harvesting, Development and Management of Water Resources in Rural Areas” to the NC Cadets attending the National Integration Camp at NCC n 7 & 8 February 2008 at Department of Earth Science, Pondicherry University, Puducherry. nt cientists h nd Valu water “ in one day workshop on “Isotop University of Madras on 17.12.2007 at Chennai. 19. Regional Director, SECR delivered key note address on “Renovation of Water Bodies” on 18.12.2007 at Bharathidhasan University, Trichy. 20. Scientists of CGWB, NER, Guwahati delivered lectures during the month at Awareness Programme on Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting organized by Chief Engineer, MES at Guwahati, Tezpur (Assam), Shillong (Meghalaya), Agartala (Tripura), Tenga Valley (Arunachal Pradesh). 21. Lectures delivered by the Senior officers of CGWB, NER, Guwah P protection of ground water” organized by the Chief Engineer, MES at Shillong, Meghalaya to the officers of MES in and around all the States of NER.. 22. Scientist CGWB, SR, Hyderabad delivered lectures on 14th and 16th January 2008 on “ Group Headquarters, Tirupati. 23. Scientist of CGWB, SWR, Bangalore attended lectures on “Challenges of climate change relevant to India” and “District disaster management plan” given by the experts of Ministry of Earth Science, Govt. of India. The Lectures were organized by Karnataka Natural Disaster Management Centre, Govt. of Karnataka at Bangalore on 24.01.2008. 24. Regional Director, South Eastern Coastal Region, Chennai delivered lectures on “Ground Water Contamination in Tamil Nadu” and “Rain Water Harvesting and Artificial Recharge to Ground Water” o th th
  • 237. 25. Scientist of CGWB, South Eastern Region, Bhubaneswar delivered two lectures on “Manual Logging including Temperature and Fluid Logging” and “Geophysical Studies in the Coastal Areas of Orissa in “Application of Geophysical techniques for Ground Water Exploration and Management “ held at CGWB, MER, Patna on 22.01.08 to 24.01.2008. 26.6 Participated in the celebration of Republic Day Central Ground Water Board participated in the celebration of Republic Day and th the Central Water Commission. The front part of the Tableau reminds us of the picturesque world when r is a nagement is being practised for its proper use and prevention of pollution. The back part presents the captivating 26.7 Ind Central Develo e andhiji Seva Sangha at the Exhibition Ground, B with vario nical and scientific exhibits and activities of CGWB. Interactive discuss n among interes ♦ Water a Zone on 12th & 13th July, 2 7 n request scientists from CGWB, ER, Kolkata delivered lectures on different topics on Ground enic affected Murshidabad district and fluoride affected Birbhum district have been Nawapara District Report of Orissa State was issued by the Regional Director, supervised the fabrication of Tableau of Ministry of Water Resources. This office planned and designed the entire Tableau in consultation wi wate vailable in plenty and conservation and ma metaphor depicting inter-linking of various water resources across the country to ensure the equal distribution of water. It also depicts Rainwater Harvesting and Artificial Recharge to check the declining trend of water table. This depiction of Ministry of Water Resources through Tableau encourages people for water conservation and also informs them about the initiatives of the Ministry to ensure the equal distribution of water across the country. ia National Development Festival - 2007 Ground Water Board, South Eastern Region, participated in the India National pm nt Festival - 2007 organized by G hubaneswar from 1st to 8th July 2007. CGWB was represented in a pavilion us tech io s were held and technical brochures and pamphlets were distributed ted visitors. 26.8 Activities under Water Year - 2007 Ye r 2007, organized by the Chief Engineer, MES, Siliguri 00 was inaugurated by Major General C. D. Sawant, AVSM. O Water Management in North Bengal, Sikkim. About 50 persons mainly in the cadre of GE and AGE participated in the programme. The participants took keen interest during the question-answer session. The scientists from CGWB were Dr. B. C. Mehta, Sc ‘D’(Ch), Dr T. L. Chakraborty, Sc ‘D’, Sh B. B. Bhattacharya, Sc ‘D’, Sh R. K. Guha, Sc ‘B’, Sh A. K. Chatterjee, AHG & Dr. S. K. Adhikary, AGP. During the closing ceremony Brig. I.P.S Ahuja, CE, MES, Siliguri Zone highly appreciated the lecture modules prepared by the scientists of CGWB, ER, Kolkata. In order to celebrate ‘Water Year 2007’, two Ground Water Information Booklets on ars completed for release. ♦ South Eastern Region, Bhubaneswar during July 2007 in the presence of all senior technical officers and other staff of CGWB.
