Building the BorderlessWorkplaceNew Talent Management Imperatives for 2012Josh BersinPresident and CEO November, 2011Copyr...
Bersin & Associates Who We Are•   Bersin & Associates is the leading global provider of best-practices,    trends, and be...
Agenda Today’s Business Environment Talent Markets: Out of Balance Proven High-Impact Talent Management Strategies    1...
Today’s Business  Environment         Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 4
2012 Business EnvironmentGlobalization, Innovation, Cost Containment              What Are Your Organization’s Top Busines...
The Global Auto MarketplaceAutomobile Sales – U.S. vs. China                  20                      U.S.                ...
Ford Figo – Fastest Selling Car in India  Ford Figo Story    Designed in                                                  ...
The Borderless Workplace   WORKFORCE                                                                          WORKPLACE   ...
What would You Be Willing to Give Up fora Week to Keep your Mobile Phone? Brushing teeth: 22% Sex: 33% Exercise: 54% C...
Today’s Talent Marketplace                  Out of Balance     Skills and                                 Free Agent      ...
Global Talent Deficit                                                        India Graduates Millions, but                ...
The Ill-Prepared US Workforce Only 32% of college graduates  have “excellent” skills to enter  the workforce Only 16% of...
Free Agent Workforce Job tenure for under-35 year  olds is 2.5 years The average worker today will  have 11 jobs by the ...
Increasing Specialization Expertise drives competitive                                                                Top...
Change in Employment Contract      In 2011 32% of employees are “planning       on leaving” their employers, vs. 19% two ...
The Workforce is really Younger….   This generation has a very different view of work and, therefore, of loyalty.   They s...
Evolution ofTalent Management         Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 17
Integrated Talent Management                                                                                              ...
1. New Models for   Leadership          Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 21
Leadership Remains One of                                 the Toughest Challenges© Bersin & AssociatesTalentWatch, Fall 20...
Major Managerial Skills Gap         Managerial skills rated lower than skills of entry-level workers                      ...
21st Century Leadership DevelopmentNew Models: Creativity, not planning Quick decision-making Getting closer to custome...
Emergence of “Girl Power” Between1970 and 2009 women went  from holding 37% of all jobs to nearly  48%. (McKinsey) 76% o...
2. Talent Mobility and Career Management            Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 26
Creating Talent Mobility                                                                     Emerging                     ...
Implementing Talent Mobility                                   Exec                                Succession             ...
High-Impact Talent MobilityFacilitated Talent Mobility – New Market for Integrated Career Development                     ...
Managing Talent Mobility                                                                                                 C...
Need for Development Planning Organizations with highly effective  development planning significantly  outperform those w...
Career Development Models                            Relative Business                     25%                            ...
Entire Organization Must Contribute toWorld-Class Career Management Employee              Manager                    HR   ...
Disappointment with Performance Management             Performance Management’s Effectiveness at Key Activities that Drive...
3. BorderlessTalent Acquisition          Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 35
The War for The Best People              Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 36
Attracting the right candidate in the right placequickly, efficiently, and consistently                                   ...
Radical Changes in Talent Acquisition                                                                                  Int...
4. Transformation ofLearning & Development            Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 39
Evolution of Enterprise LearningChange in Disciplines, Technologies, and Strategies                                       ...
Leaders Know Learning is InformalWhich learning approaches drive the greatest business value in your organization?        ...
The Continuous Learning ModelExpert                           Continuous Learning                              Career     ...
A New Learning FrameworkBersin & Associates Enterprise Learning Framework®                                                ...
Development of a New Formal Learning Architecture                            Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rig...
But do We Know what Really Matters?    Great Corporate         Strong CLO and      Excellent                Use of rich me...
We found…success depends on   Culture                                      52%              High Performing Organizations ...
High-Impact Learning Culture® Model6 Keys to an Enduring Learning Culture                                                 ...
Organizations with a Strong Learning Culture Significantly Outperform their peers… Innovation      Productivity    Time to...
5. The Need forData Science in HR          Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 49
How do Companies Hire People?2/3 of hiring done without any significant assessment% of Organizations Which Regularly Use F...
The Surprise Effect of Data What is the most important  baseball statistic that drives a  winning team?   • Team batting ...
CognitiveFriendliness                                         Ability                What Factor                   drives ...
Data Analysis Skills Important to HR Top HR Skills | Capabilities                                                    Corre...
HR Organizations are Not Ready        What percentage of HR        organizations do you believe        feel have strong sk...
The Lowest Rated HR Skill                                    Relative Strengths of HR Skills and Capabilities             ...
Talent Management: What’s Next Globalization and Talent Imbalances will be  with us for the future Five keys to success ...
