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Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012
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Library Handout for CHEM - Fall 2012

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  • 1. Chemistry 111 : Exercise 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE• Read each section of the assignment and the questions. Then use the guide to help find the answers.• If you have problems please ask at the Evans Library Ask Us Desk, Chat with us at http://guides.library.tamu.edu/AskTheLibraries, or call 979-845-5741
  • 2. Part 1. Finding Technical Books and Government Documents Using LibCat1.1 Use LibCat to find a book or government document on your assignedpollutant. Write the title of the publication in Part 1.1. If there are toomany items listed, narrow the subject or keyword search with terms likepollution or environment. The truncation symbol ? can be used to helpbroaden the search.Example search: Keyword = benzene AND pollut?LibCat searches generally rank results in a relevancy order; use the pull-down menu to change to a ranking by date to examine recent works.
  • 3. Part 1. Finding Technical Books and Government Documents Using LibCat1.2 Obtain a Location Guide from the Evans Library Ask Us Desk orother service desk. Look for your book or document in the library, andcircle its location on the Location Guide to show where you found theitem.Example: QD’s on 4th floor, or government documents on the5th floor of the Sterling C. Evans Library Annex.Attach the Location Guide and a print out of the LibCat record for theitem to the Data Reduction and Analysis worksheet. If the item iselectronic and if there is no call number associated with theitem then choose another publication.1.3 Use the LibCat record for the publication recorded in part 1.1 toanswer the following questions on the worksheet form: Was the itemchecked out, or on the shelf? What is the call number? What isthe format?
  • 4. Part 1. Finding Technical Books and Government Documents Using LibCat Questions for Part 1Part 1.1 Name of PublicationPart 1.2 Attach copy of the LibCat recordPart 1.3 Was the item checked out, or on the shelf? What is the call number?Format—Circle the correct format(s): Print Electronic Microform/Microfiche
  • 5. Library Module 1: Technical Books and Government Documents
  • 6. Library Module 1: Technical Books and Government Documents
  • 7. Library Module 1: Technical Books and Government Documents
  • 8. Library Module 1: Technical Books and Government Documents
  • 9. Library Module 1: Technical Books and Government Documents LibCat Record for an Individual Item
  • 10. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal LiteratureFor this exercise, you will be using one or more of the major databasesoften used by undergraduates. These databases allow you to quicklylocate articles on a topic. Using a database is much quicker thansearching individual journals.When communicating with other professionals, you need to give them allthe information they will need to find the article for themselves. Propercitation form becomes important. The following exercises will show youthe way to arrange the information that identifies the book or journalarticle in proper citation form.
  • 11. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature2.1 Use Web of Science, Environmental Sciences & Pollution Management, or Academic Search Complete to find a scientific article published in the last five years on your assigned pollutant. Please note that you can limit by date in these databases. You can also limit by type of material: book, articles, and conference proceedings. You will limit your search to articles.Example keyword search: benzene and pollut* (notice that for this database thetruncation symbol has changed to an *.)Print the first page of the article, if the full text is available online. If not, print thecitation, with abstract if available, from the database. Attach your printout to theback of this page. If the library does not subscribe to the online version of thejournal, use LibCat to determine if the print version of the article is available oncampus. Be sure to verify that the library owns the particular volume by looking atthe list of volumes found at the bottom of the LibCat record. If the UniversityLibraries subscribe to the journal, list the call number.2.2 Provide the bibliographic citation you would need to cite the article in a paper—journal articles should be cited using the following format: Authors separated by semicolons, Article Title, Journal name in italics, Year in bold, Volume in italics, Page numbers.Example: E. J. Mawk; M. Hyman; M. W. Rowe. Re-examination of Ancient DNA inTexas Rock Paintings. Journal of Archaeological Science 2002, 29, 301-306.