  • 238. ♦ Ground Water Information Booklets of Palakkad, Kasargod and Wayanad districts were released during July, 2007 by Shri N.K. Premachandran, Hon’ble Minister of Water Resources, Govt. of Kerala. ♦ Two Ground Water Information Booklets of Ambala and Panipat districts were y of Water Resources, Govt. of India celebrated “World Water Day” on 20th March, 2008 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi. Hon’ble Vice President of India Hon’ble Minister of State ,Ministry of Water Resources. On this occasion Technical Papers have been presented by the authors during technical sessions. • The officers of CGWB, Central Region, Nagpur participated in World Water Day on rganized by CWC, Nagpur at the institute of Engineers, Nagpur Local Centre, Nagpur. gional Director MER, Patna along with senior officers of the Region participated in the World Water Day Programme organized at WALMI on 20-03-2008 by GFCC, l Director SWR, Bangalore & team of officers from SWR participated in • rces Day in released on 31.07.2007 by Prof.(Dr.) Ravindra Kumar, Head , Department of Geology and Chairman, Center for Advanced studies, Punjab University, Chandigarh at Bhujal Bhawan, Chandigarh. 26.9 Workshop on Hydrological Design Aid Central Ground Water Board organized a workshop on Hydrological Design Aid under Hydrology Project on 30.08.2007 at CSMRS auditorium, New Delhi. The workshop was inaugurated by Chairman, CGWB and attended by the members of State & Central agencies and MoWR. The theme of the workshop was to firm up the TOR of HDA Consultancy and obtain the requirements of states. 26.10 Celebration of World Water Day • Ministr Shri M. Hamid Ansari ,inaugurated the function , welcome speech was given by Prof. Saifudin Soz, Hon’ble Union Minister of Water Resources & Vote of thanks given by Shri Jai Prakash Narayan Yadav, 20th March 2008. This programme was o • World Water Day on the theme of “Sanitation” was celebrated in the Regional Office of Uttaranchal Region, Dehradun on 20th March, 2008. • World Water Day was celebrated at SECR, Chennai on 20-03-2008 and the officers from state and central agencies participated in the celebration. • The officers of CGWB, SUO, Ranchi ,jointly with CWC organized one day programme on “World Water Day” on 20-03-2008 at Ranchi. • Re Patna. • Regiona World Water Day celebrations jointly organized by CGWB and CWC on 20-03- 2008 at Bangalore. Regional Director presented the theme paper in the function. CGWB, SER, Bhubaneswar, organized the World Water Resou association with Central Water Commission on 20th March 2008. Regional Director delivered a speech and officers/staff participate during the celebrations.