Join Us – April 10-12, 2012                    Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.   Page 57
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  • And let me emphasize how important globalization has become. For the first time ever, more than 20% of our survey respondents cited “urgency to globalize” as one of their top 3 goals. I spent a week in the mid-west last winter and met with a variety of manufacturing companies and heard the same mantra from each: our US business is flat to declining, we see all our future growth in China, Brazil, India, Eastern Europe, and other developing countries.This chart will give you a sense of how quickly this has changed. The US automobile industry, which has been the world’s largest for many years, is now #2 to China. And remember that the auto industry drags with it hundreds of other industries like steel, electronics, tires, and energy. According to the Economist in February, China’s demand for oil is growing at 3X the rate of the US, and Saudi Arabia, the largest exporter of oil, is now moving its entire focus away from the US toward China as its business partner. In fact China will eclipse Japan as the #2 economy in the world in this coming year. To make this really hit home consider this: Marriot’s biggest growth market is Asia, with 75,000 new rooms planned for 2010 – the company’s growth in the US is fewer than 10,000.What this means is that our companies, the businesses we support, will have to shift from domestic and multi-national to truly global. Just as Japanese companies spent the decade of the 60s and 70s to build businesses and talent strategies to come here, we in turn must now globalize our businesses to expand into developing markets. A good example of this is AO Smith, one of the world’s biggest manufacturers of water heaters. AO Smith now has a China engineering organization that designs water heaters for emerging markets like india, staffed by excellent engineers who understand the needs of emerging markets. I will discuss throughout the next 30 minutes “globalizing” does not mean “setting up an international operation.” It means globalizing your talent programs, strategies, and systems.Do you know how to train leaders in the middle east and why and how they are different from leaders in Europe, the Far east, and India? Do you understand the role of the patriarch in middle-eastern organizations? Do you believe you can take a US trained manager and expect him to succeed in China or the Middle east? Now is the time to focus on these important new issues in our emerging talent strategies.DIFERENT ENGGEMENT DRIVERS IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES
  • As Jeff Imelt stated it so well, we are globalizing to go after “global markets” – not to become “multinational.”The best example of what this means is the story of the Ford Figo.Designed in india by indian engineers, manufactured by an indian factory – with India colors, sized for Indian roads, styled for Indian tastes, and with features for Indian families. 1/3 of the people who built this car had never even driven a car.Now the fastest growing car in Ford’s lineup and the #1 selling car in India.
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • But as organizations globalize, what we find is that the talent markets are very unbalanced and there is a global talent deficit. Look at demographics of China.DAVOS WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM. “WE ARE ENTERING AN ERA OF UNPARALELED TALENT SCARCITY, WHICH, IF LEFT UNADRESSED, WILL PUT A BRAKE ON ECONOMIC GROWTH AND WILL FUNDAMENTALLY CHANGE THE WAY WE APPROACH WORKFORCE CHALLENGES. In India, where millions of college grads enter the workforce each year, nearly 75% of graduates do not have the skills to enter the workforce. And despite this, there are so many jobs that the turnover rates are as high as 75% in some companies.Organizations are seeing talent shortages in Japan, China, Brazil, Singapore, and almost all developing countries – there are too many people at the younger and older parts of the age curve, but not enough in the middle. In the US, over the next 8 years the percent of population over the age of 55 is going to double, creating a talent deficit here as well.Global English, one of the largest providers of english language tools for corporations around the world, published research from Mckinsey which shows that in today’s global businesses more than 70% of the Global 1000’s employees are non-english speakers, yet only 7% believe their english is good enough to do their job!
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • Need to source talent internally due to shortages. Internal talent has institutional skills and experience you need to grow. We started talking about talent mobility in 2006, with our first research on succession management – and at that point in time our maturity model showed the top of succession mnagemetn was “transparent talent mobility.”Today succession processes are totally changing, and organizations must recognize that “facilitated talent movement,” as united healthgroup calls it, is a new and strategic talent process – and it forces the integration of recruiting and onboarding with the processes of talent management and employyeedeveopment.At UHG they have integrated these functions, and Rich Hughes, the CLO of UHG, now has responsibilty for the integraetd functions of Talent Acquisition, Development and Mobility. Lori Hughest is going to talk about why and how they do this – but mark my words, this next few years is the time to integrate these process so that you can build a transparent talent mobility process internally.JPM Chase, IBM examples.
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • Our research among hundreds of companies and providers found that all corporate learning strategies and architectures revolve around five fundamental elements:  Learning ProgramsLearning ApproachesLearning DisciplinesLearning Tools and TechnologyLearning Culture.The five elements, shown above, fit together to make up the whole of enterprise learning programs. One the left of the framework, we see a bar which represents the organization, governance, and management of the L&D function. This area is detailed in our High Impact Learning Organization® framework, which describes best practices in the management of the learning function. The right area of the framework refers to the Learning Architecture, which is an organization’s chosen set of tools and approaches for training programs.Reference HILO 2008Reference Learning Architecture research report1. Learning Programs:  We believe that the most visible and most important part of corporate learning are the “learning programs.” A program is a set of carefully crafted content, information, and experiences that create skills and capabilities within a specific audiences. Within the concept of a program are the critical steps to define the business and learning problem, clearly segment and understand the audience, and analyze the gaps in learning or performance to be filled. Examples of learning programs include sales leadership programs, new product rollout programs, ERP system rollout programs, onboarding programs, leadership development programs, compliance programs, manufacturing quality excellence programs, and thousands of others. Programs make up the creative magic in the L&D profession. Our goal is to try to apply the approaches, disciplines, tools, technologies, and cultural elements to make high-impact, efficient, long-lasting programs. Programs are targeted toward “audiences” and “business problems.” Every learning program has a target set of learners and a set of learning and business objectives to achieve. In the design of a program we must consider both the business problem (or desired business improvement measure), the audience’s demographics (e.g. who is the audience we are going to train), and many characteristics of this audience.  