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This study is looking at the trends in the implementation and impact of learning technologies in the workplace.

This study is looking at the trends in the implementation and impact of learning technologies in the workplace.

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    Boosting Business Agility Boosting Business Agility Document Transcript

    • Boosting Business AgilityTowards Maturity 2011-12 BenchmarkFull Report
    • Boosting Business AgilityAbout this researchThis study is the fifth in a longitudinal research series looking at the trends in the implementationand impact of learning technologies in the workplace. The research is published in a suite of reports: Boosting Business Agility - Towards Maturity 2011-12 benchmark: Executive Summary Boosting Business Agility - Towards Maturity 2011-12 benchmark: Full report Towards Maturity 2011-12 benchmark: Longitudinal trends – data tablesThe full suite of reports can be downloaded for free at www.towardsmaturity.org/2011benchmark.Previous Towards Maturity Benchmarks can be downloaded at http://tinyurl.com/TMbenchmarkAcknowledgementsThe 2011 benchmark research has been made possible thanks to the funding support of 16 TowardsMaturity Ambassadors, who share our passion for ensuring that independent research and advice isfreely available. See Annex D for details of the Towards Maturity Ambassadors.Find out more about our Ambassadors at www.towardsmaturity.org/ambassadorsWe also thank all those organisations who have kindly agreed that we can quote them by name inthe report.Research team: Genny Dixon, Laura OvertonA copy of this report can be downloaded atwww.towardsmaturity.org/2011benchmark© Copyright Towards Maturity CIC 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this material protected by this copyright may be reproduced orutilised in any form, or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage andretrieval system without prior authorisation© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 2
    • Boosting Business AgilityForeword by Craig McCoyMuch has changed in the 18 years that I have been working as an HRDirector. For those working in the field of HR and learning, theopportunities to improve organisational performance have never beengreater; but neither have the challenges, as the pace of changeaccelerates around us.No-one is immune. Even market leaders and established serviceproviders have to constantly re-evaluate their service offering, marketingstrategies and processes in order to become more agile, productive, andcompetitive. The world of business is changing fast and the pressure ontime means that business managers are demanding shorter, fasterlearning interventions. In an increasingly unpredictable economic climate, the HR function has animportant role to play in helping businesses become increasingly agile. But to do this, we need to beable to rapidly evolve our own service offering, using tools, technologies and the experiences ofthose around us to enable constant innovation and change.This is why I welcome the independent Towards Maturity Benchmark, which has consolidated theexperiences of over 1,800 organisations (Bupa included) over the last 8 years. It cuts through thehype to show how real organisations are using both established and new learning technologies insuch a way that those of us serious about improving performance and business agility would befoolish to ignore.At Bupa, like most organisations today, we need to evolve our skills base to survive. This meansadopting new skills from other sectors and disciplines, as well as being creative in the ways that webuild the skills of our talented workforce. Our job is to make more people, more effective, morequickly and in order to do that the HR function has to grow up to become more commercial. There isno getting away from it, there are only 2 options: we can either change or stagnate!The Towards Maturity 2011-12 study illustrates a number of areasthat we still have to take action on if we are to avoid becoming If HR is looking toirrelevant within the organisations that we serve. establish a credible relationship with theFirstly it is time to move up the value curve. If HR is looking to business, we can’t affordestablish a credible relationship with the business, we can’t afford to ignore the tangibleto ignore the tangible business benefits illustrated by this report. business benefitsInvestment in innovative learning approaches facilitates business illustrated by this reportagility and can support business generation, improve customerservice and increase organisational efficiency. But to achieve theseresults we have to work in partnership with business, and this study has a challenge for businesspeople as well: take a second look at what your HR and L&D teams can do for you today! Really goodL&D practitioners can make a substantial difference to your bottom line so it is important not toframe your view of what learning can achieve on your past experiences alone – look beyond that,expect innovation and actively engage with your HR teams to achieve so much more.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 3
    • Boosting Business AgilitySecondly, we are reminded that technology-enabled learning is not just about ‘tick in the boxcompliance’ – it has a critical role in building customer service excellence and leadership resilience. Itis also clear that L&D still has a way to go to grasp the full potential of technology as an enabler tomake our learning proposition different. We can no longer ignore the broader context of how peoplelearn. This is not just about Generation Y: the way everyone acquires knowledge, increasinglythrough technology, is changing. HR and learning professionals need to help make jobs moreeffective, by creating a knowledge environment that encourages sharing and ensures thatinformation, contacts and networks are accessible to all. This role is not just ’nice to have’, it iscritical for business success.We are all in the market for talent: to attract, retain and develop the best people that we can.To do this, I believe it is critical for all organisations to aspire to become industry leaders. Mostorganisations have a change agenda and L&D has a critical role toplay in supporting and driving that change. But in order to do this We can no longer ignorewe also have to adapt, so it is critical that we rapidly become the broader context of howconfident in new approaches to today’s skills challenges. people learn.This is not a time to remain introspective, with our point of The way everyone acquiresreference internally focussed. We need to look to our external knowledge, increasinglynetworks, communities and external benchmarks to tap into a rich through technology, issource of new ideas and innovation necessary for our success in the changing.future.If you are looking for proven approaches to boost business agility within your organisation, Ithoroughly recommend the 2011-12 Towards Maturity Benchmark as a great place to start.Craig McCoyHR Director, Bupa Health and WellbeingTowards Maturity Supporters- The 2011 study remains current and vendor neutral thanks to theindependent experts, magazine publishers and event organisers, industry communities andmembership bodies who make up Towards Maturity Supporters. Our supporters feed into thebenchmark process, providing insights on future trends and practices that should be investigatedwithin the study. TM Supporters share the goal of providing independent advice and services tostimulate effective learning innovation. They include:Find out more about what our supporters think about the Towards Maturity Benchmark atwww.towardsmaturity.org/supporters© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 4
    • Boosting Business AgilityTable of Contents1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 7 1.1 8 years of benchmarks – the story so far ................................................................................ 7 1.2 Methodology and participant demographics .......................................................................... 82 Adding value ....................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 Shifting budgets ..................................................................................................................... 12 2.2 Drivers for investment in learning technologies ................................................................... 13 2.3 Enabling business agility ........................................................................................................ 16 2.4 Bottom line benefits .............................................................................................................. 19 2.5 Improving results through maturity ...................................................................................... 223 Building skills ...................................................................................................................... 25 3.1 A quick overview of learning technology adoption............................................................... 25 3.2 Evolving content strategies ................................................................................................... 26 3.3 Delivery strategies ................................................................................................................. 30 3.4 Engaging learners and improving talent ............................................................................... 34 3.5 Working with external training providers ............................................................................. 364 Harnessing technology to improve performance .................................................................. 38 4.1 Adopting social learning ........................................................................................................ 38 4.2 Barriers to uptake of social media......................................................................................... 40 4.3 Promoting a performance culture ......................................................................................... 415 Building confidence in new approaches to learning .............................................................. 44 5.1 Overcoming reluctance to change ........................................................................................ 44 5.2 Improving business partnerships .......................................................................................... 47 5.3 Managing change .................................................................................................................. 48 5.4 Developing the skills of the learning professionals ............................................................... 496 Taking action ...................................................................................................................... 53Annexes ..................................................................................................................................... 55 Annex A - Survey design and participant demographics ................................................................... 55 Annex B - Sample of participating organisations .............................................................................. 59 Annex C – The Towards Maturity Model........................................................................................... 61 Annex D - Towards Maturity Ambassador Programme ................................................................... 63 Annex E – About Towards Maturity .................................................................................................. 65© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 5
    • Boosting Business AgilityList of FiguresFigure 1 Industries represented by survey respondents ............................................................................................................ 9Figure 2 Distribution of survey respondents in terms of perceived maturity .......................................................................... 10Figure 3 Length of time using learning technologies related to perception of maturity .......................................................... 11Figure 4 Maturity related to the Towards Maturity Index quartile ......................................................................................... 11Figure 5 Training budgets varied by sector .............................................................................................................................. 13Figure 6 Skills that are most likely to be e-enabled .................................................................................................................. 14Figure 7 Percentage of all organisations e-enabling skills compared with 2008 ...................................................................... 15Figure 8 Drivers for investment increase year on year ............................................................................................................. 16Figure 9 Audience groups that are using learning technologies .............................................................................................. 17Figure 10 Benefits achieved by those seeking them ................................................................................................................ 23Figure 11 Index measures of benefits related to e-learning maturity ...................................................................................... 24Figure 12 Relative usage of different learning technologies .................................................................................................... 25Figure 13 Trends in the use of video in learning and development ......................................................................................... 27Figure 14 Source of e-learning content varies with maturity ................................................................................................... 30Figure 15 Maturity alters the way in which content is combined ............................................................................................ 31Figure 16 The rise in live online learning .................................................................................................................................. 32Figure 17 Different learning methods supported by live online learning ................................................................................. 32Figure 18 Trends in use of mobile devices ............................................................................................................................... 33Figure 19 Locations where learners can access technology-enabled learning ......................................................................... 34Figure 20 The extent to which learning technologies support talent management ................................................................ 35Figure 21 Media supporting the sharing of good practice ....................................................................................................... 39Figure 22 Uses and benefits of social networks in workplace learning .................................................................................... 39Figure 23 Use of 3rd party social networks .............................................................................................................................. 40Figure 24 Barriers to use of social networks in workplace learning ......................................................................................... 41Figure 25 Fostering a performance culture .............................................................................................................................. 42Figure 26 L&D skills and confidence with new media .............................................................................................................. 45Figure 27 Barrier perception decreasing with maturity ........................................................................................................... 46Figure 28 Communication tactics of top performers ............................................................................................................... 49Figure 29 Size and location of benchmark participant organisations ....................................................................................... 57Figure 30 Industry sector and job roles of benchmark respondents ........................................................................................ 57Figure 31 Relative maturity of different sectors ...................................................................................................................... 58Figure 32 Length of time using learning technologies related to the TM Index ....................................................................... 58Figure 33 Towards Maturity workstreams ............................................................................................................................... 62List of TablesTable 1 Benefits relating to learning administration ................................................................................................................ 21Table 2 Benefits of developing content in-house ..................................................................................................................... 28Table 3 Challenges reported when bringing content development in house........................................................................... 28Table 4 Costs of creating e-learning content ............................................................................................................................ 28Table 5 Barriers relating to e-learning content ........................................................................................................................ 29Table 6 Integrating e-enabled learning with the classroom ..................................................................................................... 30Table 7 Accessing content beyond the firewall ........................................................................................................................ 31Table 8 Usage of tools to support talent management ............................................................................................................ 35Table 9 Learning supports career development ....................................................................................................................... 36Table 10 How performance varies with learner engagement .................................................................................................. 36Table 11 Demographics of survey respondents ....................................................................................................................... 56Table 12 Distribution of survey respondents ........................................................................................................................... 57© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 6