  • 239. 27. ional rate n to ttee sals received by INCOH on ground water issues for their r Out of total 19 projects received so far, 2 proposals were approved and recommended by R&D(GW) sub committee, 2 proposal approved in principle and sent to PI for revision and remaining 15 proposals are under scrutiny. The details of the proposals in Table 27a, Table 27b and Table 27c: Table 27a: List of approved & recommended proposals by R&D (GW) Sub Committee: Sl No Project Title RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES The Central Ground Water Board is chairing a sub-committee of Indian Nat Committee on Hydrology ( INCOH ), on R&D in ground water with a view to accele the development programme in ground water sector and giving due consideratio increased need of taking up research in the field of ground water. This Commi examines the project propo suitability for funding and recommends for sanctioning by the Ministry of Wate Resources. 1 Spatio-temporal Modelling of Ground Water Quality using Artificial Neural Network 2 Developing a Methodology for Evaluating the Impact of Rain Water Harvesting in Urban Areas Table 27b: List of Proposals approved in principle by R&D (GW) Sub Committee and sent to PI for revision based on observation of the committee: l No Project TitleS 1 Arsenic Problem in Jharkhand & Bihar and some remedial measure 2 Ev er Harvesting Filter Systemsaluation and Modelling of Rain Wat Tab water and under process: Sl No le ist of New R&D Proposals received on ground27c: L Project Title 1. acB nol from Pulp Paper Effluent and its Applications for Aquaculture & Ferti-Irrigation. terial Degradation of Lignin and Pentachlorophe 2 Fluoride Contamination of Ground Water in Nayagarh District, Orissa 3 Mo Rec ased approach, Jhalawar districts, Raj rpho-tectonic Study of Jhalawar Urban area & its Hinterland towards Groundwater harge Enhancement: A Remote Sensing and GIS b asthan” 4 Eval diff uation of Heavy Metal Pollution index for groundwater of townships located near erent mining areas 5 Gro har undwater potential assessment and management in the Rangamalai watershed, a d rock region in Dindigul district, Tamil Nadu 6 Ass Uni its Rajeev Gandhi South Campus, Barkachha, Mir essment, Augmentation and Regulation of Water Resources at Banaras Hindu versity Main Campus Varanasi and zapur 7 Vul Pon nerability assessment and groundwater management studies in aquifers of dicherry and Karaikal regions.
  • 240. 8 Ma AG nagement of Aquifer Recharge for Augmentation of Groundwater Resources (MAR for WR 9 De Wa tion for Industrial Use velopment of Nanofiltration Membrane Technology for Drinking Water Purification and ter Reclama 10 Hyd Bas ro-Geochemical Investigations of high fluoride groundwater terrain in part of Morel in, Jaipur District, Rajasthan 11 Esti uitable techniques to improve the mation of aquifer potential in coal mining region with s recharge 12 Integrated groundwater management in Chubaka Basin, West Bengal 13 Assessment of hydro-geochemical impacts of shrimp farming on coastal watershed 14 Flu ed media packed filtr oride removal from contaminated groundwater using develop ation bed in the lab and field 15 Assessment of groundwater potential in velar river basin based on GWREC Norms of 1997
  • 241. 28. PUBLICITY PUBLIC AWARENESS Water is a precious resource vitally important for development as a whole for ev ry day life. With a vie enerate consciousness among the masses ‘ Water Resources Day” lebrated everywhere since 1986. Central Ground Water Board has played very by organizing functions jointly with Central Water Commission, other State izations and ents. On th emphasis has been laid to educate the rural population on various aspects of water resources in the country by organizing these functions in rural areas and by giving popular talks and ng ou nical hlets in regional lang . Important technical achievements of the Board have been brought to the knowledge of the public throug io Talks, Televis terv of ort film on ground water pollution, News Paper reports, release of district reports ses at the Public functions. Working Model o rolo cle, Conjuncti rface and Gr Water, Artificial Recharge St out in JNU, N d Rotary Dril Rig are displayed along with photos of