Executive Panel Bill Holst,  President & Principal Consulting Software Engineer at Prescient Software Engineering and  Sys...
A Project Methodology Comparison  Waterfall vs. Agile at  Colorado Springs Utilities   Presented by Bill Holst  President ...
Background to Comparison <ul><li>Two major phases to Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) Energy Distribution Design  </li></u...
Why change horses in the middle of a stream?  (because you can!) <ul><li>Phase I – Waterfall was successful but- </li></ul...
Phase II – The Agile Adventure <ul><li>Converted Autodesk contract to T&M </li></ul><ul><li>Hand picked our Agile team </l...
The Results <ul><li>Project went well through about 5 or 6 iterations </li></ul><ul><li>And then… </li></ul>(c) Prescient ...
We hit the wall! (c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
The Results – the Wall! <ul><li>Delivered our first release for review – it was very successful but… </li></ul><ul><li>Log...
Project Velocity – this is not your textbook chart! <ul><li>. </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Res...
Reforming the Project <ul><li>Used an entire iteration to re-define logic based on data </li></ul><ul><li>Logic dropped by...
Where We Stand Today <ul><li>First production release next week – month and a half early </li></ul><ul><li>Costs almost 30...
Conclusions – What’s Next <ul><li>Solution has an amazing usability factor – it works the way it should from the user pers...
Summary   <ul><li>Not your typical government project </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Early delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Und...
 
StoneRiver Agile Adoption Adam Woods Director of Product Development
Main Challenges Before Agile Adoption <ul><li>High and increasing time to implement </li></ul><ul><li>Getting stuck at 90%...
Early Challenges / Experiences <ul><li>Initially ramped up architecture / platform teams as Agile pilot </li></ul><ul><li>...
Middle Maturity Challenges / Experiences <ul><li>Structured delivery teams in a blended model of offshore and employees </...
Advanced Maturity Challenges / Experiences <ul><li>Increased engagement by product owners </li></ul><ul><li>High rates of ...
Some Specific Suggestions <ul><li>Major organization change takes time, so be patient and persistent </li></ul><ul><li>Tak...
Summary of Experience <ul><li>Currently, we are 31 sprints into our Agile adoption have, 15 Agile teams working very close...
Want More Information <ul><li>Adam Woods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>303.729.7508 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </l...
 
Jean Tabaka Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Fellow 12 Agile Adoption Success Modes
12 Agile Adoption Success Patterns Jean Tabaka, Rally Software www.rallydev.com
 
 
 
 
Agile is not the problem
 
Success
Prepare to change WORLD your
your group
your organization
your company
your customers
Don’t abandon Agile
Knowledge-creating company Expansion not Scarcity Customer Value
3 categories of patterns
“ Getting started” patterns
“ In it”  patterns
“ Sustainability”  patterns
Each pattern has practices
“ Getting started” patterns
A clear and compelling goal #1   http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158
http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158 Be clear about the “Why Agile?”
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158 Crisis or culture of improvement
<ul><li>Examples from some real customers: </li></ul><ul><li>Earlier business value via faster time-to-market </li></ul><u...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158 Scarcity vs. Expansion
Vision A high level Agile plan has VISION
Engaged executive sponsorship #2
Fully committed to success
Israel Gat – Cutter Consortium Israel Gat – “I want us all to succeed. I will do everything I can for you. Please help me ...
Social contract with organization
What’s in it for me? (WIIFM)
“ We will learn and all of us will have better skills as software professionals.”
Planning framework for rollout #3
Create a rollout plan
How will we know if we are successful? <ul><li>High-Level Business Goals </li></ul><ul><li>[Co-create clear goals at an ov...
Example of Agile Rollout for 500
Use 5 levels of planning
Vision Roadmap Release Iteration Daily High level plan to a daily plan
Rank organizational backlog
Backlog Planned In Progress Complete Rollout Coach helps hire internal coach ARP with leadership to plan next waves Add Ra...
Engage your plan with guidance #4
Find bright spots
 
Bring in experienced mentors
Books are not enough. We need to find others and work with them.
Train everyone in their roles
The team knows what to do
AGILE ORGANIZATION Quarterly Business Cycle (Cross Organizations) Product Cycles (Cross Departments) Team Cycles
Start pilot teams based on rollout plan
Learn and mature  before you scale
“ In it”  patterns
Create strong leadership context #5
Servant leadership
 
