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World History Radio Shows
 

World History Radio Shows

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presentation given at Technology Applications Teacher Network, at TCEA in Austin, Texas on February 3, 2009

presentation given at Technology Applications Teacher Network, at TCEA in Austin, Texas on February 3, 2009

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    World History Radio Shows World History Radio Shows Presentation Transcript

    • World History Radio Shows Presented by Heidi Whitus (based on lessons developed by Jill Barton) Communications Arts High School Northside Independent School District San Antonio, Texas TATN January 2009
      • Students choose a time period from their current unit of World History and create an original radio broadcast as if it were from that era.
      • Shows can be in the form of a commercial , public service announcement, news story, or talk show, including musical interludes and sound effects.
      Unit Overview
      • Students will first write the script, then use audio editing software (such as Adobe Audition, Audacity, Garage Band) to record their voices and to combine several audio tracks in order to add music and sound effects.
        • Audio editing features of the program (special effects, audio enhancement and correction, and volume and pan control) will be used.
      Unit Overview
    • World History TEKS
      • §113.33 (c) (1) (A) major eras in world history
      • §113.33 (c) (1) (B) turning points in world history
      • §113.33 (c) (13) (A) Neolithic agricultural revolution
      • §113.33 (c) (13) (B) development of the first civilizations
      • §113.33 (c) (17) (B) roles of citizens & noncitizens in historical cultures
      • §113.33 (c) (18)(B) Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian ideals
      • §113.33 (c) (20) (B) art, architecture, literature, music, and drama
      • §113.33 (c) (22) (A) Eastern civilizations
      • §113.33 (c) (22) (B) Greece and Rome
      • §113.33 (c) (25) (B) locate and use primary and secondary sources
      • §113.33 (c) (25) (E) process of historical inquiry
      • §113.33 (c) (26)(A) social studies terminology
      • §113.33 (c) (26) (D) transfer information from one medium to another
    • Multimedia TEKS
      • §126.26 (c) (1) (I) basic sound editing principles
      • §126.26 (c) (2) (A) electronic input devices
      • §126.26 (c) (2) (D) audio input
      • §126.26 (c) (3) (C) respect of intellectual property
      • §126.26 (c) (5) (A) acquisition of information in electronic formats
      • §126.26 (c) (5) (B) identify, create, and use available file formats
      • §126.26 (c) (7) (A) use foundation and enrichment curricula
      • §126.26 (c) (8) (C) multimedia programs and tools
      • §126.26 (c) (8) (F) roles and jobs of a multimedia production crew
      • §126.26 (c) (8) (I) capture, record, and integrate sound
      • §126.26 (c) (10) (B) use content selection and presentation
      • §126.26 (c) (10) (C) format the multimedia project
      • §126.26 (c) (11) (B) publish information
      • §126.26 (c) (12) (B) seek and respond to input
    • Objectives
      • Students will:
      • Engage in pre-production planning by conducting research on a time period from World History and writing a radio script following a prescribed format.
      • Select appropriate sound effects and music to enhance the mood and authenticity of the radio program.
    • Objectives
      • Students will:
      • Record voice tracks using audio software and a microphone, and select the best performance for the final project.
      • Use audio software to edit multiple tracks of audio, adding music and sound effects where appropriate.
      • Export the final project in the correct format.
    • Time Required
      • Approximately eight (8) 50-minute class periods
        • 2 periods: research and pre-production
        • 2 periods: recording voices and acquiring sound effects and music
        • 2 periods: editing
        • 2 periods: class critique and feedback
    • Materials Required
      • Instructional materials:
        • handouts explaining project and requirements;
        • optional: template for script created ahead of time in word processing program;
        • software how-to handouts;
        • assessment rubric; and
        • examples of different types of radio shows and completed projects (from previous years)
    • Materials Required
      • Resources:
        • Internet access and/or World History textbook for background research;
        • music loops (as available with certain audio software);
        • objects for creating sound effects , or sound effects files on CD or from Internet
    • Materials Required
      • Hardware:
        • computers capable of recording audio;
        • microphones and headphones
      • Software:
        • word processing software for scriptwriting;
        • audio editing software such as Adobe Audition, Audacity, Cool Edit or Garage Band
    • Procedure
      • Spend some time listening to various radio segments (commercials, public service announcements, talk radio, etc). [Teacher can also play examples of this project from previous classes if available.]