drilling activities nels s g a achievements of CGWB, Translite showing various methods of artificial Recharge, Translite on Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting echniques, various publications released by entral Ground Water Board and various slogans on ground water are displayed to create wareness on various aspects of ground water. Knowledge on water quality and testing is rovided to visitors and facility for ‘on the spot analysis of water to check its suitability r drinking and domestic use is provided. he Central Ground Water Board was successful in attracting the masses and creating among the farmers, school/college students, agriculture Scientists, general ublic and dignitaries. During the exhibition brochures on activities and achievements of , Roof Top rain Water harvesting Techniques, Ground ributed. Various publications of CGWB and Water Testing B were in great demand by the visitors. Some of them have expressed this in the visitor book also. 28.1 EXHIBITIONS/ MELAS/ TRADE FAIRS During the par 28.1.1 Central Ground Water Board participated in the 28th India International Trade Fair (IITF) -2007 with seven other departments under the Ministry of Water Resources during the period 14th to 27th November,2007. Ministry of Water Maidan area, H followin • Ground Water Flow in Aquifer • Map depicting notified areas & area notified for registration purpose. • Map depicting Over-exploited, ritical and Semi-critical area. • Map depicting status of enact ent of model bill in states. AND e w to g is being ce active role Govt. Organ departm e occasion of Water Resources Day, bringi t tech pamp uages h Rad ion in iews, telecast a sh , Atla f Hyd udies carr gical Cy ied ve use of Su ew Delhi an ound ling , pa howin ctivities and T C a p fo T awareness p CGWB, Attributes of Ground Water Water and Health etc were dist Kits developed by CGW the year 2007-2008 various exhibitions and trade fairs have been organized and ticipation of the Board in these events are indicated below. India International Trade Fair-2007 at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi along Resources organized the exhibition in a separate pavilion Hall of Pragati . CGWB demonstrate live Models of Rain Water Harvesting depicting the Rural illy Terrain and high raised buildings in the urban localities. Apart from that, g poster were prominently and attracting displayed in the CGWB stall : C m
  • 242. • Ground Water Resources of India. • Ground Water Development & Management in Palla Well Field in NCT, Delhi. • Map showing long term decline of ground water level in NCT, Delhi. • Hydro geological Atlas of India . Following pamphlets were distributed for the information to the general public. • 4 Pamphlets describing the wo ing models in details. • A Pamphlet depicting details of the Ground Water Regulation Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon’ble Minister of W er Resources inaugurated the pavilion of Ministry of Water Resources on the 15th November 2007 in the presence of Shri Jai Prakash Narayan Yadav, Hon’ble Minister Water Resources, Smt. Gauri Chatterji, Secretary to the Minister of Water Resources, Chairman CGWB and other dignitaries from the Minister of Water R e stall of CGWB attracted the visitors and the exhibits, models and demonstrations on ground water etc were appreciated by them. Minister of Water Resources pavilion was awarded 1st Prize i.e. gold medal among all Central Govt. Stalls and was appreciated by one and all. 28.1.2 Exhibition at Vigyan Bhawan Exhibition at Vigyan Bhawan was organized by the Ministry of Rural Development with the theme of Rural Water Supply and Sanitation. Central Ground Water Board had participated in display with its working models on Rain water Harvesting and Ground Water Management. Hon’ble Minister for ural Development Shri Rahuvansh Prasad Singh along with other dignitaries visited the CGWB stall. 