Not command and control
 
Support collaboration
Form support councils not status reporting
Coordinate and support teams Multi-Team Program Team-of-Teams  Program Steering Portfolio Mgt & Governance Architecture Co...
Create the right team context #6
Team ownership
 
Team commitment
Team success and growth not heroes
 
Embrace Agile team habits #7
Adopt Agile ceremonies
<ul><li>Release planning </li></ul><ul><li>Iteration planning </li></ul><ul><li>Daily planning </li></ul><ul><li>Demo and ...
Build feature by feature
GUI Business Logic Database SLICES VERTICAL Story 1 Story 2
Use fast feedback loops
Continuous, fast feedback through the Agile ceremonies Inform next iteration through feedback from this iteration Iteratio...
Vision Roadmap Release Iteration Daily Inform the Vision from the daily plan
Pull testing forward
STORY ONE Task Estimate Owner Code the UI 6 Brenda Code the middle tier 8 Yi Create and automate tests 4 Alan
Invest in a robust infrastructure
 
Ensure code is always releasable
 
Measure the right things #8
Definition of Done
Sample Definition  of Done
Readiness of the product backlog
Readiness of the product increments
“ Watch the  work product not the worker” -- Don Reinertsen
Flow of value
FLOW of VALUE Customer’s Pull Value Agile
Create a culture of continuous learning #9
Retrospect with teams regularly
 
Retrospect the organization regularly
 
Create knowledge flow up and down
Create knowledge across the organization
 
 
“ Sustainability”  patterns
Prepare to scale #10
Architect for change
 
Support organizational growth
 
 
Employ passionate change agents
 
Be patient and repeat patterns #11
It takes time!
AGILE Alignment Corporate Level Departmental Level Team Level Personal Level
Revisit your compelling goal
<ul><li>Earlier business value via faster time-to-market? </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency, visibility, predictability? </li...
Revisit the strength of your sponsorship
Israel Gat – Cutter Consortium Israel Gat – “I want us all to succeed. I will do everything I can for you. Please help me ...
Continually improve your organizational backlog
Backlog Planned In Progress Complete Rollout Coach helps hire internal coach ARP with leadership to plan next waves Add Ra...
Apply these patterns to your context! #12
Prepare to inspect and adapt!
Wrap up our story
Agile is not the problem
 
Success
 
Start where you are
A clear and compelling goal #1   http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158
Apply these patterns to your context! #12
Knowledge-creating company Expansion not Scarcity Customer Value
A story of Agile success
 
Prepare to change WORLD your
12 Success Patterns for Agile Adoption Jean Tabaka, Rally Software www.rallydev.com
 
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Agile Cafe Boulder - Panelist and keynote slides

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Agile Cafe, 2/3 in Boulder, CO. Presentations from Adam Woods at StoneRiver, Bill Holst at Colorado Springs Utilities and keynote by Jean Tabaka at Rally Software.

