Kowal
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Kowal

on

  • 209 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
209
Views on SlideShare
209
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Kowal Kowal Presentation Transcript

  • British Library Georeferencer Crowdsourcing map data 1Kimberly C. Kowal, Lead Curator Digital Mapping, The British Library
  • Snapshot• 725 maps assigned spatial metadata• 13-18 February 2012• Publicity minimal – social media *key*• ~90 participants• Top five completed half the work• Data quality good: <3% had errors >.005 2
  • • Purpose• Application and methods• Results• Wider benefits 3
  • What is georeferencing?Ordnance Surveyors Drawing 40 (detail). Pen and Ink on paper. 1801. 4British Library, Maps OSD 40(3).
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • Ordnance Survey drawingsOriginal large-scale drawingsmade for the famous one-inch-to-the-mile maps. England andWales, 1780-1840.Part of Staffordshire Containing 100 Square MilesSurveyed by Mr Field and Drawn by Mr Stevens(detail). Pen and ink on paper. 1817.British Library shelfmark: OSD 210. Crace Collection of maps of London Illustrating development of the city and its immediate vicinity from ca 1570 - 1860 BAYNARDS CASTLE AND FARINGDON WARD WITHIN with their Divisions into Parishes according to a new SURVEY. (detail). Cole, B. engraver. 1754. 8 British Library shelfmark: Maps Crace VIII.25
  • http://maps.bl.uk 9
  • http://maps.bl.uk 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15Image copyright 2012 Bluesky
  • 16Image copyright 2012 Bluesky
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • What made it work…Content relevantAccessibility and convenience of applicationActivity engagingImmediate results and feedbackCompetitive crowdsourcing toolsRecognition and visible overall contribution 22
  • Asking the top five contributors• Access: How did you know….?• Methods: use of application• Interest / motivation• Other feedback 23
  • 24
  • Crowdsourcing• Model of participation (Bonney, R. et al., 2009) – Contributory – Collaborative• Initiatives (tasks) – Correction and transcription – ContextualisationOommen J. and L. Aroyo, ‘Crowdsourcing in the Cultural Heritage Domain: Opportunities and Challenges.’ Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, 29 June-2 July 2011. http://www.cs.vu.nl/~marieke/OomenAroyoCT2011.pdf 25
  • 26