    • Boosting Business Agility 1 Introduction Learning technologies are an established part of the armoury for organisations looking to move ahead despite ongoing economic uncertainty. The 2011-12 Towards Maturity benchmark draws on data from over 600 organisations. 1.1 8 years of benchmarks – the story so far The fundamental question that has fuelled Towards Maturity research with over 1800 respondents over the last 8 years is: What are successful organisations doing to deliver business results with learning technologies and how can we learn from them? Over the past 3 years the economic climate has forced organisations to revisit“The majority of our L&D learning strategies. The business priority for skills as a strategy for growth hasdelivery staff are either from been raised by both the Institute of Directors and the Confederation of Britisha clinical background or long Industry. Poor skills are shackling the economy - 47% of employers say that theirestablished classroom staff lack skills to do their job. This fact impacts business through increasedtrainers. This has really workload for other staff (reported by 61%), curtailed growth (58%), higherhelped focus on some areas operational costs (32%), compromised quality (34%), lost orders (25%), and stifledand relationships we need to innovation (33%).1improve on if we are tosuccessfully progress learning Because of this 41% of business directors plan to increase investment in skillstechnologies.” (Betsi (according to the CBI’s Ready to Grow report) but two thirds are looking for moreCadwaladr University Health targeted and more cost effective training2.Board) It is no wonder that the use of technology in learning is now mainstream, with 78% of organisations now using some form of e-learning (and over half planning to increase their use in the next 12 months).3 However, over the years, our research has demonstrated that the benefits hoped for from technology enabled learning are not always realised. Those that are more mature in their use of learning technologies are realising significant benefits measured in terms of: Increased business benefit – in terms of speed to competency and responsiveness to business demand Increased learning efficiency – in terms of cost savings, time savings and volume of learning delivered. 1 IOD Shackled by the Skills Crunch - http://www.iod.com/MainWebSite/Resources/Document/shackled_by_the_skills_crunch_1012.pdf 2 CBI Ready to Grow report 3 CIPD - Focus on eLearning report June 2011 http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/survey- reports/focus-e-learning.aspx © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 7
    • Boosting Business Agility: Introduction Through our previous research we have been able to identify 6 workstreams of implementation behaviours that characterise maturity and directly link to the successful outcomes of learning technology implementation. (See Annex C for a description of the TM model and the Towards Maturity Index or TMI.) Organisations in the top quartile of these maturity workstreams (as measured by the Towards Maturity Index) have consistently reported better business results and fewer barriers to implementation.The Towards Maturity Model They are also more likely to report that they are able to adapt rapidly to change. The 2011-12 Towards Maturity Benchmark builds on previous research to provide an in-depth long-term study into the implementation of learning technologies in workplace learning. This year we continue to investigate the impact of maturity on business results, efficiency and talent development. We also focus on one aspect of business impact in more detail – business agility: the ability to respond rapidly to change. The 2011-12 Benchmark report aims to provide a robust evidence base that supports more effective implementation of innovative learning. The report aims to help organisations: – Deliver value – Eliminate risk – Increase business engagement – Build confidence in new approaches – Share effective practices and – Save time and cost 1.2 Methodology and participant demographics“Thanks - it was worth thetime taken to go throughthe questions to reflect on 1.2.1 Survey methodologyhow far weve come and Individuals with responsibility for implementing learning technologies in thehow far there still is to go!” workplace were invited to participate in a two-part online review during June and(Hanover Housing July 2011.Association) The first part surveyed skills, technologies, benefits and barriers to e-learning; the second part was a benchmark review against 124 action statements of implementation good practice. These action statements are the building blocks of the Towards Maturity Model and provide the basis for determining the organisation’s Towards Maturity Index. The survey was widely distributed via a number of channels and partners to those already with an interest in using learning technologies. The assumption was that all respondents have already started on their ‘e-learning journey’. Participants were invited to complete the review via a traditional online survey or via the © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 8
    • Boosting Business Agility Towards Maturity Benchmark Centre. All participants who completed received immediate feedback in September via the Towards Maturity Benchmark Centre in the form of a personalised benchmark report. This highlighted their current strengths and weaknesses against a number of Key Performance Indicators and the effective practices outlined in the Towards Maturity Model.4 1.2.2 Demographics of benchmark respondents A total of 767 respondents from 643 organisations commenced the survey, with 488 completing all sections. Participating organisations included AXA UK, Barclaycard, Barnados, Boots UK, BT plc, Cable&Wireless Worldwide, Christian Aid, E.ON AG, Eversheds LLP, IKEA of Sweden, Lloyds Banking Group, Nestlé, NSPCC, Pearson International, Shell, The Rugby Football League, Tesco Stores Ltd,“This has been a very Toyota Motor Europe NV SA , Vodafone, 33 councils and over 20 hospitals andinteresting process to go NHS trusts. A sample of participating organisations is listed in Annex C.through and has given me The number of respondents was 50% higher than the previous year. Whilst oversome ideas for the future 100 had taken part in the review in 2010 and over 50 had also taken part in 2008,however, as always, the large numbers of new organisations taking part each year ensures that theworking in a charity longitudinal study reflects trends across a wide range of organisations.sometimes really impactson what can realistically be Respondents were more evenly distributed between industry sectors than inachieved.” (Addaction) previous studies and were spread across private (57%), public (30%) and not-for- profit sector (13%) organisations. The highest numbers of responses were from the Finance, IT/telecoms and Voluntary sectors, but there were also high numbers from Health/Social care, Professional and Technical, Local and Central Government and Manufacturing5. There were fewer responses than in previous years from those engaged in commercial training or from small educational consulting companies reducing any unintentional bias towards those who are themselves ‘suppliers’ of e-learning solutions. Figure 1 Industries represented by survey respondents 4 Delegates were benchmarked against the current TM Benchmarks established in the 2010-11 report. New implementation benchmarks from the 2011-12 study will be set in January 2012. Further information on the Towards Maturity Benchmark Centre can be found at www.towardsmaturity.org/mybenchmark. 5 17 individual sector benchmarking reports will be available from January 2012 © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 9
    • Boosting Business Agility: Introduction Two-thirds of respondents were from the UK, with 19% from other European countries6. The 2011 benchmark also attracted 15% respondents from around the world (See Annex A and B). Organisation size varied, ranging from micro businesses with fewer than 10 employees, to large multi-nationals operating globally from a number of locations worldwide. Collectively, these organisations employ at least 2m employees. Responses came from those working within their own organisation (78%) and those supporting external organisations (22%). Two-thirds were L&D professionals reporting either to HR/L&D central or within a line of business, and two-thirds had responsibility for learning strategy and management as all or part of their job role. 1.2.3 Maturity Respondents were invited to self-assess their ‘e-learning maturity’ on a five point scale7. The spread reflected a similar pattern of perceived maturity to previous years although a greater proportion of novice users responded than in 2010. Figure 2 Distribution of survey respondents in terms of perceived maturity (2010 proportions shown in grey text) 16% (12%) 22% (23%) Embedded 31% (39%) Established 19% (20%) Developing 12% (7%) Sporadic Novice 67% of respondents have now been using learning technologies for 3 years or more and many consider them to be well established or embedded within organisational practice. Whilst maturity relates in part to time, there are a significant number that still consider themselves ‘novice’ users even after over 3 years of use (Figure 3). When we use the TMI as an indicator of maturity, calculated from respondents’ level of agreement with 124 good practice statements within the 6 areas of the Towards Maturity Model, we find that 70% of those in the top quartile of TMI describe themselves as either ‘established’ or ‘embedded’ users. 6 Specific trend analysis for Europe can be found at www.towardsmaturity.org 7 See Annex A for definitions © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 10
    • Boosting Business AgilityFigure 3 Length of time using learning technologies related to perception of maturity 100 90 80 70 0 - 1 years 60 1 - 3 years 50 4 - 6 years 40 6 - 10 years 30 10 years plus 20 10 0 Novice Sporadic Developing Established EmbeddedThe pattern shown in Figure 4 is not surprising, as we would not expect those thatare new to e-learning to be realising the same level of benefits as those withconsiderable experience. However, there are still over 10% of established orembedded users in the bottom quartile for TMI that are still not achieving thebenefits promised!Figure 4 Maturity related to the Towards Maturity Index quartile 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% TMI Bottom TMI Quartile 3 TMI Quartile 2 TMI Top Quartile Quartile Embedded Established Developing Sporadic Novice N=7641.2.4 A note on longitudinal trendsThrough this study we have been able to track longitudinal trends since 2006.However, it is apparent that 2010 presented some anomalies with inflated figures– perhaps due to the greater proportion of e-mature or ‘supplier’ organisationsthat took part. In this report, we therefore compare some of the 2011 data with2008 figures.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 11
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding Value 2 Adding valueTop 10 drivers in 2011 In addition to supporting the delivery of business critical skills, learning89% Increase access to learning technologies are now adding value by helping organisations become more agile85% increase flexibility and deliver significant efficiency savings. However, investment in technology alone is no guarantee for success as many are yet to realise the benefits they84% Improve quality seek.83% Reduce training costs In a time of economic uncertainty, business priorities are all about agility – how82% Extend reach of training they can adapt rapidly (and cost effectively) to the changing external80% Achieve greater environment. This agility is critical for growth, survival and the ultimate consistency satisfaction and loyalty of customers and service users. To date, the priorities from the L&D team perspective are more likely to be related to improving the79% Improve induction efficiency, reach and quality of the learning interventions themselves. However, in79% Increase sharing of good 2011, in order to help their organisations adapt faster to change, we see that practice benchmark participants are starting to look beyond the efficiency agenda as a driver for investment.79% Reduce time away from job In this section, we look at what has been happening to budgets over the last few78% Help implement new processes/products years, the key drivers for ongoing investment in learning technologies, the benefits that are being realised as a result, and consider how maturity can help organisations achieve a better return on their expectations. 2.1 Shifting budgets An estimated 18% of overall training budget is being spent on technologies. This has fallen slightly in the last 12 months, despite predictions a year ago by 65% of organisations that the proportion would increase. Over 65% of respondents continue to predict greater use of technology in the next two years as they see e- On average, 18% learning as a cheaper alternative to traditional modes of delivery and a way of reaching a wider audience. One example being the increased use of live online of overall training webinars and meetings to cut down on travel costs. budget is allocated to learning technologies The up-front costs of purchasing new IT solutions can make technology options appear more expensive, which can slow adoption or delay development. Economic pressures have also encouraged organisations to sharpen their focus, look for ‘quick wins’ and to develop their own content in-house. Overall, training budgets have not fallen as much as feared in the last 2 years: 26% reported an increase (but only 17% had expected an increase) 38% reported they stayed the same (40% predicted this) 36% reported a decrease (42% predicted a decrease) © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 12
    • Boosting Business Agility Sectors differ markedly, with 58% public sector organisations reporting a decrease in their training budget and only 12% reporting an increase. Budgets have“We have to negotiate best increased most in the private sector, with 34% reporting an increase.value for money” Figure 5 Training budgets varied by sector Compared with last year Forecast for 2 years time 70% 70%“We are more careful about 60% 60%spend, but look for a Returnon Expectations rather than 50% 50%on Investment” 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20%“It is more difficult to gainapproval for spend on 10% 10%technologies” 0% 0% Increase Stay the same Decrease Increase Stay the same Decrease Not-for-profit Private Public Not-for-profit Private Public There is some optimism that overall training budgets will be fairly stable for the“There are severe constraints next 2 years:on spending on delivery butalso an increased awareness 29% predict an increase/ acceptance of potential 41% predict they will remain the samesavings.” 30% predict a decrease However, again, there is greater pessimism in the public sector with 58% forecasting further decrease in their budget.“The increased demand for (It should be noted that the survey was conducted in June/July 2011 at a timetraining with less budget has when the public sector in particular was reeling from announcements aboutdriven the use of learning changes to pension arrangements.)technologies” (Surrey CountyCouncil) 2.2 Drivers for investment in learning technologies We look at the drivers for investment under five main headings: o Developing business critical skills o Enabling business agility o Improving customer satisfaction o Managing talent and o Increasing learning efficiency – without loss of quality © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 13
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding ValueTop 10 e-enabled skills 2.2.1 Developing business critical skills Developing skills remains a top priority for business and this continues to drive55% IT user skills investment in learning technologies. Historically the subjects most likely to be e-53% Health and safety enabled were related to compliance and IT, but now technology is being applied to every subject, including management, leadership and customer sales / service51% Induction skills8.49% Industry specific compliance Figure 6 illustrates the wide range of skills currently being e-enabled in some way in 2011.48% Company specific training Figure 6 Skills that are most likely to be e-enabled46% IT professional skills46% CSR (eg equality & diversity)45% Improving own learning and performance42% Leadership and management36% Customer service In 2011, we find that the subjects most likely to be e-enabled have not changed from the previous year9. These are also the skills areas that organisations new to e-learning are likely to focus on first10:“We are beginning to provide 1. IT user (55%)online learning opportunities 2. Health and safety (53%)to our 100,000 volunteers - 3. Induction (52%)we are just piloting our first 4. Industry specific regulatory/compliance skills (49%)online learning module on 5. Company specific skills (48%)the topic of mentoring skills, More skills are being e-enabled in 2011 than in 2008 (Figure 7) with the exceptionwith a view to developing of IT user skills where the number of organisations e-enabling IT user skills hasfurther online learning for fallen from 59% in 2008 to 55% in 2011 (interesting given that 30% still note thatvolunteers. In terms of HR, poor learner IT skills are a significant barrier to further implementation success!).some learning is providedonline - mainly diversity The skills that have seen the biggest increase in use of learning technologies in thetraining.” (Girlguiding UK) last 2 years are the business critical areas. These are leadership and management, customer service and the ‘soft’ skills of communications, team working and problem solving. 8 Top 3 business critical skills gaps identified by the IOD Shackled by the Skills Crunch report 2010 9 See Boosting Business Agility: Longitudinal Trends 2011-12 for full data tables 10 Full In focus report on top skills for getting started due 2012 http://tinyurl.com/TMINFOCUS © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 14
