Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Public Relations (PR) Measurement
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Public Relations (PR) Measurement

8,692
views

Published on

A presentation by Hugh Anderson of Forth Metrics on public relations measurement - what has changed, the implications of digital and social media, a new framework, tools and resources. Presented as …

A presentation by Hugh Anderson of Forth Metrics on public relations measurement - what has changed, the implications of digital and social media, a new framework, tools and resources. Presented as part of the CIPR '

Published in: Business

1 Comment
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
8,692
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
175
Comments
1
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. CIPR Social in the City #sitc, 25 October 2012PR MeasurementHugh AndersonForth Metrics
    • 2. Agenda• Why measure?• Our changing world• Old-school metrics• What’s wrong with AVE’s?• New metrics & framework• Tools & resources• Conclusion
    • 3. Why Measure?• Institute for Public Relations (IPR) paper, 1999 (Katie Payne, James Grunig et al) Measurable objectives in public relations do two things: 1. They facilitate and support business objectives, thus demonstrating that PR activities support the business or performance goals and are thereby “strategic”. 2. They enable PR practitioners to show they have achieved what they set out to achieve, and thereby demonstrate accountability.
    • 4. Why Measure? • Public Relations Society of America (PRSA)Without appropriate measurement, you can’ttruly gauge success, focus resources on whatworks, adjust plans if they don’t work, getmore budget or engage executives. It will be difficult for PR to get a larger share of the total communications expenditure without quantitative means that go well beyond measurement of media outputs.
    • 5. Why Measure?• CIPR, PR2020 report : “The Future of Public Relations”, key recommendation #4 There is a need for clearer thinking and guidance on measurement and evaluation.
    • 6. Why Measure? • to your Client• To Prove VALUE • to your Manager • to your Board • Share of Budget (own & client) • Delivery against objectives • To learn and improve
    • 7. And yet ... • It doesn’t come naturally IPRA South % members USA Australia AfricaEvaluation recognised as necessary 89 76 90 89 Frequently undertake evaluation 19 16 14 25• IPRA (International PR Association) study, 1994
    • 8. Why? (the myths)• Too expensive• Too labour intensive• Lack of knowledge• Lack of standards/methodology• Lack of demand• Simply not a core skill
    • 9. The changing world: from this ...• Traditional “paid” media• Media relations• Journalists• Press clippings• Control of the message and who distributes it
    • 10. The changing world: to this ...• Digital media• Social media• Mobile• Bloggers, influencers• NO control of the message and who distributes it
    • 11. The changingworld:consumerconsumption
    • 12. The changing world:new media models Source: previewnetworks.com
    • 13. Old-school metrics • There are lots ... potential viewershipopportunities to see (OTS) # of cuttings/clips article count single column centimeters (scc)gross rating points (GRP’s) column inches # of impressions broadcast run-time • And, of course : AVE’s
    • 14. Old-school metrics• The consequences : • No comparability • No consistency • Confusion • Lack of tangible value
    • 15. AVE’s : definition• Advertising Value Equivalency (AVE) is what your editorial coverage would cost if it were advertising space (or time).• To calculate the AVE for one month, measure the space (column inches) occupied by a clip (for radio and television coverage, you measure time). Then multiply the column inches (time) by the ad rate for that page (time slot).
    • 16. What’s wrong with AVE’s• Not real value (cost)• PR is not Advertising• Not applicable in new world media• Encourage wrong behaviours• Can be manipulated• Inconsistent• Industry denounced
    • 17. But in the real world ...• Clients still want AVE’s• There’s nothing better out there= old world mentality that is limiting progress• There is no silver bullet• Real, tangible ROI is challenging, BUT• There are new frameworks and metrics
    • 18. New principles 1• A Three Tiered Approach From To To Programme Programme Business Outputs Outcomes Outcomes
    • 19. New principles 2