To design and implement the learning program, we must select the appropriate or available learning approaches, which leads us to the second level of our framework.In the Bersin & Associates Learning Impact Measurement Framework® (www.bersin.com/measurement) we illustrate a way to decompose the audience into the various influences on outcomes so that you can measure each outcome and impact area of a program as it is deployed.. Learning Approaches: The second element of our framework is what we call the “learning approaches.” As any trainer well understands, there are a myriad of ways that adults learn and hundreds of possible ways to design and implement a learning solution. Depending on the problem and the audience, we can assemble many different types of experiences, media, and interactivities to meet the business need. Some problems and audiences demand highly rigorous learning approaches (teaching pilots to fly a jet, teaching call center agents to use a complex banking application), because the learner must learn experientially. Other problems warrant self-study and meticulous practice (computer programming, accounting, and math skills); and others warrant a high degree of discussion, roleplays, and interaction (leadership development, sales, and customer service).Formal vs. Informal In today’s corporate training world, there are two broad categories of approaches: formal and informal. What precisely is the difference between “formal” and “informal” training? According of the dictionary, the word “formal” means “being in accordance with usual requirements, customs, etc.; observant of conventional requirements of behavior, procedure, etc., as persons; ceremonious; made or done in accordance In a learning context, formal typically means that the program elements are designed (typically using the disciplines covered in the next section), have a formal structure, and have specific, well-defined learning objectives. From the standpoint of our research, “formal training” programs are those which have traditional modules and have a formal structure – a “beginning” and an “end.” The word “informal,” taken from the dictionary, means “not officially recognized or controlled, free from constraint, casual and without ceremony.” In a learning context, “informal learning” has typically referred to learning which was accidental, ad hoc, unplanned, and happened without the disciplines of instructional design. It has typically referred to the things that training professionals did not necessarily pay attention to, but knew they were going on. Our research shows that most corporate managers believe that at most 20% of on-the-job skills is learned through formal, traditional training. 80% of all organizational learning occurs informally – or on-the-job. So we drew the model to reflect this distribution:Formalizing Informal Learning One of the important concepts we are introducing in this framework is the need to “formalize” these informal training activities. We illustrate them boldly in the framework because our research shows that organizations which consider elements of informal learning in their program design can get orders of magnitude greater returns than those that do not. We will come back to this idea a bit later.Three Broad Types of Informal Learning Using these definitions, “informal learning” falls into three broad types:On-Demand Learning (also called self-study or self-directed learning).In our model the term on-demand refers to learner-led activities: self-study e-learning, books, reference materials, videos, podcasts, and other forms of content which the learner uses on their own when needed or as directed. In this approach the learner “learns” through their own interaction with content, and they essentially assemble their learning with help from the training department. E-learning can be both formal and informal depending on the manner in which it is designed and deployed. Some e-learning courses are the product of very formal design processes and are then assigned to learners via equally structured learning and talent programs. These types would therefore be best described as formal learning. Other examples of e-learning are less formally designed or structured (rapid e-learning and/or SME written e-learning often fit this description) and are best understood as informal. And regardless of design, any e-learning content can become informal learning when deployed as learner-initiated, “on-demand” performance support (where the learner gets to decide what course elements are useful for the moment).In The Blended Learning Book® we refer to two models for self-directed learning: “program flow” (where a designer specifies an order and flow to the content), and “core and spoke,” where a designer creates core content and supporting materials. Today’s modern self-study programs blend both of these approaches.Social Learning (also called collaborative learning).Perhaps the newest and hottest new topic in corporate training is the use of social experiences to learn. This is nothing new: classroom training with breakout sessions, workshops, and problem solving groups have used social learning for years. We know that many people learn best in groups – and some people learn better by asking others for explanation than by reading or studying on their own. In the corporate training world many learning experiences are social, simply because the person with the expertise is out on the job. When you run into a problem on the job and need help, you find someone who is an expert – you would rarely if ever go back to the training department for assistance.We must also remember coaching and mentoring. Coaching is a great example of how many organizations (perhaps unbeknownst to them) are already formalizing informal learning. Coaching is one of the simplest, most common, and most effective forms of social learning; and most coaching that happens in organizations is very informal. However, when a company institutes a coaching program – providing explicit alignment to business needs, structured opportunities for coaching to happen and defined templates to follow – they are formalizing it. Coaching is a two-way street. It not only develops skills in the learner, it develops skills in the coach (or mentor). The ongoing relationship that develops between a mentor and a protégé is almost always informal, even when the original contact might have been initiating via a formal program. The guidance, conversation, and collaboration that take place are driven by circumstance instead of methodology.In today’s new technology environment, social learning can take place in new, low-cost, highly interactive ways. We can connect people very quickly and in very granular groups by using social networking, communities of practice, quality councils, wikis, blogs, and instant messenger. Using these tools we can now create highly specific social learning groups which can leverage the expertise of many people to solve the problems of the few. In this approach people learn from peers and experts, not from formal trainers.One of the important dimensions of social learning is culture. Organizations today have realized that just “creating groups” does not create knowledge sharing and learning. Many new cultural concepts must be considered, such as how to incent people to share knowledge and expertise rather than hoard it. Our new Learning Culture research explores this topic in great detail.Embedded Learning (learning “on the job”)Finally we must consider a very important third informal learning approach: embedded learning or performance support. Here we consider processes, content and systems which help an employee solve problems and learn while doing their job. There are many forms of embedded learning – some obvious and some not-so-obvious.Job aids are simple examples of embedded learning. No one will sit down and read the laminated card on a copier which tells you how to unjam the paper. But when the paper does jam, the card is there to quickly “teach you” how to fix the problem. Performance support or embedded learning is far more common than you realize. Help systems in software, job aids, checklists, reference cards, and online performance support are all forms of “embedded learning.” For this approach it is important for the program designer to consider what parts of an employee’s job or problem can be solved “as needed.” Maybe we shouldn’t bother to teach people how to unjam copiers, but just solve that problem on the job. Many retail, customer service, and manufacturing learning programs justify large amounts of embedded learning.More subtle aspects of embedded learning include things like a “stretch goal” or and “after-action review.” These managerial activities help people learn new approaches and learn from their mistakes. They tend to be monitored by talent management processes, but they fall directly into the category of “embedded learning” activities.Finally we must consider the role of customer-intelligence activities. Customer interviews, customer councils, and customer feedback surveys are also a form of embedded learning. While these types of programs do not directly fall into the ownership of the training department, they have a big influence on “on the job” learning and should be considered in some programs.As our framework shows graphically, any program could include one or more of each of the four elements. In today’s rapidly changing corporate environment, we urge program designers and learning leaders to consider all four approaches – and “formalize your informal learning strategy.”3. Disciplines The third layer of our framework discusses the disciplines or skills of the L&D organization. Our most current research among our research members shows that “understanding the