    • Boosting Business Agility Figure 7 Percentage of all organisations e-enabling skills compared with 2008 Foreign language 60% General IT user Basic skills 50% Health & safety Sales & marketing 40% 30% Induction Problem solving 20% 10% 2008 Industry specific 0% Team working 2011 Company specific Office/admin Leadership & Communications management CSR Customer service IT professionalTMI top quartile Overall, the most mature organisations (those in the top quartile of TMI) will e-organisations are enable 3 times as many subjects as those who are in the bottom quartile. Theone-third again most mature organisations are also one third again more likely to be using technology to address these priority areas than others. They are also twice asmore likely to e-enable likely to e-enable foreign language training and basic skills training as the sampleleadership, customer average.service and soft skillsthan average 2.2.2 Future predictions – e-enabled skills All respondents are planning to use more technology in every skills area in the next 2 years, addressing both the rapidly evolving demand for greater skills and reflecting the increased confidence in learning technologies. Whilst the skills most likely to be e-enabled will not change, those increasing the fastest are those that are the most important skills for business: 1 L&D skills (improving respondents own learning and performance – up 25% to 70% by 2013 2 Customer handling/service – up 24% to 60% 3 Leadership and management – up 24% to 66% The good news is that by 2013, 70% expect to use technology to support L&D skills. Currently only 45% are using technology to improve their own learning and performance. Given that L&D skills are currently the top barrier to change, this growth by 2013 may be a little too late! © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 15
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding Value 2.3 Enabling business agility 77% believe that learning technologies In the next 3 sections, we shall take a closer look at the other drivers behind will help them investment in learning technologies, but the one that has jumped the furthest in the last 12 months is improving business agility. 77% of organisations now believe respond faster to that learning technologies will help them respond faster to changing business changing business conditions, an increase of 11% from 2010. conditions Specifically organisations believe that learning technologies can help: 77% to reduce time to competency 77% to release new products faster 76% to support organisational change 69% to increase the speed of roll-out of new IT systems Figure 8 illustrates how business goals relating to agility are becoming more prominent each year. Figure 8 Drivers for investment increase year on year 100% 80% Help implement new 60% products Help implement IT 40% systems Support organisational 20% change 0% 2004 2006 2008 2010 2011 N=290 N=212 N=261 N=377 N=523 2.3.1 Delivering customer satisfaction Regardless of sector, all organisations are looking to improve the experience and“Increase profitability and loyalty of their customers and service users. Enhancing customer loyalty hasmarket share” become an increasing priority since last year: o 77% are using learning technologies to help improve customer satisfaction (increased by 11%)“Improve new senior o 70% are looking to maintain their public image (increased by 11%)manager retention rate”(Mott MacDonald Group This is being achieved by increasing the sales and product knowledge skills of salesLtd) and customer service staff but a significant number are also using learning technologies to extend their training offering to customers and suppliers: 42% are using learning technologies to help train their customers 13% are training their supply chain © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 16
    • Boosting Business Agility 2.3.2 Managing talent 3 out of 4 organisations are also looking for bottom line benefits in increased79% believe that productivity, but helping staff be more productive in their current job is only one side of the coin. 7 out of 10 organisations also focus on using learninglearning technologies technologies to improve talent management (69%) – the opportunity to attract,will help them share develop and keep great people – across the board. They recognise thegood practice across opportunities that learning technologies offer to shift responsibility for learningthe business and development away from a central HR function into the line of business. On average, some 57% of the respondents’ workforce is using learning technologies – unchanged from last year – and they are supporting staff at all levels of the organisation (Figure 8). Two audience groups are more likely to be using e-learning than last year: Directors and senior managers (62% up from 56%) and apprentices (44% up from 38%).11 Figure 9 Audience groups that are using learning technologies 79% of organisations now use learning technologies to improve the induction process. Induction is one of the first to be e-enabled (along side compliance training), and an area where benefits are most likely to be achieved. However, there are a number of other drivers that are as important in managing and attracting great talent: 75% seek to develop a better qualified workforce 75% seek to improve their compliance with industry rules and regulations 77% seek for e-enabled learning to contribute to improvements in employee engagement scores and 78% seek improvements in staff satisfaction There is also a drive to use learning technologies to ensure that knowledge is shared across the business: Increase the ongoing sharing of good practice (79%) Increase employee engagement (78%) 11 See Longitudinal trends paper for more information on changes in audience levels © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 17
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding Value 2.3.3 Increasing training efficiency The top 4 drivers for investment remain the same as in 2010, despite a much larger sample and a greater proportion of ‘novice’ users, with over 4 out of 5 continuing to look for improved access (89%), flexibility (85%), quality of learning (84%) and cost efficiency (83%). This research was largely drawn from responses by L&D professionals, so it is not surprising to find that they are looking to learning technologies to drive greater efficiencies in training without compromising on quality. Those in different job roles however, emphasise different drivers. For example, training staff and those with responsibility for setting learning strategy and management are primarily looking for increasing access and flexibility, whereas technologists focus more on sharing good practice and responding rapidly to changing business conditions. Improving learning administration and management has dropped from 4th to 24th in importance as a driver; ensuring compliance has dropped from 14th to 22nd place. These benefits are still sought by as many organisations as before but other benefits are now seen as more important! Organisations are also looking to learning technologies to increase Return on Investment (77%) and increasingly, to deliver business benefit and a Return on Expectation. However, we find that only: 19% of organisations actually know the opportunity cost of the various ways in which their learners learn 19% collect financial data when learning technologies are involved and 14% are actually calculating the ROI of their learning programmes In the following sections we report on the percentage of organisations that are realising the benefits that they are looking for. In a number of areas we asked organisations to quantify the level of benefits that they are looking for.12 However we found that the numbers of organisations that are actually measuring and quantifying the benefits of their learning technologies are low. For example: Only 48% organisations were able to estimate their cost savings, with 10% estimating that they actually spent more 62% estimated their study time savings with 5% responding that study time increased and 64% estimated delivery time with 7% responding that it had increased However, in 2011, the sample included greater numbers of novice users than in previous years, and where they are relatively new to e-learning, organisations may not yet have the data to quantify the benefits. 12 These figures are not directly comparable with 2010 as we asked respondents to provide actual estimates of efficiency savings rather than respond on a relative scale. Fewer were able to respond but those that did provided considerably higher figures than the 2010 report. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 18
    • Boosting Business Agility The quantified benefits highlighted in the green boxesTop 10 benefits achieved below are based on a minimum of 150 responses.50% Industry specific compliance48% Help implement IT systems 2.4 Bottom line benefits48% Increase access45% Increase flexibility Learning technologies are delivering benefits across a range of areas. 7 out of 10 organisations surveyed report achieving one or more benefits, with 1 in 544% Reduce time away from reporting benefits across the full range. job42% Extend reach of training Given the wide range of organisations participating in this study it is impossible to investigate the full range of business benefits and approaches to measuring and41% Reduce training costs reporting effectiveness on a case by case basis. Through our Evidence for Change39% Improve induction programme, Towards Maturity report on a wide range of specific case studies that have delivered and measured bottom line benefits13.39% Help implement new products and processes 2.4.1 The bottom line – business agility38% Deliver greater volume of learning Learning technologies are helping companies become more fleet of foot and adapt more rapidly to business demands. The proportion of respondents that achieved the following benefits of those that seek them is: - 39% have achieved the improvement in induction training they seek Organisations are - 48% report faster roll out of new IT applications reporting a 35% - 39% report improvement in ability to change products and processes - 33% report they can now response faster to business change reduction in time to - 25% report an improvement in time to competency proven competency Where the benefits have been quantified by respondents, they report: 35% reduction in time to competency 32% ability to change procedures/products Organisations are reporting an overall 32% increase in speed of rollout of new IT applications 20% improvement in customer satisfaction 2.4.2 The bottom line – customer engagement Three out of ten organisations agreed that learning technologies contribute to improvements in productivity, the same proportion also agreed that their managers within the business reported additional business benefits as a result of 13 Specific examples available at http://tinyurl.com/TMevidence © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 19
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding Value the e-enabled learning solutions rolled out. In a study of this scope it is difficult to pinpoint the exact benefits that organisations are looking for. However with respect to customer engagement and growth:“As a result we saw morevolunteers accessing skills - 32% agree that they improve customer satisfactiontraining” (Girlguiding UK) - 17% agree that they have significantly increased organisational revenue Where the benefits have been quantified by respondents, they report: 20% improvement in customer satisfaction 2.4.3 The bottom line - talent management Organisations also report using learning technologies to improve talent management and succession planning: - 20% report an improvement in overall talent management“We had an immediate - 23% report they have achieved more ongoing sharing of good practicediagnostic of the capability - 22% report they have achieved better employee engagementof our salesforce” (Janssen) Where the benefits have been quantified by respondents, there are also measurable improvements in terms of: 23% improvement in overall staff satisfaction 18% increase in qualifications gained by staff 2.4.4 The bottom line - efficiency without compromise Efficiency is one of the leading drivers for investing in learning technologies, but they also offer new ways to manage, reach and engage learners. For those that are measuring success in terms of learner numbers and course completions, they offer reliable ways to prove compliance and remove some of the inconsistencies that can occur across large scale programmes. Coupled with these efficiency“We established a benefits are improvements in the quality and consistency of the learnerconsistent global learning experience and the motivation and retention of learners.strategy” Efficiency: - 62% report that they are able to deliver learning faster - 48% report that they now provide greater access to learning - 44% report a reduction in the time learners spend away from their job 42% report they have extended the reach of their training © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 20
    • Boosting Business Agility - 41% report a reduction in their training costs - 38% report they are delivering a greater volume of trainingWithout compromise: - 45% report greater flexibility of delivery - 38% report the quality of learning has improved - 35% report greater consistency of the learner experienceRespondents estimated a three-fold increase in the volume of training beingdelivered as a result of implementing learning technologies, with some 26% offormal learning now e-enabled. Where the benefits have been quantified by respondents, there are also measurable improvements in terms of: 46% improvement in efficiency in demonstrating compliance 34% increase in the proportion of staff on L&D programmes In absolute terms, they also can boost the cost-effectiveness of training solutions, delivering an average: 26% savings in the cost of training 31% reduction in study time 39% reduction in delivery timeWhilst learning management systems have enabled better tracking andmonitoring of learners, only 1 in 3 organisations seeking this benefit actuallymanage to achieve it.Table 1 Benefits relating to learning administration % citing as % achieving Driver BenefitImprove learning management and administration 73% 28%Improve monitoring of impact measures 74% 22%Increasing return on investment 77% 21%2.4.5 What this could mean for your businessGiven that some 57% of our sample is using learning technologies and they areseeing an average improvement of:© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 21
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding Value o 35% in time to competency o 32% in their ability to change procedures and processes or roll out new IT systems or products and o 20% customer satisfaction What is the potential effect this could have on business or organisational success?Other benefits achieved: Reducing the time it takes to bring new staff up to full competency for their job role by 35% could shorten their induction programme for example, from 3 months to 2 months.“Commitment, innovation” Gaining an extra 20% of customer satisfaction could reduce complaints by one-fifth, or increase the likelihood that they will return for 20% more repeat business or give 20% more recommendations for your product or service. Savings from reducing the delivery time by the 43% or more achieved in“Meet and exceed top quartile organisations alone can be significant.offerings of competition” For example, a one-hour face-to-face course for Equality and Diversity training delivered to 3000 staff in a health authority moved to a shorter online course of 34 minutes could give a saving of £100,000 in payroll, administration and accommodation costs14.“Cost savings, increased The UK Commission for Employment and Skills estimate the Gross Value Addedsupport for staff and per person employed in the UK by sector as £38,500 and that 30% of employeesstudents” received training in the last 13 weeks (2009 data). With 30% of our sample reporting that learning technologies contributed to improvements in productivity across the organisation, the benefit to the overall the UK economy must be substantial. With 57% of the workforce currently using e-learning, rising to 76% by 2013, there is considerable potential for the future.“Knowledge generationand sharing” However, these financial benefits do not have to mean compromise in other areas. The introduction of technology will not only improve revenues and save money, but will also have the potential to offer a consistent, high quality learning experience. 2.5 Improving results through maturity Whilst many organisations expect a wide range of benefits, relatively few are actually achieving them. Some benefits are harder to achieve than others. When we look at which benefits are the most likely to be achieved, it becomes apparent that the easiest to achieve are: 1. Help implement new IT systems (achieved by 69% of those seeking it) 14 Data from Skills for Health © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 22