28.1.3 Earth Science Expo 2007 he Earth Science Expo 2007 organized t Triv th ovem nd received 8. en lic Day and sup brication of Tableau of Ministry of Water Resources. It planned and des in consultation with the Central Water Commission. The front r s us of the picturesque world when water is availa n plenty d be ised op p of oll e ng r d te various water resources across the countr su l d also ficial Rech he ining trend of wat This ater Resources through Tableau encourages people for wat ms them t the in ves of the inistry to ensure the oss the country. rk at of State for esources. Th R entral Ground Water Board participated in tC a andrum by the Department of Geology, Old Student Association from 21-24 ber 2007. The stall of CGWB was appreciated by students and public aN good coverage in the newspaper. 2 2 Participated in the celebration of Republic Day C tral Ground Water Board participated in the celebration of Repub ervised the fa igned the entire Tableau pa t of the Tableau remind ble i an p conservation and managem ution. The back part pres depicts Rainwater Harvesting and Arti er table. depiction of Ministry of W er conservation and also info equal distribution of water a ent is ents th ing pract captivati y to en for its pr metapho re the equa arge to c er use and epicting in istribution of water. It ck the decl revention r-linking of r abou itiati M cr
  • 243. 28. Celebration of Wo er Ministry of Water Resources, Govt. of India celebrated “World Water Da March, 2008 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi. Hon’ble Vice President of India Shri M. Hamid Ansari ,inaugurated the function , welcome speech was given by P din Soz, Hon’ble Union Minister of Water Resources & Vote of thanks given i Prakash Narayan Yadav, Hon’ble Minister of State ,Ministry of Water Resourc occasion Technical Papers have been presented by the authors during sessions. 8.4 Awareness through Print & Electronic Media 1. A radio talk was recorded by All Ind Radio (Medium Wave), Bhopal on Rain Water Harvesting and the discussion was broad casted on 24.05.2007 at 0715 hrs. Shri S.S.P. Mishra, Scientist – D participated in the radio talk. 2. Shri S.S.P. Mishra, Scientist – D participated in T.V. Programme “Janmanch” which focussed on Water Conserva on and People Participation. In the said programme, various issues of artifi al recharge/ mass awareness programme were discussed and replies to queries of persons participating in the programme were given. The programme was telecast on 23.05.2007 at 1830 hrs by Bhopal Doordarshan Kendra. 3. During a radio programme “Aaj di Awaj” aired “Live” by All India Radio Jalandhar on 16.07.2007. Shri Sushil Gupta, Regional Director replied the questions put up by persons from all walks of life relating to Artificial Recharge to Groundwater and Rainwater Harvesting and other aspects relating to ground water in respect of Punjab. 4. Shri G.P.Singh, Assistant Hydrogeologist, NWR, Chandigarh participated in live telecast of Punjabi Channel PTC on the topic “Mudda – Pani Bas Khatam Kahani”. The duration of the programme was of one hour. During the programme questions regarding depletion of water levels and measures taken for groundwater management were replied. . ctor, CGWB, SECR, Chennai gave a interview to All India Radio, Chennai on 9.08.2007 on the subject of Ground Water and Sanitation and the same was broad casted on 11.08.2007. 6. During a radio programme ‘Suvidha’ on the topic of “Pani di Bachat” aired live on Akashwani, All India Radio, Jalandhar on 19.09.2007. Shri Sushil Gupta, all walks of life rela ound water and rainwater ting and other aspects relating to ground water in unjab. 28.5 MASS AWARE OG Mass Awareness and Training Progr con y CGWA as part of the A ction Plan. D period March 20 Ma ess and 22 Water Ma nt Train gramme e been conducted by the Regional Offices of CGWB. The progra were attended by represen from Government Organizations, Volunta nizatio al Govt. departments, P ats, farmers, school students et These programmes had foc water conservation and artific rge to ater. A rom these, the owing a es were also carri 3 rld Wat Day y” on 20th rof. Saifu by Shri Ja es. On this technical 2 ia ti ci 5 Shri N.Varadaraj, Regional Dire Regional Director, NWR, Chandigarh replied the questions put up by persons from ting to artificial recharge to gr harves respect of P NESS AND TRAINING PR RAMMES ams are being ducted b nnual A uring the (April to 2008 ) ss Awaren nageme ing Pro s hav mmes tatives ry Orga ns, loc anchay c. us on ial recha ground w part f foll ctiviti ed out.