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  • Two major phases to Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) Energy Distribution Design presented opportunity for a back to back comparison of waterfall and Agile First phase was electric distribution design using traditional waterfall and fixed price contract with Autodesk Consulting Second phase was gas distribution design with Agile approach and time and materials – CSU assumed the project risk Phases were nearly equal in scope and technology Both phases used a two weeks requirements gathering session to define the logic for the capture of material on the design and the actual ordering in the work management system.
  • Phase I – project was successful but we saw long lag times between requirements gathering and acceptance testing, resulting in a lot of rework Test cases written prior to code development, but were often wrong – lots of rework; our field engineers wrote all the test cases Code matched our logic from requirements but sometimes logic was incorrect – more rework Lots of churn in the project – some portions of the solution are uneven from a user perspective but workable (the spec was met) Had a disparate tool set – Excel and Word for requirements, Enterprise Architect for requirements and test cases, Mantis for defects Bob Buchan, CSU Project Manger, Tim Benedict, FE Manager, Jason Kagel, Spatial Network Solutions (main development group for Autodesk) and I met to discuss a better, more efficient approach for the second phase. We wanted a more robust solution that relied less on Autodesk Consulting for system changes.
  • Met with Autodesk Consulting and restructured contract to be T&amp;M Hand picked the project team with 3 half-time field engineers, 2 full time developers from SNS, a ½ QA person from SNS, one system analyst and architect from CSU, scrum master – Jason from SNS, and a product owner from CSU Hired an Agile coach from Rally, Christopher Avery, to come in and “ground” the team at the beginning of the project; [I was a skeptic, no use cases! How can this possibly work?] Christopher returned at the end of first iteration to help us through the initial “we suck” blues Established a lot of special collaboration tools to deal with distributed team (St. Louis, San Francisco, 3 locations in Colorado Springs) Rally software Nefsis Conferencing and HD video cameras Livemeeting and Webex Two conference call lines Google Docs for all project documentation Special storage closet for our “stuff”
  • We had delivered our first release for review – it was very successful but… Logic was confusing, engineers were writing test cases for what they thought the results should be, and the code didn’t necessarily match either We stopped half-way through the 7 th iteration and decided to regroup; Team was discouraged
  • Spent one iteration with only the field engineers, analyst, and product owner to completely rewrite logic to take advantage of Compatible Unit structures available in our Maximo work management system Logic dropped by a factor of almost 4 in complexity Next iteration, all code was rewritten and all test cases re-crafted We were on a roll! Being Agile made this possible In another iteration, we learned from on of the Maximo consultants that it wasn’t necessary to have separate logic for labor and non-labor jobs We did it again – code rewrite, threw ½ our test cases away! The team had transformed itself into Agile evangelists!
  • First production release scheduled for week of February 7 th; this is approximately a month and a half early Costs are about 30% under budget Over 500 defects less than the electric phase A lot less code was written due to the redesign of the logic. Solution is now data driven, so changes can be made without any code changes Test case coverage is more thorough as the electric effort; test cases are higher quality Without the mid-course correction we would have been in a “change-order Hell’ cycle” now – probably without any idea of when the software could be installed; we could have risked a “shelf-ware” situation Process improvement on the material ordering side is immense – there are lots of pieces and parts to a gas design which makes the estimation and material ordering very time consuming and problematic Users love the software – even I can design a gas network!
  • Gas design software has an amazing usability factor – it works the way it should from the user perspective (this is one of the ‘ilities’ that is hard to measure but you know when you have it!) Project has a lot of visibility within CSU – huge interest in Agile Rally has provided scrum training for 18 folks Rally has provided Agile training for an infrastructure team which is kicking off an new upgrade project Electric field engineers want a follow-up project to rework some of the “klutzy” parts of the initial system Minimal project management expense from Autodesk (a couple hours of administrative cost) Project metrics are amazing! – they tell a great management story 69% fewer defects 30% lower project cost (this is the fixed price fudge factor) 50% less code 4x reduction in logic complexity 20% less test cases, but better test coverage
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  • I wrote this article based on all the bad practices or lack of practices I had seen by organizations who claimed that they were Agile. They weren’t Agile! AND they wanted to blame Agile for their problems
