Start the New Year Right — Focus Learning Through Competencies in 2013
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Start the New Year Right — Focus Learning Through Competencies in 2013

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Competencies have been a part of the learning discussion for some time. And, depending on where they are in the cycle of opinion about their value, can trend higher or lower. Recently, some have......

Competencies have been a part of the learning discussion for some time. And, depending on where they are in the cycle of opinion about their value, can trend higher or lower. Recently, some have stated that competencies are no longer welcome in the workplace, or have little value alongside an individual’s business goals. Esoterically speaking, there may be some truth to this. We are not, however, talking about old core values, nor are we trying to define what makes an employable corporate citizen. Rather, we are talking about what aligns a job function/family or what is a specific differentiator for level or role.

Job-specific, task-oriented competencies, associated with tools employees can use and relate to, make a significant positive difference in:

Best practices sharing.
Capturing institutional memory.
Providing consistent communication.
Setting clear expectations for hiring, performance, career engagement and development.
Providing clear skills management and mitigation for workforce planning.
Enabling flexibility in assignments and roles while accelerating capability to learn and deliver.

In this webinar, you will:

Hear case studies and research validating the justification for a learning strategy.
Learn some of the ways to relate business outcomes from learning.
Understand how the Kenexa Job Competency Library can make learning not just on the job, but targeted at the job.

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  • 1. START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT — FOCUS LEARNING THROUGH COMPETENCIES IN 2013 Gordon Ritchie, Dawn Jaglowski January 8, 2013 To us, business is personal
  • 2. AGENDA • Set the landscape • Discuss Challenges to Competency Management • Case Studies • Implementing Competency Models in Learning • Kenexa’s Components to a successful solution • QuestionsCopyright Kenexa®, ®, 2012 Copyright Kenexa 2011 22
  • 3. STATE OF THE NATION - LEARNING • No defined competencies – multiple competing models • No job alignment • Multiple ownership of job descriptions • No learning/development/performance mapping • Disconnected processes/information • That you have an LMS • That some kind of learning plans for employees are in place • Buzz word bingo: mobile, social, cloud, gamification, etc. • Confusion of TCO vs ROI – Low User licences does not equal productivity – Training hours does not mean performance improvementCopyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 3
  • 4. ELEMENTS TO DEVELOP TALENT + SKILLS x CULTURAL FIT = PERFORMANCE Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 4Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 4
  • 5. STEPPING BACK: WHAT IS A COMPETENCY? A competency is an underlying characteristic of an individual which is causally related to effective or superior performance in a job or situation. A competency is a behavior that encompasses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, motives and temperament that distinguish excellent performers. A competency describes the behaviors demonstrated by people to achieve a satisfactory outcome underpinned by the knowledge and skills they have acquired. Represent the 20% of observable behaviors that drive 80% of excellent performanceCopyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 5
  • 6. DEFINING YOUR ORGANIZATIONAL DNA A Job Based Competency Career & Succession Planning framework provides a Learning Performance common language for a Management Needs Analysis Talent Management strategy to integrate across Functional Job & Competency all the processes in the Framework Risk Compensation Analysis organization. Resource Recruitment Planning & Selection Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 6Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 6
  • 7. POLL QUESTION #1 How many of you have Functional and Job Specific technical competencies defined for your roles? (not core competencies) A. All Functions/Job Roles B. Some C. NoneCopyright Kenexa®, ®, 2012 Copyright Kenexa 2011 77
  • 8. SPEAKING THE BUSINESS LINGUA FRANCA What did you put on your SEC 10K or Annual report? • Acquiring • Engaging Sales results Talent Talent Succession Operational efficiency rate due to poor Cost of a poor employee hire: engagement: $300K-$500K 30% Cost of losing a Value of a top talented performer: 2-4X employee: performance of $250K-$500K average Expense employees Competitive management • Retaining • Evaluating product Talent Talent results These numbers are consolidation of numbers from the HCI. Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 8Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 8
