0
blended designteams:from clients andconsultantsto co-workers  Harriet Wakelam   | @hwakelam | NAB           Owen Hodda    ...
role of designin organisationsisgrowing         “The customer is increasingly buying a        set of ongoing relations and...
missio  n: a newretail
brief:“test all the things and tell us if they work”
what is ablended designteam?
whyblendeddesignteams?
thehow      &thewhatof it all
shared   designleadershi    p
outputsoutcom   vs  es
Digital                     Digital                    Yammer   Retail            Retail                Senior leadership ...
role ofartefac   ts   As the role of design grows and diversifies, we need to be able   to deliver timely commercial insig...
what’ schange
doesnotsolveproblems
informsolutions not
todesignthere is no end point
avoidfetishisationof designdeliverables
a blended designteam isnotjust
service design is     about   ‘all the  things’  all the
questions?    Harriet Wakelam | @hwakelam      Owen Hodda | @ohodda     Zaana Howard | @zaana
with thanks to…..Jess Ukotic | Cong Cao | Matt Sale | PeterHolmes | Louise Long | Anthony Waldron |Lev Orosz | Mandy Chamb...
General information onlyThis presentation contains general information only, and none of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited,...
Service design ausralia 2012   Blended teams,
Service design ausralia 2012   Blended teams,
Service design ausralia 2012   Blended teams,
Service design ausralia 2012   Blended teams,
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Service design ausralia 2012 Blended teams,

345

Published on

This presentation describes work carried out across multi-channels using a blended teams that took a design thinking approach to testing multi-channel services for a new bank branch.

Published in: Business, Design
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
345
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • [zaana] Hi everyone, today Harriet, Owen and I will share a story that centres around the testing of the proposed NAB retail stores redesign but the real story is not in the project itself but in the project team. This team comprised of NAB's internal design team with a small team of consultants from Deloitte. This is not an unusual set up - an internal design team engaging with consultants but the outcome was.
  • [zaana] B ut first to set some context… Over the past decade we ’ ve seen the role of design in organisations grow and diversify beyond traditional aesthetic and tangible purposes to more intangible services, environments, and system . This has been aided by the move to the service economy and an acceptance of the concepts of service design and design thinking across a broad range of industries. In Richard Buchanan’ s work he suggests that th is growth of scale and complexity of design interventions is related to the growth of scale and complexity of the contemporary challenges we are facing. NAB and Deloitte are no different. For NAB, d esign is a key tool in building a customer centric organisation mandated from the heads of NAB personal bank and the CEO . For Deloitte – they are integrating design thinking practices and a service experience focus across the organisation.
  • [zaana] Now to set the scene…NAB and Deloitte came together to deliver a complex service design evaluation project. The project took place at a concept store in a warehouse over 3 freezing cold days in July last year. It involved a lot of lollies, pizza and woolly coats! The project evaluated a proposed new store design including the impact these new designs had on a customer's experience, and how the bank might adjust their service delivery to better make use of the new space.