modern disciplines of corporate training” rates among the top two needs of training professionals. These needs were closely followed by the need to better understand best practices in the globalization of learning programs. Most L&D professionals learned about instructional design, content development, training, and HR development over the last 10-20 years. They were not trained to understand the new principles of information architecture, web 2.0 user experience design, tagging, and community management. Most instructional technologists did not learn about mobile technologies, RSS, semantic search, XML, and many of today’s new technologies. To encourage organizations to think about skills and knowledge, we explicitly describe what we believe are the modern disciplines of corporate learning. These disciplines have not replaced traditional instructional design: rather they add to existing approaches. Many people ask us “how do I create and manage a community of practice?” How do we build a learning portal? What role will social networking play in our leadership development program? How can I create a library of searchable learning within our internal training environment? How can my LMS look more like YouTube and less like a course catalog? These are new and important questions to answer. The answers are not simple, because in many cases these new approaches and technologies have not been widely understood, documented, and studied yet. So in order to help organizations “modernize” themselves, we identified what we believe are the “modern disciplines” of corporate training. 4. Tools and Technology Technology plays an integral role in every corporate training program. Over the years, instructional designers and learning leaders have used technology to extend the role of the instructor, empower learners to learn on their own, and make learning available anywhere and at any time.  Today organizations must deal with a wide array of learning technologies: starting with the learning management system (LMS), content management system (LCMS), and w wide range of development and assessment tools. These core technologies make up the foundation of modern training, but much more is now available. Consider all the tools now available to support informal learning. Community management software, social networking software, presence awareness tools (such as instant messenging and mobile messaging), expert directories, and highly customizable user directories now make it possible to find, locate, and interact with experts anywhere. Today’s ideal corporate learning environment looks more like YouTube than a corporate course catalog – which means that learning organizations are focused on building complete learning portals which empower people to find any formal or informal learning resource from a single place. Learning management systems also now support advanced talent management capabilities such as performance management, development planning, goal alignment, and succession management. These talent-related features make the LMS more strategic then ever. In addition, we are now in the middle of a wave of new technology changing at an accelerating rate. Because of the availability of Google, high powered mobile phones, and faster PCs, we are seeing exciting new ways for people to communicate, share content, and publish materials. And much innovation occurs in the public web before it appears within corporations: it is far easier to publish video or presentations into YouTube of Slide than it is into most corporate LMS systems. The role of the learning technologist is as important as ever. Think about some of the new technologies we must consider: Employee status: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIN, and other systems give us instant information about where someone is and what they are doing.Deep profiling: talent management systems enable us to publish everything about a person we need to find expertise: skills, languages, experience, current projects, job history, certifications, and far more.Presence and location: Instant messaging to allow you to find people online and new presence-location services tell us precisely where someone is at all times.Directories: Today’s online directories give us access to everything about someone: their skills, location, their status, their contact information, and even what they are working on.Content tagging: vast arrays of content now available through tag clouds, keyword search, and the ability to view almost any content in a web browser. The traditional top-down approach to content architecture is being re-invented by letting users “tag” content and using tag-clouds to see what content is most useful.Data: all learning systems now track every click, every completion, and almost every interaction, allowing us to mine far more data and correlate it to other talent-related data. The role of learning measurement is also as important as ever. Our Impact Measurement Framework® was developed to extend the traditional Kirkpatrick model and help companies see how to measure their entire range of learning solutions. Informal learning may not have a direct “ROI” like a traditional class, but its value can still be measured by looking at utilization, changes in behavior, and patterns of usage.5. Culture Perhaps the most important element of an informal learning strategy is culture. Organizational learning does not just “happen” – it must be supported, facilitated, and reinforced through culture. When we asked our research members to discuss their learning cultures, fewer than 20% of all organizations tell us they have a “strong and consistent culture of learning” throughout their organization. There are many aspects to a learning culture. In our research we group them into the following areas: Formal L&D processes: development planning, coaching, mentoring, leaders taking responsibility for employee development, succession processes, and career development programs and approachesOrganizational processes: quality circles, loss-reviews, open communications up and down the organization, innovation centers and councilsCustomer processes: customer feedback, customer councils, customer story-tellingEmployee culture: employee opinion surveys, suggestion and innovation programs, openness of employee feedback, employees’ ability to communicate openly up, down, and across the organizationManagement processes: managers held responsible for development, learning from mistakes and not “shooting the messenger,” rewarding people for sharing information and knowledge, encouraging job rotation and mobilityLeadership: leaders taking an interest in employee development, business plans including skills and capabilities and readiness in their model, leaders listening to new ideas, leaders asking managers to develop and promote peopleSystems: use of portals, wikis, collaboration systems, and a wide range of open systems to help people communicate. These are only a few of the business processes which demonstrate a strong learning culture. As our research shows, culture is something which is both a driver of learning as well as an obstacle of learning. Organizational cultures are sometimes hard to change: they build early in a company’s life and they evolve over time.  The role of L&D and HR is to carefully monitor the organization’s learning culture and implement new processes and systems which improve learning culture. Any change in process requires a heavy dose of change management. We think it is important to consider employee, management, and leadership culture in any major learning strategyUse the Enterprise Learning Framework to Build a Learning Architecture Our Enterprise Learning Framework™ is a guide – designed to help you build a total learning architecture for your organization. While corporate training solves problems one program at a time, to drive organizational impact today you must consider the broad and wide range of options for organizational learning.  So how can you use this framework? We believe it offers three main benefits. 1. First we hope it helps broaden and clarify your thinking about the various learning options available today. Ideally all corporate learning programs should be built with considerations for performance consulting, audience analysis, various learning approaches, technology, and culture. So we hope that the framework gives you some clarity about what is important and the many options available to you for corporate learning. 2. We hope it helps you understand the new skills, disciplines, and competencies you must build in your own L&D organization. Corporate learning is an ever-changing profession, and now, more than ever, we need many new internal skills and tools to succeed. Most importantly, we hope the framework helps you build what we call a “learning architecture.” Again, we will come back to that later.