    • Boosting Business Agility 2. Compliance with company and legal requirements (67%) These are also the most likely benefits to be reported by novice organisations, with 34% reporting improved compliance. A further group of benefits are all achieved by over half of those seeking them: 3. Reduce time away from the job (56% seeking this benefit achieve it) 4. Increase access to learning (53%) 5. Increase flexibility of learning delivery (53%) 6. Deliver a greater volume of learning (51%) Figure 10 Benefits achieved by those seeking them (Listed in order of proportion of those seeking benefit who actually achieve it) Help implement new IT systems Comply with new regulations and legal requirements Reduce time away from the job Increase access to learning Increase flexibility in providing staff training Extend the reach of training Deliver learning in the greater volume demanded by the business Improve induction training Maintain public image of a progressive and innovative organisation Help implement new processes or new products Reduce training costs 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Benefit achieved Benefit desired Average benefits achieved 27 benefits = 100% Much more difficult to achieve are:60% - Improving talent management (only 29% seeking this benefit, achieve it)50% - Increasing employee engagement (28%) - Increasing return on investment (28%)40% What emerges from this study is that those organisations that are in the top quartile for the Towards Maturity Index are:30% - Achieving a greater number of benefits overall20% - More likely to achieve the benefits they seek and - Consistently report greater percentage improvement across all indicators10% Those in the TMI top quartile are at least three times as likely to report the0% following benefits as those in the bottom quartile: TMI TMI TMI TMI Top Quartile 4 Quartile 3 Quartile 2 Quartile © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 23
    • Boosting Business Agility: Adding Value 4 x more qualifications achieved by their staff 3 x faster rollout of new IT systems 3 x higher levels of staff satisfaction They also report more than twice as high an improvement in: Customer satisfaction Their ability to change procedures and products Within this report, we have constructed 4 business indicators that we can review: - Overall business impact (linked to factors related to overall business productivity , revenue and customer satisfaction) - Business agility (linked to factors related to speed) - Training efficiency – (linked to savings in time, cost and improved reach) - Talent Management – (linked to staff development and engagement) Figure 11 highlights how those business indexes change with maturity. Efficiency is something that is quickly achieved by many (there is not much difference between the top and bottom quartile of maturity for this measure), but the story doesn’t stop there. Top quartile organisations are 2 – 3 times more likely to be reporting business critical results in the areas of agility, talent management and overall business impact. Figure 11 Index measures of benefits related to e-learning maturityMature organisationsare over twice aslikely to report thatthey are more agile,influencing businessimpact and improvingopportunities fortalent management What are the mature organisations doing differently that is giving them such a boost? During the remainder of the report – look out for this sign where we will be digging deeper into the activity areas within the Towards Maturity Model where they are making a tangible difference. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 24
    • Boosting Business Agility 3 Building skillsTop 10 technologies in use in 2011 Technology is driving solutions closer to the workplace with 4 out of 10 top technologies in use today facilitating on-demand learning to improve job80% e-learning courses performance. Content still remains king but content strategies are adapting to77% Live online learning – reflect the workplace context. Mature organisations use technology both to including Virtual meetings, support their long-term skills strategy and to encourage a ‘performance culture’. Virtual classrooms and video-conferencing 3.1 A quick overview of learning technology adoption77% Surveys and questionnaires71% Learning Management This chapter explores how we are using learning technologies to support formal Systems skills strategies and their more informal workplace performance support.68% Online assessment Figure 12 Relative usage of different learning technologies61% Video-based content54% Enterprise wide information services54% Open education resources47% Learning portals46% Communities of Practice We see from Figure 12, that the learning technologies used by the greatest“The main shift for us is number of organisations in 2011 are the traditional tools of online courses,going from ‘content is king’ surveys, learning management systems to support stand-alone learning and liveto ‘context is king’ to finally online environments for group learning. These, typically, are associated with‘collaboration is king’” traditional e-learning solutions designed to support formal/non-formal learning15. They help to drive efficiency by automating the traditional role of learning and development. Under the control of the Learning department, these tools allow the creation of shorter bite-sized learning interventions. They help provide ‘just in“… a dramatic shift from case’ learning that helps prepare staff for the future, but are limited in cateringF2F to on-demand.” for the needs of the moment. However, having tracked the usage of different learning technologies since 2003, we can see these traditional tools being joined by technologies that support wider sharing, which put the control of content into the hands of staff and learning into“.. a slow shift to the heart of the workplace. This is starting to reflect thinking in the way in whichcollaborative, online the majority of workplace learning occurs - in context whilst actually ‘doing thelearning” (Chichester job’.College) 15 Clive Shepherd ‘New Learning Architect’, 2011 © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 25
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building skills 3.1.1 Longitudinal trendsTop 10 technologies that we We are continuing to monitor the longitudinal trends in the use of differentexpect to increase the fastest by technologies by asking what organisations are planning to use in 2 years time.2013 Very few organisations are planning to decrease their use of existing technologies52% Custom-made e-learning over the next 2 years but they are planning to increase the range of technology49% Mobile learning tools in their kit bag. Most growth is planned in the tools being used to embed learning more directly into workflows.44% Podcasting44% Video-based content In such a fast moving area, direct comparison with earlier years is difficult. created in-house However, we see that in almost every case, the predictions that were made in 2008 and 2010 over-estimate the actual adoption of new technologies16. Most43% Learning portals respondents expect new technologies to be adopted more quickly than is43% Virtual classrooms practicable.43% Blogs In this chapter, we first explore how technology is being used in formal learning40% Video-conferencing including a review of evolving content and courseware development strategies. In the second part of the chapter, we look at how technology is currently supporting40% Online assessment performance improvement in the workplace. We also take a closer look at the39% Virtual meetings implementation behaviour of mature organisations in both of these areas in order to provide ideas for readers and help them refresh their existing skills strategies. 3.2 Evolving content strategies Although traditional e-learning courses remain at the top of the list as the most frequently reported instance of learning technologies (in use by 86% of organisations), it is now clear that one size definitely does not fit all! Online content comes from a wide range of sources. These include courses that are17: 86% of organisations o Custom made in-house (in use by 72% of respondents) o Generic courses available off-the-shelf (60%) are now using some form o Custom-made and commissioned externally (53%) of e-learning courses o Created in house using rapid application development tools (44%) For the first time this year, we are tracking open education resources (digital materials offered free at the point of use, such as content from providers or sources such as Wikipedia, OU etc) and have found that over half of the respondents (54%) were making use of free learning resources, perhaps to make their budget go further! 16 See Annex: Longitudinal trends 17 These types of courses do not total to 77% as many report using more than one type. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 26
    • Boosting Business Agility 31% of organisations now encourage users to also generate their own content for sharing with others. A variety of technologies are being used for this purpose: 43% are using blogs by learners or tutors 40% are using podcasts 49% are using videos capturing best practice within own organisation Sharing of video content has become more prevalent, with video content in use in over 61% of organisations. In addition to video developed in house, 37% use video that captures best practice from external sources.“We are using more e-learning to support Figure 13 Trends in the use of video in learning and developmentinduction and industry 100%knowledge. We have nowstarted to introduce more 90%video and host some 80%webcasts and webinars 70%with external providers.” 60% Video content - internal 50% Video content - external 40% Video on demand All video 30% 20% 10% 0% 2008 2010 2011 2013 Predicted Figure 13 highlights that organisations have great expectations for video content moving forward. In-house video is forecast to rise fastest, to an estimated 79% of organisations by 2013. This growth may be fuelled by the fact that individuals are willing to accept lower production standards thanks to the growth in platforms such as Vimeo and You-Tube.81% of organisationsare now developing Content is no longer delivered purely within the firewall. One in five organisationscontent in house is working with cloud-based content (20%) and software as a service (27%). 3.2.1 Building content in-house Despite so many and varied opportunities for organisations to find e-learning content on the web and with so much free content available under open or education licences, there is still a critical need for tailored content and many are commissioning external suppliers or are creating their own new content in-house. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 27
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building skills Some 81% of organisations are now developing at least some of their own content“Learning technology in-house. For many, taking control over content development enables them toadvocates within our team boost business agility by being more flexible, adaptive and responsive to changinghave come together to business need.work on a specific initiative Table 2 Benefits of developing content in-houseto increase e-learningcompetencies across whole % of those that developteam to shift emphasis of Benefit content in-house (n=359)what we do as group away Reducing development costs 77%from f2f ILT. The initial Taking control over our own needs 74%focus is on e-learning Ability to integrate learning quickly into line of business 65%authoring and content Increasing responsiveness to business need 64%creation (e.g. visual & Increased speed to learning delivery 63%instructional design,creation of media assets,writing skills).” However, those requiring highly specialised or company-specific content can find it difficult to outsource development. Bringing content development in-house also provides a number of challenges as well (Table 3). Table 3 Challenges reported when bringing content development in house % of those that develop Barrier content in-house (n=303) L&D staff lacking the necessary technical skills 69% L&D staff lacking the necessary instructional design 63% skills Lack of time to develop content 8%“Lack of travel budget and 3.2.2 Cost of content developmentthe need to cut costs in We looked at the different types of e-learning content in use and their relativegeneral means more and costs. Expenditure varies widely between organisations and sectors, withmore training is delivered dramatically lower levels of expenditure in the Higher Education sector. The tableusing learning below illustrates the range and gives a comparison between the median costs fortechnologies; we have little creating one hour of content:budget for commissioninge-learning externally (in IT Complex and simple coursestraining area)” Courses bought in from an external supplier and created in-house Table 4 Costs of creating e-learning content Simple course Complex course Median cost Range Average cost Range Created in house £500 Up to £20K £1,000 Up to £100K From an external £6,000 Up to £100K £12,000 Up to £250K supplier NB. These costs are approximately halved in the not for profit sector. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 28
    • Boosting Business Agility For 1 in 2 organisations, the cost of development and maintenance is a major barrier to using learning technologies. Only 21% of the top quartile TMI organisations cite cost as a barrier, focussing more on the relevance and credibility of ‘off-the-shelf’ content. For many, past experience has unfortunately not lived up expectations! Table 5 Barriers relating to e-learning content Barrier All TMI Top Quartile Cost of set-up, development and maintenance 50% 21% Lack of attractive, high-quality e-learning 38% 7% Suppliers overemphasise presentation and style 22% 29% e-learning too generic and not tailored to our needs 36% 32% Lack of credibility of learning materials 23% 25% 3.2.3 Content strategies of mature organisations In the Building Capability workstream of the Towards Maturity Model we find that top performers focus on the skills and approaches of learning professionals for designing, delivering and supporting online learning. In the 2011-12 benchmark we find that the top performers (those in the top quartile of the Towards Maturity Index) are nearly twice as likely to use a mix ofWe develop our own methods in their content design, combining video, audio, images and text (88% ofcontent …. top quartile organisations do this compared with 55% on average). They are almost three times as likely to add interactive features or games to engage – and retain – their learners’ interest.“…to be more effective What is apparent, however, is that the mature organisations are more likely tocapture and transfer of core use ‘good enough’ content rather than spending a long time on development.proprietary knowledge” They are using more off-the-shelf content, open education resources, user- generated videos and other content, in order to be able to react and adapt quickly“…to give tailored learning to new business requirements.solutions aligned to For content development, they are more likely to use open source-learning toolsbusiness need” (57% are using these compared to an average 35% across the sample as a whole) or rapid application development tools (used by 61% of top quartile organisations compared with 44% overall).“…to give opportunity toimprove e-learning They are more confident in using materials that are not entirely within theirdesign/development skills control and are able to decide when they need to go for a quick solution, andwithin our training team” when to invest in a long-lasting quality product. They trust other providers, and they trust their users – and it is paying off. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 29
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building skills Figure 14 Source of e-learning content varies with maturity 100% 90% e-learning courses – custom made in-house 80% e-learning courses – 70% custom made externally 60% e-learning courses - off- the-shelf 50% Online books 40% 30% User-generated content 20% Open education resources 10% /digital materials free at the point of use 0% TMI Quartile 4 TMI Quartile 3 TMI Quartile 2 TMI Top Quartile 3.3 Delivery strategies An estimated 38% of learning is now taking place beyond the remit of L&D departments. This figure is consistent across sectors and maturity levels, but we see a discrepancy in that those who are responsible for content development estimate the proportion at 80%, whereas technologists and delivery staff estimate it at 29%.26% of formal The proportion of formal learning that is e-enabled has increased from 23% to 26% since 2010 (38% for those the Top Quartile for TMI) but content isn’t the onlylearning is now e- aspect of learning delivery.enabled Over the years we have reported on the success that mature organisations are realising from using a blend of delivery media and methods to develop skills. Mature organisations are also more likely to integrate their e-enabled learning with their face-to-face learning interventions (Table 6). Table 6 Integrating e-enabled learning with the classroom Percentage agreeing with the statement: All TMI TMI Top Bottom quartile quartile Our face-to-face training courses integrate e- 25% 4% 71% learning content Our face-to-face training courses actively build on 27% 5% 73% knowledge gained through e-learning Our trainers provide tutor support to e-learners 20% 4% 58% © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 30
    • Boosting Business AgilityFigure 15 Maturity alters the way in which content is combined 100% 90% 80% We use highly interactive methods, such as games, in our 70% e-learning solutions 60% E-learning in our organisation is always part of a broad mix of 50% methods 40% We use video, audio, images and animation as well as text in 30% our e-learning 20% We blend our use of several different learning technologies 10% 0% TMI Bottom TMI Q3 TMI Q2 TMI Top quartile quartileThey are more likely to use learning portals, Software as a Service and cloud-based services to increase access to their learning. For example, learning portalsare in use by 47% of organisations across the sample but by 75% of those in thetop quartile for TMI, The level of use is predicted to increase to 78% by 2013.Table 7 Accessing content beyond the firewallTool All TMI TMI Top Bottom quartile quartileLearning portals 47% 30% 75%Cloud-based content 20% 15% 34%Software as a service 27% 20% 37%3.3.1 Using live online learning within the blendLive online learning is now a serious and increasing part of the blend, with over77% of organisations using at least one of: o Virtual meetings (in use by 65% of respondents) o Video conferencing (63%) o Virtual classrooms (46%)© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 31
