Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Ten myths about memory

on

  • 2,912 views

For decades, nothing has been more hotly contested than the subject of human memory. ...

For decades, nothing has been more hotly contested than the subject of human memory.
From major discoveries in short-term memory to how our brain stores away our long-term memories, many experts have been simultaneously baffled and awed by the power of memory.

But like with most neurological functions within our brains, human memory is often shrouded in myth and misplaced facts. These myths aren’t just frustrating for those who want to understand more about how our powerful brains work…

…They can be downright debilitating for individuals who want to learn how to improve their memory.

So with that in mind, let’s take a look at the top ten myths about memory – and bust each and every one of them!

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,912
Views on SlideShare
2,484
Embed Views
428

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
96
Comments
0

2 Embeds 428

http://www.gradutempore.com 424
http://efesto.cloudapp.net 4

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Ten myths about memory Ten myths about memory Presentation Transcript

  • Ten Myths about Memory
  • For decades, nothing has been more hotly contested than the subject of human memory. From major discoveries in short-term memory to how our brain stores away our long-term memories, many experts have been simultaneously baffled and awed by the power of memory.
  • But like with most neurological functions within our brains, human memory is often shrouded in myth and misplaced facts. These myths aren’t just frustrating for those who want to understand more about how our powerful brains work…
    View slide
  • …They can be downright debilitating for individuals who want to learn how to improve their memory.
    View slide
  • So with that in mind, let’s take a look at the top ten myths about memory – and bust each and every one of them!
  • Myth: Memories Can Last For a Lifetime
    This favorite tagline of advertisers everywhere is nothing more than a myth. In fact, many reputable experts believe that it’s possible to learn enough things within our lifetime that will “push out” long-term memories from when we were younger.
  • Although researchers have tried to develop a method for creating permanent memories (commonly known as “permastore”), in truth, the human is a lot like a cup – and when you have too many memories, it simply runneth over.
  • Myth: Repetition Helps to Improve Memory.
    Say good-bye to flashcards and lists, because this favorite “memorization technique” only helps to reinforce short-term memory.
  • If you want to transfer short-term memory into long-term memory (for example, you need to bone up on your vocabulary for a test fast), then you’re better off used spaced repetition, which encourages followers to review their material at certain timed intervals.
  • Myth: Memory is Improved by Visualization.
    A picture’s worth a thousand words, right? Not when it comes to improving your memory. In fact, your ability to improve your memory depends on the type of learner you are.
  • If you’re a visual learner, then you’ll remember facts better when presented visually. However, if your learning is enhanced by reading or listening, then a picture won’t have much influence on your long term memory.
  • Myth: Learn Something Before You Sleep.
    Experts have long believe that if you learn something new before you sleep, the unconscious mind will transform it into long term memory. However, recent research has suggested that the best time to learn new material is in the early morning, when our brains are at their peak to boost memory efforts.
  • If you’ve been a victim of any of these memory myths, then you’re probably looking at your brain function in a completely new way now. But hold on to your hats – we’re about to expose more truths about the human memory than you thought possible!
  • Myth: Memory Gets Worse as We Age
    Surprised at this fact about the human memory? Don’t be – it’ll all make sense in just a moment!
  • You see, we do lose neurons as we age, and many people will become susceptible to Alzheimer’s Disease – however, resilient long-term memories are often unaffected by both of these side effects of age. In fact, most Alzheimer’s patients have a remarkable ability to remember things from their childhood; however, it’s more recent memory that they often have trouble with.
  • Myth: The Human Memory Loves the Number Seven.
    Have you ever heard that short term memory can only absorb information in chunks of seven? Well, new research has indicated that the number seven isn’t as magical as we once thought; in fact, our short term memory is better suited to learn new information in chunks of two and three.
  • Myth: Linking Information with Bizarre Imagery Helps Your Memory.
    Back in the late 1960s, Ralph Hader and his colleagues “proved” that visual memory was the best memory; additionally, when subjects connected bizarre imagery with new words, they often recalled that new information in memory tests later on.
  • However, experts now know that it’s best to use this as part of a secondary source for memory techniques, as it risks confusing your comprehension with irrelevant and often pointless associations.
  • Human memory is a fascinating subject, and one that’s been in serious contention for many years. New research is continually being highlighted to suggest the memory’s power to confuse and excite us. But no matter what new things we discover about the human memory, there will almost certainly be new memory myths that need to be busted.
  • Myth: Intention Improves Retention.
    Experts have often said that if we focus on remembering something, then it we’ll be able to store it as a long term memory. However, current research has shown that it’s not intention that creates long term memory; it’s skillful thinking. The next time you want to remember something, try focusing on effective thoughts rather than just the intent to remember.
  • Myth: Confidence can Improve Your Memory
    Many test prep authors have stated that long term memory and memorization skills can be greatly improved by confidence and a positive attitude; however, confidence has nothing to do with the brain’s ability to remember and recall information.
  • Someone with low confidence but who still sticks to memorizing their test prep will do much better on the exam than a confident person who did not put in the necessary focus into their study.
  • Myth: To Memorize Something, We Should Take a 5-10 Minute Break Every Half Hour.
    Your school teacher may have highlighted the importance of taking short breaks during every half hour interval while memorizing a list. However, neurological experts now think that these intervals are far too long for short term memory to transfer to the long term, as it’s easy to get distracted during these longer intervals.
  • Instead, experts recommend taking a break of no more than two minutes, and minimizing any and all distractions around you. That way, your new memories will stay right where they belong – in your brain!
  • Even the most well-informed person can fall victim to these human memory myths. However, now that we’ve exposed these myths, you can start to appreciate your amazing memory in new and exciting ways!
  • Get 10 free expert tips on improving memory. Click on the link now and get the report.
    Powerful Ways to Sharpen Your Memory