  • And let me assure you that these things are not simple “soft” things to work on. David’s research found that in fact the organizations which scored in the top 10% in learning culture were vastly outperforming their peers. They had 37% greater measures in employee productivity, they were far more innovative – 32% more likely to be first to market, they were more customer focused – 35% more able to respond to customer needs, and were actually more successful overall – 17% more likely to be market share leaders.The 40 practices are all printed out for you to read after my speech, and I encourage you to read them and come to David’s presentation to hear more about this critical new area.
  • Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever – in age, expectations, location and mobility. Our research shows that 70% of organizations are still recruiting baby boomers, while 30% will still consider hiring a candidate who has inappropriate postings on social media. Further, our new High Impact HR research shows that organizations with mixed age work forces perform better than those that are highly skewed toward younger or older workers.Nearly every organization we work with is looking for ways to grow. Whether this is geographical or line of business expansion, HR professionals are striving to develop workforces that can manage through ambiguity and rapid change. This is whyAT&T chose Bersin to redesign its performance management system, resulting in a 15% improvement in productivity in the first two yearsWhen Pfizer merged with Wyatt, they looked to Bersin to effectively consolidate two training groups into one organization, 2/3 the size of the previous team. This group cut training costs by 32% while creating innovative, high performing learning programsJetBlue University transformed their training team from request managers to performance consultants by using Bersin’s research to create a business alignment tool that ensures that the University’s resources are spent on strategically significant programs.
  • Josh Bersin

    1. 1. Building the BorderlessWorkplaceNew Talent Management Imperatives for 2012Josh BersinPresident and CEO November, 2011Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved.
    2. 2. Bersin & Associates Who We Are• Bersin & Associates is the leading global provider of best-practices, trends, and benchmarking research in talent management, learning, and strategic HR.• 60% of the Fortune 100 are Bersin & Associates research members, with more than 17.5 million employees managed by HR teams using Bersin Research. Human Resources Broad Research Practices - Human Resources - Leadership Development Leadership - Learning & Development Development - Talent Acquisition - Talent Management Learning & Development Offerings• WhatWorks® Membership: Research, Tools, Education, Talent Consulting Acquisition• IMPACT: The industry’s premiere conference on the Business of Talent• BersinBasics®: Fundamentals of Talent Management for Talent Business Professionals at All Levels Management Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 2
    3. 3. Agenda Today’s Business Environment Talent Markets: Out of Balance Proven High-Impact Talent Management Strategies 1. New Leadership Models 2. Talent Mobility and Career Management 3. Borderless Talent Acquisition 4. Transformation in L&D 5. Data Science - “The Talent Analyst” What this means to YOU Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 3
    4. 4. Today’s Business Environment Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 4
    5. 5. 2012 Business EnvironmentGlobalization, Innovation, Cost Containment What Are Your Organization’s Top Business Challenges for 2012? Financial pressure to cut costs Severe business downturn 35% of organizations see the need to Competitive threats Need to Accelerate Innovation +90% Increase accelerate innovation and globalize – Declining margins the highest level in four years…. yet… Diminished access to capital New top management team Launching new products and services 51% struggle to hire the right talent, Global expansion +100% Increase despite high unemployment… Acquisition or mergers Rapid business growth +400% Increase 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% © Bersin & Associates, Corporate TalentWatch® Research, Senior HR and Business Executives, ■ June 2011 ■ June 2010 1/2010 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 5
    6. 6. The Global Auto MarketplaceAutomobile Sales – U.S. vs. China 20 U.S. 18Million Vehicles Sold 16 13.9 million 14 12 10 10.4 million 8 China 6 4 2 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 6
    7. 7. Ford Figo – Fastest Selling Car in India Ford Figo Story Designed in Manufactured India for the in Chennai by Indian Market Indian Staff Colors, face, Size, Shape, and styling and features designed for designed for Indian tastes lifestyle and roads in India Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 7
    8. 8. The Borderless Workplace WORKFORCE WORKPLACE Connected Transparent Global Dynamic Multi-Generational Performance-driven Mobile Specialized Transient Interconnected Employee New Models for Career New Models for HR & L&D Partner Mentor CustomerCandidate LIFESTYLE 750 million people on Facebook Peer 135 million people on LinkedIn 75% of workers are mobile BigData is Everywhere Manager Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 8
    9. 9. What would You Be Willing to Give Up fora Week to Keep your Mobile Phone? Brushing teeth: 22% Sex: 33% Exercise: 54% Caffeine: 55% Gaming is now the fastest growing application on mobile devices Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 9
    10. 10. Today’s Talent Marketplace Out of Balance Skills and Free Agent Too Many SpecializationExperience Shortage Economy Candidates Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 10
    11. 11. Global Talent Deficit India Graduates Millions, but Too Few Are Fit to Hire 75% of technical graduates and 85% The Cultural Revolution of general graduates in India are created a “missing unemployable by India’s high-growth generation” of talent between industries, including IT and call 40-55, so expatriates fill most centers. jobs at the top Regional Leadership Young workers flooding the marketplace, yet most have BofA’s retail wealth management inferior preparation, Country Leadership arm, Merrill Lynch, plans to hire language skills, and technical 2,400 trainees in 2011, a 50 percent skills. increase over last year. Middle Management Entry Level “We are entering the era of China unparalleled talent scarcity, which will put a brake on economic growth around the world, and will fundamentally change the way we approach workforce challenges.” Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 11
