Bridging The Communication Gap

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  • 1. Bridging the Communication Gap School wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports with the NNPS Model of Family and Community Partnership Programs
  • 2. Strength Based Ice Breaker
    • Partner with someone
    • Each person tells the other person what positive qualities and/or skills they possess
    • Take 2 minutes each
    • Introduce your partner to the group
  • 3. Map: NYS PBIS Regional Technical Assistance Teams, and Contact information 5/05 Chautauqua Cattaraugus Oneida Allegany Niagara Erie Steuben Wayne Monroe Genesee Orleans Chemung Yates Ontario Livingston Wyoming Tompkins Schuyler Delaware Broome Tioga Cortland Franklin St. Lawrence Lewis Madison Jefferson Oswego Onondaga Seneca Cayuga Clinton Essex Chenango Otsego Herk imer Rensselaer Washington Warren Hamilton Schenectady Montgomery Fulton Saratoga Columbia Greene Albany Schoharie New York City Dutchess Sullivan Ulster Rockland Putnam Orange Suffolk Westchester Nassau West Ann Adams (RPS) at Erie I BOCES 716-630-4277 Len Cherpak (PFC) at FTNYS 716-432-8784 Mid-West Andrea Jordan (RPS) at Genesee Valley BOCES 585-344-7574 Len Cherpak (PFC) at FTNYS 716-432-8784 East Joe Otter (RPS) at Capital Region BOCES 518-464-3974 Laurie Shutts (PFC) at FTNYS 518-578-8814 Hudson Valley Christine Downs (RPS) at Ulster BOCES 845-255-4874 (PFC) Central Linda Brown at Onondaga-Cortland-Madison BOCES 315-431-8586 Bob Ireland (PFC) at FTNYS 315-404-7085 New York City Margo Levy, Carolyn Buyse at NYC DOE 917-256-4272 or –4271 Long Island Karen Chung (RPS) at Western Suffolk BOCES 631-242-1128 Cheryl Williams (PFC) at FTNYS 631-761-3181 Key: RPS: Regional PBIS Specialist PFC: PBIS Family Coordinator FTNYS: Families Together in NYS, Inc.
  • 4. Objectives of Today’s Session
    • Understand NYS PBIS expectations for developing partnership programs; provide an overview of partnership model
    • Building on NYC’s strengths and resources, set a clear goal for partnership planning for NYC schools implementing PBIS
    • Learn one approach to designing a comprehensive district program to meet specific goals
    • Dialog and create action plan for implementation in NYC for next academic year 2005/2006
  • 5. Families Together in NYS is the statewide chapter for the national organization, Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health and an organizational member of the National Network of Partnership Schools. Our Mission In NYS PBIS Initiative: To ensure that every family has access to information, support, and services to be able to guide their children toward academic and behavioral success.
  • 6. PBIS Collaboration
    • New York State Education Department -
    • Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities
    • Office of Elementary, Middle, Secondary, and Continuing Education
    • New York State Office of Mental Health
    • Families Together in New York State, Inc .
    NYS VESID Topical Training, 2/18/04
  • 7. PARTNERSHIPS: THEN and NOW
  • 8.
    • THEN
    • Parent, family
    • involvement
    NOW School, family, and community partnerships DEFINITION Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 9.
    • THEN
    • Up to parents
    • Organized by one person or just a few
    NOW Part of school and classroom organization Organized by PBIS Universal teams linked to school improvement goals RESPONSIBILITY Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 10.
    • THEN
    • Incidental or accidental
    • Off to the side
    NOW School Wide-PBIS plus the NNPS framework of 6 types of involvement Goal-oriented Part of comprehensive school improvement plan and linked to school mission PROGRAM DESIGN Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 11.
    • THEN
    • Pre-K, K, or elementary
    NOW All grade levels through high school IMPLEMENTATION Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 12.
    • THEN
    • Parent outcomes
    • Public relations
    • Focus on a few parent leaders
    NOW Student achievement & success in school Link practices to results for all students, parents, teachers, community RESULTS Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 13.
    • THEN
    • Success stories shared locally, if at all
    NOW Success stories shared nationally to benefit all RESULTS Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 14. LOOK TO THE FUTURE Our Work Is Crucial in our Schools We Can Develop High Quality and Goal-Oriented Partnership Programs in Schools Implementing SW-PBIS All Focused On Student Success Adapted from Epstein, J. L. (2004). Partnerships Then and Now. Presentation at the National Network of Partnership Schools Leadership Development Conference. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, March 12.
  • 15. What Do We Know?
    • Parents vary in how much they presently are involved.
    • Parents are most concerned about their children’s success in school.
    • Students need multiple sources of support to succeed in school and in their communities.
