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Libraries to Go

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A version of "Libraries to Go" focusing on mobile OPACs, presented at the Next Generation Catalog Interest Group at the ALA Midwinter Meeting, Jan. 17, 2010.

A version of "Libraries to Go" focusing on mobile OPACs, presented at the Next Generation Catalog Interest Group at the ALA Midwinter Meeting, Jan. 17, 2010.

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  • As our screens get smaller and smaller and desktop monitors get bigger and cheaper, we have to provide quality user experiences for our users at both ends of the spectrum.
  • 2012 prediction: worldwide Mobile devices will be the primary connection tool to the internet for most people in the world in 2020 (http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/270/report_display.asp) North American mobile web consumption increased 110 percent in 2009 while worldwide access grew 148 percent according to new data issued by audience measurement service Quantcast. http://www.resourceshelf.com/2010/01/07/up-and-up-and-away-mobile-web-consumption-grows-148-worldwide-in-2009/
  • http://arcadiaproject.lib.cam.ac.uk/docs/M-Libraries_report.pdf Cambridge Arcadia Programme & Open University Information Use on the Move - 2009 Students surveyed at Cambridge and OU (UK) – more interest in SMS than mobile internet Little interest in library e-resources delivered on mobile device Recommendations: Piloting text alerting services Piloting a text reference service Providing a mobile OPAC interface Ensuring that the library website is accessible and will resize to smaller screens Providing audio tours of the library Allowing mobile phone use in the library
  • Paul Pival (The Distant Librarian) created M-Libraries page on LibSuccess wiki to track the events, applications and resources being developed for m-libraries. http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=M-Libraries
  • First thing to establish is that there is a difference between an App and mobile version of website. Apps are device-specific, downloadable by the user. Mobile versions of websites are websites (or resources) that are optimized for the mobile-device screen size, not device specific, though some are sophisticated enough to recognize that you are using a particular mobile device. Other terminology: “native app” vs. “ mobile web” “mobile app” or “web app” Examples: mobile-ready: University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; iphone app DCPL
  • Services: Text-a-librarian (UNC example), library website (hours, etc.), library subject guides Campus tours: UNC WolfWalk http://www.flickr.com/photos/ncsulibdli/3922701421/in/set-72157622253278811/
  • Text-a-call number (example from http://antpac.lib.uci.edu) QR codes (example from http://webcat.hud.ac.uk)
  • Whether or not we develop any apps or mobile-ready content at UCI, our vendors are beginning to offer their content optimized for mobile devices. There can be several acquisitions issues to work out in providing links or support for licensed content on mobile devices: ERs that are downloadable to smartphones vs ERs that are accessible through library authentication – as they usually are – but optimized for smartphone viewing Affects license, price, ordering & activation process Separate fees for mobile-ready resources? Or integrated? Should be integrated – the library is not licensing content for a separate set of users. The same users have access, whether from their handheld device while walking across campus, or from their laptop in the classroom, or from a computer in the library. Are there any issues with rendering the link resolver for the mobile-ready resources? Is the platform upon which the mobile-e-resource provided separate from the platform for non-mobile-ready, and if so will it be necessary to activate separately in the link resolver? Any issues with authenticating your users for remote access, i.e. through the VPN or proxy server? (users are not just mobile, but remote and mobile ) What vendors can do: Make ERs mobile-optimized (new versions of digital content?) Make mobile-optimized ERs device-agnostic (for better migration across devices and for future devices) Work with apps developers to optimize pdfs for mobile devices, ensure added functionality (text markup, emailing, saving, etc) Provide usage stats customized to capture use by mobile devices
  • Responsibility of library staff, library IT or campus IT? How much responsibility does the Library have if users are accessing content through their own devices? What is expected? Multiple mobile access requirements: pda, blackberry, iphone, Google, Kindle, etc Migration to next-gen smartphone compatible in future? Do we need to prepare now even as we figure out how to support current-gen devices?