  • [Harriet] Our mission as an internal CX design team… , which we chose to accept with relish and more than a little trepidation was to evaluate the customer experience delivered by NABs new retail stores. We were asked to assess various elements of the store against the NAB customer experience design principles… to find out whether we were delivering a ‘ service ’ as well as a store. The new branches were designed to be "uniquely NAB"; Beyond functional elements we needed to explore the experience, perceptions and actions of the customers and staff. Our mission – 4 weeks to deliver results start ASAP and test all the things. We were working with the interplay of design, capability and technology. Our problem: a small internal team, big project, not much money…. This short video tells the story better than I can. SHOW VIDEO ****************************** As part of the redesign of the NABs new retail stores, the bank’s internal design team were asked to conduct an assessment of customers’ perceptions and interactions with the proposed redesign. The team responsible for the design had a number of specific questions they wanted answered, as well as an interest in having an overview assessment of the store design’s suitability to deliver the desired service. ‘ The store environment should contain elements that are welcoming, offer easy interactions and a safe and secure environment for customers. These features enable NAB and its staff to help deliver the vision of being ‘the best retailer in every town’. The goal of the design was that ‘The store environment should contain elements that are welcoming, offer easy interactions and a safe and secure environment for customers. These features enable NAB and its staff to help deliver the vision of being ‘the best retailer in every town’. The new branches were designed to be "uniquely NAB"; requiring the research to go beyond the functional elements and to explore the experience, perceptions and actions of the customers and staff. In order to achieve this, the project team were required to adopt a method that drew from online and experience design, as well as elements of service design in order to inform design, capability, technology and training for the implementation of the new store. SHOW VIDEO Due to the complexity of the overall project, the design team were only given a small window in which to conduct the work, and were given very little advance notice, meaning the project had to be completed within four weeks, with only two week notice. The scale of the work required, the short lead time, and the fact that a number of members of the internal design team had limited experience with this sort of work meant that outside help was required to complete the work. *********************************************************************************************************************** *********************************************************************************************************************** Project intro/ context Discuss the speed and pressure of the project situation Backdrop of why blended design team was necessary – no time for an ‘engagement’ [Harriet] As part of the redesign of the NABs new retail stores, the bank’s internal design team were asked to conduct an assessment of customers’ perceptions and interactions with the proposed redesign. The team responsible for the design had a number of specific questions they wanted answered, as well as an interest in having an overview assessment of the store design’s suitability to deliver the desired service. Due to the complexity of the overall project, the design team were only given a small window in which to conduct the work, and were given very little advance notice
  • (Owen) So, you can imagine what the brief for a project like that looks like, right. Well, actually, all I got was a phone call saying “go to Docklands” Because NAB’s team had been given such short notice, little formal planning had occurred before we arrive. This meant that how we approached the challenge, which truly what to “test all the things” was something that we sat down and nutted out as a team. As is hinted at in the video, a lot of negotiating occurred during the preparation phase before we had even really agreed on what our role there was. This is quite unlike how a lot of our clients prefer us to work. We are generally expected to define what activities we will do, what the deliverables will be etc. which whilst it may sound like “test all the things” is actually very limiting, and usually means somebody else has already done the problem definition for you by deciding what you will look at. So, by simple fact of our time constraints and the scale of the project, the Deloitte team, the NAB design team and a number of other NAB staff members were forced into a blended design team *********************************************************************************************************************S [Harriet] Like I said, our basic brief was ‘ test all the things’ and their ability to deliver a designed target experience. This was the first time we’d tested multiple elements as part of one project – we were testing the service pod, capability model, the teller desks, the entrance lobby, ATM signage, and semi-discreet zone. The brief also included – ‘anything extra you can tell us would be great We were given 4 weeks.’. We needed to conduct a series of investigative research exercises to better understand the customer response to the proposed designs – these were not clearly defined. Project scale and time frames necessitated the engaging support from an external consultancy firm (Deloitte) to extend the capacity of the internal user centred design team.  The blended team was engaged to validate and test the design intent and customer experience design guidelines as applied to the NAB store redesign. Given the scale of the project, the internal design team needed help from an external consultancy firm (Deloitte) to extend the capacity of the internal user centred design team. This was not an ‘engage and do it for us’, nor was it a traditional engagement. [Owen] Unlike most other engagements, there was in fact no formal (or even informal) brief. Day one of knowing about this project was also day one of the project. The result of this was that there was no opportunity to define the work, as we needed to begin straight away, meaning that unlike other consulting engagements in which a great deal of time is devoted to defining the outcome and deliverables, we started work straight away on defining our approach; keeping the scope of the outcome and areas of interest as wide as “test all the things” ********************************************************************************************************************* As part of the design and implementation of the new NAB stores, a series of investigative research exercises were required to better understand the customer response to the proposed designs. As The new designs affected all elements of the branch, and it was necessary to understand the impact these new designs had on a customer's experience, and how the bank might adjust their service delivery to better make use of the new space. The store was designed to be ‘uniquely NAB’ requiring testing to go beyond functional elements in isolation.  Insights were sought, not just into the services and experience delivered by the design elements, but of the interplay between elements.  The project team were required to develop a methodology sourced from online and experience design.  The new store design supports the transition of banking towards a retail environment and testing was developed to inform the deivery of experience delivered by the interplay of design, capability and technology.  The work discussed here supports a holistic view of products and services. The user centred approach enabled the key business units responsible for delivering a new retail experience to evaluate the success of the solutions against experience design questions. Project scale and time frames necessitated the engaging support from an external consultancy firm (Deloitte) to extend the capacity of the internal user centred design team.  The blended team was engaged to validate and test the design intent and customer experience design guidelines as applied to the NAB store redesign.   tight time frames required fast integration of internal and external project teams, blending a range of skills, experience and competency from human computer interaction, business analysis, user centred design, usability and user experience design.       Build knowledge of internal and external teams.  Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design.  Keep internal teams fresh.  Avoid complacency in design methodology by blending the experience of a broad team of expertise. 