  • So, I dug around to learn some more about how Agile was failing. This can be dirty work, digging into many organizations large and small about their ability to adopt Agile.. What I discovered, is that……………
  • !!!
  • What I discovered is that there are BEAUTIFUL of how to adopt Agile, patterns of practices that the way I have seen organizations Adopt Agile and not slip into those failure practices
  • There are beautiful patterns we can embrace that lead to success. This success with Agile is vital be on the top in the 21 st century global economy.
  • Be prepared to make big changes! Invest to win. These patterns are a fundamental shift in how we work. But, we have no choice. To be sustainable, we have to be prepared to change our world. And in return for the hard work, we discover that we we change our world in a way that rewardds us and brings great benefits! 2009 Servant Leadership Jean Tabaka - Rally Software
  • So don’t abandon Agile as I have seen these other organizations do! They believed Agile was the problem their adoption was the problem. And so they never really derived the great benefits available. They are just GIVING UP!!!!! Today, I want you to consider truly believing in these patterns and their practices. If you are willing to do so, I believe there are wonderful benefits for you and your teams and your customers.
  • BENEFITS YOU WILL DERIVE Servant Leadership Jean Tabaka - Rally Software 2009
  • 3 categories of success patterns
  • 3 categories of success patterns
  • We don’t just do Agile because it is cool to say, or that we are just tired of Waterfall. We have to have a reason.
  • Really what is driving YOUR organization to do Agile? 12 Agile Adoption Failure Modes Jean Tabaka - Rally Software 2009
  • Are you in a crisis? Or are you in a culture in your company that is always lookiing for ways to improve. Or do you want to be a company that gets out of being reactive to crisis and instead DRIVE the market by constantly improving, constantly being innovative. Think of some of the companies Mary mentioned yesterday: Amazon, Google, Tandberg. They were workiing out of a culture of improvement and innovation.
  • When you are working out of crisis, it is be cause you have fallen behind in the market place and you need to catch up. You are losing and so you are working out of a sense of scarcity. Agile helps us move to working out of a goal or expansion. There is so much to do, so many great ideas, how can we bring our great idea to market faster!?
  • That means you really have a vision for where you want to go, and how you’ll know you have been successful. Rally, every year, we evaluate our goal. When we started, there were very few Agile project management tools. Agile was new! Waterfall and Rational Unified Process were MUCH more popular and widely used. Did we choose to go into those markets and grab scarce resources? NO! We choose to go into a market where we beileived there was great opportunity. This is what Apple has done with each of its products. It has set a high level vision and it has set it out of a sense of the expansive market that lies out there.
  • Our second patter in the “Getting Started” patterns. It’s no good having a great vision if you don’t have an engaged executive sponsor, someone who is prepared to defend your move to Agile to the rest of the company. Again, Agile isn’t easy and a lot of companies will say GREAT! Do Agile but I expect you to be successful RIGHT away. When you learned to ride a bike, it would be like your parent saying, “Great! When you hop on that bike, I want you to be able to ride immediately and perfectly! Otherwise, you have to go back to walking everywhere because it is just too hard.” No we need someone who will help us learn and be successful.
  • I worked with Israel at BMC in 2005. He had worked with Rally before rolling out Agile. When he moved to a much larger company and was responsible for rolling out a very complex product set, he knew that there was only one thing he could do. The product line was in a crisis mode and he needed to save it. So he asked his group of 500 people to have faith in him, to be willing to dramatically change their world.
  • He called this his Agile Social contract. A good Engaged Executive sponsor creates a social contract with their employees. Their leadership is about want to help their employees and to help them understand why it is valuable to adopt AGILE and to do the hard work
  • In your Agile social contract, you are able to help your employees understand “What’s In It for me?” Why should I do this? Why can’t I just keep doing things the way I always did. Leave me alone! The Executive sponsor has an ability to hold the vision for the group and to help them understand either the crisis or the opportunity for innovation and expansion that is out there for them if they are willing stick with him or her to adopt Agile. And when they are part of a team that is successful at Agile: -- intrinsic reward -- professional growth -- sustainable software development that doesn’t demand that you give your life away. This has been important to us at our company and is something we coach executives about all the time when we talk with them about adopting Agile
  • Our 3 rd “Getting Started” pattern is to create a “Planning framework for rollout” How can we build more opportunity of success into our Agile adoption while we are getting started.
