Hanson Hosein: Storyteller Uprising Fall 2013
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With the decline of traditional journalism, there’s an increased need for trusted information and content. This presents a huge opportunity to individuals, communities, companies and organizations. ...

With the decline of traditional journalism, there’s an increased need for trusted information and content. This presents a huge opportunity to individuals, communities, companies and organizations. They can fill that void by telling their own multimedia stories and creating their own channels of distribution — thereby serving as trusted sources in their own right. That’s the “uprising” — people seizing control of communication by building ongoing credible connection through story and digital technology. Storyteller Uprising explains why this is now possible, and why you should harness the power of content in your own communication endeavors.

Presented by Hanson Hosein, Director, Communication Leadership graduate program at the University of Washington, Host Four Peaks TV, President, HRH Media Group (www.hrhmedia.com)

“A must-read for anyone trying to understand the changing world around us, especially anyone who’s got an idea, product or service to sell–which is anyone in any kind of business.” — Sree Sreenivasan, CNET (and Chief Digital Officer of Columbia University) “How to profit from the social media Storyteller Uprising“

“For anyone interested in media and how it’s being transformed by social media and the digital age, this is a must read. It will also give you unique perspective and things to think about, only possible from someone like Hanson Hosein who has such a fascinating background in traditional media, new media and also academia. It’s an easy read with important points on storytelling, how it’s changed due to technology but also how it’s stayed the same.” — Craig Kanalley, Senior Editor Huffington Post, “Great Read — Amazon.com review“