  • If you are going to purchase mobile electronic resources, then you may wish to make them accessible via your catalog. Best practices have yet to be formally established for cataloging mobile electronic resources. A search of the literature showed some older sources regarding cataloging direct access chips for older PDAs. Recent developments in the field of cataloging have made it much more straightforward to catalog mobile versions of electronic resources. The new Provider-Neutral E-Monograph MARC Record Guide (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/pcc/bibco/PN-Guide.pdf) was approved by the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC) and went into effect August 1, 2009. According to this new cataloging practice, all versions of the same electronic monograph can be captured on a single provider-neutral record. The provider-neutral practice had already been established for integrating resources (e.g. databases and websites) in 2008, and had already been the practice for serials years before. Therefore, for all electronic resources, the mobile URL can be attached to the same e-resource record as the original, unless the content differs so much that a separate record is deemed necessary (cataloger’s judgment). So, for the most part we don’t really need to worry about any separate practices for mobile electronic resources cataloging, though individual libraries may choose do approach this in different ways in order to best suit their users. Sources: 1. Cuddy, Colleen. (2005). Using PDAs in libraries. New York: Neal-Schuman. How-to-do-it manuals for libraries no. 142. pp. 64-70 “Cataloging PDA Resources” 2. Koufogiannakis, Denise; Ryan, Pam; Dahl, Susan. (2005). Just another format: Integrating resources for users of personal digital assistants. Acquisitions Librarian 17 (33/34), pp.133-145. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J101v17n33_12 3. Searches of AUTOCAT, OLAC-LIST, OCLC-CAT, etc. 4. AUTOCAT thread “Provider Neutral Questions” Aug.24, 2009, followed up by personal communication with Shana McDanold & Becky Culbertson of the Provider-Neutral E-Monograph Task Force. ___________________________________________ Free application End User License Agreement Downloaded Software (computer file) 856 field – also either local intermediate page in local catalog and/or product information page in 856 42 http://www.epocrates.com/products/rx/ The library didn’t pay for this app, but as we distribute it pre-downloaded on our iPod touches, we consider it a library resource. Question: What if libraries did pay for apps? Would you want to catalog it? _____________________________________________ Locally licensed (paid resource) Remote access (Internet required) Authentication required (via our network or VPN) Integrating resource (database) Just add the mobile URL to the existing database record. Can qualify any special restrictions or system requirements in 856 $z – special mobile requirements do not need to go into body of the record, as the record is provider-neutral. However, if the mobile version is different enough in content, you might want a separate record, in which you could describe the special mobile features in more detail. Cataloger’s judgment. _______________________________________________ Locally licensed (paid resource) Monograph (mobile version of print ed.) Authentication required (only accessible on registered devices) Interesting twist: When we acquired this resource, it was remote access (internet required), but since then Skyscape has made it accessible via an app (internet no longer required) 856 field: Local intermediate URL for local catalog in 856 40; for OCLC record 856 42 for product page http://www.skyscape.com/estore/productdetail.aspx?productid=2316 If you had other versions of this you could add additional URLs. The 300 and the 500 identify this record as a provider-neutral e-monograph using the new PN guidelines.
  • Locally licensed (paid resource) Monograph (mobile version of print ed.) Authentication required (only accessible on registered devices) Interesting twist: When we acquired this resource, it was remote access (internet required), but since then Skyscape has made it accessible via an app (internet no longer required) 856 field: Local intermediate URL for local catalog in 856 40; for OCLC record 856 42 for product page http://www.skyscape.com/estore/productdetail.aspx?productid=2316 If you had other versions of this you could add additional URLs. The 300 and the 500 identify this record as a provider-neutral e-monograph using the new PN guidelines.
  • Locally licensed (paid resource) Remote access (Internet required) Authentication required (via our network or VPN) Integrating resource (database) Just add the mobile URL to the existing database record. Can qualify any special restrictions or system requirements in 856 $z – special mobile requirements do not need to go into body of the record, as the record is provider-neutral. However, if the mobile version is different enough in content, you might want a separate record, in which you could describe the special mobile features in more detail. Cataloger’s judgment.
  • DISCOVER: Library web site, Subject guides, OPAC, WorldCat, Google Scholar, Link resolver VIEW : HTML, PDF, images (i.e. DELIVERY) INTERACT/USE: Import to citation manager (Zotero, e.g.), Download? Print? Email? Highlight? Copy/Paste?
  • Another way users might discover your electronic resources via their mobile devices is through your library’s OPAC. Do you have a mobile version of your OPAC? This is our OPAC as viewed from an iPhone (not mobile-ready).
  • While authenticated on our UCI network, one can get to library resources from Google Scholar via our link resolver.
  • Also not mobile-ready
  • PDF can be viewed on mobile device Progress is being made in terms of discovery but more needs to be done in terms of delivery Link resolver Content providers
  • Duke iPhone app Note: the app has a built-in browser, so you don’t need to leave the app in order to view the resource Note: in this case takes 4 steps to actually get to resource
  • Least effort but not ideal CSS stylesheets – “handheld” style (control width, size, etc) – smaller but not “mobilized” iPhone and newer mobile browsers ignore anyway “ Moblizers” – Google, commercial examples
  • Least effort? World Cat (not localized, static, no circ availability, no request – can’t do very much with it) Libraries can also partner with Boopsie, the company responsible for Mobile WorldCat, for mobile versions of their catalog.