  • 244. 2 RESSIVE USE OF HINDI provision rel Section 3(3) of the Offic Language Act, 1963 is complied with . tters received re inva plied in Hi i. • Hindi Quartely Progress report is sent regularly to the Ministry of Water Resources, n Official Lan Impleme Comm ridabad and Language t (Regi plementa ffice). meeting e Departm O.L. Implementation Committee are organised i per the decisions taken in the meeting. eck points has t up for pliance of O.L. Rule 1976 & O.L. Act 1963. ndi workshop w anized fr 25th April, 2007 at Bhujal Bhawan, Faridabad. cers/ officials were traine hop workshop on Ground Water T was organized from 5- 6 er. 2007 sponsored by Commission for Scientific & Technical Terminology, New Delhi. 60 shop. • Board at Faridabad from 11 – 15th June 2007 and 18-22nd June 2007 which was sponsored by Deptt of O.L. and under the technical gui ce of NPT officials were ned in this training programme. ndi Pakhwara' was celebrated from 14 – 28th September 2007. A number of grammes & competitions were organ during the fortn e participation of icers/ officials in these competitions rwhelming . Seven officials were awarded with prize for original Noting & d in Hindi. humijal News Letter', the quarterley magazine highlighting on e activities of CGWB NG published. Bhumijal Newslet was awarded Cert ate of merit on the occasion of “8th Akhil Bhartiya Ra a Vikas Sa n” organised at Ghaziabad. rayas-2007', the in-house Hindi Maga e has been published. ‘’Prayas’ has been certificate on the occasion of 9th Akhil Bhartiya Rastrabhasha Vikas rganised 25th March,200 aziabad. The inspection of following field offices were done by Dr. Birendra Kr. Singh, Dy. Director (OL). Regio ion XV, Kolkata; Regional office Bhopal; Division XII Bhopa ndigarh; Division II Ambala; Division XIV, Bangalore; Regional Office, Lucknow; Division III, Varanasi. • been awarded 2nd prize by TOLIC Faridabad um work in • Ten sections of the H.Q. have been instr ed for doing cent-percent work in Hindi. • oard is committed towards the progress and implementation of Hindi and is determined for progressive use of H s per the Annual Programme issued by icial Language Department. 9. PROG • The ating to ial • Le in Hindi a riably re nd Tow guage ntation ittee, Fa Official Departmen rterly onal Im tion O e l• Qua regularly and necessary action of th nta s taken as • Ch • Hi been se as rg the com om 4-o 2 th25 Offi • A d in e works erminology . th Novemb Officers/ Officials from various offices of the Board were trained in the work A five days Hindi Computer amme was organized in thetraining progr dan I. 52 officers/ trai • 'Hi pro ised was ove ight. Th off • rafting • 'B th IS BEI ter ific strabhash mmela • 'P zin awarded merit Sammelan” o 8 at Gh • nal offices at Patna, Kolkata; Divis l, Regional Office Cha CGWB has for doing maxim Hindi. uct The B indi a Off
  • 245. 30. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT The s gth, filled up, vacanc , category-wise l deployed and highlights of the achievemen the Board is presented in table 30.1, 30.2 and Table 30.1: PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT IN CENTRAL GROUND WATER BOARD ING 2007-08 GROUP anctioned stren y position personne ts of the administrative wing in 30.3 respectively. DUR “A” Sanc OBC Handicapped SCtioned Filled Vacant ST 423 395 28 27 0 54 15 GROUP “B”(Gazetted) Sanctioned Filled Vacant OBC Handicapped SC ST 372 303 69 21 0 47 18 GROUP “B”(Non-Gazetted) Sanctioned Filled Vacant OBC Handicapped SC ST 204 175 29 13 2 30 9 GROUP “C” Sanctioned Filled Vacant OBC Handicapped SC ST 2041 1769 272 107 9 344 126 GROUP “D” Sanctioned Filled Vacant OBC Handicapped SC ST 1347 1169 178 97 6 287 74 GRAND TOTAL Sanctioned Filled Vacant OBC Handicapped SC ST 4387 3811 576 265 17 762 242
  • 246. 31.1 e A During the year 2007-2008, 21 com were brought forward from d 13 re 2007-2008 up to 31st March, cas these 9 com be osed and 4 s cases have been taken up as i oceed erefore, carried w 01 ary Pr iscipli ings w d w.e.f. 1.04.2007 and iplin oceedings ha eived during the year. Thus a to es of ry proce on the record. Out of these iscip proceedings een finalized and 8 cases have been rwar 31. VIGILANCE . Vigilanc ctivities plaints cases the 2008. Thus total 34 complaint last year an complaints were ceived during es were on the record. Out of plaints have en cl complaint disc for plinary pr ings. Th 21 complaint cases have been ard w.e.f. .04.2008. 31.2. Disciplin oceedings 14 case 4 ca s of d nary proceed ere brought forwar ses of disc ary pr ve been rec tal 18 cas disciplina edings were 10 cases of d linary have b carried fo d.