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Hanson Hosein: Storyteller Uprising Fall 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Storyteller  Uprising   Oct  8  2013   Hanson R Hosein hrhmedia.com @hrhmedia
  • 2. Making  the  case  for  a  Storyteller  Uprising   1.  It’s  necessary  (a/en0on  is  dying)   2.  It’s  already  happening  (best  prac0ces,  cau0onary  tales)   3.  You  will  be  le@  behind  (this  is  just  the  beginning)  
  • 3. My  program:  cl.uw.edu  
  • 4. “The  balance  of  power  is  shi@ing  from   companies  to  the  networks  that  surround   them.”  
  • 5. “You  are  leading  a  company,  but  you  are   also  leading  a  social  network.”  
  • 6. Howard  Schultz:  fourpeakstv.com  
  • 7. What  are  they  watching?  
  • 8. What  are  we  sharing?  
  • 9. More digital less TV
  • 10. More mobile less PC
  • 11. “Our  shared  stories  create  a   connection  to  others  that  builds  a   sense  of  belonging  to  a  particular   community.”   -­‐Daniel  Siegel  
  • 12. Studio  3B  30  Rockefeller  Plaza  –  Summer  1997  
  • 13. Somewhere  in  Israel  –  2000  
  • 14. Canada  2002  
  • 15. Live  from  Syria’s  border  with  Israel  –  Spring  2003  
  • 16. Rogers,  Arkansas  –  June  2005  
  • 17. The  story  that  changed  everything:   independentamerica.net  
  • 18. Success:  
  • 19. Degrees  of  engagement  cl.uw.edu  
  • 20. “Winning  the  generaUon  game”  The  Economist  
  • 21. Content  
  • 22. “[T]he  top  three  priorities  for  2013  tell  the   story  of  how  companies  are  aiming  to   build  emotional  ties  that  contribute  to   the  bottom  line.       -­‐Adobe  Quarterly  Trends  March  2013    
  • 23. 1.Use  content  to  build  brand  and   generate  inbound  leads.     -­‐Adobe  Quarterly  Trends  March  2013    
  • 24. 2.  Increase  social  media  effectiveness  to   stay  engaged  with  customers  or   prospects.     -­‐Adobe  Quarterly  Trends  March  2013    
  • 25. 3.  Increasing  conversion  rates  at  key   points  in  the  process.”     -­‐Adobe  Quarterly  Trends  March  2013    
  • 26. Ford  Fiesta  Agents  2010:  Early  adopters  
  • 27. Humans  produce  5  billion  GB  of  data…   -­‐  From  the  beginning  of  time  until  2003   -­‐  Every  two  weeks  since  2011   -­‐  Every  10  minutes  as  of  2013   Source:  IBM  VP  of  Supercomputing  2012  
  • 28. The  “digital  industrial  economy”   Source:  Gartner  October  2013  
  • 29. How  do  we  persuade  someone  to  pay     attention  to  what  we  have  to  say?  
  • 30. Once  they  notice  us,  how  do  we  keep   them  interested  enough  to  engage  in   some  sort  of  transaction?  
  • 31. Give  them  a  reason  to  connect…  
  • 32.  The  action  of  telling  a  compelling  story,  which   places  our  audiences  at  the  centre  of  the  story;   stories  that  are  designed  to  engage;  with  the   ultimate  objective  of  influencing  behaviour  
  • 33.  Stories  have  to  have  emotional  heart  and   resonance,  be  authentic,  insightful  and   truthful  
  • 34.  Stories  should  not  start  and  end  with  the   brand;  it  is  about  establishing  a  connecUon   to  the  outside  world  
  • 35. action-­‐ idea All  great  content  is   built  around  an      as   the…   as  the…  
  • 36. It’s  your  core  story,  the  essence,  reduced   to   a   simple   few   lines.   It   has   a   clear   beginning,   middle   and   end   with   an   ‘AcUon’  -­‐  or  turning  point  -­‐  that  sets  the   story  in  moUon.     An   effec0ve   one   should   be   sufficient   to   engage   and   move   those   who   hear   it,   powerful  enough  that  it  can  be  expanded   into  a  fully-­‐fledged  storytelling  campaign.    
  • 37. A  boxer  who’s  afraid  he’s  a  loser  is  offered  a  chance  by   the   world   champion   to   fight   for   the   heavyweight   championship,  but  must  learn  to  believe  in  himself  with   the  help  of  his  lover  before  he  can  step  into  the  ring.   A@er   a   twister   transports   a   lonely   Kansas   girl   to   a   magical  land,  she  sets  out  on  a  dangerous  journey  to   find  a  wizard    with  the  power  to  send  her  home.   film   I  was  an  accomplished  TV  journalist  at  the  height  of  my  career  at  NBC.    But  I   saw   young   independent   storytellers   my   age   using   digital   technology   and   I   realized  it  was  the  wave  of  the  future.    I  asked  NBC  to  allow  me  to  explore  this   technology  in  my  position,  they  said  no.    I  quit,  joined  the  CBC  and  learned  it   myself.    NBC  ended  up  calling  me  back  to  work  for  them  during  the  Iraq  War  to   use  those  same  skills.    I  then  started  my  own  company,  made  a  film  using  these   principles   of   storytelling   and   now   run   a   graduate   program   built   upon   that   foundation.   life  
  • 38. Ford  wants  to  create  buzz  around  its  new   subcompact  car  before  it  goes  on  sale  in  the   United  States.    But  its  target  demographic  of   young  drivers  don't  get  Ford,  and  see  it  as  a   stodgy  company  that  makes  pickup  trucks.    So   Ford  recruits  100  “influencers”  to  take  the  Ford   Fiesta  on  monthly  missions  for  half  a  year,  film   their  experiences  and  share  their  content  and   impressions  with  their  friends  online.    Word  of   mouth  builds,  guaranteeing  the  car  is  a  hit  as  it   hits  Ford’s  American  showrooms.  
  • 39. An  absurdly  attractive  man  asks   women  if  they’d  like  their  partners  to   look  like  him.    He  confesses  that  this   isn’t  possible.    But  if  they  can  smell  like   him  by  using  Old  Spice  Body  Wash,  the   other  desires  these  women  crave  could   be  fulfilled.  This  humorous  focus,  tied   to  a  highly  engaging  online  strategy   raises  product  brand  awareness.  
  • 40. The Man Your Man Could Smell Like
  • 41. Old  Spice  body  wash  has  lost  relevance  among  men.  P&G   wants  to  boost  sales,  increase  word-­‐of-­‐mouth.   Challenge/ Success   These  products  are  usually  purchased  by  men’s  partners.  Insight   “An  absurdly  attractive  man  asks  women  if  they’d  like  their…”    Action  Idea   Assets   Online  distribution  Super  Bowl  weekend  (when  couples  are  together),   followed  by  TV  broadcast  the  day  after  the  Super  Bowl  when  people  are   searching  online  for  event-­‐related  commercials:  FB,  YT,  TW,  blogs.   Who  and   Where    Choose  a  number  of  commenters  and  respond  directly  to  them   using  time-­‐sensitive  online  videos.       Sustain  the   story   A  series  of  short  commercial  videos,  destined  for  web  and  TV.    
  • 42. Old  Spice  Responses  Campaign  
  • 43. The  head  of  one  of  the  world’s  leading   museums,  facing  declining  attendance,  needs   to  remind  people  of  the  value  proposition  of  his   institution.    He  does  so  by  telling,  “the  story   through  the  things  that  humans  have  made”  –   one  hundred  of  the  museum’s  artifacts  that  he   considers  emblematic  of  this  shared  history.     The  stories  of  these  objects  bring  that  history   to  life,  and  inject  renewed  vibrancy  to  the   museum’s  appeal.
  • 44. As  social  media  becomes  more  popular,  the  Army  realizes   that  online  conversations  are  occurring  and  it  has  no  formal   mechanism  to  respond  (let  alone  control  those   conversations).  Some  of  what’s  being  said  is  inaccurate,   which  might  have  a  negative  effect  on  its  recruiting  efforts   as  well  as  on  the  general  sentiment  towards  the   organization.  So,  it  opts  to  tell  its  own  stories.  The  Army   hopes  to  humanize  its  mission,  as  well  as  build  trust  and   foster  conversation  among  prospective  recruits,  and  media   influencers.    It  does  so  through  the  unvarnished  stories  of   nearly  900  of  its  own  soldiers  through  a  blogging  platform   and  short  videos.    Soldiers  also  interact  with  each  other,  all   through  www.armystrongstories.com.
  • 45. BINGE  VIEWING   fourpeakstv.com     “Give  the  people  what  they   want,  when  they  want  it,  in   the  form  they  want  it  in.”         Kevin  Spacey  re:  success  of  Ne`lix’   House  of  Cards    
  • 46. Jeff  Bezos  on  customer  innovaUon:  fourpeakstv.com  
  • 47. Branded  content  at  its  best?  hdp://youtu.be/lUtnas5ScSE  
  • 48. Or  a  cauUonary  tale…hdp://FunnyOrDie.com/m/8a32  
  • 49. Yet  there’s  sUll  hope  hdp://youtu.be/faIFNkdq96U  
  • 50. From  movie  to  movement:  hdp://youtu.be/Ul9c-­‐4dX4Hk  
  • 51. From  movie  to  movement:  ImaginaUon  FoundaUon  
  • 52. Content  is   everywhere  
  • 53. 165,227  views     LESSONS?   1.  Be  quick   2.  Be  good   3.  Be  current  
  • 54. 38,000   Retweets     LESSONS?   1.  Be  quick   2.  Be  good   3.  Be  current  
  • 55. Thank  you   @hrhmedia   hrhmedia.com