What makes effective questioning? David Drake 2011 Humanities Advanced Skills Teacher
Contents <ul><li>How do we learn? </li></ul><ul><li>Why question? </li></ul><ul><li>Are we using questions effectively? </...
How do we learn?
Why question? <ul><li>Questioning  is a key aspect of the teaching and learning process.     </li></ul><ul><li>There is ev...
Why question? <ul><li>Questioning  is a key aspect of the teaching and learning process.     </li></ul><ul><li>There is ev...
Are we using questions effectively? <ul><li>Improving questioning was one of the keys to raising attainment identified by ...
Is my use of questioning effective? <ul><li>Questioning techniques need to be varied: over reliance on the </li></ul><ul><...
What questions to ask? Bloom’s taxonomy triangle   (latest version) Recall of factual information  Showing understanding o...
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .  Why do you think… What happens when…
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .  Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What ...
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .  Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What ...
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .  Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What ...
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .  Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What ...
Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .  Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What ...
Some quick and practical strategies <ul><li>Increase ‘wait time’ </li></ul><ul><li>No hands up </li></ul><ul><li>Phone a f...
Increase ‘Wait time’ <ul><li>Most teachers’ questions are answered in less than a second, often by the teacher themselves....
No hands up <ul><li>Students cannot shout out OR put their hands up to indicate that they know the answer to the question....
Phone a friend <ul><li>Empower a struggling student, who does not have the answer to your question, by asking them to choo...
Staged questioning <ul><li>To increase level of challenge: </li></ul><ul><li>1. What is this called? </li></ul><ul><li>2. ...
Olympic challenge questioning <ul><li>Stage plenary questions in terms of </li></ul><ul><li>Bronze </li></ul><ul><li>Silve...
Think, Pair, Share (TPS)
Mini-whiteboard <ul><li>Pose a question </li></ul><ul><li>Give ‘wait time’ </li></ul><ul><li>Students hold up answers </li...
Hot potato <ul><li>A question is posed by the teacher – ‘wait time’ given </li></ul><ul><li>Ball thrown at a student (care...
The ‘Annoying infant’ <ul><li>Ask a question </li></ul><ul><li>Leave ‘wait time’ </li></ul><ul><li>Ask a student for a res...
Teach others?
Teach others? Teaching others is a high order skill that leads to deep learning
Teaching others - Practical strategies <ul><li>Snowballing </li></ul><ul><li>Once students have thought of the answer, the...
Teaching others – Practical strategies <ul><li>Envoying </li></ul><ul><li>Group work where ideas recorded </li></ul><ul><l...
Too much? <ul><li>Don’t try them all! </li></ul><ul><li>Just choose  one strategy  and try it a couple of times this term ...
What makes effective questioning? David Drake 2011 Humanities Advanced Skills Teacher
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What makes effective questioning?

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What makes effective questioning?