  • I’ve discovered that it is vital to create a rollout plan. You and your team need to have some ability to look out beyond today or tomorrow and say, “”How are we going to do this?” We have a hundred teams. Let’s just start right now…EVERYBODY
  • The large insurance company I worked with. We have been working with eBay in the United States and India. It has been important for the executive team to create a plan for what they will do with Agile. For each business goal that you have, what will you measure to see if you are being successful (number of teams at a certain level of expertise?
  • What this really looks like is not so much steps as overlapping waves. One of the early decisions you make is about how far you want to go and how fast. how far – not all the way agile? a program? how fast – how much learning? how much appetite for change?
  • For each “wave” or “release”, what teams will we target. What are the goals for each release. What support/training will we provide. After each “release”, run a retrospective to identify what about the rollout is going well, what’s not going well, what adjustments should we make. After each release, plan the next release. Update roadmap as needed.
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • What other companies have been doing this successfully? Help your organization learn about these success stories?
  • Books are not enough alone. It is so valuable to find others who have done this and know what the practices are that bring success and what the practices are that invite failure.
  • I have seen too many organizations not invest enough in training for EVERYONE. What does the team need to learn that is new? What will the Scrum Master do that is different? How will the business engage differently? How will managers act more in service to the team?
  • 3/4/09 - 3/5/09 Implementing Agile Teams Rally Software
  • Learn from a few teams and then apply your successes from there.
  • We’ve developed a framework that reflects what we’ve seen be successful in large-scale agile rollouts. FPI Steps reflect that it is iterative and incremental. Also reflects failure modes we’ve seen—like trying to scale “amateur” agile, or staying at the team level but never putting together the structures that support scale.
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Agile Scales by Replicating number of x-functional teams. We don’t increase Agile team size! Agile improves collaboration across all roles with greater transparency into work in progress, quality, readiness and costs.
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • As we launch new teams (expansion), we continue to pay attention to maturity Ag teams, so that teams don’t get frustrated and so that we introduce the discipline to help teams deliver consistently.
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • As we launch new teams (expansion), we continue to pay attention to maturity Ag teams, so that teams don’t get frustrated and so that we introduce the discipline to help teams deliver consistently.
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • --Communication support -- collaboration support -- configuration management -- automated testing environment -- continuous integration -- high visibility -- transparency in everything!!! Agile, Lean and the PMO Better Software 2009 Jean Tabaka - Rally Software
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Certified ScrumMaster Training V15.5- JET3 Certified ScrumMaster training - v14.13 © 2007 - Rally Software Development Corp
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Not the Worker
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • 3/4/09 - 3/5/09 Implementing Agile Teams Rally Software
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Corporate Planning meeting in 2007. Grown a little since 2006, still using Rockefeller, Gazelles, and Rocks. Added some facilitation, me 
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • 3/4/09 - 3/5/09 Implementing Agile Teams Rally Software
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • For each “wave” or “release”, what teams will we target. What are the goals for each release. What support/training will we provide. After each “release”, run a retrospective to identify what about the rollout is going well, what’s not going well, what adjustments should we make. After each release, plan the next release. Update roadmap as needed.
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Pairing in success, pairing in learning and improving
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • There are beautiful patterns we can embrace that lead to success
  • YOU have an opportunity to take what I’ve presented here today and apply it in your life RIGHT NOW. 12 Agile Adoption Failure Modes Jean Tabaka - Rally Software 2009
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • Patterns of success, beautiful patterns will bring you success, be on the top in the 21 st century global economy
  • BENEFITS YOU WILL DERIVE Servant Leadership Jean Tabaka - Rally Software 2009
  • Be prepared to make big changes! Invest to win. These patterns are a fundamental shift in how we work. But, we have no choice. To be sustainable, we have to be prepared to change our world. 2009 Servant Leadership Jean Tabaka - Rally Software
  • Agile Cafe Boulder - Panelist and keynote slides