  • 9. COMPETENCY MANAGEMENT: HOW DO YOU ANSWER • Knowing the skills and competencies your people have to run your business? • Unable to put the right people on the right project? Who does what in your organization? • Ensuring that your people receive development based on what they need to do their jobs, not just their ‘wish list’? • Unable to prove that you meet your regulatory compliance? External accreditation? • Wasting money on training or not getting the most out of your LMS? • At risk of losing key competencies? Knowing what they are? • Lack of employee and manager engagement in learning and development? • Lack of visibility of career development opportunities in your organization?Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 9
  • 10. AGENDA • Set the landscape • Discuss Challenges to Competency Management • Case Studies • Implementing Competency Models in Learning • Kenexa’s Components to a successful solution • QuestionsCopyright Kenexa®, ®, 2012 Copyright Kenexa 2011 1010
  • 11. BERSIN RESEARCH Corporate Learning Factbook 2012 Most companies have considerable skills gaps in their workforces; with a scarcity of skilled talent in the labor market, companies realize they cannot solve their skills shortages externally. To achieve competitive advantage, they must commit to developing the right skills internally. Finally, the increased focus on measurement and analytics is causing training groups to sharpen their reporting and analysis capabilities. Tracking and analyzing data can spotlight issues with cost structures and utilization, as well as assess the value and impact of training on the business. This analysis is critical to making sound investment decisions. • Challenges: “Our talent problem may be sales, …. no standard places to find data about people” • Start with the problem, not the data: six percent of HR teams rate themselves “excellent” in data analysis, while 56 percent rated themselves “poor. • HR, training, recruiting, and HR generalists are all going to have to go back to school.Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 11
  • 12. ABERDEEN GROUP The Talent Acquisition Lifecycle 2012 • Best in class strategies – Identify important roles – Assess demonstrated skills or competencies • Results – Twice as many of their organizational goals met – 5 X improvement in customer service compared to all others – 9% cost reduction over others, no change. Summary: Define your functional job related competencies enables you to find the best talent, internally or externally first, and accelerate time to productivity enabling you to maintain advantage.Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 12
  • 13. WHY COMPETENCIES ARE IMPORTANT. Internal challenges to address via assessments All Organisations Weak or limited leadership pipeline 37% Consistency in employee competence 36% Excessive first year turnover among new hires 31% “The number one strategy used by best in class Lack of skills to meet organizational needs 30% companies was to develop a competency framework.” 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Impact of Assessments 8% Employee performance 18% in Talent Management Quality of hire 2% 17% Employee productivity 7% 14% 0% Not Using Assessments Overall turnover -10% Using Assessments 0% Recruiting costs -12% -15% -10% -5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% Source: Aberdeen 2009 Study; Assessments in Talent Management Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 13Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 13
  • 14. AGENDA • Set the landscape • Discuss Challenges to Competency Management • Case Studies • Implementing Competency Models in Learning • Kenexa’s Components to a successful solution • QuestionsCopyright Kenexa®, ®, 2012 Copyright Kenexa 2011 1414
  • 15. SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT • Challenge – New IT service model – SOA – Large amount of institutional memory in contractor/outsource workforce – Low FTE engagement – Local Operational need outside of overall HR strategy – Operational Risk • Solution – Deploy an existing Competency Library – Provide a Capability Assessment/Skills inventory separate of performance – Achieve gap focused learning for current role, and clear growth Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 15Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 15
  • 16. SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT • Results – Higher FTE engagement – Captured operational institutional property and practices – Successful adoption of new service model and reduced contractor costs – Completed in parallel to existing HR/projects – ROI: being able to identify a critical skill and put that person on a project team saved over $400k of capital expense based on institutional knowledge. • Lessons – Use a job based library accelerated scoping job roles – Competency library defused content authoring delays – Optimized learning catalogue investment with existing LMS/Content partners. Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 16Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 16
  • 17. ZURICH INSURANCE • Challenges: – Measure development needs of employees – How to engage and train 60000 staff? – How to define global job profiles – Integrating designed process into an IT infrastructure • How did they address them? 1. Create a global structure and job catalogue 2. Map competencies to jobs and then jobs to employees 3. Assess proficiency gaps to identify specific training plans 4. Develop analytics and automated reporting supporting business academies. Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 17Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 17