  • [Harriet] To deliver on this scale, we needed to create a single design team, working collaboratively. The only way to test across multiple channels, with staff, customers and a variety of design elements was to draw on the combined experience, tools and methodologies from digital, service, mobile, capability and organisational design. We just don ’ t have this kind of available capacity internally waiting around for an immediate start. Our internal design team knows the context, how to navigate through the org and also the constraints in place. We know the big picture, but we are just not big enough. Traditionally in engaging an external design agency, we ’ d work separately, they would deliver their part of the project, we would get on with ours. But to work holistically, with service landscapes, we need neither internal or external but the collaboration and mix of experience, skill and knowledge that can only come from building a brand new type of team. When testing in this ‘ big ’ way, we need not just results, but the ability to share knowledge about experiences through the business. Traditional engagement sees an external team bringing tools and methods, rules and processes to the delivery of an outcome focussed team (often delivering artefacts and an implementation plan), in a project this complex, we need a way of not just completing a project, but synthesing information from across the business and helping to provide an undersatnding of complexity. From a consultant's perspective,a blended design team is one in which the primary goal of the engagement is not necessarily to deliver a pre defined piece of work. A blended design team is focused on the design challenge and organisational challenges, not the project. [Zaana] So a blended design team operates differently to traditional design consulting engagements. Whereas an external design consultant is often asked to tackle a specific problem or piece of work, the blended team incorporates design consultants into the ongoing design and innovation work of the internal team. The benefits of bringing in an external team include: specialist domain knowledge, specialist design skills, scaleable team size, independence from internal constraints. In this case, from my observation of the project, the team worked so seamlessly together in every aspect, from dress, to behaviour, to interactions, to the work itself that they functioned and presented as a single team that had worked together for a long time, not like two separate teams from two separate organisations. ******************************************************************************************************************** Design teams and what do we mean by a blended design team? Blended team = blend of expertise, diverse experience & skill, being outside and inside org at same time (internal context, external perspective) A team of internal org & external consultants working toward a shared design goal We’re really shit at applying synthesis to ourselves – we segregate ourselves from each other Designers are traditionally process specialists (Rather than content specialists)– issues with people letting go of their processes and just doing the job that needs to be done A synthesis of knowledge, experience and understanding A non defined team, a non defined outcome, a non defined finish (what does this tell us from the 3 perspectives) Academic points on: what is a complex organisation? Cultural mediator Design is expensive and human resource and time intensive. Design teams in organisations are (mostly) small and increasingly required to take on more diverse design work. They need to be multidiscplinary as a whole and individually and yet i t’s unrealistic to think that most organisations have full design capability in their teams - or likely to ever expand to this. Partnering is much more logical. However, simple partnering is not a solution as design projects require a level of collaboration that does not support the division of work into discrete chunks.  Collaborative co-working is more effective, but also more complex to set up. While this idea is not new and has been occurring in practice for a number of years, there is currently little research, literature or case studies that discuss the challenges and benefits of collaborative co-working between design teams, especially where it is also a client/ consultant relationship for a project (and so is also temporary). This paper will discuss this in the context of a NAB project where Deloitte were engaged as collaborative co-workers. The user centred approach enabled the key business units responsible for delivering a new retail experience to evaluate the success of the solutions against experience design questions. Project scale and time frames necessitated the engaging support from an external consultancy firm (Deloitte) to extend the capacity of the internal user centred design team.  The blended team was engaged to validate and test the design intent and customer experience design guidelines as applied to the NAB store redesign.   tight time frames required fast integration of internal and external project teams, blending a range of skills, experience and competency from human computer interaction, business analysis, user centred design, usability and user experience design.       Build knowledge of internal and external teams.  Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design.  Keep internal teams fresh.  Avoid complacency in design methodology by blending the experience of a broad team of expertise. 