  • 247. 32. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Persons with Disabilities for the year 2007-2008 are given in table 32.1 Table 32.1 PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES FOR THE YEAR 2007-2008 1. Schemes/Policies run by the respective Ministry/Department for the benefit of Persons with Disabilities. Nil 2. Budget allocated and expenditure incurred under each scheme during the financial year. Nil 3. No. of persons benefited Nil 4. Per capita expenditure Nil Group Sanction Strength Number of vacancies filled since 1996 Number of persons with disabilities appointed against 3% reservation Remarks UAU 423 81 - B 576 104 - C 2041 167 - 5. Sanctioned strength, the number of vacancies filled since 1996 and the number of persons with disabilities appointed in various posts in Group – A, B, C & D against the 3% vacancies to be reserved for them under Section-33 of the PWD Act. D 1347 232 3 Requisition for filling up 2 posts amongst physical handicappe d (One for OH and one for HH) has been sent to the SSC.
  • 248. 33. BUDGET AND ACCOUNTING Statement showing actual expenditure incurred by the Board during 2007-2008 has been shown in Table 33.1, Table 33.2, Table 33.3, Table 33.4 and Table 33.5. Table 33.1 : STATEMENT SHOWING ACTUAL EXPENDITURE INCURRED BY THE BOARD DURING 2007-2008 Plan (Rs. In Lakhs) Final Grant up to March 2008 Non-Plan (Rs. In Lakhs) Final Grant up to March 2008 Sub-Head Funds Expenditure Funds Expenditure Salary 1201.05 1172.76 5550.00 5516.70 Wages 12.00 11.35 1.00 0.71 O.T.A 1.95 1.92 16.00 15.83 T. E 350.00 296.98 280.50 266.45 F.T.E 3.00 0 1.00 0.15 O.E 525.00 515.96 6.50 5.78 P.S 15.00 5.43 0.50 0.18 R.R.T 180.00 167.68 5.00 2.72 Publications 50.00 46.07 2.15 1.69 Subsidies 0.50 0.26 0 0 Susp. Stock 1000.00 938.04 0 0 W. O.L 20.00 14.29 0 0 M.V. 46.00 39.90 1.00 1.27 M & E 362.10 171.15 0 0 Works 1332.00 1244.91 0 0 Medical 55.00 47.47 155.00 133.64 Other Charges 3.00 1.13 0 0 B.C.T.T. 1.00 0 0.25 0.15 POL 1098.40 1058.29 1.00 1.00 O.A.E. 95.00 59.84 0.10 0.10 Adv./Publicity 0 0 5.00 5.00 Total 6351.00 5793.43 6025.00 5951.37 Table 33.2: Rajiv Gandhi National Training & Research Institute for Ground Water Sub-Head Fund Allotment Expenditures Salaries 7.75 6.88 Wages 0 0 O.T.A 0 0 D.T.E 20.00 13.67 O.E 10.00 9.81 R.R.T 0 0 Publication 0 0 P.S 34.25 27.07 M.V 3.00 3.03 M & E 0 0 Medical treeatment 0 0 Total (RGNTR&I) 75.00 60.46
  • 249. Table 33.3: Hydrology Project Ext. Support 13.01 Sub-Head Fund Allotment Expenditures Salaries 90.05 86.71 Wages 0 0 O.T.A 0 0 D.T.E 5.00 3.74 O.E 5.00 4.60 R.R.T 0 0 Works 32.00 0 P.S 4.45 1.93 M.V 12.26 13.94 M & E 52.29 2.03 Medical treatment 4.00 0.24 Total (Hydrology Project) 205.05 113.19 Table 33.4 : Central Ground Water Board building for offices Sub-Head Fund Allotment Expenditures Major Works 172.00 131.78 Totl 172.00 131.78 Total CGWB 6803.05 6098.86 Table 33.5 : DEDUCT RECOVERIES Sub-Head Fund Allotment Expenditures Central Ground Water Board Issue to works and other credits Deduct Recoveries 17.01.70 issue to work 1100.00 978.86 Other Suspense Stock 17.02.70 100.00 - Deduct Recoveries 01.03.70 Total Recoveries 1200.00 978.86 NET CGWB 5603.05 5120.00
