Chem111 summer 2014_07212014_final

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Chem111 summer 2014_07212014_final

  1. 1. Chemistry 111: Exercise 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE • Read each section of the assignment and the questions. Then use the guide to help find the answers. • If you have problems please ask at the Evans Library Ask Us Desk, Chat with us at http://guides.library.tamu.edu/askus or call 979-845-5741
  2. 2. Use the University Libraries’ online catalog, LibCat, to find a book or government document on your assigned pollutant. Example keyword search: Methyl bromide AND pollut? The question mark after the word “pollut” is a truncation symbol. Using a truncation symbol will broaden the search and retrieve related terms. For example, using pollut? will retrieve results that include the pollution, polluting, pollutant, etc. LibCat search results are initially ranked according to relevancy. To see the most recent items, use the pull-down menu to change from “Rank” to “Publish Date (beginning with the most recent).” Finding Books and Government Documents Using LibCat
  3. 3. Finding Books and Government Documents Using LibCat 1. Go to the Libraries’ homepage: library.tamu.edu Then click the LibCat link.
  4. 4. Finding Books and Government Documents Using LibCat 2. Enter your search terms. Use the truncation symbol ? to include words that start with “pollut”, such as pollution, polluting, pollutant, etc. 3. Click Search
  5. 5. Finding Books and Government Documents Using LibCat 4. Change “Sort By” from “Rank” to “Publish Date (beginning with the most recent)” 5. Click on the title of the item to see the record.
  6. 6. Finding Books and Government Documents Using LibCat LibCat Record for an Individual Item NOTE: This government document is only available online. See next slide for an example of a government document available in microfiche with location information. 6. Note Location and Call Number
  7. 7. NOTE: This government document is available in microfiche. Print books and government documents also indicate the location, link to a floorplan/map, and indicate its status (i.e., whether it’s checked out or not). 8. Note Location, Call Number, and Status 7. Click the link to see the floor/location in the library Finding Books and Government Documents Using LibCat LibCat Record for an Individual Item
  8. 8. Searching the Professional Journal Literature For this exercise, you will be using one of the major databases often used to search the professional journal literature. Using a database is more efficient and faster than searching individual journals for a given topic. When communicating with other professionals, you need to provide all the information they need so others can find the article for themselves. Below is the proper citation format for a journal article using the ACS Style Guide. Authors separated by semicolons, Article Title, Journal Name in Italics, Year in Bold, Volume in Italics, and Page Numbers. Example: E. J. Mawk; M. Hyman; M. W. Rowe. Re-examination of Ancient DNA in Texas Rock Paintings. Journal of Archaeological Science 2002, 29, 301-306.
  9. 9. 1. Go to the Libraries’ homepage: library.tamu.edu Then click the Databases tab. 2. Enter the name of the database you want to search 3. Click Search Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  10. 10. 4. If off-campus, you may be asked to authenticate using your NetID and password. Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  11. 11. 5. Click on the name or “View Online” to access the database Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  12. 12. 6. Enter your search terms(s) using an “and” between terms and an “*” as a truncation symbol where appropriate. Using pollut* will retrieve pollutant, polluted, etc. If your pollutant is composed of two or more words, place them in quotes. 7. Limit by publication date range 8. Limit the search to just the Science Citation Index. This will help focus the search to science journal articles 9. Click Search Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  13. 13. 10. Limit “Document Types” to Article and click Refine Searching the Professional Journal Literature 10. Check “Article” under Document Types and click Refine.
  14. 14. 10. Limit “Document Types” to Article and click Refine Searching the Professional Journal Literature 11. Review the results to find the article listed in your assignment. To see the details, click on the article title to open the full record. NOTE: Your article may not be on the first page of results.
  15. 15. 12. Full record showing the citation information for the article. Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  16. 16. 13. This article is available online. Click the link to access the article 14. If the article is not available online, click the LibCat link to see if we have it in print and obtain the call number. Searching the Professional Journal Literature
  17. 17. Governmental Information Sources In this section, use ChemIDplus to locate the CASRN*, synonyms, molecular formula, and toxicity data for your pollutant. Use any source, including EPA sites (http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/lterms.html) to find brief definitions for the following terms used in toxicity studies and regulations: LD, LD50, LC, LC50, and LOAEL. * A Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CASRN) is a unique numerical identifier assigned to each substance reported in the chemical literature. A number of databases can be searched using the CASRN, which is very useful since many chemical substances have numerous common and systematic names.
  18. 18. 1. Go to the Libraries’ homepage: library.tamu.edu Then click the Databases tab. 2. Enter the name of the database you want to search 3. Click Search Governmental Information Sources: ChemIDplus
  19. 19. 4. Click on the name or “View Online” to access the database Governmental Information Sources: ChemIDplus
  20. 20. 5. Enter your pollutant as the search term. Then click Search. Governmental Information Sources: ChemIDplus
  21. 21. 7. Click the Names & Synonyms tab to see alternatives names for your pollutant. 8. Click the Toxicity tab to see the toxicity table. NOTE: Not all elements or compounds listed in ChemIDplus have a toxicity table. Governmental Information Sources: ChemIDplus 6. Note the molecular formula. This formula could also be written as: CH3Br
  22. 22. 9. Definitions for various terms used in toxicity studies and regulations can be found in many of the glossaries at EPA websites. For example: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/glossary/index.html http://www.epa.gov/ttn/atw/hlthef/hapglossaryrev.html Governmental Information Sources: Definitions
  23. 23. Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks Use the Combined Chemical Dictionary, part of an online collection of eBooks within the CHEMnetBASE database, to find information on sources, uses, melting point, and boiling point for your pollutant. If you do not find what you need in the Combined Chemical Dictionary, try the Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology or the Knovel Database.
  24. 24. Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  25. 25. 6. Enter the name of the pollutant. Then click Search. NOTE: Try searching by CASRN (instead of chemical name) if the chemical name search yields no results. Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  26. 26. 7. Click on Details icon Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  27. 27. 8. This pages contains information on sources, uses, and physical properties for methyl bromide. Finding Information in Chemical Handbooks
  28. 28. Locating Superfund Sites in Texas by County Using the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) website, http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/remediation/superfund/sites/county/index.html, locate the requested information about your assigned Superfund site. The list is organized by both counties and alphabetically by site.
  29. 29. 2. Select your assigned county. 1. Go to the following URL: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/remediation/superfund/sites/county/index.html Locating Superfund Sites in Texas by County
  30. 30. 3. Select your assigned site. Locating Superfund Sites in Texas by County
  31. 31. 4. After clicking on the link to your assigned site, obtain the information you need from the website. NOTE: Not all TCEQ webpages will have the information in a tabular form. Some will requiring reading through the text on the webpage to find the information. Locating Superfund Sites in Texas by County

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