  • (Harriet) A blended team allows artefacts to have a life beyond the project, used in ongoing conversations. allows a unique blend of knowledge and freshness that can start new conversations and open up new ways of delivering services. We can do several things - employ an agency – get work delivered that is high quality but perhaps not completely in alignement with our internal cx metrics;. Use internal non-design staff and help them build skills to support cx design, Source talented independent designers. Do a mixture of all three to build a complex source of ideas, knowledge, history, internal knowledge and external freshness. Benefits; somebody is always aware of the big picture, what other work is happening elsewhere in the business, how to package messages to different stakeholders for maximum effect. Keep new knowledge within the business. Most importantly:: Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design. Architects, retail, capability, leadership teams… digital retailing – not designers. People. (Owen) A blended team really operates on the principle that nobody can know it all. When we ’ re tackling the more complex questions face by a large organisation, we have to appreciate that we need input from a wide range of specialists, and neither an internal design team, nor an external team can complete this on their own. We actually need to appreciate that these are long term problems we are tackling, and they will require input from a broad range of people who will come in and out of the engagement over time as their skills or knowledge are needed For a consulting team, there are a number of reasons to implement the blended teams approach for design engagements. Blended design teams are one of the way for a consulting team really tackle the core design challenges that are faced by complex organisations; the type of root challenges that are not able to be addressed through traditional engagements, and that are often encountered as additional restrictions on how smaller design projects can operate and be implemented. Additionally, a blended approach gives the design team access to other members of the client organisation, which in turn allow for a deeper understanding of the core design problem and how any recommended solutions will be implemented. By using a blended team of internal and external designers and subject matter experts, specialist knowldedge can be brought in as needed, new approach, insights and fresh perspectives are given to the work, and smaller internal teams can be augmented in periods of high deman. *************** For us, the model that better meets our needs is rather than outsource the work of considering our design challenges to somebody else we prefer to have subject matter experts merge with our team. This blended approach to has a number of benefits: keeping internal designers means that somebody is always aware of the big picture, what other factors need to be considered, what other work is happening elsewhere in the business, how can message and activities be best handled to manage stakeholders for maximum effect. Avoiding a purely consulting team also means that knowledge stays within the business. This is different to skills, and refers to the ancillary information and insights that are collected during a design project that whilst not directly relevant to the design challenge at hand are often of great use in later pieces of work, and contribute to the ability to undertake an holistic approach to designing within the organisation. Understand that that a blended design team is comprised of not just designers, but of all those who can help to design a solution There is no end point to design – it is not a zero sum game. Design is collection of processes and tools to tackle complex problems, not the goal itself suggest this be incorporated into Slide 8: 'why blended design teams?' [Owen] For a consulting designer, this means a large shift in the way a traditional engagement might occur. Where traditionally a statement of work might define how what questions a designer will ask, the approach they will take to answer them, and quite often the type of answers that will be delivered, working in a blended team means committing to a non defined approach, which may look very differnet to initial estimates by the end of the engagement. This can at times be threatening to a design team, as without a clearly defined outcome, there is no way to measure the success of their engagement; to the client, internally and to future clients. (Harriet) Within a complex organisation such as NAB, design work does not have a "start and finish ". We are, by necessity, in the business of continual improvement, ongoing innovation and the constant seeking of those "crystallising moments " that lead to larger insight and innovation. This environment makes it impractical to break the design of the full experience of a NAB customer down into individual pieces, rather than viewing as an ecosystem, in order to give the work out to a consulting designer team. The instead, where previously an engagement would end with the handover of a deliverable, we now see the deliverable as the beginning of the real design work. (Zaana) With a more traditional design engagement not satisfying the needs of a complex organisation, how then can a consulting design team assist a large company tackle their larger design questions? *********************************************** Design teams and what do we mean by a blended design team? Blended team = blend of expertise, diverse experience & skill, being outside and inside org at same time (internal context, external perspective) A team of internal org & external consultants working toward a shared design goal We’re really shit at applying synthesis to ourselves – we segregate ourselves from each other Designers are traditionally process specialists (Rather than content specialists)– issues with people letting go of their processes and just doing the job that needs to be done A synthesis of knowledge, experience and understanding A non defined team, a non defined outcome, a non defined finish (what does this tell us from the 3 perspectives) Academic points on: what is a complex organisation? Cultural mediator Design is expensive and human resource and time intensive. Design teams in organisations are (mostly) small and increasingly required to take on more diverse design work. They need to be multidiscplinary as a whole and individually and yet it’s unrealistic to think that most organisations have full design capability in their teams - or likely to ever expand to this. Partnering is much more logical. However, simple partnering is not a solution as design projects require a level of collaboration that does not support the division of work into discrete chunks.  