  • 250. Annexure -1 LOCATION AND JURISDICTION OF REGIONAL AND OTHER OFFICES OF CENTRAL GROUND WATER BOARD REGIONS HEADQUARTERS JURISDICTION NORTH WESTERN HIMALAYAN REGION Regional Office Jammu J&K Division Office Div. VIII, Jammu J&K NORTH HIMALAYAN REGION Regional Office Dharamshala Himachal Pradesh Division Office Div. XVII, Dharamshala Himachal Pradesh NORTH WESTERN REGION Regional Office Chandigarh Punjab, Haryana, NCT of Delhi & UT of Chandigarh State Unit Office Delhi NCT of Delhi Division Office Div. II, Ambala Punjab, Haryana, NCT of Delhi & UT of Chandigarh WESTERN REGION Regional Office Jaipur Rajasthan State Unit Office Jodhpur Western Rajasthan Division Office Div. XI, Jodhpur Rajasthan WEST CENTRAL REGION Regional Office Ahmedabad Gujarat, UT of Daman & Diu Division Office Div.I, Ahmedabad Gujarat, UT of Daman & Diu NORTH CENTRAL REGION Regional Office Bhopal Madhya Pradesh Division Office Div.XII, Bhopal Madhya Pradesh NORTH CENTRAL CHATTISGARH Regional Office Raipur Chattisgarh Division Office Div.XIII, Raipur Chattisgarh CENTRAL REGION Regional Office Nagpur Maharashtra, UT of D & N. Haveli State Unit Office Pune West Maharashtra Division Office Div. VI, Nagpur Maharashtra, UT of D & N. Haveli NOTHERN REGION Regional Office Lucknow Uttar Pradesh State Unit Office Allahabad Uttar Pradesh Division Office Div.III, Varanasi Uttar Pradesh UTTARANCHAL REGION Regional Office Dehradun Uttaranchal State Unit Office Bareilly Uttaranchal Division Office Div.XVI, Bareilly Uttaranchal MID EASTERN REGION Regional Office Patna Bihar, Jharkhand Division Office Div. V, Ranchi Bihar, Jharkhand EASTERN REGION Regional Office Kolkata West Bengal, Sikkim, UT of A & Nicobar Islands Division Office Div. XV, Kolkata -do- NORTH EASTERN REGION Regional Office Guwahati Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Tripura State Unit Office Itanagar Arunachal Pradesh Shillong Meghalaya Agartalla Mizoram, Tripura Division Office Div.VII, Guwahati Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Tripura SOUTH EASTERN REGION Regional Office Bhubaneshwar Orissa Division Office Div. x, Bhubaneshwar Orissa SOUTHERN REGION Regional Office Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh State Unit Office Vishakhapatanam Coastal Andhra Pradesh Division Office Div. ix, Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh SOUTH WESTERN REGION Regional Office Bangalore Karnataka & Goa State Unit Office Belgaum W. Karnataka & Goa Division Office Div. xiv, Bangalore Karnataka & Goa SOUTH EASTERN COASTAL REGION Regional Office Chennai Tamil Nadu, UT of Pondicherry Division Office Div. iv, Chennai Tamil Nadu, UT of Pondicherry KERALA REGION Regional Office Trivendrum Kerala & UT of Lakshadweep Division Office Div. iv, Chennai Kerala & UT of Lakshadweep