Es l1 - introduction to engineering

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Es l1 - introduction to engineering

  1. 1. Engineer in Society EE014 3 5 3EE014-3.5-3 Introduction To Engineering
  2. 2. A Brief History of EngineeringA Brief History of Engineering • The concept of engineering existed since• The concept of engineering existed since the ancient times I ti f ll h l t– Invention of pulleys, wheels, etc. – Pyramids in Egypt, Great Wall of China • “Engineering” ← “Engineer” ← “Engine” (originated in the Middle Ages around 1000-1200 AD) EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 2
  3. 3. A Brief History of Engineering ( t )(cont.) • Latin word for “Engine” is Ingenium• Latin word for Engine is Ingenium – “innate quality, especially mental power, hence a clever invention”hence a clever invention – they were mainly builders of civil and mechanical structures such as buildingsmechanical structures such as buildings, bridges, roads, mills and war machines • Understanding advancement and• Understanding, advancement and application of science and mathematics Engineering evolution steamed engine EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering – Engineering evolution → steamed engine, telephone, motorcars, electronics……. Slide 3
  4. 4. What is Engineering?What is Engineering? • Definition by American Accreditation Board for• Definition by American Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET): The profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences gainedmathematical and natural sciences gained by study, experience and practice is applied with judgement to develop ways to utilize, economically, the materials and forces of nature for the benefit of mankind EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 4
  5. 5. IEM Definition of EngineeringIEM Definition of Engineering • Share a common heritage of knowledge skill• Share a common heritage of knowledge, skill and art. • Renders a specialized service.p • Involves a confidential relationship between practitioner-client and/or employer. • Is charged with a substantial degree of public obligation. Is bound by a distinctive Ethical Code• Is bound by a distinctive Ethical Code. • Has learned organizations or societies. EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 5 Adapted from Hairul Azhar, “Engineers in Society”
  6. 6. Engineering is…Engineering is… • A profession: it has standards of conduct• A profession: it has standards of conduct, responsibilities, is based on specialized knowledge and members can attain professional status in well-defined ways. • An art as well as science: experience and practice is required.required. • The application of professional judgment in seeking optimum solutions. • The utilization of resources: nature, forces, energy, material, knowledge. A i i ti i i i t EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering • An exercise in optimizing economic cost. Slide 6 Adapted from Hairul Azhar, “Engineers in Society”
  7. 7. … with Rules of Conduct t i i tpertaining to … • Who is permitted to practice?• Who is permitted to practice? • What are an engineer’s obligations to his/her client or employer and his/herhis/her client or employer and his/her colleagues? • What further obligations does an engineer• What further obligations does an engineer owe to society? • By what standards shall an engineer be• By what standards shall an engineer be compensated? • How and by whom shall an engineer’s EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering • How and by whom shall an engineer s professional conduct be judged? Slide 7 Adapted from Hairul Azhar, “Engineers in Society”
  8. 8. What it means to be an E i ?Engineer? • A profession whose principal duty is to• A profession whose principal duty is to serve mankind. A l i k l d t t ti l• Applying knowledge to create practical devices, structures and processes. • In contrast: Scientist aims to seek knowledge. EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 8
  9. 9. Engineers Vs ScientistsEngineers Vs Scientists • Both require the understanding of• Both require the understanding of principles of sciences and mathematics. Scientists study how nature behaves. Engineers make use of the scientists’ findings to develop useful devices.g p EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 9
  10. 10. Disciplines of EngineeringDisciplines of Engineering • Traditionally 4 main branches of• Traditionally, 4 main branches of engineering: Ci il E i i– Civil Engineering – Mechanical Engineering – Electrical Engineering – Chemical Engineering EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 10
  11. 11. Functions of EngineersFunctions of Engineers • Research and Developmentp • Design • ManufacturingManufacturing • Construction • TestingTesting • Sales and Marketing • Maintenance• Maintenance • Management • Quality Control EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering • Quality Control • …many other fields of engineering… Slide 11
  12. 12. Public’s PerceptionPublic s Perception • Generally negative:• Generally, negative: – Difficult course D t i d iti d t t i– Do not receive due recognition and status in society quite low I f i d t d t l– Inferior as compared to doctors, lawyers or accountants Lack of glamour and prestige– Lack of glamour and prestige – Majority of public do not get to see engineers directly EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering directly – Almost no TV or film on engineers Slide 12
  13. 13. Engineers in SocietyEngineers in Society • Learn the social side of engineering• Learn the social side of engineering – Includes issues like national development, environment social and professionalismenvironment, social and professionalism • This is no less important than your t h i l k l dtechnical knowledge • In reality engineers are expected to analyse situations and problems and propose rational solutions or EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering recommendations Slide 13
  14. 14. EAC Expectations from E i i St d tEngineering Students 1) ability to acquire and apply knowledge of1) ability to acquire and apply knowledge of science and engineering fundamentals 2) i d i d th t h i l t2) acquired in depth technical competence in a specific engineering discipline 3) ability to undertake problem identification, formulation and solution 4) ability to utilise systems approach to design and evaluate operational EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering g p performance Slide 14 Adapted from EAC Manual 2007
  15. 15. EAC Expectations from E i i St d t (C t )Engineering Students (Cont.) 5) understanding of the principles of design5) understanding of the principles of design for sustainable development 6) d t di f f i l d thi l6) understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them 7) ability to communicate effectively, not only with engineers but also with the community at large EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 15 Adapted from EAC Manual 2007
  16. 16. EAC Expectations from E i i St d t (C t )Engineering Students (Cont.) 8) ability to function effectively as an8) ability to function effectively as an individual and in a group with the capacity to be a leader or managercapacity to be a leader or manager 9) understanding of the social, cultural, l b l d i t l ibilitiglobal and environmental responsibilities of a professional engineer 10)recognising the need to undertake life long learning, and EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering possessing/acquiring the capacity to do so Slide 16 Adapted from EAC Manual 2007
  17. 17. Activity 1Activity 1 • Developing countries are particularly vulnerable to industrial crises.Developing countries are particularly vulnerable to industrial crises. However, industrial accidents such as Bhopal, India are not just an Indian or even a Third World problem but are industrial disasters waiting to happen , whether they are in the form of "mini-Bhopals", smaller industrial accidents that occur with disturbing frequency in chemical plants in both developed and developing countries, and "slow-motion Bhopals", unseen chronic poisoning from industrial pollution that causes irreversible pain, suffering, and death. These are the key issues we face in a world where toxins are used and developed without fully knowing the harm that can come from their use or abuseuse or abuse. • As a future engineers, discuss the issue. EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 17
  18. 18. The End EE014-3.5-3-ES Introduction To Engineering Slide 18
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