Collaborative co-working is more effective, but also more complex to set up. While this idea is not new and has been occurring in practice for a number of years, there is currently little research, literature or case studies that discuss the challenges and benefits of collaborative co-working between design teams, especially where it is also a client/ consultant relationship for a project (and so is also temporary). This paper will discuss this in the context of a NAB project where Deloitte were engaged as collaborative co-workers. The user centred approach enabled the key business units responsible for delivering a new retail experience to evaluate the success of the solutions against experience design questions. Project scale and time frames necessitated the engaging support from an external consultancy firm (Deloitte) to extend the capacity of the internal user centred design team.  The blended team was engaged to validate and test the design intent and customer experience design guidelines as applied to the NAB store redesign.   tight time frames required fast integration of internal and external project teams, blending a range of skills, experience and competency from human computer interaction, business analysis, user centred design, usability and user experience design.       Build knowledge of internal and external teams.  Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design.  Keep internal teams fresh.  Avoid complacency in design methodology by blending the experience of a broad team of expertise. 
  • (Owen) An important element of looking at how our team worked together is to remember that what we did is not remarkable, but simply bears highlighting as an alternate way of engaging design teams. Time was not wastes on definitions of roles – it was spent exploring what could be in in the few weeks we had This meant that nobody came to the table pretending to have the answers or the expertise. We were all outside of our comfort zones – the admission of discomfort led to increased acceptance of risk – led to greater team buy in as all activities agreed upon and everybody understood why decisions were made (Harriet) And the other reason it worked was we were trusted internally, our leaders trusted us, and their leaders trusted them…… How did we become a blended design team? What did we do? We didn't start too early. It’s not remarkable Levelled the playing filed Sat, talked, argued, critiqued, came to shared understanding Did not push to act, but took time to talk , we also trusted in each other ’ s expertise. ****************************************************************** Challenges of a Blended Design Team Hierarchy Roles and responsibilities Reporting back into the client organisation Access, equipment and infrastructure How to retain knowledge and insights Managing different methods, approaches, vernacular Managing differing objectives The blended team faces a number of challenges Shared workspaces, access to buildings, log ons to laptops, Hierarchy, roles and responsibilities Due to the differing areas and levels of expertise, all team members are required to take on greater responsibility. This often resulted in team members having to trust one another that things were being done properly, which introduced an element of risk to the project, but also meant trust developed rapidly. Team members needed to quickly identify and agree on who was the best person to undertake certain activities, and then allow them to do so. There was little room for a deep hierarchy. However, an unspoken agreement existed that the client had the final say on how things were run. Due to the speed of the project, it was often necessary for the consulting team to interact with other stakeholders from the client org. In these instances (usually earlier in the project) it was often unclear who the consultant was representing; the consulting team or the project team Due to lack of “bigger picture” view from consulting members, there was at times not a thorough understanding of why certain things were done Knowledge not kept in organisation Insights relating to both the research topic as well as new methods and approaches are not completely captured within the organisation. New approaches and skills are harder to be built upon as much of the experience leaves the organisation with the consulting members Hard to give cross channel insights (no understanding of what is happening in other areas of business) Much of the team are unlikely to have a broader awareness of other projects and initiatives elsewhere in the organisation, making it hard for them to see where insight from one project could be applied to another Differing approach to collecting & analysing data As the project team is made of two practising teams (client and consultant) it is likely that there will be different preferred methods in planning and executing the research as well as processing and analysing the data Consultant team conflicted between deep research (risk taking) and being bound by engagement outline (minimal insight)
  • (Zaana) one of the things that distinguished this as a blended design team was shared leadership. Shared leadership is when a team works together to lead one another to the achievement of the groups goals. This means that individuals essentially take turns leading the group dependent upon their skills and capabilities and the needs of the team at any given time. Within the blended team each person stepped in and out of the leadership role fluidly dependent on the project and team needs at each stage of the process. This required a letting go of ego and trusting the skills and knowledge of each team member. From shared leadership within the blended design team this project has also led to the NAB internal design team increasingly taking on a role of design leadership within the organisation. By design leadership I mean the need for design expertise in guiding a team often not design trained through a design process as well as accountability for final design outcomes. This requires the design team to take on several roles throughout the design process – particularly facilitation and education. So while while all aspects of a design project can be co-created through participatory processes they may not necessarily be co-designed. So for example, f rom within the store redesign project while the blended design team collaborated and co-created with others throughout th e project , it was the blended design team that synthesized and made sense of the information and were accountable for the outputs and outcomes. ******************************************************************************************************************************************************* As part of the design and implementation of the new NAB stores, a series of investigative research exercises were required to better understand the customer response to the proposed designs. Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design.  Architects, retail, capability, leadership teams, digital retailing, Avoid complacency in design methodology by blending the experience of a broad team of expertise.  A blended methodology – drawn from online and experience design, service design and wayfinding, blended with experience from both teams, and varying levels of experience in each of these disciplines. "uniquely NAB"; research beyond the functional elements and to explore the experience, perceptions and actions of the customers and staff. Staff engagement. Testing holistically, not just element by element, but elements in combination, under load, with the complexity added by humans. In this way we would understand how the bank might adjust their service delivery to better make use of the new space. Defined against customer experience This would design, capability, technology and training for the implementation of the new store. Evaluation of retail store concepts against design intent and customer experience design guidelines. tight time frames required fast integration of internal and external project teams, blending a range of skills, experience and competency from human computer interaction, business analysis, user centred design, usability and user experience design.       Keep internal teams fresh. 
  • (Harriet) Experience is the interplay of everything...which can't be captured in a simple deliverable. A large shift in the way that blended design teams work differently to traditional design consultancies is the focus on outcomes over outputs. Rather than starting a project saying “we will explore this, and deliver this” the blended design team takes on responsibility of exploring the design question being faced by the client organisation, and commits to providing an holistic outcome that takes into account the complexities of the organisation, without ignoring the challenges that are often deemed ‘out of scope’ These are the outputs…usually want them to be a neat little package, a table assessing the store against CX metrics – CHECK A prioritised list of future work: - check A set of infographics, video, knowledge and patterns – CHECK A vibrant and visual set of artefacts to communicate back to each team leader CHECK: But these are the outcomes…Outcomes are long term change. Blended design teams help balance the need for short term deliverables and long-term implementation and thought leadership....
  • (Owen) With this move towards focusing on outcomes – our design artifacts also change Today, many design engagement’s goal is to develop artifacts – “we’re making personas” “were making a journey map” – and these are seen as the purpose of the work The real outcome is what happens after the artifact is created – they should be conversation starters, catalyst for actions and the scaffold for how that action will proceed Working in a blended team promotes this longitudinal plan for design artefacts. The combination of a short burst team who need to articulate what they have done alongside those responsible for ensuring the findings and recommendations survive the journey keeps perspective on what exactly the role of artefacts should be. ************************************************************************************************** In a complex organisation, design cannot be the end point. It simply is a means of unpacking the complex questions that plague such organisations each day. Likewise, the role of design artefacts needs to change as well. Today, many design engagement's goal is to develop artefacts; personas, journey maps etc, and this is seen as the end point. Really, to role of these artefacts is to be conversations starters, catalysts for actions and the scaffold for how that actions will proceed. The real outcome of a design engagement is essentially intangible, and these artefacts are a way of making them tangible, but should not be the end point. (Zaana) So design artefacts, deliverables and outputs are simply boundary objects for the common goal of improving the organisation’s service delivery. Etienne Wenger describes boundary objects as entities that can link communities together to allow different groups to collaborate on a common task . T hey serve as a point of mediation and negotiation for the purpose of understanding and further action. They are not the end point as Owen said but simply common ground to congregate around and discuss the next step. ***************************************************** Boundary object (BO), originally introduced by Starr (1989), is a concept to refer to objects that serve an interface between different communities of practice. Boundary objects are an entity shared by several different communities but viewed or used differently by each of them. As Star points out, boundary objects in an organization work because they necessarily contain sufficient detail to be understandable by both parties, however, neither party is required to understand the full context of use by the other - boundary objects serve as point of mediation and negotiation around intent. Boundary objects are flexible enough to adapt to local needs and have different distinct identities in different communities, but at the same time robust enough to maintain a common identity across the boundaries to be a place for shared work. Boundary objects are not necessarily physical artifacts such as a map between two people: they can be a set of information, conversations, interests, rules, plans, contracts, or even persons.