    1. 2. Executive Panel Bill Holst, President & Principal Consulting Software Engineer at Prescient Software Engineering and Systems Analyst at Colorado Springs Utilities Adam Woods, Director of Product Development at StoneRiver, Inc.
    2. 3. A Project Methodology Comparison Waterfall vs. Agile at Colorado Springs Utilities Presented by Bill Holst President and Principal Software Engineer Prescient Software Engineering, Inc.
    3. 4. Background to Comparison <ul><li>Two major phases to Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) Energy Distribution Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First Phase – Electric Distribution Design – Waterfall and Fixed Price </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second phase - Gas Distribution Design - Agile - Time and Materials – CSU assumed the project risk </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for comparison of waterfall and Agile </li></ul><ul><li>Equal in scope and technology </li></ul><ul><li>Two week session for requirements definition </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    4. 5. Why change horses in the middle of a stream? (because you can!) <ul><li>Phase I – Waterfall was successful but- </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Test cases developed early but many were wrong </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>long lag time from requirements to testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mismatch of code to logic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project churn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disparate tool set </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key players met to evaluate how we could do things better – Agile approach </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    5. 6. Phase II – The Agile Adventure <ul><li>Converted Autodesk contract to T&M </li></ul><ul><li>Hand picked our Agile team </li></ul><ul><li>Engaged Rally for training and coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-training at the end of iteration 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rally software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nefsis Conferencing and HD video cameras </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Livemeeting and Webex </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two conference call lines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Google Docs for all project documentation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Special storage closet for our “stuff” </li></ul></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    6. 7. The Results <ul><li>Project went well through about 5 or 6 iterations </li></ul><ul><li>And then… </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    7. 8. We hit the wall! (c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    8. 9. The Results – the Wall! <ul><li>Delivered our first release for review – it was very successful but… </li></ul><ul><li>Logic was confusing, test cases, code and logic did not match </li></ul><ul><li>7 th Iteration stopped mid-stream </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    9. 10. Project Velocity – this is not your textbook chart! <ul><li>. </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    10. 11. Reforming the Project <ul><li>Used an entire iteration to re-define logic based on data </li></ul><ul><li>Logic dropped by a factor of almost 4 in complexity </li></ul><ul><li>Next iteration, rewrote all code and test cases </li></ul><ul><li>On a roll! Being Agile made this possible </li></ul><ul><li>Another iteration – reduced logic complexity again </li></ul><ul><li>We did it again – code rewrite, threw ½ our test cases away! The team had transformed itself into Agile evangelists! </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    11. 12. Where We Stand Today <ul><li>First production release next week – month and a half early </li></ul><ul><li>Costs almost 30% under budget </li></ul><ul><li>500 defects less than the electric phase </li></ul><ul><li>Less code! Solution data driven, changes made without code changes </li></ul><ul><li>Better test case coverage </li></ul><ul><li>Mid-course change avoided change order “Hell” and potential “Shelfware” </li></ul><ul><li>Huge process improvement on material and labor ordering </li></ul><ul><li>Users love the software – even I can design a gas network! </li></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    12. 13. Conclusions – What’s Next <ul><li>Solution has an amazing usability factor – it works the way it should from the user perspective (this is one of the ‘ilities’ that is hard to measure but you know when you have it!) </li></ul><ul><li>High Visibility within CSU – huge interest in Agile </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rally has provided scrum training for 18 folks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rally has provided Agile training for an infrastructure team which is kicking off an new upgrade project </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Probably redesign of the Electric Solution </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal project management expense from Autodesk (a couple hours of administrative cost) </li></ul><ul><li>Amazing Project Metrics! – they tell a great management story </li></ul><ul><ul><li>69% fewer defects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>30% lower project cost (this is the fixed-price fudge factor) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>50% less code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4x reduction in logic complexity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20% less test cases, but better test coverage </li></ul></ul>(c) Prescient Software Engineering, All Rights Reserved