  • 18. ZURICH INSURANCE • Results – Headcount reporting by country/function/segment ensured executive support – 279 key job roles address 99% of workforce (not titles, but roles) – 80% complete assessments – Focused training plans delivering Learning linked to jobs linked to business goals – Integration across HR processes: Compensation, recruiting, performance, etc. • Lessons – Smart marketing: focus on development, and performance follows – Find an executive hook early – Use an existing competency catalogue – Don’t focus on job descriptions: let the competencies describe expectations – Clear, focused Project Management led approach. Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 18Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 18
  • 19. AGENDA • Set the landscape • Discuss Challenges to Competency Management • Case Studies • Implementing Competency Models in Learning • Kenexa’s Components to a successful solution • QuestionsCopyright Kenexa®, ®, 2012 Copyright Kenexa 2011 1919
  • 20. CHALLENGES DEFINING COMPETENCIES What prevents you from implementing competencies (or extending the competencies you have) in your organization? 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Manual Budget Too difficult to Too many Lack of process Constraints define jobs executive competencies support Source: Competencies, Compensation and Technology Luncheons.- 2012 Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 20Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 20
  • 21. COMPETENCY MANAGEMENT Types of Competency Models High Transactional impact on business Specificity of the Model High Low Defines culture Defines job skills Reinforces strategy Enables assessment Broadly applied training and communicate Supports development 80/20 rule Enabled by technology …does not account for job differences …challenging to manage the data Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 21Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 21
  • 22. COMPETENCY FRAMEWORKS • Structure • Focus Consistent use is critical • Measurement Scales • CARS/BARS Kenexa Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 22Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 22
  • 23. JOB COMPETENCY MODEL • Job Description • Competencies (KSAs) – Code – Definition – 4 Proficiency levels – Title  Behavior Statements – Summary  Proficiency Level Target – Responsibilities – Talent Accelerators – Compensation  Learning References  Development Statements  Coaching Tips  Writing Assistance – Interview Questions Classifications Job Function, Family, Level, Focus Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 23Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 23
  • 24. JOB MAPPING APPROACH 1. Organization/Industry/Direction 2. Job Functional Group: 3. Job Role (not title or position): Its what we’re paid to do – Key accountabilities – Key Responsibilities 4. Critical Competencies – Proficiencies = behavioural expectations – Map behaviours to Instructional Design and learning content outcomes – Behaviours can define learning measures – Behaviours can define syllabi if content doesn’t exist. Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 24Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 24
  • 25. SALES DIRECTOR JOB ROLE Competency Name Suggested Proficiency Level Weighting Products and Services 3 - Extensive experience Medium Business Markets 3 - Extensive experience Medium Business Acumen 3 - Extensive experience Medium Industry Knowledge 3 - Extensive experience MediumBusiness Planning: Tactical, Strategic 3 - Extensive experience Medium Oral Communications 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth HighIndividual Effective Presentations 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High Decision Making and Critical Thinking 3 - Extensive experience High Negotiating 3 - Extensive experience HighLeadership Influencing 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High Networking 3 - Extensive experience High Strategic Thinking 3 - Extensive experience High Leadership 3 - Extensive experience High Team Management and Team Building 3 - Extensive experience Medium Customer Service Management 3 - Extensive experience Medium MARKETING TASKS AND ACTIVITIES 3 - Extensive experience Medium MARKETING CHANNELS 2 - Working experience Medium SALES FUNCTION 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth HighFunctional Selling 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High Sales Forecasting 3 - Extensive experience Medium Cross-Selling 3 - Extensive experience MediumTechnical SALES TASKS AND ACTIVITIES 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High KNOWLEDGE OF CUSTOMERS 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High KNOWLEDGE OF SALES CHANNELS 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High KNOWLEDGE OF PRODUCT LINE 4 - Subject matter depth and breadth High Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 25Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 SALES SYSTEMS 3 - Extensive experience Medium 25