    12. 12. The Ill-Prepared US Workforce Only 32% of college graduates have “excellent” skills to enter the workforce Only 16% of high school graduates have such skills. Missing are: • Professionalism/work ethic • Creativity and Innovation • Lifelong learning/self-direction • Critical thinking/problem solving Only 18% of workforce training programs raise skills from “deficient” to “adequate” Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 12
    13. 13. Free Agent Workforce Job tenure for under-35 year olds is 2.5 years The average worker today will have 11 jobs by the age of 45 2/3 of all employers are increasing their percentage of contingent workers We estimate that as much as 40% of the US workforce is currently on a contingent basis Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 13
    14. 14. Increasing Specialization Expertise drives competitive Top advantage Management Specialization improves Senior quality and reduces cost Management The Deep skills developed Experts Middle Management through “deliberate practice” and reinforcement Senior Specialists First Line Management Deep skills come from a range Functional Specialists / Front-Line Employees of developmental experiences We need career development Back Office, Operational, Contingent Employees in all critical job roles High Performing Organizations Understand This Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 14
    15. 15. Change in Employment Contract  In 2011 32% of employees are “planning on leaving” their employers, vs. 19% two Loyalty years ago  59% of employees believe their employer is a sound “long term” place to work vs. Career 65% over last three years  Only 42% of employees believe that promotions go to the “most qualified” Equity employeesMercer Whats WorkingResearch, October 2011 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 15
    16. 16. The Workforce is really Younger…. This generation has a very different view of work and, therefore, of loyalty. They see work as a mutually beneficial exchange with their employer and, when it’s no longer working for them, much to move on. And…Younger employees arethey planmore likely There is no strong senseleave their to the organization or expectation of to of allegiance employers. long-term employment. Their allegiance is primarily to themselves and their careers, and that has 25 year olds are for how employers manage this Under major implications 10% more likely youngest segment of their workforce.” to want to leave, and under 35 are 5% more likely. Mercer October 2011 Mercer October 2011 “By 2013, 47% of employees will be those born after 1977. -- US Census Bureau Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 16
    17. 17. Evolution ofTalent Management Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 17
    18. 18. Integrated Talent Management Team alignment Global Pay equity Recruiting 2 3 Managerial Efficiency and Sourcing Performance expertise Effectiveness & Recruiting management HR Systems Informal & Metrics and Mobile 1 4 LearningFuture planning Expertise & Scenarios Talent Strategy Learning & Career Business level & Planning Development talent plans Competency Development Gap and risk Management analysis Roles Jobs 7 5 New leadership Effective pay models and equity and Compensation Succession needs efficiency planning Total talent Comparative mobility pay analysis 6 Talent pools Pay for and segments performance Leadership Development Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 19
    19. 19. 1. New Models for Leadership Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 21
    20. 20. Leadership Remains One of the Toughest Challenges© Bersin & AssociatesTalentWatch, Fall 2011, n=283 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 22
    21. 21. Major Managerial Skills Gap Managerial skills rated lower than skills of entry-level workers Current Capabilities by Role, June 2011 Line Managers 59% 6% Weakest Entry-Level 50% 7% Top Missing Skills in Mid-Level Leaders Sales representatives 42% 10% Customer Service 1. Coaching 38% 5% 2. Performance Appraisal % Uneven Director-Level 3. Developing Others 2% 38% 4. Managing Change % Weak Engineering-Professional 5. Communications 26% 5% 6. Business Acumen Top Executives 24% 2%© Bersin & Associates, Corporate TalentWatch®Research, Senior HR and Business Executives, 9/2011 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 23
    22. 22. 21st Century Leadership DevelopmentNew Models: Creativity, not planning Quick decision-making Getting closer to customers Globalization, diversity Continuous change Manage unexpectedness Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 24
    23. 23. Emergence of “Girl Power” Between1970 and 2009 women went from holding 37% of all jobs to nearly 48%. (McKinsey) 76% of women now work and 58% of all college degrees go to women. Catalyst found that companies with significant female board representation had a 26% great return on capital invested. Yet the same research also found that only 14% of top executive positions are held by women. Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 25
    24. 24. 2. Talent Mobility and Career Management Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 26
    25. 25. Creating Talent Mobility Emerging Top Leaders Emerging Leaders Management Senior Management SMEs Middle Management (Consultants) Senior Specialists First Line Management Functional Specialists / Front-Line Employees Back Office, Operational, Contingent Employees Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 27
    26. 26. Implementing Talent Mobility Exec Succession Top New Top Management Leader Management New Candidate Senior Management Developmental Assignment SMEs Middle Management Contract (Consultants) Hire Stretch LateralPart Time Assignment Promotion Loan Senior Specialists First Line Management External Upward Assignment Promotion Functional Specialists / Front-Line Employees Lateral Job AssignmentIntern New Back Office, Operational, Contingent Employees Assignment Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 28
