Applying Psychology to Web Design

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The slides I used for my SXSW presentation:

High On Line: Applying Psychology to Web Design

Audio can be found here: http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP13717

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Applying Psychology to Web Design

  1. Behavior Driven Design 101D JASON HREHA : Behavior Driven Design 101
  2. D Jason Hreha jason.hreha@gmail www.persuasive.ly @jhreha
  3. D Co-founder of Dopamine UX Advisor @ 500 Startups
  4. D Studied Neuroscience @ Stanford Researched in the Stanford Persuasive Tech Lab
  5. D A framework
  6. D Why do we need one?
  7. D
  8. D
  9. D
  10. D
  11. D 1. Commitment 2. Consistency 3. Social Proof 4. Liking 5. Authority 6. Scarcity
  12. D
  13. D Why do these tactics work? What are we changing?
  14. D BJ FOGG
  15. D FOGG BEHAVIOR MODEL
  16. D What causes BEHAVIOR?
  17. D 3 things need to coincide for behavior to occur
  18. D 1. Ability 2. Motivation 3. Trigger
  19. D What do we need to fly a ROCKET?
  20. D Shell = Ability Fuel = Motivation Match = Trigger
  21. D Shell = Ability Fuel = Motivation Match = Trigger
  22. D RunningMotivation + Ability Time
  23. D 1. Ability + 2. Motivation + 3. Trigger
  24. D 1. Ability
  25. D BJ Fogg’s Ability Factors • Time • Money • Physical Effort • Mental Effort • Social Deviance • Non-routine (experience)
  26. D Time = proxy for how hard/ streamlined the expected experience is
  27. D The Central Question: Are we asking for too much?
  28. D Are we asking for too much money?
  29. D
  30. D
  31. D Demand curve.
  32. D Are we asking for too much text? (physical effort)
  33. D
  34. D
  35. D Are we asking for too much information? (mental effort)
  36. D
  37. D
  38. D Jason’s list • Amount of money required • Amount of text required • Amount of information required • Amount of media required • Amount of learning required (familiarity) • Equipment required
  39. D Fundamentally, it’s about: Getting to the CORE of the experience. What is absolutely necessary? Get rid of everything else.
  40. D 2. Motivation
  41. D 2 levels 1. product 2. screen-to-screen
  42. D Does the product solve a true pain point? (-) to (+)
  43. D Does it provide users with value? (-) to (+) (+) +
  44. D If you’re not solving a true problem, you’ll be treated like a game. Finished in 40 hours.
  45. D 2 levels 1. product 2. screen-to-screen
  46. D
  47. D
  48. D
  49. D
  50. D Operant Conditioning
  51. D 3. Trigger
  52. D
  53. D
  54. D On-site triggers Off-site triggers
  55. D
  56. D
  57. D Off-site triggers Emails etc.
  58. D !
  59. D !
  60. D !
  61. D !
  62. D On-site triggers Calls-to-Action (CTA)
  63. D
  64. D
  65. D
  66. D
  67. D
  68. D 1
  69. D 1 2
  70. D 1 2 3
  71. D 1 2 3 4
  72. D 1 2 3 4 5
  73. D 1 2 3 4 5 6
  74. D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  75. D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  76. D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  77. D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  78. D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11 8 9 10
  79. D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 12 etc... 11 8 9 10
  80. D Motivation Ability
  81. D Ability Motivation 1 6 11 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10
  82. D 1. Ability + 2. Motivation + 3. Trigger
  83. D The order of design: 1. Trigger + 2. Ability + 3. Motivation
  84. D BJ FOGG
  85. D Jason Hreha jason.hreha@gmail www.persuasive.ly @jhreha

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