  • 26. COMPETENCY ARCHITECTURE Competency Innovation Definition Develops new ideas and initiatives that improve the organizations performance. Suggests better ways of completing own work. Level 1: Competency Basic Understanding Innovation Demonstrates the ability to generate ideas organically or in a brainstorming session. Supports innovations that are introduced by team leaders and managers. • provide a definition to assess the Develops new ideas and initiatives that improve the Seeks help to shape ideas into workable proposals for change. Definition knowledge, skills, and abilities the Seeks new or non-traditional ideas to improve effectiveness in own area of responsibility. organizations performance. incumbent is demonstrating. Participates in efforts to develop ideas generated by team members. Level 2: Working Experience Suggestsprovideways of completing own work. • better a consistent, common Seeks applicable new ideas and approaches. Surfaces ideas from other groups that have applicability to the team. language regarding the competency. Demonstrates the ability to generate ideas organically or Helps develop implementation plans for introducing innovations to the group. Level 1: in a brainstorming session. Encourages exploration of non-traditional ideas from team members. Seeks new or non-traditional ideas to improve effectiveness in teams area of responsibility. Basic Supports innovations that are introduced by team leaders Level 3: Extensive Fosters a team culture that encourages exploration of non-traditional ideas. Understanding and managers. Experience Guides team members in the development and fulfillment of proposed innovations. Seeks help to shape ideas into workable proposals for Develops change initiatives that target improvement of significant organizational capabilities. Implements strategies for renewing or deepening change efforts. change. Introduces new perspectives and information to the team in order to stimulate innovation and change. Level 4: Supports new ideas and technologies that produce competitive advantage. Subject Matter Shares best practices and benchmarks of excellence. Depth Provides ongoing sponsorship for innovation programs and change initiatives. and Mentors team to question established practices and propose innovations. Breadth ® Copyright Kenexa , 2012 26Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 Leads a continuous cycle of innovation that incorporates feedback to improve future initiatives. 26
  • 27. LEARNING- INNOVATION Learning Learning Reference Reference Learning Reference Name Description Activities On & Off Quality initiative Participate in the the job participation implementation of a significant quality initiative that includes process mapping, developing improvement strategies, negotiating tradeoffs and buy-in for resources, and developing follow-up measurements Activities On & Off Observe role models Observe and analyze the the job behavior of potential role models for change Activities On & Off Create benchmarks Benchmark other groups or the job external organizations to get new ideas for productive change Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 27Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 27
  • 28. DEVELOPMENT AND COACHING: INNOVATION Development Statement Devel. Statement Group Name Description Types Fostering Innovation Foster innovation by increasing R&D expenditures by 20% in the Quantitative next year. Prompting Innovative Thinking Attend industry-specific conferences on a quarterly basis, and look Qualitative for products of offerings that could be improved or expanded on as a way to jumpstart innovative thinking. Rewarding Innovation Offer a quarterly award to the most innovative employee, as Qualitative measured by the number or success of innovations. Coaching Tip Name Description Coaching Tip Type Looking for Alternative Solutions Look for alternative solutions to business problems, without initially Exploring|Planning evaluating feasibility or likelihood of success. Sharing Problems for Second Encourage your team to share problems with coworkers for second Promoting Opinions opinions. People not directly involved in the problem can provide ideas and points of view not previously explored. Out-of-the-Box Thinking For major projects, hold brainstorming meetings with your team that Exploring facilitate out-of-the-box thinking. Let employees bounce ideas off of each other without requiring an immediate solution. Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 28Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 28
  • 29. COMPETENCY IMPLEMENTATION:FOCUS ON IMPACT Recommended Approach 80% of the effort 20% of the effort Application Integration Launch & Long-Term Development Iteration Communication Implementation  Get the “big things Position as prototypes  Develop and use quickly and update over time. right”; “don’t dwell on for learning how to  Focus on buy-in and change management the small stuff”. change behaviors (vs. a processes.  Apply existing materials perfect output).  Make sure you get to the applications; don’t get and best practices in stuck in model development. developing a rapid draft  Focus on the overall architecture  Key success criteria and themes. Typical Approach 20% of the effort (if able to move out of 80% of the effort development stage)Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 29