    13. 14. Summary  <ul><li>Not your typical government project </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Early delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Under budget </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User ‘love-affair’ with software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Let’s do it again!” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Team commitment to success – great management support </li></ul><ul><li>One of my most successful projects! </li></ul>
    14. 16. StoneRiver Agile Adoption Adam Woods Director of Product Development
    15. 17. Main Challenges Before Agile Adoption <ul><li>High and increasing time to implement </li></ul><ul><li>Getting stuck at 90% complete for long periods of time </li></ul><ul><li>Quality assurance disconnected from development </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of automation </li></ul><ul><li>High levels of defects </li></ul><ul><li>Project success highly dependant on skill of project manager </li></ul><ul><li>Project risks / warnings signaling too late to be addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of feedback mechanisms for improvement </li></ul>
    16. 18. Early Challenges / Experiences <ul><li>Initially ramped up architecture / platform teams as Agile pilot </li></ul><ul><li>Attempted to run Agile teams with existing offshore vendor without re-organizing fundamental team structure or relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of buy-in and understanding of Agile principles from executives, project leadership and delivery teams </li></ul><ul><li>Distance between delivery teams and product owners </li></ul><ul><li>No acceptance, or agreement to do acceptance testing, Agile seen as a development only practice </li></ul>
    17. 19. Middle Maturity Challenges / Experiences <ul><li>Structured delivery teams in a blended model of offshore and employees </li></ul><ul><li>Greater understanding of vertical slicing by teams and product owners </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery teams adopting and owning point sizing </li></ul><ul><li>Testing and defect resolution occurring within the sprint </li></ul><ul><li>Adjusting testing model to ensure business value vs. focusing on individual component </li></ul><ul><li>Increased collaboration between teams and product owners, still no acceptance </li></ul>
    18. 20. Advanced Maturity Challenges / Experiences <ul><li>Increased engagement by product owners </li></ul><ul><li>High rates of acceptance </li></ul><ul><li>Better consistency of velocity from sprint to sprint </li></ul><ul><li>Full automation as a requirement in teams’ definition of done </li></ul><ul><li>Steadily declining defect backlog </li></ul><ul><li>Increased understanding of executive leadership in Agile principles </li></ul>
    19. 21. Some Specific Suggestions <ul><li>Major organization change takes time, so be patient and persistent </li></ul><ul><li>Take the initiative to champion the improvements that you have made even in the face of skepticism, then figure out an improvement to address the skepticism </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes outside training and consulting can present the message in a new and different way that gets heard </li></ul><ul><li>If what you are doing is not working, or is showing signs of deteriorating consider going back to the very basic principles </li></ul>
    20. 22. Summary of Experience <ul><li>Currently, we are 31 sprints into our Agile adoption have, 15 Agile teams working very closely together, across 3 continents </li></ul><ul><li>We are still in a position to keep growing the number of teams and refining our practice </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing what I know now would I still adopt an Agile methodology for our development organization? </li></ul>
    21. 23. Want More Information <ul><li>Adam Woods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>303.729.7508 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.linkedin.com/pub/adam-woods/6/1ba/236 </li></ul></ul>
    22. 25. Jean Tabaka Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Fellow 12 Agile Adoption Success Modes
    23. 26. 12 Agile Adoption Success Patterns Jean Tabaka, Rally Software www.rallydev.com
    24. 31. Agile is not the problem
    25. 33. Success
    26. 34. Prepare to change WORLD your
    27. 35. your group
    28. 36. your organization
    29. 37. your company
    30. 38. your customers
    31. 39. Don’t abandon Agile
    32. 40. Knowledge-creating company Expansion not Scarcity Customer Value
    33. 41. 3 categories of patterns
    34. 42. “ Getting started” patterns
    35. 43. “ In it” patterns
    36. 44. “ Sustainability” patterns
    37. 45. Each pattern has practices
    38. 46. “ Getting started” patterns
    39. 47. A clear and compelling goal #1 http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158
    40. 48. http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158 Be clear about the “Why Agile?”
    41. 50. http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158 Crisis or culture of improvement
    42. 51. <ul><li>Examples from some real customers: </li></ul><ul><li>Earlier business value via faster time-to-market </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency, visibility, predictability </li></ul><ul><li>Improve employee engagement and teamwork </li></ul>
    43. 52. http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158 Scarcity vs. Expansion
    44. 53. Vision A high level Agile plan has VISION
    45. 54. Engaged executive sponsorship #2
    46. 55. Fully committed to success