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building skills Figure 16 The rise in live online learning 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% Video conferencing Virtual classroom 50% Virtual meetings 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2006 2008 2010 2011 2013 Predicted In Harnessing Live online learning18, a previous study with 200 organisations released in October 2011, we explored what learning methods were being addressed using these media. Figure 17 Different learning methods supported by live online learning (Source: Harnessing Live Online Learning) Business presentations Business meetings Discussions Software demos/training Workshops Collaboration between learners Practical IT skills eg via labs Presentation of learner assignments Action learning meetings One-to-one coaching 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% N=212 Significant experience Some experience Figure 17 highlights that the more mature organisations are more likely to use this media to shift from presenting to their learners to engaging and supporting their learners. 18 Harnessing Live Online Learning can be downloaded at http://tinyurl.com/TMlive11 © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 32
    • Boosting Business Agility 3.3.2 Mobilising learning There has been a steady trend to increase the opportunity for learning away from the workplace over the last 8 years. Although most organisations continue to offer learning at the desk, fewer now offer learning at fixed in-house centres and more are offering mobile learning as an alternative. Usage of mobile devices in learning has increased to 39% in 2011. 39% of organisations However, this increase is much slower than predicted. The level of usage in not- offer mobile learning for-profit organisations is significantly lower at 13% than usage in either the private (44%) or public sector (40%). Fears relating to the technology or IT security are still holding 71% organisations back. An interesting distinction emerged when comparing the perceptions of respondents with different roles and responsibilities. Over 50% of those in a consultancy role reported use of mobile technologies in the organisation, whilst these were reported by only 22% of technologists. Mobile devices are being used to reinforce formal learning and provide additional flexibility with regard to where and when people can access e-learning. Figure 18 Trends in use of mobile Mobile learning is being used to: devices 100% o Reinforce formal learning (62%) o Provide an alternative to PC-based 90% delivery (51%) 80% o Support the application of learning 70% back in the workplace (43%) 60% o Support the application and generation of user content (27%) 50% 40% It is also being used to assess learners on“On the technology side, the 30%challenge is taking what we the job, gather portfolio evidence, accesshave and making it accessible podcasts, hold virtual meetings and access 20%to our mobile Smartphone general information resources. 10%users, particularly within a 0%corporation where our The benefits of mobile learning are mostly 2008 2010 2011 2013business technology is often around convenience (79%), being able to Predicted Actualbehind colleagues access support at the point of need (64%),personal/home and allowing learners to use their own mobile devices (64%). There is sometechnology.”(Janssen) evidence that organisations are becoming more willing to let learners use their own mobile devices to access company learning – now encouraged in 12% of organisations. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 33
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building skills Figure 19 Locations where learners can access technology-enabled learning When travelling At home Other location away from work At work but not at a desk At work in a learning centre At work in a quiet area nearby At the desk 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2006 2008 N=262 2010 N=435 2011 N=436 Some 7% actually provide learners with mobile devices. This is most likely to occur in the more mature organisations in the private sector (24%), for example in large multinationals in the IT and Telecoms sector or in very small micro e-learning consulting businesses. However, whilst mobile learning is becoming established, there are clearly still challenges to be met: 60% report difficulties due to wide variations in the capability of their mobile devices and 23% report their learners still prefer to use PCs or laptops for learning 3.4 Engaging learners and improving talent All respondents in this study are using or planning to use technologies to support learning but we were also interested in the extent to which technology helped to integrate learning within other aspects of talent management. Figure 20 highlights that one out of every four organisations in our study support performance management and appraisal with their learning technologies. However, they are less likely to support talent management, succession planning and recruitment. Across the board the top performers are two to three times more likely to be integrating learning with talent management. For top performers, they are more likely to integrate with talent activities associated with existing staff (50% of top performers) but less likely to link back to recruitment of new staff (36% of top performers). This may change as more organisations e- enable their induction programmes in the future. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 34
    • Boosting Business Agility Figure 20 The extent to which learning technologies support talent management Recruitment Succession planning Talent management (overall) Appraisal Performance management 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% TMI Top Quartile All As a result, it is unsurprising that there is a trend towards greater integration of Learning Management Systems with HR and other information systems (noted in 47% of organisations, up from 43% in 2010; Stand-alone LMS down to 53% from 54%), particularly in the most mature organisations and those in the top quartile for TMI, where 59% are now using an integrated LMS. Skills diagnostics tools are in use by 41% of organisations, with 36% using a full competency management system. Both of these areas are predicted to increase by over 35% in the next 2 years. Table 8 Usage of tools to support talent management All TMI TMI Top Percentage using: Bottom Quartile Quartile Skills diagnostic tools 41% 35% 60% Competency management systems 36% 28% 54% Online assessment 68% 62% 76%12% of organisationstailor their learning to The top performing organisations are not only more likely to be using these tools,individual need but 34% are using them to specifically tailor learning programmes to meet individual needs (compared with just 12% of the total sample). 3.4.1 Career progression In the Learner Context stream of the Towards Maturity Model we see that top performing organisations are more likely to provide relevant choices for their staff (in terms of control, access and information available to them) and address issues of motivation (such as recognition and personal aspiration). In this study we see that mature organisations are more than twice as likely to support their learners in their career development (Table 9). © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 35
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building skills Table 9 Learning supports career development Percentage agreeing with the statement: All TMI Top Quartile We support career aspirations 23% 56% We allow access to a broad range of non-job related 25% 45% learning Learners consider e-learning to be good for their careers 15% 49% Across the sample, approximately 22% of e-enabled formal learning programmes leads to a qualification – although this varies from almost half of IT professional programmes to under one-fifth of ‘soft skills’ programmes. Where the benefits have been quantified by respondents, they report: 18% increase in the qualifications gained by staff The integrated approach to talent management, combined with effective content design (outlined in section 3.3) may contribute to the fact that top performing organisations are more likely to report tangible improvement in learner engagement and motivation (Table 10) than others. Table 10 How performance varies with learner engagement All TMI TMI top bottom quartile quartile Percentage achieving improved staff 26% 6% 56% satisfaction to aid retention and motivation Measure of the degree to which staff 23% 9% 33% satisfaction/engagement has improved 3.5 Working with external training providers4 out of 5 expect Organisations are still making use of external training providers to support theirany external training skills development, in fact, we saw an increase in last year across the board.providers to be Currently:innovative in their use 89% use commercial training providers for general trainingof learning technologies 86% use commercial providers to support professional qualification and 70% use publicly funded providers (to deliver apprenticeships, NVQs etc) © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 36
    • Boosting Business Agility Respondents based in centralised L&D functions are 20% more likely to use all types of training providers than those who are based directly within the lines of“The balance is shifting from business.face-to-face to remotelearning through mobile However, we are no longer looking at external providers to purely deliver face-to-technology and greater face skills training. 82% of organisations say that innovative use of learningaccess to online learning and technology will be a deciding factor in their selection of an external learningassessment content.” provider in the future.(Chichester College) 1 in 3 say it is critical today. The expectation of publically funded providers is lower in the not-for-profit sector with fewer respondents saying that use of learning technologies is critical in their choice of external provider. Those in the private sector are more likely to say that these are critical to success. Training providers Private Public Not-for-profit (critical) (critical) (critical) Commercial –general 92% (36%) 82% (25%) 91% (17%) Commercial –professional qualifications 89% (35%) 81% (28%) 83% (25%) Publically funded 70% (24%) 74% (20%) 62% (12%) © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 37
    • Boosting Business Agility: Improving performance 4 Harnessing technology to improve performance Learning is getting closer to the workplace. It is no longer just about the push of formal programmes into the business. It is increasingly about improving productivity and performance in the workplace. 4.1 Adopting social learning The 70:20:10 model of learning 19 has been increasingly discussed in recent years“We are just starting to as organisations start to consider that the majority of learning (70%)takes place inintroduce wikis, video and the workplace through experience and joint problem solving, a smaller butpodcasts. We are also significant amount (20%) is from reflection and feedback (coaching) and thelooking at resources such as remainder (10%) through formal learning interventions. Traditionally L&Dyammer and chatter to scope professionals have concentrated on the latter but perceptions are starting to shift:how to use for learning.”(Barnardo’s) 85% of L&D staff in the TMI top quartile agree strongly that the ‘course’ is only one of many options for building skills and performance (compared with 55% on average) 79% of the total sample say that they are looking for technology to help support sharing of good practice within organisation Many, particularly the top performers, are looking for ways to encourage learning away from ‘the course’ and into the workplace. Organisations certainly want technology to encourage interaction, building two- way conversation and communication, and potentially, this is where social media comes into its own. Many have been experimenting with different forms of social media for some time now, and some tools are starting to become established. 46% are using communities of practice to connect like-minded people together, although growth in usage has been slower than predicted 54% are harnessing existing enterprise-wide information platforms such as SharePoint to provide a point of focus for sharing In each case, usage in mature organisations well exceeds the sample average (Figure 21). 19 Based on work by Lombardo & Eichinger: The Career Architect Development Planner 1996 © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 38
    • Boosting Business Agility Figure 21 Media supporting the sharing of good practice Video content - best practice internal Communities of Practice Third-party social networking sitesIn the next 2 years: SharePoint Video content – best practice external Podcasting“Definitely increasing with Wikisgreater use of social mediaand learner generated Blogs by tutors or learnerscontent” In-house social media 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% TMI Top Quartile 2011“More social learning, more What are organisations looking to achieve through these new media?web-conferencing, talent Of the 144 organisations that were proactive in this area, we see that one of themanagement system and top aims of adoption is to encourage reflection and share effective practicesHR/IS integration.” amongst learners (Figure 22). Figure 22 Uses and benefits of social networks in workplace learning Encourage reflection“Building the use of informal Support generation and sharing of user contentplatforms to share Reinforce formal learningknowledge, use of videos & Support application of learning back in the workplacepodcasts for dip in learning 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Those that are using social media tools for learning and development reported a number of specific benefits in communications from their use:“Developing social learning o 62% reported improved communication between learners and tutorsincluding communities of o 46% reported imported communications between learnerspractice, videos, webcast and o 46% reported increased employee engagementteleconferencing” (LancashireCounty Council) 4.1.1 The role of social networks The uses of social media approaches (blogs, podcasts etc) for sharing are becoming established but there is still a question around the use of 3rd party platforms to bring people together. Social networking is improving communications between learners, with tutors and with subject experts beyond the organisation. For many learners, they can enhance engagement. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 39
    • Boosting Business Agility: Improving performanceFigure 23 Use of 3rd party social Research shows that the jury is still out about their use in the workplace. Onlynetworks 31% of Gen Y agrees that you should use personal social media at work20.Two- thirds of UK workers think social networking sites should be banned from the100% workplace21. In the Towards Maturity study last year, over 76% believed that 3rd 90% party sites would play an important part in learning by 2012, this year expectations have dropped to 59%. 80% 70% From our own study only 16% of participating organisations are using learning technologies proactively to help learners communicate with each other (down 60% from 20% last year). However top performers are over 3 times as likely to support 50% these peer to peer communications. 40% It is clear that organisations are still experimenting. The use of in-house social 30% networks (such as Yammer and Ning) is not rising as fast as anticipated even one 20% year ago, but use of third party social networks (such as Facebook and Twitter) in 10% L&D has trebled in the last year. 0% In 2010, only 22% of respondents were using 3rd party social networks in learning 2010 2011 2012 2013 and development, and we predicted that 71% of organisations would be using 3rd Predicted Actual party social networks by 2012. In 2011 we see that figure has risen to 41% using social networks. However, the prediction for 2013 is only 59%. There are significant differences between usage of social media in the private, 58% allow access to public and not-for-profit sectors. Whilst 58% organisations overall unblock third party sites such as Twitter and Facebook (up from 48% last year), this varies from third party social media 44% in the public sector to 72% in the not-for-profit sector. The proportion is also sites slightly higher at 68% amongst those organisations that seek, and achieve, better sharing of good practice as a benefit of learning technologies. 4.2 Barriers to uptake of social media We face a number of challenges in this area, one of which is awareness. Only 16% of our total sample are even aware of how their learners are using social media (outside of L&D) to share ideas with each other. This rises to 39% of the top performers. Figure 24 illustrates the barriers to ongoing adoption. Only 16% are aware 71% report that barriers due to IT infrastructure and security hold them of how learners are using back from using mobile technologies social media beyond 65% report that technical IT/security barriers restrict the use of social the world of L&D media in learning 20 Decoding social media at work Jan 2011 - 4500 interviews with gen Y (15-34 year olds) 21 Social networking at work July 2011 – interviews with over 4000 workers from reed.co.uk © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 40
    • Boosting Business AgilityHowever, the not-for profit sector report fewer barriers to use in every categorystudied. The organisational culture in not-for-profits is more likely to encouragethe use of social media and it is less likely to fall into the domain of the HR/L&Ddepartment!Figure 24 Barriers to use of social networks in workplace learning Technology or IT security related Issues of user safety, identify or trust Existing control and command culture General fear of losing control Social media is not in the domain of L&D 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Not-for-profit Public sector Private sector All organisations4.3 Promoting a performance cultureFor many years, organisations have been discussing the importance of fostering alearning culture. Social media can certainly help create the right environment forcontinual learning, bringing many benefits for the organisation in terms of skillsutilisation and the sharing of good practice.4.3.1 The role of management This year for the first time, we asked a number of questions relating toorganisational culture within the Work Context stream of the Towards Maturitymodel22, and were particularly interested in the business culture that encouragessharing in order to improve performance. We found that on average: 49% of organisations welcome innovation and contributions from all staff but only 19% encourage and make time for social and informal learning22 Building on the work of Jay Cross and the Internet Time Alliance© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 41
