Proudly sponsored by RELLCO & B.E.S.T Saturday 1 st  May 2010 Literature Circles and Blogging Discussions. Developing Rich...
room8owhata.wikispaces.com Literacy in an e-learning context Literacy Circles Literacy Circles
<ul><li>e-fellows  </li></ul><ul><li>Criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Release </li></ul><ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Proj...
What does it mean to be literate in the 21 st  Century? What does it mean to be literate in the 21st Century? Why do we te...
21 st  Century Skills and How do we get there?
<ul><li>“ How are the literacy skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed for the 21st century supported through e-learnin...
My Project <ul><li>“ Can Literacy Circle Discussions and Blogging create a deeper understanding with what children are rea...
<ul><li>Small groups of students gather together to discuss a piece of literature in depth </li></ul><ul><li>The discussio...
<ul><li>Authentic audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Connections to our lives and the world </li></ul><ul><li>Something important...
The Gurus <ul><li>Harvey Daniels developed in 1993 but had been working on since 1980.  </li></ul><ul><li>Lit Circle Resou...
The Roles
Questioner <ul><li>Creates 3 to 5 interesting  questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to think of questions that will get </li><...
Summariser <ul><li>Completes a summary of the story or </li></ul><ul><li>the section that has been read. </li></ul><ul><li...
Word Detective <ul><li>Finds interesting, unusual, hard or </li></ul><ul><li>funny words in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>F...
Illustrator <ul><li>Picks out a scene from the story and </li></ul><ul><li>draws how they believe it would look.  </li></u...
The Connector <ul><li>Makes connections from the story to  </li></ul><ul><li>their own lives, events in the news,  </li></...
Character Describer <ul><li>Tells us what the main characters  </li></ul><ul><li>are like – traits/personality,  </li></ul...
Investigator <ul><li>Researches background information  </li></ul><ul><li>about the book and related topics. </li></ul><ul...
Paragraph Picker <ul><li>Finds exciting paragraphs to  </li></ul><ul><li>share with the group. </li></ul><ul><li>They may ...
Travel Tracker <ul><li>Tells us where the main characters have travelled in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>It is like plotti...
 
Book Choice <ul><li>Thought provoking </li></ul><ul><li>Rich language </li></ul><ul><li>Children can make connections with...
Let’s have a go <ul><li>In a small group </li></ul><ul><li>Read story </li></ul><ul><li>Choose a role </li></ul><ul><li>10...
Discussions   <ul><li>Initial discussions  (very stilted, round robin or through teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>Dominant Child...
Meaningful Contexts <ul><li>Does it really matter if I understand?   </li></ul>“ AHA”
Surface Features <ul><li>Children becoming more self-monitoring and regulatory of the group.   </li></ul>“ AHA”
Making Connections “ AHA”
“ AHA” <ul><li>I have children excited about choosing their books. Rushing into class to tell us about what they have been...
How much of what we do is the same…just because we have shifted the context or environment, have we really made a shift in...
Children want to move forward. They want to learn new skills and want to be challenged. They can take responsibility for t...
Is what we are asking children to share really worth sharing? Do we already know what they are going to say? Do the other ...
How often do we ask children to express an opinion without getting them to base it on anything? emilyowhata  re: Pre Thoug...
<ul><li>“ Not every member must contribute, but all must believe they are free to when ready and it will be valued.” </li>...
“ How are the literacy skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed for the 21st century supported through e-learning contex...
Where to next? <ul><li>Next group </li></ul><ul><li>More mini inquiries </li></ul><ul><li>Writing </li></ul>
<ul><li>“ Instead of asking the question &quot;What  technology  skills must a student have to face the 21st century?&quot...
 
Questions to ask yourself and your children?  What are you doing about it?