  • AIRPAC from III (OCLS example) – can be expensive module SirsiDynix announced free BookMyne iPhone app 1/14/10 – locates nearby libraries and allows users to search library catalogs for available materials. Users registered with a library can also place and cancel holds at their library using their iPhone. Libraries can become discoverable through BookMyne by installing SirsiDynix Symphony Web Services, which gives libraries access to their Symphony data. Symphony Web Services 2.0 is available at no cost to institutions using Symphony version 3.3 or later. http://www.librarytechnology.org/ltg-displaytext.pl?RC=14469
  • From Tim Spaulding email: 1. Works with almost every OPAC. 2. No installation. 3. Price is low-hundreds to low-thousands per year. 4. Mobile-Web version, so when someone hits your OPAC from an iPhone, or whatever, they get a mobile version. 5. Native applications for iPhone, Android, Blackberry 6. An "accessibility version" libraries can use as a truly Section 508-compatible catalog. 7. "Pre-selling" now; available for all in April, I think. (In part, it's dependent on app. approvals from Apple, etc.) http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2010/01/library-anywhere-mobile-catalog-for.php
  • Development – key is to get data out of ILS Library Technology Reports 2009: Opening up Library Systems through Web Services and SOA: Hype or Reality? Marshall Breeding UNC, Duke, NCSU – all ENDECA (UNC – III, NCSU SirsiDynix, Duke Ex Libris Aleph). Uses xml-based web services from Endeca to provide search results. Duke, UNC, NC State and North Carolina Central University share a single Endeca application, part of that Endeca application includes a web services layer that can be used to get search results in XML streams. The web services layer doesn’t come built-in with Endeca, it’s something they built. DCPL – SirsiDynix Symphony API. The code for the iPhone app is freely available under CC license, can be used and adapted by any Sirsi library. V2 is coming out end of January, will have Blackberry support and additional features Tripod – connect to III catalog via HTTP and parse HTML output in PHP UVA – Blacklight + Summons API (Serials Solutions) – one search
  • Horizon report - charts the landscape of emerging technologies for teaching, learning and creative inquiry How much time and effort should we extend when we are already being asked to do more with less? At our library .5% of visits (half of 1 percent) come from mobile devices and at GML where all residents have iphones or ipod touches the visits are only 1% of the total. (these stats are for the last six months) There are a number of things you can do: Campus initiatives – is your campus working on an iphone app, push for the library to be involved: residents getting iphones means it makes sense for us to pursue something in this area
  • Location-based mobile services (WolfWalk at NCSU) – uses GPS to show off historical info Layar – augmented reality browser (e.g. book reviews in stacks (Helene Blowers blog); historical photos on campus tour) Mobile device as library card (barcodes) Take a picture, identify a book (Amazon.com) More non-text mobile electronic resources (audio, video, images, etc.) QR Codes “ So, what is a QR Code? A QR Code is a two dimensional bar code which when scanned using your camera phone enables you to access some pre-written content or complete a task. For instance, read some text, access a web site, send an sms or an email. An example is below. If you scan the code it will open this website (http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/qrcode) on your phone. “ (e.g. open a book review for a book, open some text about an library exhibit item) More mobile applications built by libraries (DCPL) More platforms (not just iPhones) Use of mobile devices in library instruction (tutorials, clickers, etc.) More mobile-optimized versions from vendors??? 
  • Any questions? Contact us at University of California, Irvine using the emails above.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Kristine Ferry, Lisa Sibert and Holly Tomren ALA Midwinter Meeting 2010
    • 2. Flickr: Schlusselbein2007
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    • 5. http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=M-Libraries
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    • 10. Flickr: steve-chippy
    • 11. Catalog card courtesy of http://www.blyberg.net/card-generator/
    • 12. 245 04 The ABX guide ǂh [electronic resource] : ǂb diagnosis & treatment of infectious diseases / ǂc edited by John G. Bartlett, Paul G. Auwaerter, Paul A. Pham. 300 _ _ 1 online resource 500 _ _ Description based on print version record. 856 40 ǂu http://www.lib.uci.edu/ online/skyscape/
    • 13. 245 00 IEEE Xplore ǂh [electronic resource] 500 _ _ Title from Web page (IEEE, viewed Aug. 3, 2009). 856 40 ǂu http://www.ieee.org/ieeexplore/ 856 40 ǂz Mobile version: ǂu http://ieeexlore.ieee.org/mobile
    • 14. Flickr: TopTechWriter.US Flickr: Tambako the Jaguar Flickr: hanaan
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    • 27. Kristine Ferry [email_address] Holly Tomren [email_address] Lisa Sibert [email_address]