Texture Studies

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Texture Studies

  1. 1. A
few
words
about
cri0ques…
 Although these activities can at times leave an artist feeling vulnerable or inadequate, they are only intended to help you think more deeply about how you can be better. These activities are not meant to make you feel like a failure, but to help you know how to succeed.! We cannot grow in life nor can we grow in art if we do not have a source of objective feedback. A critique provides us with some insight into how our artwork is communicating without our personal feelings, attachment, thoughts processes, or biases getting in the way. Think of it as a friend telling you that you’ve got food in your teeth. They mean no harm, they are simply telling you something that you cannot see on your own.! Analyzing and talking about art helps us develop our own judgment skills. We do spend time judging all day long, be it deciding if that girl’s pants match her shirt or if we like what the cafeteria is serving for lunch. But it isn’t until we really sit down and think about why those colors don’t go together or what doesn’t quite taste right about the Tuna Surprise that we can avoid making the same mistakes in our clothing choices or cooking. Being able to talk about what works well and what needs growth in another person’s artwork helps us do the same thing with our work without feeling so bad about it. !
  2. 2. Assemblage
Cri-que
 1.  Put
up
your
composi-on
and
affix
the
s-cky
note
from
the
top
of
the
pile
on
 it.
 2.  Choose
a
number
out
of
the
hat
and
find
the
corresponding
artwork.
 3.  Discuss
the
following
topics
on
s-cky
notes:
 1.  Close
your
eyes.

Keep
them
closed.

When
you
open
them,
remember
 what
the
first
thins
is
that
you
no-ce.

Why
did
you
see
it
first?
 2.  Where
did
your
eyes
go
aIer
the
first
thing
you
no-ced?

What
elements
 and
principles
did
the
ar-st
use
to
direct
your
eyes
in
this
way?
 3.  Talk
about
the
composi-on
of
this
work.

Is
it
effec-ve
in
keeping
you
 engaged
in
the
work
of
art
or
would
you
move
or
change
something
to
 make
it
more
interes-ng?
 4.  What
are
the
strengths
of
this
piece?

Specifically
name
at
least
two
 things
that
keep
you
interested
in
this
work
of
art.
 5.  Based
on
what
you’ve
observed
about
the
strength's
of
this
piece,
give
 this
ar-st
a
few
ideas
of
how
they
can
challenge
themselves
on
the
next
 assignment.

What
are
some
areas
of
growth
that
this
person
could
 pursue?

What
could
they
do
to
make
this
work
even
beTer?
 4.  Affix
your
comments
to
the
edge
of
this
artwork.
 5.  Return
to
your
seat
and
wait
quietly
when
you
are
finished.

  3. 3. Texture
Studies
 1.  Observe your object with as much detail as you can. Feel it with your eyes closed. Find the darkest areas and the lightest highlights. Think about what the object is used for, how it is made, and how its texture is related to its purpose. What role does the texture play in the “life” of your object?! 2.  Describe
the
shape
and
texture
of
your
object
in
words.

Try
to
describe
the
texture
as
if
 you
were
telling
someone
without
a
sense
of
touch.

Describe
it
as
though
you
were
 explaining
it
to
a
blind
person.

What
shapes
are
there
within
the
texture?

Make
a
list
 of
of
ten
adjec-ves
that
describe
the
texture
of
your
object.
 3.  Distill the texture down to a basic pattern. What series of shapes can you find within the texture. Would you describe the texture as being geometric or organic? What basic shape best fits this texture? Design a pattern that might be applied to a fabric or wallpaper based on the texture of your object. What shapes will you use? What areas will be dark and what areas will be light? Is the pattern simple or complex?
  4. 4. 3.  Draw a two-inch square. With as much detail as you can, fill this square with the texture of your object. Draw the basic structure with pencil and fill in the rest with pen. Check the proportions within the texture to make sure everything is in the right place. Look for every nuance and shade within your values. Make sure you are using the full value scale! 4. Draw a four-inch square. Inside this square, do a zoomed-out drawing of your object so that you can tell what the whole thing is. Think about the composition of your object within this square. You object needs to touch at least two sides of your square. 5. Choose two more objects with textures strongly contrasting your original object. Place this textured object next to your first. Draw a second 4- inch square. Inside this square, draw the two new objects and your first object so that their textures fill the entire picture plane. Arrange the textures/ objects in a pleasing way (think about rule of thirds, amounts, balance, ect).!

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