  1. 1. What makes effective questioning? David Drake 2011 Humanities Advanced Skills Teacher
  2. 2. Contents <ul><li>How do we learn? </li></ul><ul><li>Why question? </li></ul><ul><li>Are we using questions effectively? </li></ul><ul><li>What questions to ask? </li></ul><ul><li>Types of questions </li></ul><ul><li>Quick and practical strategies </li></ul>
  3. 3. How do we learn?
  4. 4. Why question? <ul><li>Questioning is a key aspect of the teaching and learning process.    </li></ul><ul><li>There is evidence that teachers can improve their use of questions, focusing on types of questions and strategies for using them.    </li></ul><ul><li>Questions should draw pupils into the learning process as well checking on acquisition of knowledge. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Why question? <ul><li>Questioning is a key aspect of the teaching and learning process.    </li></ul><ul><li>There is evidence that teachers can improve their use of questions, focusing on types of questions and strategies for using them.    </li></ul><ul><li>Questions should draw pupils into the learning process as well checking on acquisition of knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Research shows that effective teachers use a greater number of higher order questions and open questions than less effective teachers </li></ul>
  6. 6. Are we using questions effectively? <ul><li>Improving questioning was one of the keys to raising attainment identified by Black and </li></ul><ul><li>Wiliam in Inside the Black Box </li></ul><ul><li>Most teachers’ questions are answered in less than a second, often by the teacher themselves. Increasing wait time to 3 seconds for lower order questions and 10 seconds for higher order ones improves the quality of answers </li></ul><ul><li>Pupils fear being made to look silly and this inhibits them in answering </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of pupils articulating ideas themselves means that it is important to try to get them to ask questions </li></ul>
  7. 7. Is my use of questioning effective? <ul><li>Questioning techniques need to be varied: over reliance on the </li></ul><ul><li>‘ volunteer’ method is to be avoided. </li></ul><ul><li>Questioning is a key tool in Assessment for Learning strategies: </li></ul><ul><li>for allowing the teacher to test learning </li></ul><ul><li>for involving students in applying assessment criteria </li></ul><ul><li>for developing listening skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Students need time to think, to know how long they have to respond. </li></ul>
  8. 8. What questions to ask? Bloom’s taxonomy triangle (latest version) Recall of factual information Showing understanding of the information remembered Consideration of practical relevance of information Ability to investigate elements of the information Ability to make judgements about the nature of information Using information to move forward in a creative way
  9. 9. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . .
  10. 10. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . . Why do you think… What happens when…
  11. 11. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . . Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What do you think will happen?
  12. 12. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . . Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What do you think will happen? What is the function of.. State the point of view…
  13. 13. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . . Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What do you think will happen? What is the function of.. State the point of view… Propose an alternative… How else would you… What conclusion can you draw?
  14. 14. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . . Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What do you think will happen? What is the function of.. State the point of view… Propose an alternative… How else would you… What conclusion can you draw? Which is more important…. Why is this valid? How can you defend…
  15. 15. Types of questions What is the name for? Name this . . Why do you think… What happens when… What does this suggest? What do you think will happen? What is the function of.. State the point of view… Propose an alternative… How else would you… What conclusion can you draw? Which is more important…. Why is this valid? How can you defend… Lower order questions Higher order questions
  16. 16. Some quick and practical strategies <ul><li>Increase ‘wait time’ </li></ul><ul><li>No hands up </li></ul><ul><li>Phone a friend </li></ul><ul><li>Staged questioning </li></ul><ul><li>Olympic challenge </li></ul><ul><li>questioning </li></ul>Think, Pair, Share (TPS) Answers on your mini whiteboard ‘ Hot potato’ student questioning The ‘annoying infant’ technique
  17. 17. Increase ‘Wait time’ <ul><li>Most teachers’ questions are answered in less than a second, often by the teacher themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing wait time to 3 seconds for lower order questions and 10 seconds for higher order ones improves the quality of answers </li></ul>
  18. 18. No hands up <ul><li>Students cannot shout out OR put their hands up to indicate that they know the answer to the question. </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher chooses students to answer question. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep them on their toes! </li></ul><ul><li>Students can use phone a friend if they are really struggling. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Phone a friend <ul><li>Empower a struggling student, who does not have the answer to your question, by asking them to choose three students, who do have an answer ready </li></ul><ul><li>Students give their answers </li></ul><ul><li>The struggling student chooses the ‘best’ answer and explains their reasons for their choice. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Staged questioning <ul><li>To increase level of challenge: </li></ul><ul><li>1. What is this called? </li></ul><ul><li>2. When would you use it? </li></ul><ul><li>3. How does it work? </li></ul>
  21. 21. Olympic challenge questioning <ul><li>Stage plenary questions in terms of </li></ul><ul><li>Bronze </li></ul><ul><li>Silver </li></ul><ul><li>Gold. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Think, Pair, Share (TPS)
  23. 23. Mini-whiteboard <ul><li>Pose a question </li></ul><ul><li>Give ‘wait time’ </li></ul><ul><li>Students hold up answers </li></ul>
  24. 24. Hot potato <ul><li>A question is posed by the teacher – ‘wait time’ given </li></ul><ul><li>Ball thrown at a student (carefully!) </li></ul><ul><li>Student gives response </li></ul><ul><li>Student poses question, waits 10 seconds and tosses ball to another student </li></ul><ul><li>This can then be repeated as much as necessary </li></ul>
  25. 25. The ‘Annoying infant’ <ul><li>Ask a question </li></ul><ul><li>Leave ‘wait time’ </li></ul><ul><li>Ask a student for a response </li></ul><ul><li>Then act like an ‘annoying infant’ and repeat ‘so what?’ or ‘why?’ after each response </li></ul>
  26. 26. Teach others?
  27. 27. Teach others? Teaching others is a high order skill that leads to deep learning
  28. 28. Teaching others - Practical strategies <ul><li>Snowballing </li></ul><ul><li>Once students have thought of the answer, they pair and share ideas </li></ul><ul><li>They then join with another pair and each take time sharing their answer and asking questions of each other </li></ul><ul><li>Can go on and on…(if appropriate) before feeding back </li></ul>
  29. 29. Teaching others – Practical strategies <ul><li>Envoying </li></ul><ul><li>Group work where ideas recorded </li></ul><ul><li>One envoy visits another group for one minute, collecting information and asking questions </li></ul><ul><li>Envoy returns to original group and communicates findings for inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher questions groups </li></ul>
  30. 30. Too much? <ul><li>Don’t try them all! </li></ul><ul><li>Just choose one strategy and try it a couple of times this term </li></ul>
  31. 31. What makes effective questioning? David Drake 2011 Humanities Advanced Skills Teacher

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