emotional intelligence

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  • I would take this with a large pinch of salt. Nobody would argue that emotional awareness is unimportant, but meta-analyses suggest that EQ is generally less important than IQ as a measure of job performance (see Carr, Positive Psychology (2011: 169). The concept of emotional INTELLIGENCE is also questionable, as the correlation with conventional IQ is low. Emotional awareness or ability would be a more accurate description.
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  • 1.
    • “ Anyone can be angry—that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way — that is not easy.”
  • 2. Emotional Intelligence
    • Emotional Intelligence is the ability of an individual to deal successfully with other people , to manage one’s self, motivate other people, understand one's own feelings and appropriately respond to the everyday environment
  • 3. Emotional Intelligence
    • In Working with Emotional Intelligence, author Daniel Goleman defines EI in the workplace as the ability of employees to recognise:
    • Their own feelings
    • The feelings of others
    • What motivates them
    • How to manage their emotions, both in themselves and in relationships with others
  • 4. Emotional Intelligence
    • Doesn't mean being soft – it means being intelligent about emotions – a different way of being smart.
    • Ability to acquire and apply knowledge from your emotions and the emotions of others.
  • 5. Importance
    • Emotional Intelligence is very important for managers.
    • E.Q. predicts higher work performance three times better than I.Q. Prediction range varies between 15 – 45%
    • Leadership is largely an emotional intelligence.
    • Two-thirds of workers say communication problems are the leading cause preventing them from doing their best work.
    • E.Q. is one of the best predictors of divorce and marital satisfaction
  • 6. CONTD..
    • EQ scores help predict:
    • Academic drop out
    • Ability to cope with severe medical condition
    • Aggression in the work place
    • Suicide attempts
    • Ability to recover from mental illness
  • 7. CONTD..
    • Over the past two decades, children have become more:
    • Depressed and lonely
    • Impulsive and disobedient
    • Nervous, prone to worry, and irritable
    • Prone to eating disorders
    • What are some possible causes?
    • Parents have less free-time with their children
    • Less relatives in children’s lives these days
    • Both parents often work
    • There is more TV watching and computer game playing
    • One learns EQ from a social life, which has been decreasing.
  • 8. EMOTIONS AND THEIR BLENDS
  • 9. Examples of Use Of Emotions:
    • She is too sensitive.
    • He takes everything too personally.
    • He is jealous of his colleagues.
    • My boss is always in a hostile mood.
    • She does not understand the feelings of others.
    • The HOD blurts things out without thinking of others.
    • Nobody understands/listens to me.
    • The management is way out of touch with employee’s emotions.
    • Why does it happen with me only in life.
    • I am always nice with the people around me.
    • The above statements refer to various emotions we experience in our day to day life.
  • 10. IQ v/s EQ (Intelligence Quotient v/s Emotional Quotient)
    • The research shows that IQ can help you to be successful to the extent of 20 percent only in life. The rest of 80 percent success depends on your EQ.
    80% EQ 20% IQ
  • 11. WHAT IS “SUCCESS”
    • Is it your IQ: Exams passed, competitions cleared, percentage of marks in schools and colleges,academic qualifications etc
    • Earning fat salary, top positions in workplace, being rich and wealthy, powerful,dominating, being influential etc
  • 12. OR SUCCESS IS SOMETHING ELSE
    • The word "success" is a relative term
    • Living a healthy and happy married life may be an indicator of success for some.
    • Reaching a top position in carrier may be an indicator of success for others
    • For some having a satisfying job life or personal satisfaction may be an indicator of success
    • Only the tangible achievements may not be indicators of success in life. Many a times non-tangible performance or achievements may be termed as successful.
  • 13. GETS YOU HIRED GETS YOU FIRED/PROMOTED THE PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS
  • 14. EQ IQ THE PERSONALITY The HEAD The HEART
  • 15. Characteristics of a High EQ Person
    • A time to wait and a time to watch,
    • A time to be aggressive and a time to be passive,
    • A time to be together and a time to be alone,
    • A time to fight and a time to love,
    • A time to work and a time to play,
    • A time to cry and a time to laugh,
    • A time to speak and a time to be silent,
    • A time to be patient and a time to decide.
