Getting Started with Rounds
http://bit.ly/1fbGFnb
Three Big Ideas of a PLC
Essential Characteristics of a PLC
Mission, Vision,
Values, Goals
Collective
Inquiry
Continuous
Improvement
Collaborative
...
Why Instructional Rounds?
http://bit.ly/19gWRyy
Why Instructional Rounds?
“You can’t change learning and
performance at scale without creating
a strong, visible, transpar...
Why Instructional Rounds?
Professional Learning Should Be:
 Job embedded
 On-going
 Collaborative
 Collective inquiry
Big Idea #1 - Everyone
Everyone involved is working
on their practice1
Big Idea #2 – The Core
Focus is the instructional core
2
Big Idea #3 - Improvement
Goal is to improve practice
over time3
Big Idea #4 – Know Thy Impact
Develop shared practices and a
shared understanding of the
cause-and-effect relationship
bet...
The Instructional Core
http://bit.ly/18CGv14
The Instructional Core
Improvement can occur through
changes in the relationship of
students and teachers in the
presence ...
Steps of the Rounds Process
1. Identifying a problem of practice
2. Observing in small groups
3. Debriefing as a group
4. ...
The Problem of Practice
A problem of practice is a statement
that describes the instructional
problem that a school is str...
Observing
Use the ESMS observation protocol
Focus on our school’s identified
problems of practice. Look for
alignment with...
Describe
Describe what you saw using
specific, nonjudgmental language.
Analyze
Look for patterns across classrooms,
giving names to categories and
patterns.
Predict
In light of your group’s evidence,
predict what students are learning.
Predict
What should the school do or learn
next? What should the observers
do or learn next?
Avoiding “Scrub-like” Rounds
http://bit.ly/18CGv14
Small Group Observations
Observation Norms
 20 minute observation
 Refrain from talking to teachers in class
 Fine to ask students questions if ...
Observation Reminders
 Describe what you see.
 What is the task?
 What are students saying or doing?
Observation Reminders
 Be specific – pay attention to the
instructional core (teacher, student,
content) and the evidence...
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Instructional Rounds Training

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Instructional rounds at Excelsior Springs Middle School will take place on two levels this year. First, rounds will be an important part of small group reflection, where a team of teachers who share a common planning hour observe two classrooms a month. In this format teachers will look for descriptive evidence and avoid subjective speculation about practice. Small groups will use our faculty protocol form and will also look for evidence in support of NEE indicators 1.2, 4.1, 5.1, and 7.4. Second, rounds will be used by department chairs as a school-wide strategy to identify problems of practice. As defined by Roberts (2012), "a problem of practice is a statement that describes the instructional problem that a school is struggling with and that serves as a focus for classroom observations" (pg. 4). Department chairs will conduct rounds twice this year (once each semester) to support our progress toward our building goals. The purpose of this practice is not evaluative, this practice will report broad trends for staff reflection from a school-wide perspective; no individual teacher data will be reported.

References:

City, E. A., Elmore, R. F., Fiarman, S. E., & Teitel, L. (2009). Instructional rounds in education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Roberts, J. E. (2012). Instructional Rounds in Action. Harvard Education Press. 8 Story Street First Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138.

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Instructional Rounds Training

  1. 1. Getting Started with Rounds http://bit.ly/1fbGFnb
  2. 2. Three Big Ideas of a PLC
  3. 3. Essential Characteristics of a PLC Mission, Vision, Values, Goals Collective Inquiry Continuous Improvement Collaborative Teams Action Orientation Results Orientation
  4. 4. Why Instructional Rounds? http://bit.ly/19gWRyy
  5. 5. Why Instructional Rounds? “You can’t change learning and performance at scale without creating a strong, visible, transparent, common culture of instructional practice.” (City et. al, 2009)
  6. 6. Why Instructional Rounds? Professional Learning Should Be:  Job embedded  On-going  Collaborative  Collective inquiry
  7. 7. Big Idea #1 - Everyone Everyone involved is working on their practice1
  8. 8. Big Idea #2 – The Core Focus is the instructional core 2
  9. 9. Big Idea #3 - Improvement Goal is to improve practice over time3
  10. 10. Big Idea #4 – Know Thy Impact Develop shared practices and a shared understanding of the cause-and-effect relationship between teaching and learning 4
  11. 11. The Instructional Core http://bit.ly/18CGv14
  12. 12. The Instructional Core Improvement can occur through changes in the relationship of students and teachers in the presence of content. Student Teacher Content
  13. 13. Steps of the Rounds Process 1. Identifying a problem of practice 2. Observing in small groups 3. Debriefing as a group 4. Focusing on the next level of work
  14. 14. The Problem of Practice A problem of practice is a statement that describes the instructional problem that a school is struggling with and that serves as a focus for classroom observations.
  15. 15. Observing Use the ESMS observation protocol Focus on our school’s identified problems of practice. Look for alignment with the four district NEE indicators.
  16. 16. Describe Describe what you saw using specific, nonjudgmental language.
  17. 17. Analyze Look for patterns across classrooms, giving names to categories and patterns.
  18. 18. Predict In light of your group’s evidence, predict what students are learning.
  19. 19. Predict What should the school do or learn next? What should the observers do or learn next?
  20. 20. Avoiding “Scrub-like” Rounds http://bit.ly/18CGv14
  21. 21. Small Group Observations
  22. 22. Observation Norms  20 minute observation  Refrain from talking to teachers in class  Fine to ask students questions if it seems appropriate
  23. 23. Observation Reminders  Describe what you see.  What is the task?  What are students saying or doing?
  24. 24. Observation Reminders  Be specific – pay attention to the instructional core (teacher, student, content) and the evidence related to the problem of practice.
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