      • Research the components of these radio segments, i.e., what is typically included in the segments. Select one as the format for your product.
    • Procedure
      • Select a theme and region from the time period of 3000 B.C. to 476 A.D. (World History Chapters 1-5).
        • To fulfill your requirements for World History, make sure you highlight a Turning Point for your theme and region from the time period.
    • Procedure
      • Write a script for an entertaining radio program based on your time period and turning point.
        • Your program should sound as if it was recorded for an audience in that time period; for example, a commercial actually produced in 1500 B.C., not a commercial produced today that refers to 1500 B.C.
      • Your final script must incorporate three elements : voice, sound effects and music.
        • For ease of readability during recording, double space and make sure that sound effects and music are clearly distinguished from dialog in the script.
    • Procedure
      • Using the audio software program and a microphone, record the voice portion of your program in a new project.
        • Do your best to eliminate unwanted background noise (keep the microphone close, but to prevent “popping,” remember not to place the microphone directly in front of your mouth).
        • Stay in character.
        • Play back your recording to check its quality; record as many times as necessary to get the best possible performance.
      • Edit the recording to delete mistakes and tighten pauses.
    • Procedure
      • Add additional audio tracks for sound effects and music.
      • Record sound effects using props, or find sound effects on CDs, in the loops available with your audio program, or on the Internet.
    • Procedure
      • Create suitable music to accent your program, optimally using the loops available in the audio program.
        • Use music sparingly for the best effect. Keep in mind your World History region and theme when you create your music.
      • If you use copyrighted music or sound effects in your project, you must cite your audio sources in your project log to be turned in with your final recording.
    • Procedure
      • The final edited length of the radio segment should be:
        • Radio commercial (product or service) - exactly 30 or 60 seconds
        • Public Service Announcement - exactly 30 seconds or 60 seconds
        • Talk Radio - 60 seconds
      • Export your project as an .mp3 file. Remember to also save the project file [on your flash drive].
      • Upload your final .mp3 to the eclassroom by the deadline.
    • Closure
      • One or two class periods will be devoted for a class critique of all projects. The rubric will be discussed by the entire class for each project.
    • Grading Rubric-part 1 Criteria Expert 4 points Practitioner 3 points Apprentice 2 points Novice 1 point
      • Requirements
      • time
      • loops
      • voice
      All requirements are met. One requirement was not completely met. Two requirements were not completely met. More than two requirements were not completely met. Script Audio reflects the content written in the script all of the time. Audio reflects the content written in the script most of the time. Audio reflects the content written in the script some of the time. Audio reflects very little of the content written in the script. Writing Audio creative and purposeful and held the listener ’ s interest. Audio creative and purposeful and held the listener ’ s interest most of the time. Audio somewhat creative and purposeful and held the listener ’ s interest some of the time. Audio lacked creativeness and purpose and rarely held the listener ’ s interest.
    • Grading Rubric-part 2 Criteria Expert 4 points Practitioner 3 points Apprentice 2 points Novice 1 point Voice Recording Voice free of “ popping ” and static. Voices always audible. Track volumes adjusted so voices clearly heard over music and/or sound effects. Voices usually audible. Track volumes not adjusted adequately so voices clearly heard over music and/or sound effects. Voice contained minimal “ popping ” and static. Voices sometimes audible. Track volumes not adjusted adequately so voices clearly heard over music and/or sound effects. Voice contained much “ popping ” and static. Voices of actors were rarely audible. Track volumes not adjusted adequately so voices clearly heard over music and/or sound effects. Voice contained too much “ popping ” and static. Staying in Character Actors stayed in character throughout the recording. Voices showed a lot of expression and emotion. Actors stayed in character through most of the recording. Voices showed some expression and emotion. Actors tried to stay in character through some of the recording. Voices showed little expression and emotion. Actors acted silly or showed off. Actors' voices were monotone and not expressive.