    • 20. New framework • The Barcelona Principles:• 1. Importance of goal setting and measurement• 2. Measuring the effect on outcomes is preferred to measuring outputs• 3. The effect on business results can and should be measured where possible• 4. Media measurement requires quantity and quality• 5. AVEs are not the value of public relations• 6. Social media can and should be measured• 7. Transparency and replicability are paramount to sound measurement.
    • 21. New framework • Valid Metrics:
    • 22. New framework • Valid Metrics example:
    • 23. New metrics in practice• Programme outputs audience reach, level of engagement (likes, shares, retweets, etc)• Programme outcomes number of visitors, downloads, views, calls, event attendance, etc• Business outcomes actual sales, market share, cost savings, leads generated, etc
    • 24. Social media metrics Metric Use vs. Usefulness 45% Increase in foot traffic Increase in revenue/sales 39% # of new customers (mentioning social media)Usefulness(% rated 5) Increased traffic to website 33% # of conversions # of comments/ # of posts compared # of comments/ LIkes to competitors posts mentioning org. 26% # of shares/ retweets Secondary audience Avg. # of size interactions w/ 20% follower 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Current Use • Source: Vocus study of social media and SME’s
    • 25. But remember ...• The difference between monitoring (the buzz/chatter/conversation) and measuring.• Get beyond clip counts and audience impressions (CPM, print circulation, etc.)• Don’t get fixated on one metric or ROI.• Qualitative analysis is still valid (awareness, opinion, attitude, brand preference, purchase intent, advocacy, perceptions, reputation, etc.)
    • 26. More help on the way• Coalition for PR Research Standards• Mission: to provide a broad platform of standards for research and measurement• 2012 Deliverables: • Social media measurement • Traditional media analysis • Ethical standards for research • Return on investment • Communications lifecycle
    • 27. More help on the way• Coalition for PR Research Standards• Mission: to provide a broad platform of standards for research and measurement• 2012 Deliverables: • Social media measurement • Traditional media analysis • Ethical standards for research • Return on investment • Communications lifecycle
    • 28. Tools 1Monitoring/Listening • Challenge = so what?
    • 29. Tools 2Own site(s)• Google Analytics is your friend: • Visitor data (new, returning, sources, etc) • Engagement data (time on site, pages per visit, etc) • Outcome data (via Goals: videos watched, ebooks downloaded, sales made) • + lots more (including social sources, multi-channel funnels, keywords)• Similar with Facebook Insights
    • 30. Tools 3: Inkybee
    • 31. Tools 4: Bigger Budget
    • 32. Resources 1• AMEC Valid Metrics http://amecorg.com/downloads/dublin2012/Valid-Metrics- Framework-Mike-Daniels.pdf• CIPR measurement toolkit http://www.cipr.co.uk/content/policy-resources/for-practitioners/ research-planning-and-measurement/toolkit• Hotwire PR eBook http://hotwirepr.com/knowledge• Katie Paine measurement blog http://kdpaine.blogs.com/• Forth Metrics blog http://blog.forthmetrics.com/2012/08/10/setting-objectives-for- blogger-outreach/
    • 33. Resources 2• IPR measurement commission http://www.instituteforpr.org/research/commissions/measurement/• Google Analytics ‘how-to’ http://mashable.com/2012/01/04/google-analytics-guide/• Facebook Insights ‘how-to’ http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/29064/Facebook- Launches-Revamped-Insights-Tool-for-Business-Pages.aspx• AMEC http://amecorg.com/• IAB social media measurement framework http://www.iabuk.net/sites/default/files/research-docs/IAB %20measurement%20framework%20for%20social %20media_FINAL4_0.pdf
    • 34. Resources 3• Coalition to establish standards for PR research and measurement http://www.instituteforpr.org/topics/reaching-a-consensus- standards-for-public-relations-research-and-measurement/• CIPR “4 Steps to Unlocking Online Success” conference, 30 January 2013 http://ciprscotland.wordpress.com/conference-scotland-unlocking- online-success/• Vocus study of social media and SME’s (http://www.slideshare.net/Vocus/vocus-study-of-sm-bs-and-social- media-final)• PRSA/Tim Marklein presentation http://www.slideshare.net/tmarklein/best-practices-new-ideas-in-pr- measurement
    • 35. Conclusions• Measurement is important• Try to consign AVE’s to the bin!• It can be affordable using simple, low cost tools• Digital media opens up opportunities and makes it easier• Try to get beyond monitoring to actual measuring of outcomes• It’s going to get easier, better, more standardised and more consistent
    • 36. Thank You! Hugh Anderson hugh@forthmetrics.com @hughforthblog.forthmetrics.com www.inkybee.com