  • 12. Part 2. Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature Questions for Part 2Part 2.1 Attach the first page of your article and list call numberPart 2.2 Write the bibliographic citation
  • 13. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 14. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 15. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 16. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 17. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 18. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 19. Library Module 2: Tools for Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  • 20. Part 3. Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM3.1 Using ChemIDplus or IRIS, find the CAS RN (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number) and molecular formula for the assigned pollutant.3.2 Use ChemIDplus to find two other names for the assigned pollutant, including the systematic name.3.3 Use IRIS, ChemIDplus, or other sources identified in this assignment to determine where this compound or element primarily occurs as a pollutant. Examples: air, water, food, etc.3.4 Does ChemIDplus include a table of toxicity values for your pollutant?3.5 Use any source, including the EPA site (http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/lterms.html), to find brief definitions for the following terms used in toxicity studies and regulations; LD, LD50, LC, LC50, LOAEL.
  • 21. Part 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM Questions for Part 3Part 3.1 What is the CAS RN and molecular formula for your pollutant?Part 3.2 Two other names and the systemic name of the pollutant?Part 3.3 Where does pollutant occur?Part 3.4 Does your pollutant have a toxicity table?Part 3.5 Provide definitions: a. LD b. LD50 c. LC d. LC50 e. LOAEL
  • 22. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM
  • 23. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM
  • 24. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM
  • 25. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM Iris Search Screen
  • 26. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM
  • 27. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM ChemIDplus Record
  • 28. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM Exercise 3.5
  • 29. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM Exercise 3.5
  • 30. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM Exercise 3.5
  • 31. Library Module 3: Governmental Information Sources: EPA and NLM Exercise 3.5
  • 32. Library Module 4: Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks4.1 Use ChemNetBase, the Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology or the Knovel Database to find information on your pollutant, including melting point, boiling point, and uses.4.2 Identify the sources (substances) used to manufacture this chemical.4.3 If the pollutant is naturally occurring, where is it found?
  • 33. Library Module 4: Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks Questions for Part 4Part 4.1 Melting point, boiling point, and usesPart 4.2 Substances required for manufacturePart 4.3 Where it is found in nature (if naturally occurring)
  • 34. Library Module 4: Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  • 35. Library Module 4: Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  • 36. Library Module 4: Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  • 37. Library Module 4: Finding Information in Chemical HandbooksCombined Chemical Dictionary Substance Information for Benzene
  • 38. Part 5. Database for Locating Superfund Sites in Texas by County: TCEQ Using this website, http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/remediation/superfund/sites/county/index.html, complete the following for one Superfund site located in the county where you are from. (Example: Dallas, Houston, Navarro, etc.) If your county isn’t listed, then select a neighboring county that is more populated or industrialized.Superfund Site NameLocationStatusTypes of FacilitiesCategoryLast Date UpdatedMedia AffectedLatitudeLongitudeHazard Ranking Score (HRS)Contaminants at Time of HRSTCEQ RegionLegislative District
  • 39. Library Module 5: TCEQ
  • 40. Library Module 5: TCEQ
  • 41. Library Module 5: TCEQ
  • 42. Part 6. Learning How This Pollutant Affects or Might be Handled by Professionals in Your Major Area of Study6.1 Use the Subject Guides link on the university libraries homepage to find the subject guide for your major or a related field (http://guides.library.tamu.edu/). Select one of the databases listed. Identify the name of the subject guide, the name of the database, and your major.6.2 Find an article in the database that addresses how professionals in your chosen field deal with or are affected by the pollutant, or if the particular pollutant isn’t listed, by pollution in general. A business major, for example, might search a business database to find an article on the financial impact of pollution abatement for the chemical. A liberal arts major could use newspaper databases to determine how the media has covered pollution caused by the chemical. Consider terms such as public health, occupational exposure, and risk to workers. Write a short summary of your findings and provide the citation to the article. Write no more than half a page. If you do not find material in 20 minutes, then please ask for help. Include the citation.
  • 43. Part 6. Learning How This Pollutant Affects or Might be Handled by Professionals in Your Major Area of Study Questions for Part 6Part 6.1 Name of the subject guide Name of the database MajorPart 6.2 Attach the article summary (typed) with the appropriate citation.
  • 44. Library Module 6: Pollution and Your Chosen Profession
  • 45. Library Module 6: Pollution and Your Chosen Profession
  • 46. Library Module 6: Pollution and Your Chosen Profession
  • 47. Library Module 6: Pollution and Your Chosen Profession
  • 48. Library Module 6: Pollution and Your Chosen Profession
  • 49. Library Module 6: Pollution and Your Chosen Profession

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