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Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country
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Using technology to maintain course quality- delivery a city course in the country

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  • 1. Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences Using technology to maintain course quality: Delivering a city course in the countryRural Curriculum Innovation Conference, Dec 2012 Dr. Hung The Nguyen Clinical education and Professional Development Unit, School of Primary Health Care hung.nguyen@monash.edu hung
  • 2. Acknowledgements**Course designAssociate Professor Lyn ClearihanDr. George ZahariasDr. Hung The Nguyen**TutorsDr. Nizar FarjouDr. Mohammad R.Al-MagablehDr. Nadida Kachkouche**Course administrationMs. Caroline Menara
  • 3. Background International Medical Graduates make up a significant workforce in the rural Australia • Australian health system is increasingly reliant on IMGs (HWA Health Workforce 2025, 2012) • 25% of the medical workforce are IMGs (AMWAC, 2005) • 23% work in regional areas and 13% in rural and remote areas (Hawthorne et al, 2003) • Permanent resident OTDs fill the gap in vocational training programs (AMWAC, 2005) • 43% of Victorian GPRs were PR OTDs (RWAV, 2004) • 36% of the GP workforce in rural Victoria were IMGs (RWAV, 2010)
  • 4. Background IMGs require adequate educational, supervisory and other socio- cultural supports for themselves and their family (Lost in the Labyrinth report, 2012): • Introductory support (clinical and professional orientation, cultural awareness training; social and cultural orientation for their families) • Ongoing support (education and professional development, examination preparation, mentoring and peer support programs) IMGs can travel great distances to access educational activities they need
  • 5. Monash University IMG Clinical Bridging Course Based in Notting Hill 8 days Tutorials, lectures Workshops – demonstrations, role play, simulated patients Clinical exam practice
  • 6. 3D Intensive Clinical Bridging CourseBased in Mildura3 daysTutorialsWorkshops – demonstrations, role plays and simulated patientsClinical exam practicesPre-course and at home in-course activities activities Google sites
  • 7. Learning concepts and tools Challenges: • How to maximise classroom efficacy? = in-class tools AND out-of class study • How to structure out-of-class study? = content AND delivery • How to maximise peer-peer instruction? = building team spirit AND safe learning environment The "flipped" classroom • Information transfer takes place in advance. • students study before rather than during or after class. • the classroom becomes a place for active learning, questions, and discussion. • facilitators spend their time addressing students difficulties rather than lecturing.
  • 8. Learning concepts and tools Content • Developed by the Unit • Available on the web Delivery of content - Google Sites • Available: web-based • Accessible: easy to sign up and sign in, staff/students can collaborate • Affordable: free • Appropriate/Acceptable: ?
  • 9. Learning concepts and tools Educational instructions • Before the course: • readings (clinical guidelines, cultural competency concepts and principles, clinical interview tips and strategies, study plan and learning objectives), • videos (demonstration physical examinations); • case studies (history, physical examination, management strategies) • In-course: • minute paper; safe learning environment; peer-peer feedback • role play, simulated patients and immediate feedback • Between sessions: • revision of reading; • preparation for the next day
  • 10. Google Sites Structured out-of-class learning activities • readings (clinical guidelines, cultural competency concepts and principles, clinical interview tips and strategies, study plan and learning objectives), • videos (demonstration physical examinations); • case studies (history, physical examination, management strategies)
  • 11. Minute paper To investigate how well students understand important concepts presented during a class period, and to improve instruction in the succeeding class by modifications in delivery/presentation. • Real time feedback • During or at the end of a session • Anonymous What we were interested in: • Learning environment • Delivery • Relevance • Learning achievements
  • 12. Safe Learning Environment SLE = engaging, inclusive, challenging, supportive AND culturally safe • foster peer to peer feedback • increase group interactions • “Giving it a go” • honest and meaningful feedback
  • 13. Our first class... n = 21 all in working in general practice or hospital most from rural victoria, NSW/ACT and SA =12 Melbourne (4) interstate - WA (4), Qld (1) IMGs working in general practice, have AMC part 1, studying for AMC part 2 or FRACGP/FACRRM
  • 14. Did the minute paper help? D2 D1
  • 15. Did the minute paper help? D2 D1
  • 16. Did the minute paper help? D2 D1
  • 17. Did the minute paper help? The questions: • learning environment • relevance • delivery - scored 4-5/5 in all areas, with improvements on D2 learning achievements • D1 - physical examination skills, communication skills, history taking skills, interpreting x-rays • D2 - mock exam cases, physical examination skills - practical skills > knowledge - practice cases > case studies Changes to the sessions: • D3 “expert” individual feedback in front of peers, before peer-peer discussions
  • 18. Was Google Sites acceptable?
  • 19. Was Google Sites acceptable?
  • 20. Was Google Sites acceptable?
  • 21. Was Google Sites acceptable?
  • 22. Was Google Sites acceptable?
  • 23. Was Google Sites acceptable?• very useful, focused, gives us option to read what you need and not everything in a typical section• what about joining IMG remotely for a few online bridging course and study program; maybe more videos made by examiner as he is a good teacher• I would be happy to pay a yearly fee for the site
  • 24. Acceptability of the “flipped class” Evaluation: - What was the best? • delivery - interactive, hands on, OSCEs are a good way to learn • feedback - personal, individual, immediate • environment - friendly, non-judgemental • content - comprehensive, perfect and precise - What could be better? • more time, more cases • obstetrics, gynaecology, paediatrics
  • 25. Acceptability of the “flipped class”
  • 26. Acceptability of the “flipped class”
  • 27. Conclusion A successful approach (flipped class, google sites) • To manage available time for the application of knowledge, skills and attitudes • To allow learning in a place, at a time and at a pace students most benefit • To maximise instruction and feedback time with expert facilitator Does this suggest changes to the main course? • A different cohort • Teacher resistance Other tools? • Resource development (videos, virtual patients) • Online tools egNB

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