    • Boosting Business Agility: Improving performance 51% agree that staff understand how their work is linked to theOnly 51% can report that organisation’s performance (rising to 77% for TMI top quartile)staff understand how their but onlywork is linked to the 18% encourage and make time for reflectionorganisation’s The starting point for many organisations is to foster learning for all staff, not justperformance for those new in post or for technical staff. However, only 59% of organisations are managing to achieve this. Figure 25 Fostering a performance culture Our organisation fosters learning for everyone, not just new hires and technical staff Our organisation welcomes innovation and contributions from our workers Our organisation experiments with new ways of doing things Our learners share information freely with each other Our organisation encourages and makes time for social and informal learning Our organisation encourages (and provides time for) reflection 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% TMI Bottom Quartile Q3 Q2 TMI Top Quartile Developing a performance culture cannot be the remit of the HR and L&DOnly 3 out of 10 function alone. Line managers in top performing organisations play more of a role in this but overall, managers need to understand the full benefits of new ways ofmanagers give learners working, learning and sharing. At the moment:time to learn at work Only 3 out of 10 managers will give learners time to learn at work (31% vs. 56% in the top quartile for TMI) Only 1 in 5 managers give learners time to learn at home (22% vs. 51%) 4.3.2 The role of learning and development The more mature organisations are more likely to allow experimentation with new ways of learning, and to encourage and provide time for reflection. They are more likely to view the ‘course’ as just one of many options for building skills and performance, and provide good follow-up support for learners back in the workplace, providing job aids and opportunities for connecting with tutors and subject experts. However, Figure 25 illustrates that the top performers (who report the greatest business benefits) are streets ahead of the others in creating an environment to foster learning and build performance. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 42
    • Boosting Business Agility Learners are more likely to be able to access reliable learning resources at any time and from places that are convenient to them, fitting learning into their work schedule. However overall, there are things that L&D can do to facilitate collaboration. We consider this in the Building Capability workstream of the Towards Maturity Model, and found:“We will continue to look for 75% of top performers encourage learners to pass on their learning tonew technologies that will others (compared with 34% on average)improve productivity, speed 53% of top performers ensure that their learning technologies enableup change or provide a learners to communicate and learn from each other (16% on average)positive business benefit, but 48% encourage learners to collaborate in building knowledge resources,only if the cost is right.” using tools such as wikis, forums, podcasts and videos (16% on average)(Legal & General) 36% encourage learners to share experiences and solve problems using online social media tools (12% on average) These characteristics were identified last year but in every case, these implementation behaviours have all increased or stayed the same within the top 25% performers but have decreased overall on average. Organisations are increasing their use of the tools that can help to improve performance support but are not yet harnessing them effectively. We will be considering the skills of the Learning and Development professionals in the final chapter. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 43
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building confidence 5 Building confidence in new approaches to learning Organisations that are achieving greater business impact and agility through their use of learning technologies are successfully promoting a performance culture and overcoming reluctance from users, trainers and managers alike. Overall, organisations are reporting more barriers than in 2010 but the top barrier remains the same – the skills, knowledge and confidence to adopt new ways of learning. In this section we take a final look at the implementation behaviours of top performing organisations that help to drive engagement, and consider the role of the learning and development function in influencing change. Finally, given this year’s increased participant desire to respond quicker to business change, this chapter considers the characteristics of the organisations who are achieving the greatest benefits in terms of delivering results faster. 5.1 Overcoming reluctance to change For the last 3 years, the top barriers to introducing new approaches to learning are all to do with the knowledge, skills and confidence of the L&D team, their perceptions that their learners are not ready and willing for technology, and the reluctance of management to adopt new ways of working. 75% of L&D staff lack instructional design skills for developing content in-Over half of L&D housestaff are still not 62% of L&D staff lack knowledge about its potential and lack the skills toconfident in the use of manage and implement learning technologies 62% of learners lack the skills to manage their own learningnew media 55% of line managers are reluctant to encourage new ways of learning Too many of our L&D staff are still out of their comfort zone and out of their depth when it comes to working with learning technologies. They also perceive that their learners have the same problems that they do! Since 2008, L&D staff are more willing to embrace change, but their confidence and skills levels have been steadily decreasing. Figure 26 shows the percentage of the whole sample that agree with the 3 statements about confidence, willingness to change and training. It would appear that a year on, not only are we no further forward in addressing the skills issues of the training staff, we are actually slipping further behind. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 44
    • Boosting Business Agility Figure 26 L&D skills and confidence with new media 70% 60% 50% Our L&D staff are confident in the use of new media 40% We train trainers to use blended solutions 30% Our internal training teams are willing to embrace new ways of 20% working 10% 0% 2008 2010 2011 Other barriers that remain a concern include the level of learner ICT skills across54% don’t have the ICT organisations at all levels of maturity, with 3 out of 10 organisations reportinginfrastructure to that learner ICT skills are a barrier to progress. However, this is less of a problemsupport the use of new in the private sector (21%) than the public (39%) or not-for-profit sectors where the proportion rises to almost one in 2 organisations (49%).media Public sector organisations have more problems with their ICT infrastructure, lack of skills for training staff and reluctance of their users The not-for-profit sector is less likely to report unreliable ICT, barriers due to cost or a lack of attractive quality content. They report fewer barriers due to staff resistance or reluctance to embrace new methods The private sector is less likely to report barriers due to learner ICT skills, or learner reluctance 5.1.1 Are top performing organisations reporting fewer barriers? Organisations in the top quartile of the Towards Maturity index not only report improved results from their learning adoption but they also report fewer barriers overall, particularly with regard to the level of engagement with senior and line managers (Figure 27). However, we continue to see that even in the top quartile there are a significant number of L&D staff that are still reluctant to embrace new methods and adopt new technologies. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 45
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building confidence Figure 27 Barrier perception decreasing with maturity 80% 70% Reluctance by L&D staff 60% Lack of skills amongst L&D staff 50% Lack of knowledge by L&D staff 40% Reluctance by users 30% Lack of skills amongst users 20% Not seen as a management priority 10% Reluctance by managers 0% TMI Bottom TMI Q3 TMI Q2 TMI Top quartile Quartile However, even in the most mature organisations: 50% of employees lack the skills to manage their own learning (62% in sample overall) 39% of learners are reluctant to use new technology (52% overall) The cost of set-up and maintenance is a huge barrier for novice organisations just getting started with learning technologies (71%, compared with an average of 50% overall). In 2010, we reported on the implementation practices of the most mature organisations and identified a number of ‘performance accelerators’ that were having the greatest effect on increasing the level and number of benefits achieved.23 These activities within the work streams also play a part in removing barriers. So far in the report we have considered the activities of top performers within the following work streams: Learner Context, specifically the motivational importance of clear alignment to job aspirations and career development Work Context – specifically work and performance culture Building capability – specifically great design and facilitating collaboration and sharing. 23 Chapter 4 of Accelerating Performance www.towardsmaturity.org/2010benchmark © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 46
    • Boosting Business Agility 5.2 Improving business partnerships Research in the spring of 2010 showed that more than half (52%) described their L&D function as slow to respond to the changing requirements of their business during economic turbulence. Only 18% of those business leaders agreed that their L&D strategy was completely aligned to their operational strategy.24 A year later, our study shows that 77% of L&D organisations are searching for ways to respond faster to the changing demands of their business. However, to what extent are they positioned to respond to that need? In the Defining Need work steam of the Towards Maturity Model we have found that top performers are much more likely to have a strategic business partnership. From a business perspective, 75% of top performers agree that their organisation assigns board level accountability for organisational learning (compared with 42% of organisations on average). From an L&D perspective top performers are twice as likely to agree that they have a learning technology strategy that allows for changing business perspectives (80% of top performers agree vs. 39% on average). However overall, Learning and Development are still weak at identifying and aligning to need: Despite continued investment in content, only 3 out of 5 are confident that their e-content is relevant to current jobs (compared to 91% of topLess than 50% are performers)confident that their Less than 50% are confident that their e-solutions support the skills thesolution supports the business needs (compared to 86% of top performers) Only 35% identify key business indicators that they want to improveskills the business through learning (compared to 63% of top performers)needs The more mature organisations have better communications with senior management, involving them at all stages of the learning and development cycle. In these organisations, managers work jointly with L&D professionals to agree strategy and targets, take training decisions and even get involved in learning design. They are also more likely to actively use and promote e-learning themselves and be interested in the results!25 And results are what really matter to business – business results, not training statistics. 24 ‘Learning to Change report’ research with senior decision makers at 100 of the UK’s largest 500 firms by turnover, conducted by Coleman Parkes on behalf of Capita 25 Strategies for engaging with management will be the subject of a later Towards Maturity In Focus report visit http://tinyurl.com/TMINFOCUS © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 47
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building confidence In the Demonstrating Value work stream of the Towards Maturity model, we see that top performers continue to build on partnerships with the business to jointly understand the impact of the learning solutions and to communicate successes widely. For example, they are more active than average in a number of areas: Understanding how learning is being applied – 49% of top performers collect information from managers on the extent to which the learning points have been applied at work (compared to 20% on average) Monitoring agreed business indicators – Top performers are twice as likely to measure performance against pre-agreed performance indicators“It has made us (53% vs. 34%)recognise the need to External benchmarking – Half of the top performers are active inexplore the possibility of benchmarking as a tool for improving performance and for proving valuee-learning much more back to the business (compared to 24% on average)than in the past as a Communicating successes – 7 out of 10 top performers regularlypotential way to offer communicate success to senior and line managers (compared to 38% onmore accessible learning average)to fit in with an agileworkforce and a more The importance of being able to demonstrate value back to the business in thecost effective way of current economic climate has not been lost on benchmark participants, This wasrolling out organisation one of the few areas within the Towards Maturity Model where activity haswide changes to policy increased the most.and procedures”(Lancashire County Buy-in occurs at all levels in the management structure, from overall board levelCouncil) accountability to the line manager. It is not just about engagement with the training budget-holder. Lack of engagement at any one point in the chain can become an obstacle to current – and future – implementation. Mature organisations are almost half as likely to report manager reluctance than average and report increased manager confidence in new approaches. They demonstrate the success of new learning approaches by addressing the issues of relevance and business alignment. 5.3 Managing change The Ensuring Engagement work stream of the Towards Maturity Model shows that top performers are proactive in managing change with all key stakeholders. Figure 28 highlights that the top performers are: More likely to have an overall communications plan for all stakeholders Work with key stakeholders to help spread the message © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 48
    • Boosting Business Agility Figure 28 Communication tactics of top performers Publish successes of individualsTop performers are Trainers promote e-learning3x more likely to Top managers promote e-learningwork with local Routine use of peer to peer feedbackchampions Clear communications plan 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% TMI Top Quartile All Top performers are also more likely to work closely with those who have influence over their learners. They are three times more likely to train local champions to act as change agents and to equip line managers with resources to encourage them to help their teams engage with the learning available to them. In Section 3.4 we discussed that top performers are also more likely to integrate with talent management strategies and have clear career progression pathways. This coupled with good communication strategies may contribute to the fact that they are 20% less likely to report reluctance by users as a barrier to adoption. 5.3.1 Leading by example Over the years we have found that when top managers are seen to use learning technologies themselves, not just promote them, this has a direct influence on business results and overall engagement. This year the number of directors now being offered e-enabled development opportunities has significantly increased. In a recent Towards Maturity Study, Reinventing Leadership Development26, we found that when top leaders are exposed to great learning and performance tools themselves, including mobile and social media, this stimulates a demand for new ways of learning and previous preferences for classroom training start to shift. 5.4 Developing the skills of the learning professionals Many L&D departments are still behind the times, but are putting in place programs to address their skills gaps, recognising requirements from the new generation of learners and the potential offered by new technologies. This was a topic commented on in detail by 86 respondents, indicative of high awareness that action is needed in this area. However as we saw earlier in this chapter, it is critical to turn awareness into action. 26 Reinventing leadership Development – published June 2011, review of use of learning technologies in leadership training with 200 organisations. http://tinyurl.co/tmleadership © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 49