  • This is what we are doing differently… [Harriet] A broader engagement – more stakeholders, more engagmenet. Conversations about customer experience that transcend experience. Alignement and involvement with multi-channel strategy. Ongoing complex engagement. Working with some of the best service and user experience design agencies in the business. Ongoing conversation with business bank. Retail transformation deciding rather than replacing a role in CX they will work with the design team. Use of the IDC for both innovation, testing ongoing engagment, iterative testing – new systems not just new product.s [Owen] A lot. And not so much. Whilst officially little has changed about how our engagements are run (we are a big company after all), those who were involved in this project now have an increased level of comfort with the ambiguity of working in blended team, and now see their work as less a practice of delivering solutions, and more a process of bringing expertise to the design of problem definition. Talk about PSL here
  • [zaana] From this project and with the benefit of hindsight and a number of passionate conversations we ’ ve learned a number of things about how to make better use of design in complex environments. After all, design itself doesn ’ t solve problems and so we think a number of things need to change in how we think of design and in order to empower blended design: *********************************** As part of the design and implementation of the new NAB stores, a series of investigative research exercises were required to better understand the customer response to the proposed designs. Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design.  Architects, retail, capability, leadership teams, digital retailing, Avoid complacency in design methodology by blending the experience of a broad team of expertise.  A blended methodology – drawn from online and experience design, service design and wayfinding, blended with experience from both teams, and varying levels of experience in each of these disciplines. "uniquely NAB"; research beyond the functional elements and to explore the experience, perceptions and actions of the customers and staff. Staff engagement. Testing holistically, not just element by element, but elements in combination, under load, with the complexity added by humans. In this way we would understand how the bank might adjust their service delivery to better make use of the new space. Defined against customer experience This would design, capability, technology and training for the implementation of the new store. Evaluation of retail store concepts against design intent and customer experience design guidelines. tight time frames required fast integration of internal and external project teams, blending a range of skills, experience and competency from human computer interaction, business analysis, user centred design, usability and user experience design.       Keep internal teams fresh.  As part of the design and implementation of the new NAB stores, a series of investigative research exercises were required to better understand the customer response to the proposed designs. Enable bravery in emerging practice by blending methodologies from design practices from architecture to user centred design.  Architects, retail, capability, leadership teams, digital retailing, Avoid complacency in design methodology by blending the experience of a broad team of expertise.  A blended methodology – drawn from online and experience design, service design and wayfinding, blended with experience from both teams, and varying levels of experience in each of these disciplines. "uniquely NAB"; research beyond the functional elements and to explore the experience, perceptions and actions of the customers and staff. Staff engagement. Testing holistically, not just element by element, but elements in combination, under load, with the complexity added by humans. In this way we would understand how the bank might adjust their service delivery to better make use of the new space. Defined against customer experience This would design, capability, technology and training for the implementation of the new store. Evaluation of retail store concepts against design intent and customer experience design guidelines. tight time frames required fast integration of internal and external project teams, blending a range of skills, experience and competency from human computer interaction, business analysis, user centred design, usability and user experience design.       Keep internal teams fresh. 