E-fellow Photo Story
Resource Help/Discussions http://rellco.wikispaces.com/Literacy+Circles http://room8owhata.wikispaces.com
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  • 10 efellows applied this time last year. In past years the criteria just asked for an e-learning context, you were released for the time of the e-fellowship and did all your own research. For 2009 it was literacy in an e-learning context. 20 release days, working in own school, a mentor from CORE/NZCER who worried about the research component. Changes – losing out on the benefits of the efellowship – keep it as real in the classroom learning. “ How are the literacy skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed for the 21st century supported through e-learning contexts?”
  • Think, pair, share
  • Play video, reflect on how this matches what our thinking was.
  • Play video, reflect on how this matches what our thinking was.
  • Our discussions take place on our wiki and by being challenged by what others share I hoped to see that their thinking will keep evolving and they will engage in discussions which while perhaps changing their thinking, will also challenge others to reflect on their thinking as well. I wanted to develop their thinking skills and for the children to take more responsibility for their own learning.
  • Began with all doing the same role. Then in pairs, then package of 4 roles. Now children choose own roles. Different books lend themselves to different roles.
  • Often it has been me as the teacher setting questions if I think our thinking has stalled. Pre-thinking questions to stimulate and get the hook for children to have buy in to the book/topic.
  • Easy in the beginning. When chn started choosing own books some were much longer in length. Emily – first long length book, couldn’t keep track of what she’d read so found summarising reminded her.
  • In the beginning, very much just words we didn’t know. Now we are beginning to choose more interesting words. Koare/Cullen – German accent – important for people who might read the story to know w becomes v. Discussions – ticket/voucher as prize.
  • Emily – Drawing pic about girl trapped under a bed. Read passage about how she tore strips off her dress to bind her wounds. Emily – What! She’s wearing a dress! Understood the importance of detail. Often give just the story typed out to not cloud their thinking.
  • Can spark off mini inquiries.
  • Some of the books we’ve used. I have no idea of the level of them. Sparked an interest in me. Children found a connection between the stories that I hadn’t thought about.
  • Children trusting of my choices but now wanting something more challenging.
  • Go to Kids alone in a cyclone.
  • Emily going back and back and back to first book. By blogging discussions, children going back to previous books/discussions and adding to them. How often do we allow them the time to go back to things and to change their thinking. Children logging in from home as they have a thought.
  • Quake safing our houses. First story, no understanding of what words meant for 3 little pigs – no pic in head – superficial understanding.
  • No full stops, spaces, spelling.
  • (Ticket (summary)/voucher (story)
  • This for me has been the overriding aha moment. The elearning context has given the children the chance to participate, for others to interact with them.
  • Next group involved – learning from the first group, reading, challenging their thinking. More mini inquiries Experimenting with using the roles for writing.
  • These skills are not tied to any particular software or technology type, but rather aim to provide students with the thinking skill and thus the opportunity to succeed no matter what their futures hold.”
  • Best literature circle presentation

    1. 1. Proudly sponsored by RELLCO & B.E.S.T Saturday 1 st May 2010 Literature Circles and Blogging Discussions. Developing Rich, Real & Relevant practices in Literacy Robyn Hurliman Improving Student Learning Outcomes
    2. 2. room8owhata.wikispaces.com Literacy in an e-learning context Literacy Circles Literacy Circles
    3. 3. <ul><li>e-fellows </li></ul><ul><li>Criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Release </li></ul><ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Projects </li></ul>
    4. 4. What does it mean to be literate in the 21 st Century? What does it mean to be literate in the 21st Century? Why do we teach children literacy skills? What does it mean for our teaching?
    5. 5. 21 st Century Skills and How do we get there?
    6. 6. <ul><li>“ How are the literacy skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed for the 21st century supported through e-learning contexts?” </li></ul>
    7. 7. My Project <ul><li>“ Can Literacy Circle Discussions and Blogging create a deeper understanding with what children are reading in response to what others say.” </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Small groups of students gather together to discuss a piece of literature in depth </li></ul><ul><li>The discussion is guided by students' response to what they have read </li></ul><ul><li>P rovides a way for students to engage in critical thinking and reflection as they read, discuss, and respond to books </li></ul><ul><li>Students collaborate to reshape and add onto their understanding as they construct meaning with other readers </li></ul><ul><li>Guides students to deeper understanding of what they read through structured discussion and extended written and artistic response. </li></ul>Emily Cullen Israel What are literacy/literature circles?