    • Teachers and administrators are initially hesitant to increasing family involvement.
    • Teachers and administrators need inservice, preservice, and advanced education on partnerships.
    • Schools must reach out in order to involve all families.
    Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • 16. What does NNPS research say about PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT?
    • Programs and practices of partnership make a difference.
    • Subject-specific practices assist students’ learning.
    • Teachers who use practices of partnership are more likely to report that all parents can help their children.
    • Programs will be most useful to schools and to families if they are customized, comprehensive, and continually improved to help meet important goals for students.
    Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • 17. Designing School-Wide Support Systems for Student Success 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90% Academic Systems Behavioral Systems
    • Intensive, Individual Interventions
    • Individual Students
    • Assessment-based
    • High Intensity
    • Intensive, Individual Interventions
    • Individual Students
    • Assessment-based
    • Intense, durable procedures
    • Targeted Group Interventions
    • Some students (at-risk)
    • High efficiency
    • Rapid response
    • Targeted Group Interventions
    • Some students (at-risk)
    • High efficiency
    • Rapid response
    • Universal Interventions
    • All students
    • Preventive, proactive
    • Universal Interventions
    • All settings, all students
    • Preventive, proactive
  • 18. Focus on Results: Connecting school, family, and community partnership activities to student outcomes
    • Attendance
    • Math Achievement
    • Student Behavior
    • Reading and Languages Arts Achievement
  • 19. Theoretical Model OVERLAPPING SPHERES OF INFLUENCE OF FAMILY, SCHOOL, AND COMMUNITY ON CHILDREN’S LEARNING Force B Experience, Philosophy, Practices of Family Force C Experience, Philosophy, Practices of School Force D Experience, Philosophy, Practices of Community Force A Time/Age/Grade Level Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Coates, L., Salinas, K.C., Sanders, M. G., & Simon, B. S. (1997). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. See Handbook, page 73, for the internal structure of this model.
  • 20. Goal-Oriented Partnerships School-Wide PBIS Universal Team School Improvement Plan and School Mission Goal 1 Bóklegur Goal 2 Bóklegur Goal 3 Hegðunar- Goal 4 Climate Family & Community Involvement Activities 1. 2. 3. 4. Family & Community Involvement Activities 1. 2. 3. 4. Family & Community Involvement Activities 1. 2. 3. 4. Family & Community Involvement Activities 1. 2. 3. 4. Creates an action plan for for School, Family, and Community Partnerships and SW-PBIS
  • 21. SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Decision Making Supporting Student Behavior Three Components of PBIS
  • 22. Six Components of PBIS
    • Select and define behavioral expectations
    • Teach behaviors directly (in all settings)
    • Actively monitor behavior
    • Acknowledge appropriate behavior
    • Use data to make decisions
    • Correct behavioral errors
  • 23. SCHOOL-FAMILY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS SIX TYPES OF Practices PARENTING COMMUNICATING VOLUNTEERING LEARNING AT HOME DECISION MAKING COLLABORATING WITH COMMUNITY Type 1 Type 2 Type 6 Type 5 Type 4 Type 3
  • 24.
    • Assist families with parenting and child-rearing skills, understanding child and adolescent development, and setting home conditions that support children as students at each age and grade level. Assist schools in understanding families, family resiliency and family development.
    PARENTING Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Type 1
  • 25.
    • Communicate with families about PBIS kick offs, training events, team meetings, activities and individual student progress through effective school-to-home and home-to-school communications.
    COMMUNICATING Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Type 2
  • 26.
    • Improve recruitment, training, work, and schedules to involve families and community members as volunteers and audiences at school or in other locations to support students and school wide PBIS programs at all levels.
    VOLUNTEERING Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Type 3
  • 27.
    • Involve families with their children in learning activities at home, including homework and other curriculum-related activities and decisions. Family liasons creating PBIS home matrix using school wide expectations.
    LEARNING AT HOME Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Type 4
  • 28.
    • Include families and community members as participants in school wide PBIS teams in decision making, planning, implementation and evaluation processes. This can include PTA/PTO, school councils, committees, action teams, and other family support resources and family liasons. Must be reflective of school’s ethnicity and culture.
    DECISION MAKING Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Type 5
  • 29.
    • Coordinate resources and services for students, families, and the school with businesses, agencies, and other groups, and provide services to the community. Invite college interns and art community to be on PBIS planning teams.
    COLLABORATING WITH COMMUNITY Reprinted with permission: Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action (Second Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Type 6
  • 30. Goal: to identify strengths, to ensure inclusion of the current NYC partnership programs and activities across the PBIS continuum and the 6 types of partnership activities Group Activity
  • 31.
    • Questions and Answers
  • 32.
    • Evaluation