  • 30. WHAT SHOULD I ASK TO TESTORGANIZATIONAL READINESS? Readiness Factor High=3 Medium=2 Low=1 What is the current level of commitment to competencies in your organization? How sophisticated are your managers and employees in using competencies? What is the current level of use for competencies in Talent Management and/or Operational Effectiveness? What is the level of perceived buy-in, ownership or validity required? What is the level of capability of your managers for coaching and performance development? How sophisticated is your organization in implementing significant changes? High Level of Readiness = 11-15 Medium Level of Readiness = 6-10Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 Low Level of Readiness = Less than 6 30
  • 31. AGENDA • Set the landscape • Discuss Challenges to Competency Management • Case Studies • Implementing Competency Models in Learning • Kenexa’s Components to a successful solution • QuestionsCopyright Kenexa®, ®, 2012 Copyright Kenexa 2011 3131
  • 32. ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL PROGRAM Technology Methodology Architecture Content Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 32Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 32
  • 33. THE KENEXA JOB PROFILE & COMPETENCY LIBRARY Job Competency Models 18 Industry Frameworks Kenexa Job Competency General Corporate Manufacturing Pharmaceutical models provide: job families, Functions (HR, Finance, Insurance SFIA job profiles with Legal, Sales) Healthcare Media/Publishing competencies critical to each Information Technology Education Retail role and the proficiency level Banking/Financial Energy Real Estate recommended for each CRM High Tech Software Construction competency Consulting High Tech Hardware Job Model Components Job Families (115+) Competencies (2,000+) Application Accelerators Business – 36 • Function or expertise Learning References Individual – 28 • 6 Job Bands for employees, Management – 22 Development Goals management and executive Leadership – 20 Coaching Tips matrices Performance Feedback Writing Assistants Functional/Technical – 1900 Interview Questions Jobs (2,500+) 4 Levels of Proficiency with 21 unique behavioral descriptors for action oriented • Job descriptions skill evaluation • Job profiles − Level 1: Basic understanding • Job responsibilities − Level 2: Working experience − Level 3: Extensive experience • Focus: tech, biz, prof, mgmt − Level 4: Subject matter depth/breadth • Compensation Market pricingCopyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 33
  • 34. IMPLEMENTATION METHODOLOGY Phase I Phase II Phase III Phase IV Phase V Project Model Results Planning & Customization Application Analysis & Maintenance Definition Actions •Communications • Steering Committee •Engage • Organization-wide •Integration w/ other Campaign • Working groups competencies reports TM efforts •Define roles and •Select and Edit •Apply to learning • Strategy for •Decisions re: care responsibilities management managing risk and feeding • Strategic Client version •Determine Scope of Framework • Continuous support and Objectives •Software evaluation Copyright Kenexa®, 2012 34Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 34
  • 35. COMPETENCY IMPLEMENTATION BEST PRACTICES Model Building • Ensure linkage between competencies and organization strategies • Keep models simple at launch • Add dimensional criteria and keep the momentum • Start with a library or Competency Framework Applications • Focus on assessment and development first, then evaluation and pay applications • Integrate of the competencies with all processes, even if tools aren’t • Ensure consistency of applications rather than allowing too many variations Change Management • Clarify and communicate specific objectives of your applications up front • Ensure top management and line management buy-in and ongoing support • Be focused in implementation (i.e., one function, one pilot group first) • Provide training and communication more consistently and carefully (building in training at all stages of implementation) • Develop and consistently apply a measurement system used to evaluate the effectiveness of implementation over timeCopyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 35
  • 36. COMPETENCY MANAGEMENT: DECEMBER 2013 • Knowing the skills and competencies your people have to run your business? • Unable to put the right people on the right project? Who does what in your organization? • Ensuring that your people receive development based on what they need to do their jobs, not just their ‘wish list’? • Unable to prove that you meet your regulatory compliance? External accreditation? • Wasting money on training or not getting the most out of your LMS? • At risk of losing key competencies? Knowing what they are? • Lack of employee and manager engagement in learning and development? • Lack of visibility of career development opportunities in your organization?Copyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 36
  • 37. QUESTIONS Gordon Ritchie phone: +1 781-851-8319 email: gordon.ritchie@kenexa.com Dawn Jaglowski phone: +1 407-548-0456 email: dawn.jaglowski@kenexa.com http://www.kenexa.com/Solutions/Compensation/JobBasedCompetenciesCopyright Kenexa®, 2011 2012 37