Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
Is this website the right one
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Is this website the right one

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Teach elementary school students what they should look for in a website.

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  • This is a PPT for teaching a 3 rd grade class how to evaluate a website. As a group we are going to discuss the criteria for evaluating a website and then go to the computer where each student will fill out a rubric for the Time for Kids Website.
  • Cornell professor, Jim Kapoun, breaks Webiste Evaluations into 5 different categories, Accuracy, Authority, Currency, Objectivity , and Coverage . Keeping this and Kathy Schrock’s readings in mind, I developed the basis for a scaffolding of these criteria. What should a 3 rd grader look for in evaluating a website? We are going to discuss the Appearance, Information, and Mechanics of a website. Together these 3 things create the acronym A.I.M., so students know it is expected of them to AIM high. As a group we are going to discuss these evaluation criteria.
  • What does the page look like and is it easy to find information at a glance?
  • How is the page organized? Are there rows and columns or do text and pictures appear randomly on the page?
  • Keep in mind the five finger rule for books. Is this page easy for you to read?
  • Are the pictures and photos easily identifiable? Are there captions under the pictures that help you identify what the picture is?
  • Kathy Schrock’s 5 W’s of website evaluation. Who, What, Where, When and Why. This format is easily recognizable and transferable from writer’s workshop.
  • Who wrote this page? Who is the author and publisher? Is there any contact information? How Accurate is this site?
  • What kind of information is on this page? Is it the right Information for you? Are there enough details? Is there something on the page that you know is wrong? How Objective is this page?
  • Where does the information come from? Is it a reputable source? Does it have Authority ?
  • When was the website created or last updated? How Current is the website?
  • Why should I use this information? Are the facts on the page what you were looking for? Do the facts on this page answer my research questions? Would I have gotten more information from the encyclopedia or a book?
  • How easy is the page to navigate and does it contain formatting basics? These will scaffold to Coverage , are links evaluated and do they complete the documents themes and is information formatted and cited correctly?
  • How easy is the page to navigate, if you go to another page is there a a way to get back to the first? Can you use the back arrow or are there breadcrumbs?
  • Is the spelling and grammar on the page correct? Is the page formatted correctly?
  • The rubric for students to use when they are evaluating the Time for Kids website. It is broken down into the 3 categories, Appearance, Information and Mechanics. Evaluation criteria for each is included. Students will take a handout of the rubric, go to the Time for Kids website and fill out the rubric.
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