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building confidence Specific skills areas mentioned by respondents include:Learning professionals areincreasingly shifting from Project managementthe role of classroom Interpersonal skillstrainer to that of Technical skillsperformance consultant: Knowledge of new media Higher level IT skills Commercial acumen Broader range of learning delivery “More projectmanagement, influence, 48% of organisations provide Continuing Professional Development to support theinterpersonal and technical use of technology in learning and encourage their L&D staff to join externalskills are needed rather networks or professional bodies. It is interesting that whilst CPD is being providedthan skills to enable for almost half, it may not be completely addressing the new skills needed in theinstructional design.” industry in order to take learning forward. This is evidenced by the fact that 60% continue to be concerned about L&D skills and confidence with new media. However, more importantly, 52% do not provide CPD and almost 1 in 5 don’t even consider doing so. “We have moved from For L&D staff: All TMI Toptraining providers to QuartilePerformance consultancy. Our organisation provides CPD opportunities to supportThe need for deep insight use of technology for learning 48% 70%into training groups They join internal interest groups to learn from each other 38% 55%remains, but the value is in They join external interest groups 54% 57%the consultancy process.” Our organisation encourages them to join external(Janssen) networks or professional bodies 48% 57% We don’t know – but they are expected to keep up to date 18% 14% We dont know – and leave it up to them 17% 8% Many encourage staff to attend learning events, conferences and general Over half of networking outside the organisation. L&D departments do 38% join internal interest groups to learn from each other 54% join external interest groups not provide any CPD for their teams Case study: Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board “The majority of our L&D staff are either from a clinical background or long established classroom trainers. We are in the process of implementing a new departmental structure which for the first time, acknowledges the need for a Learning Modernisation Manager. This role will develop L&D staff as well as other organisational staff knowledge regarding new ways of learning/learning technologies. There is a real need to overcome the barrier of fear of the unknown in staff so that they can go out and advocate these new ways of learning.” © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 50
    • Boosting Business Agility5.4.1 How much can L&D influence aspects of culture?L& D staff are a major influence on the performance culture. Where topperformers are achieving greater engagement and benefits, the trainersthemselves are more likely to: Be actively involved in the design of blended programmes and in learner engagement Blend e-learning content with their face-to-face delivery Happily embrace new media and new approaches to learning Provide ongoing online support to learners5.4.2 Responding faster to changeWe have an important window of opportunity to build confidence in new learningapproaches given that today’s businesses operate under extreme macro- andmicro-economic pressures. Those that can adapt rapidly to external andenvironmental change gain significant competitive advantage. Throughout thisreport we have seen how the strategies of top performers, in terms of theTowards Maturity Model have been able to adapt rapidly to change, increaseoverall business impact (including customer engagement), improve efficiency andenhance talent management.But what can we learn from those who are reporting results in terms of speedalone? As part of this study we looked in detail to define the most agileorganisations that are achieving the greatest results in terms of: o Benefits achieved (supporting organisational change, respond faster to changing business conditions, reduce time to competency) o Percentage improvement in time to competency o Percentage improvement in ability to change procedures or products o Percentage improvement in ability to roll out new IT systemsWhere the benefits have been quantified by respondents, the most agileorganisations are able to report: 47% reduction in time to competency 75% greater efficiency in demonstrating compliance 68% faster roll-out of new IT systems, processes or products© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 51
    • Boosting Business Agility: Building confidence The detail of this will be covered in a Towards Maturity ‘In Focus’ report27, butWarning when we compared the overall top performers (as defined by the TowardsFocusing on speed Maturity Index) with those in the top quartile of organisations reporting agilityalone may deliver short and speed alone we identified a number of differences. Those delivering benefitsterm wins at the linked to speed and agility were:expense of long term Engaging more users overallbusiness gain Reporting more benefits linked to speed and demonstrating compliance but half as likely to report benefits linked to overall productivity and increase in revenues Using more custom-made content, e-assessment and rapid development tools but less likely to connect staff and promote sharing through media such as virtual classroom, user generated content or social media More likely to cite management reluctance as a barrier to adoption Achieving more benefits in terms of reducing time to competency Half as likely to report that their staff recommend e-learning to colleagues 27 http://tinyurl.com/TMinfocus © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 52
    • Boosting Business Agility 6 Taking action Since 2003, we have seen the adoption of learning technologies and expectations of what they can achieve, accelerate. In this report, we have identified a range of alternative learning approaches that are starting to deliver bottom line results for some, but not for all. In addition, we have outlined effective practices that have been drawn from mature organisations that consistently influence those results. Many of these are just common sense, but are still not common practice. However, there is little action being taken to address some of the obvious gaps, and yet our expectations continue to rise. Here are just a few small examples: In 2011, we are less likely to agree that our learning technologies support the skills the business needs than last year (46% agree down from 51%) Learners are less likely to consider that e-learning is good for their careers (15% agree down from 21%) We are less likely to know what technology enabled learning our IT infrastructure can support (42% know this down from 58%) Our L&D teams are less confident in their use of new media (29% feel confident down from 38%) We are less likely to provide learners with job aids to support performance (30% do this down from 40%)“Insanity: doing the samething over and over again These are just a few examples but in each area, the top performers all excel.and expecting different According to Albert Einstein, given our expectations, this lack of progress might beresults.” (Albert Einstein) considered a little insane! For those working in talent, HR and learning, some of these areas are within our control, whilst others are within the remit of business managers. The economic environment is causing many business managers to question previous approaches and stimulate a demand for change. There is a clear call to action for improved partnerships with business, and one of the aims of this report is to highlight some of the tangible business benefits of new approaches to learning that will make sense to business managers. It is time to help our organisations challenge their previous experiences of learning and think again about new approaches to building skills and performance. Please use the evidence in this report to help you engage your organisation in a new conversation. The check list on the following page summarises some of the effective practices highlighted by this report where we MUST to take action if we are to move forward. There are actions outlined for L&D professionals, Business managers and areas for L&D and Business managers to work together in partnership. © Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 53
    • Boosting Business Agility: Call to Action TM Work- FOR IN FOR stream &D PROFESSIONALS PARTNERSHIP BUSINESS LEADERS Defining Need Make sure your learning Work together to identify Assign board level technology strategy allows specific business metrics accountability for for changing business that you want to change learning in your priorities organisation Learner Context Make it easier for learners Ensure learners can enjoy Recognise and reward to see how they can use flexibility and choice of achievement learning to progress their where and when to learn careers Work Context Work together with IT to Foster innovation in your Work with others to understand what business by expecting integrate learning within technology enabled staff to make time to the wider talent learning is possible in share, reflect and learn management agenda your organisation together Building Capability Invest in new own skills to Look for the best - don’t Look at the evidence for future proof your career accept ‘the course’ as new learning approaches your only option for & encourage appropriate improving performance innovation across your business Ensuring Demonstrate a Engagement Communicate! Identify e-learning commitment to e- Communicate! champions in the learning by both using Communicate! workplace who can act as learning technologies agents for change and promoting their use by others Demonstrating Value Communicate successes Work together to identify Expect results, celebrate regularly and often to the impact of learning on successes senior directors and line business performance managers© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 54
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAnnexesAnnex A - Survey design and participant demographicsFor the purpose of this study we define the term e-learning and /or learning technologies as: ‘theuse of any technology across the learning process, including skills diagnostics, learning delivery,support, management (of learners and content), informal and formal learning’.Individuals with responsibility for implementing learning technologies in the workplace were invitedto participate in a two-part online review during June and July 2011. The online review was designedin 2 main sections:The first section was a survey element asking factual questions about the benefits and barriers, skillsand technologies, users and locations for learning - continuing a longitudinal study first reported in201028. Respondents were asked to also forecast the changes in budgets and technologies expectedin 2013.Quantitative questions captured content development costs, estimates of changes in training costs,study time, delivery time and time to competency resulting from implementing LearningTechnologies. Responses were used to derive Key Performance Indicators in each of these areas.The second section was an implementation benchmark review that primarily consisted of 124 actionstatements that respondents were asked to agree or disagree with on a 9 point scale. Questionswere largely opinion-based and used to derive the Towards Maturity Index, introduced in 2010.Whilst a number of statements were added following extensive industry collaboration to reflectcurrent trends and thinking, the majority have remained consistent with earlier studies to provide acomparison of implementation behaviours over time.Data collectionThe questionnaire was designed for use by Learning and Development managers or otherindividuals, responsible for Learning Technologies in organisations. To engage with the audience, anextensive email campaign was launched from the beginning of June to the end of July 2011. Inaddition, the survey was supported by 16 supporting media and networking organisations all ofwhom distributed information and links about the survey to their contacts.As an incentive, all respondents were offered access to the Towards Maturity Benchmark Centre, torevisit their responses and receive a personalised online feedback report to support performanceimprovement. This report provided benchmark data on both factual performance indicators such asthe Towards Maturity Index29, efficiency benefits, take up and business agility together with abenchmark profile of their own implementation practice in order to highlight areas of strength andweakness.28 See ‘Accelerating performance – 2010 Benchmark Report’ www.towardsmaturity.org/2010benchmark29 See ‘Accelerating Performance – TM Benchmark Review 2010’ at www.towardsmaturity.org/2010benchmark© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 55
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAnalysisIn most cases the analysis and data presentation is a straightforward summary of the data collected,expressed in percentage terms. Since respondents could opt out of any section as they progressedthrough the survey, the actual number of the sample varies from question to question. In particular,fewer than 200 organisations were able to provide quantitative estimates of their cost and timesaving benefits achieved.Responses are segmented on the basis of several factors: 1. A personal estimation of where their organisations had reached on a maturity scale. The maturity definitions used were the same as those used over the last 6 years in the Towards Maturity reviews and questionnaires (see below) 2. The job role, sector and industry of respondents 3. The quartiles for the Towards Maturity Index.DefinitionsRespondents were invited to self-assess their degree of e-learning maturity from the following scale:Novice: We know very little about learning technology, with only the occasional use/we are investigating how we might use more but have not completed any projects.Sporadic: Our use is localised or sporadic (used in some departments or for some courses)Developing: We are developing and coordinating our use of learning technologies.Established: Learning technologies are established across the organisation and are transforming the way we manage our learning and development.Embedded: Learning technologies are thoroughly embedded within the organisation – we have a learning culture that influences our everyday work.Participant demographicsA total of 767 respondents from 643 organisations commenced the survey, with 488 completing allsections. Respondents were more evenly distributed between industry sectors than in previousstudies and were spread across private (57%), public (30%) and not-for-profit sector (13%)organisations.Table 11 Demographics of survey respondentsPrivate sector 57% Single site 17%Public sector 30% Multi-site – single nation 43%Not-for-profit sector 13% Multinational 40%Two-thirds of respondents were from the UK, with 19% from other European countries. The 2011benchmark also attracted respondents from around the world (Figure 29).Organisation size varied, ranging from micro businesses with fewer than 10 employees, to largemulti-nationals operating globally from a number of locations worldwide.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 56
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexFigure 29 Size and location of benchmark participant organisations 1000 - 4999 21% Europe 19% 5000+ 34% 500 - 999 10% USA/Canada 6% South/Central America 250 - 499 UK Asia/Pacific 1% 6% 4% 66% Middle 10 - 249 East/Africa/India 1-9 16% 4% 13%Figure 30 Industry sector and job roles of benchmark respondents Professional and Engineering and technical manufacturing 9% 9% Learning strategy and management Information and Finance and insurance Consultancy Chemical and 35% communication 12% 9% 9% pharmaceutical 3% Content Retail Health and social care development 3% 7% 7% Learning delivery Central and local 8% government, public admin Other 14% 16% All roles Technologist Administration Further and Higher 32% 7% 2% education Training 12% 6%Responses came from those working within their own organisation (78%) and those supportingexternal organisations (22%). Two thirds were L&D professionals reporting either to HR/L&D centralor within a line of business, and two-thirds had responsibility for learning strategy and managementas all or part of their job role.Table 12 Distribution of survey respondentsReporting to HR/L&D central 52%Reporting to HR/L&D within a line of business 14%Working within the line of business 34%The survey respondents reflected a similar pattern of perceived maturity to previous years. Themajority still considered that they were starting to develop and co-ordinate their use of learningtechnologies. A greater proportion of novice users responded than previously.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 57
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexThere were a higher proportion of ‘novice/sporadic’ organisations from the not-for-profit sector andembedded users than from the public or private sector. The majority of organisations describingthemselves as embedded were from the private sector.Figure 31 Relative maturity of different sectors50% 50%40% 40%30% 30%20% 20%10% 10% 0% 0% 0-1 1-3 4-6 6 - 10 10 years Novice Sporadic Developing Established Embedded years years years years plus Private Public Not for profit N=764 Private Public Not for profit N=764Figure 32 Length of time using learning technologies related to the TM Index 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 - 1 years 1 - 3 years 4 - 6 years 6 - 10 years 10 years plus TMI Quartile 4 TMI Quartile 3 TMI Quartile 2 TMI Top Quartile N=764Over 70% of respondents stated that simply taking part in the Benchmark review had provoked foodfor thought and generated new ideas to aid implementation.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 58
