Sound Effects in Poetry

10,543 views
10,089 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
10,543
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
157
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
86
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Sound Effects in Poetry

  1. 1. Sound Effects in PoetryAlliteration, Assonance and Rhyme& how they can contribute tomeaning
  2. 2. AlliterationRepetition of consonant soundsMy stick fingers click with a snickerLight footed my steel feelers flicker. . . I’m light like the moon
  3. 3. AssonanceRepetition of vowel soundsMy stick fingers click with a snickerLight footed my steel feelers flicker. . . I’m light like the moon
  4. 4. Focus on sound not spellinga “Sleigh,” “ rain”, “page” assonate though they are spelled differently.a “Cycle” and “sail” alliterate though they are spelled differently.a “Ice” and “fish” don’t assonate. The “ i” sound is different though it is spelled the same.
  5. 5. onomatopoeiaa Words that sound like what they mean • Some single words are onomatopoeias – buzz, ding-dong, bang, hush – meow, woof, quack – squeak, whisper, titter
  6. 6. onomatopoeia • Alliteration or assonance can create an onomatopoeia – “the monstrous anger of the guns: the stuttering rifles rapid rattle” The repeated r and t sounds make this line sound like machine gunfire
  7. 7. Rhyme--words with a similarsounda Exact Rhyme-- a Examples of Exact perfect assonance Rhyme on a stressed • cat/sat syllable followed • kitten/mitten by the exact same • bumbling/fumbling sounds • alone/stonea Eye Rhyme--looks a Examples of Eye like exact rhyme Rhyme but pronounced • Blood/Food differently Cow/Low • Love/Move
  8. 8. Near Rhymea Consonance-- same final consonant • home/same death/trutha Alliteration + Assonance+ different final sound • blade/blame tight/tidea Initial Alliteration + Consonance • blade/blood same/somea identical unstressed syllable following a different stressed sound • drowning/moaning
  9. 9. Other names for rhymesa Exact Rhyme is also called Perfect Rhyme.a Near Rhyme is also called • slant rhyme • approximate rhyme • half rhyme • off rhymea I will use “exact” and “near.”
  10. 10. Positions of rhymesaBoth rhyming words come at the end of lines = end rhyme.a At least one of the rhyming words comes at someplace other than the end = internal rhyme.
  11. 11. Positions of rhymesa The splendor falls on castle wallsa And snowy summits old in storya The long light shakes across the lakesa And the wild cataract leaps to glorya falls/walls shakes/lakes are internal rhymes. story/glory is an end rhyme. All these rhymes are exact
  12. 12. Masculine versus femininea Masculine rhymes a moon/June rhyme on a single car/star stressed syllable. a shakes/tykes a stone/alonea Feminine rhymes rhyme on a a coming/strumming stressed syllable followed by one or a quiver/shiver more unstressed a echo/gecko syllables. a sighing/fighting
  13. 13. Rhyme schemea A rhyme scheme is a pattern of end rhymes used in a poem.a Certain fixed forms call for certain rhyme schemes.a We mark a rhyme scheme by labeling the first final sound a. If the next final sound rhymes with the first it also gets an a, otherwise a b and so on.
  14. 14. Labeling a Rhyme Scheme The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  15. 15. Labeling a Rhyme Scheme The world is charged with the grandeur of God. a It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; b It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil b Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? a Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; a And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; b And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil b Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod. a
  16. 16. Look for Internal Rhyme The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  17. 17. Look for Internal Rhyme The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  18. 18. Look for Assonance andAlliteration The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  19. 19. Look for Assonance andAlliteration The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  20. 20. Look for Figures of Speech The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  21. 21. Metonymy, simile, synecdoche, hyperbole, metaphor(explained on the next pages] The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  22. 22. Metonymya “Reck his rod” is a metonymy meaning to obey God. A rod is a staff or stick such as a shepherd uses to lead his flock, but it can also be used to beat. So “reck his rod” can both mean to “fear God’s power” with rod standing for the power to punish with it, or to “follow God’s direction,” with rod standing for the process of leading.
  23. 23. Metonymy and synecdochethe soil/ Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.The soil is a synecdoche for the earth. The soil is one part of the earth, but appropriately the part associating with growing crops. Saying the soil is bare is a way of saying that the world now is experiencing some literal barrenness, as result of pollution or exhaustion of the land, practical barrenness as a result of conversion from natural or agricultural into urban usage (we could grow things but do not use the land for that purpose), and spiritual barrenness. “Foot” is a synecdoche for humanity and “being shod” is a metonymy for being civilized. Being shod literally means wearing shoes. We wear shoes as we move away from our natural state. A foot in a shoe cannot feel the earth. A person in a urban environment no longer feels an emotional or spiritual connection with nature and its creator.
  24. 24. Metaphora “Generations have trod, have trod, have trod”a This literally means that generations have marched roughly over the earth. This is a way of describing exploiting the earth for profit or other advantage with little regard for the effect on the environment.
  25. 25. More metaphorsa “seared with trade” “smeared with toil” are also metaphors for the effects of industry on the environment and our appreciation of it. To sear is to scorch, to damage by burning. To smear is to spread something (unpleasant) over something else. The peasant who works all day in the fields cannot look at them and see beauty, for they are “smeared with toil.”
  26. 26. Hyperbolea I also marked these lines “all is seared with trade, smeared, bleared with toil” as hyperboles, because Hopkins is overstating the case for effect.
  27. 27. End-stopped vs. Enjambed In end-stopped lines there is a pause in the meaning of the poem at the end of a line. In other words, the end of the line coincides with the end of a thought, or a pause in the thought. In strongly end-stopped lines the pause is created by the end of a sentence and marked by a period, question mark, exclamation point, or a semi-colon. In weakly end-stopped lines the pause is created by the end of a phrase and is marked by a comma.
  28. 28. End-stopped vs. Enjambed In enjambed lines the meaning continues on to the next line without a pause. There is no punctuation mark at the end of the line. When reading aloud, do not pause at the end of enjambed lines.
  29. 29. Which lines are end-stopped andwhich enjambed ? The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  30. 30. End-stopped vs. Enjambed The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.
  31. 31. Sound & meaninga Sound effects emphasize and link certain words to reinforce the poet’s meaning. • world charged grandeur God – linked by r and d sounds • grandeur God gathers greatness – linked by g soundsa Both examples above almost illustrate their meaning through sound effects.
  32. 32. Sound & meaninga Sound effects emphasize and link certain words to reinforce the poet’s meaning. • seared bleared smeared – linked by rhyme • smeared, smudged, smell – linked by alliteration of sm sounda Both of these examples heighten the tone of disgust by emphasizing negative words.
  33. 33. Sound & Meaninga Sound effects create cacophony or euphony and alter the flow or rhythm of the poem in ways that fit the poet’s meaning. • Cacophony--”Why do men then now nor reck his rod?” Difficult to say, slows reader down, sounds short and choppy to reflect man’s perversity. • Euphony in the second stanza reinforces the positive turn of the poem.
  34. 34. Sound & Meaninga End rhymes may embody or reinforce a theme or tone of the poem. • God/ rod emphasizes God the father’s capacity to punish heedless mankind. • Springs/wings emphasizes the uprising of the Holy Spirits loving concern for the “bent world.”
  35. 35. Sound & Meaninga A shift from exact rhyme to near rhyme or from masculine to feminine rhyme or vice versa may correspond to the meaning of that part of the poem.

×