    9. 9. <ul><li>Authentic audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Connections to our lives and the world </li></ul><ul><li>Something important to say </li></ul><ul><li>The literacy skills to get our thinking across to others </li></ul>The Key Ingredients
    10. 10. The Gurus <ul><li>Harvey Daniels developed in 1993 but had been working on since 1980. </li></ul><ul><li>Lit Circle Resources11 Key Elements of Literature Circles.doc </li></ul><ul><li>Laura Candler lauracandler.com </li></ul>
    11. 11. The Roles
    12. 12. Questioner <ul><li>Creates 3 to 5 interesting questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to think of questions that will get </li></ul><ul><li>the group to dig into the book and </li></ul><ul><li>share their thoughts and opinions. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to make them “FAT” questions. </li></ul>Israel
    13. 13. Summariser <ul><li>Completes a summary of the story or </li></ul><ul><li>the section that has been read. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to include only the </li></ul><ul><li>important characters and events. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try to tell us everything that </li></ul><ul><li>happened. </li></ul><ul><li>When you’ve read it to the group, </li></ul><ul><li>they will let you know if you have </li></ul><ul><li>missed out anything important. </li></ul>Maia
    14. 14. Word Detective <ul><li>Finds interesting, unusual, hard or </li></ul><ul><li>funny words in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Find out what they mean, what the </li></ul><ul><li>base word is, any prefixes or suffixes, </li></ul><ul><li>antonyms, synonyms….. </li></ul><ul><li>Use them in different sentences so </li></ul><ul><li>we can understand how to use them. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget to tell us why you chose </li></ul><ul><li>them. </li></ul>Emily Eden
    15. 15. Illustrator <ul><li>Picks out a scene from the story and </li></ul><ul><li>draws how they believe it would look. </li></ul><ul><li>Pay attention to details about the </li></ul><ul><li>characters, setting and mood. </li></ul><ul><li>The rest of the group will discuss </li></ul><ul><li>how they would have visualised the </li></ul><ul><li>same scene, any differences…… </li></ul><ul><li>any similarities they see. </li></ul>Jasmine
    16. 16. The Connector <ul><li>Makes connections from the story to </li></ul><ul><li>their own lives, events in the news, </li></ul><ul><li>historical events that may relate. </li></ul><ul><li>What similarities or differences can </li></ul><ul><li>you find in the story to your life. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss your connections and others </li></ul><ul><li>in the group might be able to add any </li></ul><ul><li>connections they have found. </li></ul>Cullen
    17. 17. Character Describer <ul><li>Tells us what the main characters </li></ul><ul><li>are like – traits/personality, </li></ul><ul><li>connections to other characters. </li></ul><ul><li>What impact do they have in </li></ul><ul><li>the story….? </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to make it clear to the </li></ul><ul><li>group why you think that character </li></ul><ul><li>is important to the overall story. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Investigator <ul><li>Researches background information </li></ul><ul><li>about the book and related topics. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses questions and key words to find </li></ul><ul><li>information. </li></ul><ul><li>Might find websites and interactive </li></ul><ul><li>activities and games to further our </li></ul><ul><li>understanding. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Paragraph Picker <ul><li>Finds exciting paragraphs to </li></ul><ul><li>share with the group. </li></ul><ul><li>They may be based on language, </li></ul><ul><li>imagery, use of synonyms, dialogue, </li></ul><ul><li>descriptions of characters…. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to tell us why you chose </li></ul><ul><li>that paragraph to share. </li></ul>
    20. 20. Travel Tracker <ul><li>Tells us where the main characters have travelled in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>It is like plotting the story on a map. </li></ul><ul><li>It needs to be in the order that it has happened in the story. </li></ul>