    47. 56. Israel Gat – Cutter Consortium Israel Gat – “I want us all to succeed. I will do everything I can for you. Please help me help you.”
    48. 57. Social contract with organization
    49. 58. What’s in it for me? (WIIFM)
    50. 59. “ We will learn and all of us will have better skills as software professionals.”
    51. 60. Planning framework for rollout #3
    52. 61. Create a rollout plan
    53. 62. How will we know if we are successful? <ul><li>High-Level Business Goals </li></ul><ul><li>[Co-create clear goals at an overall level, and also at lower levels as appropriate.] </li></ul><ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>3. </li></ul><ul><li>Success Metrics </li></ul>Goal Metric How Reported
    54. 63. Example of Agile Rollout for 500
    55. 64. Use 5 levels of planning
    56. 65. Vision Roadmap Release Iteration Daily High level plan to a daily plan
    57. 66. Rank organizational backlog
    58. 67. Backlog Planned In Progress Complete Rollout Coach helps hire internal coach ARP with leadership to plan next waves Add Rally-developed apps IATs for new teams Release Planning after 3d iteration On-site CSM On-site CSPO T&E consulting
    59. 68. Engage your plan with guidance #4
    60. 69. Find bright spots
    61. 71. Bring in experienced mentors
    62. 72. Books are not enough. We need to find others and work with them.
    63. 73. Train everyone in their roles
    64. 74. The team knows what to do
    65. 75. AGILE ORGANIZATION Quarterly Business Cycle (Cross Organizations) Product Cycles (Cross Departments) Team Cycles
    66. 76. Start pilot teams based on rollout plan
    67. 77. Learn and mature before you scale
    68. 78. “ In it” patterns
    69. 79. Create strong leadership context #5
    70. 80. Servant leadership
    71. 82. Not command and control
    72. 84. Support collaboration
    73. 85. Form support councils not status reporting
    74. 86. Coordinate and support teams Multi-Team Program Team-of-Teams Program Steering Portfolio Mgt & Governance Architecture Council Release Mgt
    75. 87. Create the right team context #6
    76. 88. Team ownership
    77. 90. Team commitment
    78. 91. Team success and growth not heroes
    79. 93. Embrace Agile team habits #7
    80. 94. Adopt Agile ceremonies
    81. 95. <ul><li>Release planning </li></ul><ul><li>Iteration planning </li></ul><ul><li>Daily planning </li></ul><ul><li>Demo and Retrospetive </li></ul><ul><li>Product council </li></ul>Incremental Delivery of Customer Value Product Backlog Release Backlog Iterations 1-4 Weeks Daily Meetings Product Increment Releases 1-4 Months
    82. 96. Build feature by feature
    83. 97. GUI Business Logic Database SLICES VERTICAL Story 1 Story 2
    84. 98. Use fast feedback loops
    85. 99. Continuous, fast feedback through the Agile ceremonies Inform next iteration through feedback from this iteration Iterations 1-4 Weeks Daily Meetings Releases 1-4 Months
    86. 100. Vision Roadmap Release Iteration Daily Inform the Vision from the daily plan
    87. 101. Pull testing forward
    88. 102. STORY ONE Task Estimate Owner Code the UI 6 Brenda Code the middle tier 8 Yi Create and automate tests 4 Alan
    89. 103. Invest in a robust infrastructure
    90. 105. Ensure code is always releasable
    91. 107. Measure the right things #8
    92. 108. Definition of Done
    93. 109. Sample Definition of Done
    94. 110. Readiness of the product backlog
    95. 111. Readiness of the product increments
    96. 112. “ Watch the work product not the worker” -- Don Reinertsen
    97. 113. Flow of value
    98. 114. FLOW of VALUE Customer’s Pull Value Agile
    99. 115. Create a culture of continuous learning #9
    100. 116. Retrospect with teams regularly
    101. 118. Retrospect the organization regularly
    102. 120. Create knowledge flow up and down
    103. 121. Create knowledge across the organization
    104. 124. “ Sustainability” patterns
    105. 125. Prepare to scale #10
    106. 126. Architect for change
    107. 128. Support organizational growth
    108. 131. Employ passionate change agents
    109. 133. Be patient and repeat patterns #11
    110. 134. It takes time!
    111. 135. AGILE Alignment Corporate Level Departmental Level Team Level Personal Level
    112. 136. Revisit your compelling goal
    113. 137. <ul><li>Earlier business value via faster time-to-market? </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency, visibility, predictability? </li></ul><ul><li>Improve employee engagement and teamwork? </li></ul>
    114. 138. Revisit the strength of your sponsorship
    115. 139. Israel Gat – Cutter Consortium Israel Gat – “I want us all to succeed. I will do everything I can for you. Please help me help you.”
    116. 140. Continually improve your organizational backlog
    117. 141. Backlog Planned In Progress Complete Rollout Coach helps hire internal coach ARP with leadership to plan next waves Add Rally-developed apps IATs for new teams Release Planning after 3d iteration On-site CSM On-site CSPO T&E consulting
    118. 142. Apply these patterns to your context! #12
    119. 143. Prepare to inspect and adapt!
    120. 144. Wrap up our story
    121. 145. Agile is not the problem
    122. 147. Success
    123. 149. Start where you are
    124. 150. A clear and compelling goal #1 http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkybob/122476158
    125. 151. Apply these patterns to your context! #12
    126. 152. Knowledge-creating company Expansion not Scarcity Customer Value
    127. 153. A story of Agile success
    128. 155. Prepare to change WORLD your
    129. 156. 12 Success Patterns for Agile Adoption Jean Tabaka, Rally Software www.rallydev.com
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