    27. 27. High-Impact Talent MobilityFacilitated Talent Mobility – New Market for Integrated Career Development Enterprise Workforce Planning Talent Assessment Talent Outreach & Exploration Talent Deployment Talent Onboarding & Development Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 29
    28. 28. Managing Talent Mobility Coaching Succession Assessment Management ORGANIZATION INDIVIDUAL NEEDS NEEDS / DESIRES VALUES STRATEGIC DESIRED INITIATIVES COMPETENCIES ANNUAL Individual (KNOWLEDGE, GOALS DESIRED Development DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS BEHAVIOR, INDIVIDUAL NEEDS Plan (IDP) MOBILITY OUTCOMES SKILLS) DEVELOPMENT OPEN POSITIONS PLAN (IDP) STRENGTHS CAREER ASPIRATIONS & MISSION OPPORTUNITIES VISION Strategic Career PerformanceCompetencies Organizational Management Management Planning / Restructuring Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 30
    29. 29. Need for Development Planning Organizations with highly effective development planning significantly outperform those without. With WithoutVoluntary Turnover 8% 11%Turnover among High-Performers 2% 3%Ability to “develop great leaders” 23% 7%Ability to “plan for future talent 22% 6%needs”Median Revenue per Employee $169,000 $82,800 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 31
    30. 30. Career Development Models Relative Business 25% Impact Business Impact (12 measures) 20% Engagement and retentionin business impact Functional Career% Improvement 15% Development 10% Strategy An Open, Social 5% Market for Career 0% Individually Manager Level Business Unit Level Enterprise Level -5% -10% -15% “Manage your -20% Own Career” Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 32
    31. 31. Entire Organization Must Contribute toWorld-Class Career Management Employee Manager HR Company• Identify • Define Job • Provides Tools & • Infrastructure – Career Profiles Resources Process, Goals • Provide Coaching • Develop Career Technology,• Maintain Profiles • Assess Potential Models People• Demonstrate • Identify • Facilitate • Create Culture of Values Development Process Mobility• Socialize Opportunities • Offer Career • Communicate Interests • Provide Candid Coaching Expectations• Create Internal Feedback • Career • Create Network • Share Talent Development Transparent• Share Expertise Openly Training Marketplace • Integrate with Talent Mgmt Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 33
    32. 32. Disappointment with Performance Management Performance Management’s Effectiveness at Key Activities that Drive Business ResultsSource: Bersin & Associates High ImpactTalent Management and High Impact PerformanceManagement research, 2011 n=290+ Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 34
    33. 33. 3. BorderlessTalent Acquisition Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 35
    34. 34. The War for The Best People Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 36
    35. 35. Attracting the right candidate in the right placequickly, efficiently, and consistently Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 37
    36. 36. Radical Changes in Talent Acquisition Internal Sourcing Facebook Advanced and Analytics Farming LinkedIn Online Video Candidate Broad Job Reference Interviewing Relationship Employment Seeker Check & Screening Mgt Branding Tools Referral Networks Electronic Online SEO for Talent Social Candidate Talent Resumes Advertising Talent Networks Referral Exchanges Acquisition Networks Scanners Online Parsers Assessments Job Integrated Online Aggregators Employee Classified Online Integrated Advertising Profile Advertising Job Boards Onboarding Client/Server SaaS, Hosted Cloud PC Tools Resume Scan Workflow Open Sourcing Applicant Resume Parse Career Site Social Network Tracking Search Integration with TM Mobile Late 1980s Early 1990s Early 2000s 2010+Forms Automation Recruiter Productivity Workflow and Online Leveraging the Cloud Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 38
    37. 37. 4. Transformation ofLearning & Development Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 39
    38. 38. Evolution of Enterprise LearningChange in Disciplines, Technologies, and Strategies We are Here Get Materials Expand, Blend Solve Talent Informal Learning Online Improve E-Learning Problems Skills & Specialization Building Deep and Integrated Alignment with the Business Career Development Rich Catalog Learning Paths Competency-Based Deep Specialization University Role-Based Learning Leadership Development Search, Collaboration, Instructional Design Rapid E-Learning Community Kirkpatrick Information vs. Instruction Understanding Integrating Information Architecture Selecting and Integrating Informal Learning and Aligning Implementing Adapting, and Social Networking with Collaborative / Social E-Learning and E-Learning InteractivityEnriching Blended Mobile Get MaterialsLMS Talent Learning, Content Mgt, the Online Simulation Blended Learning Learning and Management Rich Media Globalization Learning Portal LMS LMS 1 2 3 Blogs, Wikis, Twitter, 4 E-Learning Platform Enterprise Learning Platform Mobile, and Social Networks 2001 2004 2007 2010 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 40
    39. 39. Leaders Know Learning is InformalWhich learning approaches drive the greatest business value in your organization? On the job experience 60% On the job mentoring, projects, rotation 36% Coaching by supervisor 33% Formal training - company provided 28% Peers, friends, personal networks 14% Formal training - outside provider 8% 72% of leaders believe their User generated materials 4% most valuable learning approaches are informal Corporate documentation 3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%© Bersin & Associates, High-Impact Learning Practices®n=1,100, www.bersin.com/hilp Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 41
    40. 40. The Continuous Learning ModelExpert Continuous Learning Career Communities Curriculum of Practice Social Coaching Networking Mentoring E-learning Mobile courses Learning Training Event Job AidsNovice Traditional Training Time Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 42