    21. 22. Book Choice <ul><li>Thought provoking </li></ul><ul><li>Rich language </li></ul><ul><li>Children can make connections with </li></ul><ul><li>Have some sort of message </li></ul><ul><li>Problems in the beginning </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple copies </li></ul><ul><li>Ones that engage the children </li></ul><ul><li>Meet the criteria I’ve set </li></ul>
    22. 23. Let’s have a go <ul><li>In a small group </li></ul><ul><li>Read story </li></ul><ul><li>Choose a role </li></ul><ul><li>10-15 minutes using the role </li></ul><ul><li>Share with the group </li></ul><ul><li>Compare with another group </li></ul>Or check out our wiki and my blog www.room8owhata.wikispaces.com http://robynse-learningnews.blogspot.com/
    23. 24. Discussions <ul><li>Initial discussions (very stilted, round robin or through teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>Dominant Children </li></ul><ul><li>Worth Sharing (Thinking Challenged, Thinking time, Change time) </li></ul>“ AHA”
    24. 25. Meaningful Contexts <ul><li>Does it really matter if I understand? </li></ul>“ AHA”
    25. 26. Surface Features <ul><li>Children becoming more self-monitoring and regulatory of the group. </li></ul>“ AHA”
    26. 27. Making Connections “ AHA”
    27. 28. “ AHA” <ul><li>I have children excited about choosing their books. Rushing into class to tell us about what they have been reading. Thinking ahead to what their next book will be….. Why? </li></ul>
    28. 29. How much of what we do is the same…just because we have shifted the context or environment, have we really made a shift in our thinking? Are we giving children what they need? Are we doing it any differently?
    29. 30. Children want to move forward. They want to learn new skills and want to be challenged. They can take responsibility for their own learning. How much do we steer them when they can actually steer themselves? Do we really allow them the chance to choose their learning steps? Do we give them the right foundation steps to succeed? How much do we still remain in control?
    30. 31. Is what we are asking children to share really worth sharing? Do we already know what they are going to say? Do the other children already know what they are going to say? How interesting is that????
    31. 32. How often do we ask children to express an opinion without getting them to base it on anything? emilyowhata re: Pre Thoughts I haven't been camping yet but I am very keen to give it a go. Posted Aug 3, 2009 <ul><li>Robyn_Hurliman re: Pre Thoughts Are you still keen to give it a go Emily after reading about Grandma McGarvey's experiences? </li></ul>emilyowhata re: Pre Thoughts Not very keen as I was before because a wild pig coming up to you and stealing a sausage off you isn't very pleasant although it isn't based on a true story.
    32. 33. <ul><li>“ Not every member must contribute, but all must believe they are free to when ready and it will be valued.” </li></ul>Confronting the challenges of Participatory Culture MacArthur Foundation
    33. 34. “ How are the literacy skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed for the 21st century supported through e-learning contexts?” <ul><li>Collaboration – access to people and texts that might not have otherwise been available </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership </li></ul><ul><li>Interaction with a global, neutral community </li></ul><ul><li>Authentic Audiences – it matters what I have to say </li></ul><ul><li>Making connections – specialising according to strengths and interests </li></ul><ul><li>Being able to review, adapt, modify thinking. Greater choice about how to make meaning of and with texts – removing the laboriousness of editing. </li></ul><ul><li>A balance of freedom and constraint </li></ul>So has it made a difference? Yes!!!!!!!! Conditions of Learning
    34. 35. Where to next? <ul><li>Next group </li></ul><ul><li>More mini inquiries </li></ul><ul><li>Writing </li></ul>
    35. 36. <ul><li>“ Instead of asking the question &quot;What technology skills must a student have to face the 21st century?&quot; should we not be asking &quot;What thinking and literacy skills must a student have to face the 21st century?&quot; newliteracy.wikispaces.com </li></ul>Technology vs Literacy Skills
    36. 38. Questions to ask yourself and your children? What are you doing about it?
    37. 39. E-fellow Photo Story
    38. 40. Resource Help/Discussions http://rellco.wikispaces.com/Literacy+Circles http://room8owhata.wikispaces.com
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