  • 16. Characteristics of a low EQ Person
    • “ If only I had a different job … …”
    • “ If only I had finished graduation … …”
    • “ If only I had been handsome/beautiful …”
    • “ If only my spouse had stopped drinking …”
    • “ If only I had been born rich and famous…”
    • “ If only I had good contacts…”
    • “ If only I had better friends …”
    • “ If only I had married someone else …”
  • 17. TWO VIEW POINTS ABOUT EQ
    • Motivate us
    • Increase our
    • confidence
    • Speed our analysis
    • Build trust
    • Provide vital feedback
    • Must be managed
    • Distract us
    • Increase our
    • vulnerability
    • Cloud our judgment
    • Inhibit free flow of data
    • Must be controlled
    High performers say that emotions Traditionalists say that emotions
  • 18. How EQ succeeds IQ
    • Emotional Intelligence explains why in spite of equal intellectual capacity, educational background, training or experience some people excel while others of same caliber and high educational degree lag behind.
    • Emotional Intelligence is the dimension of intelligence responsible for our ability to manage ourselves and our relationship with others.
  • 19. High IQ High EQ
  • 20. Need
    • When Managers Fail, It is Usually Due To Poor Emotional Intelligence
    • By Freda Turner
  • 21. Bosses and leaders, in particular, need high EQ
  • 22. Leaders with empathy are able to understand their employees’ needs and provide them with constructive feedback, he says
  • 23. Why Emotional Intelligence is necessary for managers Helps managers handle adversity & setback Teaches managers cope when change & uncertainty hits organisation or their personal lives.
  • 24. Why Emotional Intelligence is necessary for managers Help them manage effective relationship. Help them being focused and stay on track by remembering purpose & vision.
  • 25. EQ & Managers
    • Interaction with Distinct Needs, Wants & Expectations.
    • Influence the attitudes, performance & satisfaction of employees.
    • Lower turnover and retention of company managers and supervisors.
  • 26. EQ is very important for managers as they are direct line of contact & their behaviour & treatment determines retention & turnover
  • 27. EQ & Managers
    • The stress of trying to lead and satisfy so many people's changing needs and expectations can be overwhelming, to say nothing of the demands from upper management. Being both firm and caring at the same time causes many to feel inadequate for the role..
    85 % percent of turnover is reportedly due to an inadequate relationship between the employee and their direct supervisor
  • 28. Enhancing EI skills enables Supervisors and Managers to regulate their emotions and motivate themselves more effectively – allowing them to manage their own emotional turmoil effectively and demonstrate compassion and empathy for their employees. EQ & Managers
  • 29. Upon graduating from college, Debra believed that if she worked hard, she would achieve her career success goals She racked up a list of accomplishments However, just two years into her career she was fired. Example to illustrate how EQ can positively or negatively impact one's career and the organization:
  • 30. Example to illustrate how EQ can positively or negatively impact one's career and the organization:
    • Debra Benton reports in her book, Lions Don't Need to Roar , "I was stunned ... college courses had not addressed the importance of people skills or being a team player. That lack of knowledge cost me my job." She thought work was all about producing results. While working with an outplacement firm, Debra met other high producers who had lost their jobs for the same reason.
    That lack of people management cost her job
  • 31. The number one-factor that sets high-powered professionals apart from the pack is a high level of emotional intelligence, compassion and energy to function in a team environment Debra soon learned that shooting stars have a short life cycle if they are unable to relate to and understand others.
  • 32. Reason for Failing
    • People derail because of classic emotional failings, not the lack of technical skills –Developing emotional intelligence can help companies generate productive & profitable outcome. The manager who knows how to stay motivated under stress , motivate others, navigate complex interpersonal relationships, inspire others and build teams who is an unchallenged expert on a product or service will get superior results
  • 33. Suppose that the morning of a big presentation you have a fight with any of your family member. Not a big argument—maybe just one of those unnerving spats about who forgot to pick up the dry cleaning—so your morning doesn’t get off on the right foot. Then you car is punctured upping your stress level a bit more. When you arrive at work, there’s a problem with the elevators, causing more delay. Arriving at the conference room for your presentation, you find that the sound system doesn’t work and the caterer hasn’t shown up with refreshments. Your junior associate—who was supposed to call the caterer—bears the brunt of your anger that has been building since you left the house. An Example of EQ
  • 34. Working with people means working with Emotions
    • Working at a common place, emotions will play a role.