  • [zaana] Firstly we need to understand that o ur role is to inform solutions to complex problems, not always provide the solutions itself . Designers at the level we are talking are more about being process and framework specialists rather than content specialists – and we need to accept our role in that rather than try and be all things to all people all of the time. This is about confidence and bravery in the value in what we do and provide – we don ’ t need to prove our worth – it ’ s not about being content expertise.
  • (Owen) There is no end point to design – it is not a zero sum game. Design is collection of processes and tools to tackle complex problems, not the goal itself Just as deliverables should not be our goal, we need to understand that our work never ends, even if we have finished working on it. The blended team understands that there is no right answer. It is not a case of 1+1 = 2 every time, but instead a constant, ongoing process of discover, refinement and innovation.
  • (Owen) One of the key messages from exploring this areas, is that for design teams to truly add benefit, we need to move away from the culture of deliverables as the end goal. Outputs like journey maps and personas and interaction flows are meant to inform design, no define it. Of course it's OK to spend time making these outputs look good, that's taking pride in your work, but they should not be presented as the actual definition of your role as a designer to make the deliverables. Instead, understand their role as boundary objects; scaffolds to inform how you might go about tackling the true design challenges
  • (Harriet) Understand that that a blended design team is comprised of not just designers, but of all those who can help to design a solution
  • (Harriet) Finally, service design is about all the things all the time. Challenges to organisations. Organisations continue to be arranged in silos in terms of products, capabilities or outputs. If we’re serious about service design – messy models, blended models, chaos to deliver cycle Test all the things all the time Clients consultants and co-workers. Develop new ways of working – we don ’ t know what is going to happen – this is why a blended team is best. WE can ’ t do it otherwise. As a design profession, we need to learn like this.
  • Transcript of "Service design ausralia 2012 Blended teams, "

    1. 1. blended designteams:from clients andconsultantsto co-workers Harriet Wakelam | @hwakelam | NAB Owen Hodda | @owenhodda | Deloitte Zaana Howard | @zaana | QUT
    2. 2. role of designin organisationsisgrowing “The customer is increasingly buying a set of ongoing relations and interactions through which service will be rendered” Cefkin 2006
    3. 3. missio n: a newretail
    4. 4. brief:“test all the things and tell us if they work”
    5. 5. what is ablended designteam?
    6. 6. whyblendeddesignteams?
    7. 7. thehow &thewhatof it all
    8. 8. shared  designleadershi p
    9. 9. outputsoutcom vs es
    10. 10. Digital Digital Yammer Retail Retail Senior leadership Self ServiceSelf Service Next Gen Capability Verification Capability NAB Care Business Bank Senior leadership Commercial Cards Compliance training Yammer Innovation Intranet Change Marketing Out of the box Yammer Marketing
    11. 11. role ofartefac ts As the role of design grows and diversifies, we need to be able to deliver timely commercial insight, whilst still being on the lookout for those “’crystallising’ moments: observations, ideas, connections, which are not complete in themselves, but which catalyse a well and richly prepared ground into a completely different way of seeing the world” Bezaitis, M & Robinson R 2011
    12. 12. what’ schange
    13. 13. doesnotsolveproblems
    14. 14. informsolutions not
    15. 15. todesignthere is no end point
    16. 16. avoidfetishisationof designdeliverables
    17. 17. a blended designteam isnotjust
    18. 18. service design is about ‘all the things’ all the
    19. 19. questions? Harriet Wakelam | @hwakelam Owen Hodda | @ohodda Zaana Howard | @zaana
    20. 20. with thanks to…..Jess Ukotic | Cong Cao | Matt Sale | PeterHolmes | Louise Long | Anthony Waldron |Lev Orosz | Mandy Chambers | Warrenand Mahoney | Jacqui Gill | KerrynEastwood | Scott Tim West | MelHambarsoomian | Chris Wilson | RobertLee | Chris Smith | the staff of theDocklands store | NAB volunteers +customers | and many many more…
    21. 21. General information onlyThis presentation contains general information only, and none of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, its member firms, or their related entities (collectively the “Deloitte Network”) is, by means of this presentation , rendering professional advicor services.Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your finances or your business, you should consult a qualified professional adviser. No entity in the Deloitte Network shall be responsible for any loss whatsoever sustained by anyperson who relies on this presentation.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×