    • Grading Rubric-part 3 Criteria Expert 4 points Practitioner 3 points Apprentice 2 points Novice 1 point Sound Effects (FX) and Music Sound FX and music were creative, added interest to the audio play, and were appropriate to the mood/action. Sound FX and music were creative and appropriate throughout most of the recording. Sound FX and music were creative and appropriate throughout some of the recording. Sound FX and music was lacking in crucial areas, or were distracting (late or inappropriate) during the recording. Editing The audio recording reflected consistently high quality in recording and editing of audio files into a single product. Background noise removed. The audio recording mostly reflected high quality in recording and editing of audio files into a single product. Most background noise removed. The audio recording reflected an inconsistent level of quality in recording and editing of audio files into a single product. Some background noise removed. The audio recording reflected a consistent level of poor quality in recording and editing of audio files into a single product. No background noise removed.
    • Grading Rubric-part 4 Criteria Expert 4 points Practitioner 3 points Apprentice 2 points Novice 1 point Overall performance Timing was excellent. There were no dead spots or awkward pauses. Speed of voice recording excellent; not rushed. Timing was good, however there were a few dead spots as actors tried to find their place in the script. Speed of voice recording good; rushed some. Timing was awkward at some points. Actors seemed unprepared many times. Speed of voice recording okay; too rushed. Obviously unprepared. Giggling and unscripted comments overheard between pauses. Speed of voice recording poor; irregular. Creativity and Effort The overall audio reflected exceptional creativity and extra effort. The overall audio reflected good creativity and extra effort. The overall audio reflected little creativity and extra effort. The overall audio reflected no creativity or extra effort.
    • Grading Rubric-part 5 Criteria Expert 4 points Practitioner 3 points Apprentice 2 points Novice 1 point Documentation (if copyrighted audio was used) Source information collected for all copyrighted audio (i.e. music and/or sound effects). All documented in MLA format. Source information collected for all copyrighted audio (i.e. music and/or sound effects). Most documented in MLA format. Source information collected for copyrighted audio (i.e. music and/or sound effects), but not documented in MLA format. Very little or no source information was collected. Time Management Always used class time effectively. Used computer lab outside of class when necessary Frequently used class time effectively. Occasionally used computer lab outside of class when necessary. Occasionally used class time effectively. Seldom used computer lab outside of class when necessary. Rarely used class time effectively. Used computer lab outside of class at last minute.
    • Extension Activity
      • Advanced students can create longer and more complex radio programs, based on radio shows from the 1930s and 1940s such as “The Shadow” or “Burns and Allen.” Examples can be found on sites such as http:// www.radiolovers.com /
      • http://www.archive.org/details/ClassicRadioShows_626 and http:// www.oldtimeradiofans.com /
      • Struggling students may use music from CDs rather than creating their own music (being sure to cite sources).
    • Student Examples
      • Colin
      • Nathan
      • Erica
      • Rosalind
      • McKenzie
      • Eric
      • Andrew
      • Questions or comments?
        • [email_address]
      • Slideshow is online at Slideshare.com
        • (search for “World History Radio Show”; will not contain audio files)
    • Radio show examples for inspiration
      • Nick Danger (Firesign Theater)
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5XfXECpU6w
      • Professional voiceover examples
      • http://www.eccsvox.com/audio-general.html
      • Downloadable commercials and advice on writing radio spots
      • http://www.burkhardworks.com/ADSOURCES/downloadable_radio_commercials.html
    • Sources for sound effects
      • Students can make their own using objects or their mouths
        • http://www.archive.org/details/Insight_050224
      • Loops available through some audio editing software
      • Websites such as:
        • Freesound http://www.freesound.org/
        • Internet Archive http://www.archive.org/index.php
    • Formatting for online media from http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/mla.html
      • Author's Last Name, First Name OR Corporate/Institutional Author Name <if known>
      • Title of Document or File
      • Document date OR date of last revision
      • Medium (e.g. Online video clip)
      • Title of larger web site in which clip is located
      • Name of hosting library or agency (if appropriate).
      • Access Date
      • URL <web address>
      • Examples:
      • Lucasfilm, Ltd. &quot;Star Wars Trailer.&quot; 05 November 1999. Online video clip. Star Wars Official Site . Accessed on 02 April 2008. <http://starwars.com/episode-i/news/trailer/>
      • &quot;Daughter Turns Dad In.&quot; CNN Video. Online video clip. CNN.com Accessed on 04 April 2008. <http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/crime/2008/04/02/dnt.oh.drunk.driver.dad.wnwo>
    •