    • Don’t bring your personal problems
  • 35. CONSEQUENCES Rage in the workplace Relationship Problems
  • 36. Poor decision making capability
  • 37. failure to advance in career
  • 38. ARE YOU EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT? OR YOU STILL THINK (not feel) THAT IQ MATTERS MORE THAN EQ
  • 39. Are we giving EQ education in schools /colleges
    • NO, More stress on IQ and not on EQ.
    • Not TAUGHT how to handle frustration, anxieties, stress, failure, depression, burnout, inferiority complexes, ego problems.
    • Not told how to manage emotions i.e.; interaction, coordination, Adjustment, communication.
    • We are expected to learn all these from our parents, peer group of other role models.
  • 40. CAN EQ BE DEVELOPED?
    • YES. You can develop your EQ by upgrading your emotional skills. The popular thinking that EQ is entirely inherited is incorrect. Emotional Intelligence is not fixed at birth. There is no emotional intelligence genes as such that we know of today. It is something one has learned.
  • 41. Children are not born with social skills; they must learn them. If children are not born with social and emotional skills… WHAT CAN EDUCATORS DO TO STIMULATE THESE SKILLS IN THE CHILDREN IN OUR SETTING?
  • 42. ADDING THE TOOLS TO THE TOOLBOX
    • CLEARCOMMUNICATION
    • EMPATHY
    • SELF AWARENESS
    • DECISION MAKING
    • PROBLEM SOLVING
    • SHARING
    • PATIENCE
    • LISTENING
    • CARING
    • GETTING ALONG WITH OTHERS
    • GENTLENESS
    • SELF MOTIVATION
    • SELF CONTROL
  • 43. EDUCATING THE HEART IS AS IMPORTANT AS EDUCATING THE MIND
    • EACH MORNING HAVE A COMMUNITY/FEELING CIRCLE-how do you feel and why?
    • READ STORIES TO EMPHASIZE THE TOOLS
    • TELL YOUR OWN STORIES TO ENHANCE THE TOOLS
    • CHILDREN ROLE PLAY CHARACTERS IN THE STORIES
    • USE MUSIC TO BUILD SELF-ESTEEM, ENHANCE EXPRESSION, STIMULATE LISTENING
  • 44. A study of 80 Ph.D.’s by EQ Consortium A study of 80 Ph.D.’s in science who underwent a battery of personality tests, IQ tests, and interviews in the 1950s when they were graduate students at Berkeley. Forty years later, when they were in their early seventies, they were tracked down and estimates were made of their success based on resumes, evaluations by experts in their own fields, and sources like American Men and Women of Science. It turned out that social and emotional abilities were four times more important than IQ in establishing professional success and prestige . (EQ CONSORTIUM)
  • 45. A STUDY OF INSURANCE SECTOR
    • In another research it has
    • been found that Insurance
    • salespersons who were
    • optimists
    • sold 37 percent more
    • insurance policies in
    • their first two years
    • than did
    • pessimists.
  • 46. A STUDY OF IAS OFFICERS
    • After studying 60 IAS officers of Assam Cadre it was found that 77 % of them fall in the category of Average EQ.
    • Only 15 % showed High EQ
    • (Prof NK Chadha, Psychology Dept, Delhi University)
  • 47. A STUDY OF STRESS AND BURNOUT
    • The managers High on EQ were low on ‘burnout’ implying that they can cope up better with stress.
    • (Prof NK Chadha, Psychology Dept, Delhi University)
  • 48. Do different professions require different Levels of EQ?
    • CLUSTER I: EXTREMELY HIGH
    • Artist, Insurance, Advertisement, Social Work
    • CLUSTER II: HIGH
    • Teaching, Legal, Tourism, Politics, Business/ Entrepreneurship, Police
    • CLUSTER III: AVERAGE
    • Judiciary, Administration, Information Technology, Medicine, Banking, Engineering, Accountancy, Nursing
    • (DALIP SINGH 2002)
  • 49. What is Training in EI Worth? Increases retention. Decreases absenteeism. Increases overall organizational growth. Could increase production as much as 20%
  • 50. If we knew nothing about a store except that employee attitudes had improved 5%, we could predict that its revenue would rise .5% above what it otherwise would have been. --Sears executive, Harvard Business Review, January, 1998
  • 51. A one-day seminar won’t do it. Unlearn old habits
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