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAnnex B - Sample of participating organisationsA P Moller-Maersk A/S British Dental Association DuPont do Brasil S/A - Divisão Hampshire County CouncilA&N MEDIA British Gas Pioneer Sementes HandsOnResultsA1 Technologies Ltd British Red Cross Dyslexia Action Hanover Housing AssociationAble2 Consulting Ltd British Sky Broadcasting E.ON AG HaysABN AMRO Bron Afon Community Housing Ealing, Hammersmith & West HBC Vehicle ServicesAction on Hearing Loss BT Plc London College Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AGADCO Bupa Health and Wellbeing UK East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust Heineken UKAddaction Business Stream East Renfrewshire Council Hertfordshire ConstabularyADEC BWise EB Management Hertfordshire County CouncilAdhoc Learning SL Cable&Wireless Worldwide Ed Du Vivier Consulting HFC Bank LtdAdmiral Group plc Caerphill County Borough Council EDF Energy Hillingdon Adult EducationAEP Caja Madrid Editions Didier Hinton PhotographyAGSM MBA Programs, Australian Call Connection Ltd EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Hitachi Capital UKSchool of Business, UNSW Canadian Institute for Health CENTER Hitachi Data SystemsAiSolve Limited Information Edusoft Ltd. Home GroupAmplua Carillion Plc e-Learning Competence Center Home Retail GroupAnglia Ruskin University Carphone Warehouse Elements of Art GmbH HSBCAOK-Bundesverband Cell C (Pty) Ltd EMBL-EBI HSBC Merchant Services LLPAPSE Central Manchester NHS EMC Hull College GroupAQA Centrica Emirates HydratightArco Ltd Charles River Eniac Formacion IBMARI Business Solutions Chartered Insurance Institute eOrigen.com Limited ICMCArts Council Chelmsford Borough Council Equifax ICWEArup Chelsea & Westminster Hospital Ericsson Ideal Training SolutionsASCD Chichester College ESCC Identity and Passport ServiceAspen Technology Chiltern Training Ltd. Eskom IE Business SchoolAstra Zeneca Christian Aid ESS If P&C InsuranceAstriumLtd CIPS Estee Lauder Companies IFG Management LimitedAthens Technology Center S.A. Cirrus EUROGNOSI SA IHRDCAtkins Cisco Eversheds LLP IHSCSAtos City College Brighton and Hove Execom IKEA of SwedenAtradius Credit Insurance NV City of Ballarat Expert Messaging ILCUAuckland City Libraries City of Edinburgh Council Explosive Learning Solutions iLearn Forum LtdAXA France City of London Corporation Fasthosts Internet IMDAXA UK CIWM Fauna & Flora International Imperial College NHS TrustBabcock International Group, Clyde Valley L&D Project/South Fed of Norwegian Industries Improvement ServiceMarine Division Clyde Lanarkshire Council Fidessa INCBalogh-Consulting CMS Computers Ltd Fife Council Inflite Engineering Services LtdBanco Sabadell CNA Insurance Findel Education InforpressBANKIA Cogiton Technologies inc FirstGroup plc Ingersoll Rand plcBarclaycard Cognisco Ltd. Flourishing People Ltd INL Consultancy LtdBarnardos Coleman & Woolf Associates Footprint Media Innotica GroupBarnfield COMPASS Forum Corporation Institut Aminuddin BakiBaseCore Coops & Co Freshfields LLP Integrys Energy GroupBayer HealthCare Courts Service of Ireland Friends Life INTELECTUSBernd Wiest Consulting GmbH CoVE Consultancies Fruition Personal Improvement Int. Union Against TB&Lung DiseaseBest Training London South Cranfield University Fujifilm Interpeace LiberiaBetsi Cadwaladr UniHealth Board Credit Suisse Fujitsu Interserve FMBG Group CRI Fulcrum IPABhilai Engineering Corporation Cristal Global GAES, S.A. Ipsos MORILimited Croft Management Centre Ltd Gdansk University of Technology Irish Prison ServiceBinary System Engineering UK Ltd Crucible Learning & Development GE Energy Gas engines Irishlife & PermanentBMJ Group CSR plc Gebrüder Weiss gmbH Islamic ReliefBNY Mellon Cumbria County Council General Healthcare group ITS LtdBoeing Dean Foods Girlguiding UK Jaguar Land RoverBolton College Defence Academy Glasgow City Council JanssenBoodle Hatfield DWP GlaxoSmithKline John OwensBoots UK Department of Communities Gloucestershire Constabulary John Wiley & Sons ltdBorough of Poole Dept of Immigration & Citizenship Gordon Brothers Europe JRI Europe, LtdBox Hill Institute Detecon Gothaer Kalinga Institute of Social SciencesBP International Devon County Council GROUP7 Kevie & Karsten EnterpriseBracknell Forest Council Dewy Peony Grundfos Kevoy Community DevelopmentBrewin Dolphin DHL Supply Chain GSH Group Institute (KCDI)Brinker International Discovery Communications Guide Dogs King Faisal Specialist Hospital &Bristan Group Distance Learning Australia Gwynedd Council Research CenterBritish Airways plc dunnhumby Hachette UK Kirklees CollegiatesBritish American Tobacco Durham County Council Hampshire Constabulary KLM© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 59
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexKnowledge Universe National Instruments Rolls-Royce plc The Guinness PartnershipKOMPJUTER CENTAR BOR NATS Romford YMCA The Improvement ServiceKonica Minolta Business Solutions NCC Royal Artillery CentreRoyal London The Listening CompanyKPMG NCeL Royal Mail The National Autistic SocietyKPN / Getronics NDS TI RSAMD The National TrustLancashire County Council Nelsons RSA UK The Networking FirmLancashire Fire and Rescue Service Nestlé RSPCA The Open UniversityLarmer Brown NETEX Ruscello Management Services The Pensions RegulatorLBH Newport City Council Limited The Princes TrustLearn2grow NHORA HIGH SCHOOL Sabmiller plc The Rugby Football LeagueLearning Leadership NHS Blood and Transplant Saga Services / Direct Choice The IDL GroupLearning, Employment and NHS Direct Sage Think Associates LtdTraining Services NHS National Genetics EDC Salmat Thomson ReutersLegal & General NHS North Lancashire Santander UK ThornbeckLegal Services Board Nightingale SAP TimsoftLegal Services Commission North Cumbria Informatics Service Save the Children T-Mobile USALeonard Cheshire Disability North Lincolnshire Council SCA TNOLewisham College N Warwickshire & Hinckley College School of Economics and Law TomTom InternationalLincolnshire County Council Northern Trust Scitecs Torbay Care TrustLKN - LOGOS Knowledge Network Novabase Scottish Enterprise Toyota Motor EuropeLloyds Banking Group Novozymes Scottish Gas TransactLloyds Register npower Scottish Government Transport for LondonLondon Borough of Hillingdon NSPCC Scottish Social Services Council Tribeca KnowledgeLondon Business School Olympus Surgical Technologies Scottish Power TTCLondon School of Economics Europe Shakespeak TU DelftLowell On Track training Sheffield City Council U.S. Department of StateM&Co Open University of China Shell U21Global Graduate SchoolMaarif Optimum Technology Transfer Shrewsbury Sixth Form College UIMMMace Orbit L4L Signosis Sprl. United BiscuitsMacedonian Bank for OUNL Skandia United ResponseDevelopment Promotion AD OUP Skills for Justice Universiti Tenaga Nasional,KajangMacfarlan Smith Outstream Consulting SkillsTech TAFE University of Agriculture, MakurdiMacIntyre Oxford Health NHS Foundation SLO University of Applied SciencesMacmillan Cancer Support Trust Smart Education FHWienMAG Paragon Smollan University of BedfordshireMakro PDSA South Lanarkshire Council University of CanterburyMalam Consulting Pearson International South Wales Police University of GuelphManches LLP Peking University Southampton Solent University University of GuyanaManchester Business School People Partners Limited Southeastern Community College University of MiamiMarie Curie Cancer Care Personal Touch Financial Services Specsavers University of Southern QueenslandMarks and Spencer plc Pfizer Speechly Bircham University of ZululandMastervoice nv PhaseChange Consulting SSE UnumMayer Brown International LLP Philips St Mungos UPMMBDA(UK) Ltd Pilgrims Hospices Strathclyde Fire & Rescue URENCO UKMcAfee PNE Group Student Loans Co Valuation Office AgencyMDA Training PR-eMarketing Ltd. Suffolk Support Services Veale Wasbrough VizardsMEDDTL PricewaterhouseCoopers Germany Surrey County Council Venture FinanceMedical University of Graz Prudential Swiss Reinsurance Company VertaMerseyside Police PSL Business Consultants Ltd The Adolescent & Childrens Trust VitAPPMetropolitan Housing Partnership PTTEP Talent Century Chaser Sports Intl. VIUMichaels RAF No 1 Radio School Tata Interactive Systems AG VodafoneMicrosoft RBKC Tata Steel VT FlagshipMidland Heart RBS Technology for Tomorrow Waiariki Institute of TechnologyMindquest RCGP OHG Wandsworth CouncilMinster Law RCN Telefonica UK and Germany Wigan CouncilMisys Plc Readspeaker Tesco Bank Willmott DixonMJA Leadership Consulting Red Dog Communications Tesco Stores Limited Wiltshire PoliceMLP Finanzdienstleistungen AG Redaktionsbüro Porath Thames Valley Police Worcestershire County CouncilMoat Reed Learning The Blue Cross WorldLearnMoi University Renfrewshire Council The Body Shop International plc WRVSMoorfields Eye Hospital RestorEgo The Boston Consulting Group XchangingMortgage Matters Direct Rexel UK Ltd The Charity Commission Xface LtdMott MacDonald Group Ltd Rexykings Production The Chartered Institute of Payroll XylosMSD Reynolds Porter Chamberlain LLP Professionals Yum! Brands, IncNapp Pharmaceuticals RM The College of Law Zimmer, Inc.NatCen RNLI The Co-operative Financial Services ZOOM InternationalNational Audit Office Robert Gordon University The Disabilities TrustNational Autistic Society Roche Products Ltd The Garden Centre Group© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 60
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAnnex C – The Towards Maturity ModelOver the past 8 years, 1800+ organisations have progressed through the TM Learning TechnologyBenchmark Survey, allowing us to identify the behaviours that influence success in the workplace.Organisations mature in their use of learning technologies are more likely to report that e-learning take-up is increased and that the solutions are having an impact on both staff and organisational targets. TheTowards Maturity Benchmark Survey is now considered the most comprehensive, independent andauthoritative review on the use of learning technologies in the workplace in the UK and is widelyendorsed by learning and development professionals. Our work has identified 6 high-level workstreams that correlate back to maturity, business success and take up of learning. These are divided into 19 activity areas against which organisations can benchmark themselves. The 19 activity areas are made up of 124 individual actions and behaviours. The model has been proven in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors. New for 2011: a new action area has been included in 2011: Organisational Culture.As organisations mature in their use of learning technologies, they are increasingly likely to: Have strategic alignment with a clearly defined vision endorsed by business leaders, yet flexible enough to shift with changing business priorities. At a tactical level, they focus on business alignment to ensure learning is job relevant. To demonstrate an understanding of their learners in 2 ways. They provide relevant choices for their staff (in terms of control, access and information available to them) as well as addressing issues of motivation (such as recognition and personal aspiration). Proactively build IT relationships, integrating the technical environment to increase options for learners. They also offer more managerial support to staff, embedding learning within appraisal and talent management systems to create a performance-based organisational culture. Be proactive in building skills in their L&D workforce focussing on designing learning, assessing achievement, supporting learning and facilitating collaboration. Focus on managing change within the business by working with key stakeholders. This includes involving leaders to support promotion, engaging trainers to include technology within learning interventions and empowering learners so that they are engaged and confident. Gather feedback from the business, going beyond the ‘happy sheet’ to measuring effectiveness in terms of business metrics and communicating benefits back to key stakeholders.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 61
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexIn 2010, we introduced the Towards Maturity Index and set out a number of Key Performance Indicatorsthat organisations could use to benchmark their performance. Figure 33 illustrates the relative strengthof organisations in the top quartile TMI against each of the workstreams of the Towards Maturitymodel.Figure 33 Towards Maturity workstreams Defining Need Learner Context Work Context Building Capability Ensuring Engagement Demonstrating Value 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 TMI Top Quartile AllFor more information on benchmarking against the Towards Maturity model visit:www.towardsmaturity.org/mybenchmark.For a more in depth article on the Towards Maturity model – see Impact, the journal of applied researchin workplace e-learning at: http://www.towardsmaturity.org/article/2010/01/15/impact-journal-applied-research-workplace-e-learni/© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 62
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAnnex D - Towards Maturity Ambassador ProgrammeAmbassadors support the annual Benchmark Research and the identification and dissemination of goodpractice case studies. They work together as Ambassadors for change, identifying and improving goodpractice, raising awareness and driving the whole industry forward.Ambassadors share Towards Maturity’s vision and values: Encouraging learning innovation that directly impacts results in the workplace Building on, acknowledging and contributing to collective good practice Supporting the learning and education of others Building transparent, trusted and open relationships with those with whom we work Encouraging excellence from within Celebrating successAmbassador(*Founder Ambassador) What they do Expert in developing quality e-learning solutions that achieve a positive measurable impact, Brightwave provides a complete e-learning service, from bespoke content and platforms to capability building and consultancywww.brightwave.co.uk * As one of the first companies in Europe to develop computer-based training, Epic has been providing bespoke e-learning, mobile learning and blended solutions for over 25 years.www.epic.co.uk * GlobalEnglish is the only company dedicated to advancing Enterprise Fluency™: the communication and collaboration that drives high performance in a global economywww.globalenglish.com * The UK market leader for bespoke e-learning solutions, including mobile and blended learning. It also has a comprehensive learning and technical consultancy capabilitywww.line.co.uk * The UK partner for Harvard Business Publishing providing high quality resources to develop Leadership and Management Excellencewww.lmmatters.com * Designs, delivers and deploys award-winning blended learning solutions including certification-led training, virtual classrooms, e-learning andwww.redtray.co.uk* ALTO LMS.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 63
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAmbassador(*Founder Ambassador) What they do A leading provider of cloud-based Business Execution Software that includes performance and goal management, recruiting, core HR, and learning management solutionswww.successfactors.com * Enables cost effective eLearning in the Third Sector. The largest group of UK based charities collaborating to make eLearning affordable.www.charitylearning.org* Toolwire is a leading Learning Solutions provider by bringing learning to life through immersive, real world hands-on experiences.www.toolwire.com Inspired by innovation, Fusion is determined to bring about real change to the people and organisations it works with.www.fusion-universal.com/ An award-winning company delivering bespoke communication and learning solutions that make a difference for people and organisationswww.informationtransfer.com We use technology to transform lives and businesses through learning, helping 3m+ people to get the skills they need for work.www.learndirect.co.uk The global provider of award winning corporate language training focuses on software tools and blended solutions. Speexx works with many of the fortune 1,000 companies across 80 countries.www.speexx.com Provides the award winner CERTPOINTVLS™ global learning platform, which are used by companies such as L’Oréal, Honda, Black & Decker, Toyota, etc.. Forward thinking and visionary according to Gartner latest magic quadrant report. Advanced mobile delivery and social learningwww.certpointsystems.com functionalities. Our products offer the most comprehensive content alongside the most experienced and qualified consulting team in the e-learning industry.www.skillsoft.com/emea e2train is an award-winning supplier of learning, performance, talent management and succession planning technologieswww.e2train.comFind out more: www.towardsmaturity.org/ambassadors© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 64
    • Boosting Business Agility: AnnexAnnex E – About Towards MaturityTowards Maturity is a benchmarking company that provides independent expert advice and support tohelp organisations use learning technologies to accelerate business performance. It leverages the dataof its in-depth Benchmark Study, the UK’s largest learning technology benchmark, gathered by TowardsMaturity over 8 years with over 1800 organisations. The Benchmark Study forms the basis of theTowards Maturity Index, a unique indicator that measures the level of good practice using learningtechnologies in an organisation.Towards Maturity Benchmarking CentreIn January 2011, Towards Maturity launched an online Benchmarking Centre, to help organisationsimprove the impact of their learning technologies. Members of the centre are taken through astructured questionnaire that enables them to review how they have implemented their learningtechnologies and compare their results against evolving good practice. They are given their ownTowards Maturity Index (TMI) – a measure of good practice in their organisation. Each memberreceives a detailed personalised benchmark report highlighting priority action areas for improvement.The site also provides further help in the form of targeted resources, tools, checklists, hints and tips.There is also information about the services Towards Maturity provides alongside its partner networkincluding coaching, mentoring and workshops.Visit www.towardsmaturity.org/mybenchmark for more information.Towards Maturity Support and ResourcesThe Towards Maturity’s Headstart Programme helps boost the impact that learning technologies arehaving in an organisation through a tailored workshop and the use of innovative benchmarkingtools. Headstart helps an organisation review how they are currently implementing learningtechnologies, how that implementation compares to established good practices and identifies how toact going forward to increase performance. Run by leading learning consultants, our workshops andunique benchmarking tools can help at any stage of implementation.Free resources are also available to help you on your journey towards maturity in the application oflearning innovation. These include: case studies, podcasts, white papers, articles and summaries ofindustry research.To help further, we are working with our Ambassadors to create 2 new resources30 to help you use the2011-12 benchmark findings more effectively to open up new conversations with business: An infographic (created in conjunction with Brightwave) A mobile app (created in conjunction with Epic)Visit www.towardsmaturity.org for more information.Contact UsEmail: Laura@towardsmaturity.org or elearning@towardsmaturity.org Tel: +44 (0)208 542 233130 Visit www.towardsmaturity.org/2011benchmark for more information and to download these resources.© Towards Maturity CIC 2011 Page 65