    41. 41. A New Learning FrameworkBersin & Associates Enterprise Learning Framework® Learning ProgramsOrganization, Governance, and Management Audiences, Problems, and Environment Informal Learning Architecture Approaches Formally Designed On-Demand Social Embedded Training 20% 80% Disciplines New Disciplines ToolsTools and Technology New and Technology Learning Culture Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 43
    42. 42. Development of a New Formal Learning Architecture Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 44
    43. 43. But do We Know what Really Matters? Great Corporate Strong CLO and Excellent Use of rich media University Alignment L&D Skills and social tools Excellent Training Innovative and E-Learning program design Have we created an organization which truly has a culture to learn? Does leadership Is expertise Are decision- Do people share reinforce the need rewarded and making processes information to learn? valued? clear? openly? Do people feel Do we take Do people Do we listen empowered to the time to move around to customers point out errors? reflect? and take risks? openly? Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 45
    44. 44. We found…success depends on Culture 52% High Performing Organizations are 3X more likely to have a strong learning culture 37% 32% 24% 22% 18% 7% 3% 3% High Impact Organizations All Organizations2% Poor Fair Good Excellent World Class We do not A few locations Learning valued Learning is Valued atvalue learning value learning in some locations highly valued all levels Strength of Learning Culture Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 46
    45. 45. High-Impact Learning Culture® Model6 Keys to an Enduring Learning Culture Business Outcomes Demonstrate Enabling FormalizingBuilding Encouraging Empowering Learning Agility Learning’s Knowledge Learning Trust Reflection Value Sharing Employees As Process Innovation Employee Productivity Customer Ability Motivation Satisfaction Leadership to Learn to Learn Customer Responsiveness Customer Input Acquisition + Application Management Cost Structure of Knowledge and Skills Time to Market Market Share 40 Practices of a High-Impact Learning Culture® Workforce Expertise Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 47
    46. 46. Organizations with a Strong Learning Culture Significantly Outperform their peers… Innovation Productivity Time to Quality Skills for the Profitability Market Future 46% 37% 34% 26% 58% 17%more likely to greater better greater ability more more likely to be first to employee response to to deliver prepared to be market market productivity customer “quality meet future share leader needs products” demand Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 48
    47. 47. 5. The Need forData Science in HR Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 49
    48. 48. How do Companies Hire People?2/3 of hiring done without any significant assessment% of Organizations Which Regularly Use Following Assessment Practices Background checking: 79% 2/3 use no real Managerial interviews: 64% assessment process Interview training: 47% at all … leaving the process to Behavioral assessments: 34% hiring managers or recruiters Reference calls: 32% Skills-based assessments: 25%Bersin & Associates High-Impact Talent AcquisitionStudy, Fall 2010, 158 organizations responded Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 50
    49. 49. The Surprise Effect of Data What is the most important baseball statistic that drives a winning team? • Team batting average? • Runs batted in (RBI)? • Pitcher’s earn run average (ERA)? On Base Percentage (OBP) Not a Characteristic of the Player (candidate) Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 51
    50. 50. CognitiveFriendliness Ability What Factor drives sales revenue in these three organizations? Tenure Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 52
    51. 51. Data Analysis Skills Important to HR Top HR Skills | Capabilities Correlation Business Partner relationship management .52 Managing and leading people .51 Coaching and Mentoring .49 Change management and communications .48 Analyzing and interpreting data .47 Knowledge Sharing and expertise directories .47 Managing your Personal Development .45 Top Organizational | Managerial Capabilities Developing a high performance culture .77 Developing a strong learning culture .77 Developing strong talent segmentation .74 Developing high levels of career development and mobility .73 Attracting and selecting the right talent .64 Measuring business impact of HR .64 Developing high levels of engagement .54 Giving people honest feedback .49 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 53
    52. 52. HR Organizations are Not Ready What percentage of HR organizations do you believe feel have strong skills in data analysis and interpretation? 6% Rate themselves “High” 56% - “Poor”Bersin & AssociatesHigh-Impact HR Organization® 2011and 2010, n=741 organizations Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 54
    53. 53. The Lowest Rated HR Skill Relative Strengths of HR Skills and Capabilities Attracting and selecting the right talent 17% Promoting health and wellness 15% Onboarding new talent 7% Fairly allocating compensation 6% Understanding skills needed by role 4% Encouraging innovation and collaboration 1% Creating a high-performance culture -4% Measurement, analytics, and Enabling a learning organization -5% segmentation are the lowest rated skills in HR teams Identifying and developing future leaders -6% today Driving internal mobility -11% Developing workforce analytics for management -12% Measuring HR program effectiveness -18%Bersin & AssociatesHigh-Impact HR Organization® 2011and 2010, n=741 organizations Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 55
    54. 54. Talent Management: What’s Next Globalization and Talent Imbalances will be with us for the future Five keys to success • New Models of Leadership • Talent Mobility and Career Development • Borderless Talent Acquisition • Transformed Learning & Development • Bring Data Science to HR Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 56
    55. 55. Join Us – April 10-12, 2012 Copyright © 2011 Bersin & Associates. All rights reserved. Page 57
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