Irony
Irony
• Awareness of a discrepancy between
appearance and reality that takes three
common forms
• Verbal irony
• Situation...
Verbal irony
• What a person says is contrary to what they
mean.
• This is different from a lie, where what a
person says ...
Types of verbal irony
• A tone that conflicts with the content of what is said (such
as describing serious events lightly,...
Types of verbal irony
• Sarcasm—saying the opposite of what you
intend with the intent to wound or shame
someone.
• “Thank...
Types of verbal irony
• Satire-using humor, exaggeration and distortion
to expose the ridiculous of an argument or practic...
Types of verbal irony
• Parody: “Taking a cue from the Oakland school district,
Fortune 500 companies should request feder...
Situational Irony
• When something happens that is contrary to what
is expected or intended.
• A child gets sick and misse...
Dramatic Irony
• The reader/audience is aware of something
that characters in the literary work don’t
recognize.
• Miss Br...
Dramatic Irony
• The reader/audience is aware of something
that characters in the literary work don’t
recognize.
• Miss Br...
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Irony

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Different types of irony

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Irony

  1. 1. Irony
  2. 2. Irony • Awareness of a discrepancy between appearance and reality that takes three common forms • Verbal irony • Situational irony • Dramatic irony
  3. 3. Verbal irony • What a person says is contrary to what they mean. • This is different from a lie, where what a person says is contrary to what they know to be true, but they do not want the contradiction to be perceived. • Jake “I’m a musician” = lie • Narrator says “Jake exaggerated greatly” = verbal irony
  4. 4. Types of verbal irony • A tone that conflicts with the content of what is said (such as describing serious events lightly, or pretending to be angry when someone has done something nice for you) • Understatement -- “I find that a little hard to believe” “Jake exaggerated greatly” “This is a sad story . . . It rained in Sarajevo and we had expected fine weather.” • Humorous exaggeration-- “I’m addicted to Dr Pepper” • Gently mocking or skeptical tone “Good morning, Sleeping Beauty” to someone who gets up late. “My hero” to someone who does a minor service.
  5. 5. Types of verbal irony • Sarcasm—saying the opposite of what you intend with the intent to wound or shame someone. • “Thanks a lot” to imply that someone has not done what they should to help you. • Calling a man a “titan of industry” after he loses all his money in a shaky business deal
  6. 6. Types of verbal irony • Satire-using humor, exaggeration and distortion to expose the ridiculous of an argument or practice often while pretending to advocate it. • The benefits [of giving all students A’s] are obvious. Students will be assured of high grade point averages and an absence of obstacles on their march toward graduation. Professors will be relieved of useless burdens and have more time to pursue their real interests. Education will no longer consume vast quantities of paper for books, compositions and examinations. Roberta Borkat “A Liberating Curriculum”
  7. 7. Types of verbal irony • Parody: “Taking a cue from the Oakland school district, Fortune 500 companies should request federal funds to teach workers Standard English. How will our employees compete in the global village if they can’t speak the same proper English used in Japan and Taiwan? While many office workers describe their dialect as lingo they use only among their upper-middle class peers and in office parks, while reverting back to normal English in public, some linguists consider office jargon to be a language separate from English.” Ted Rall “Office Jargon: Language or Dialect?”
  8. 8. Situational Irony • When something happens that is contrary to what is expected or intended. • A child gets sick and misses school on the day she is supposed to receive a perfect attendance award. • A policeman is robbed. • Oedipus fulfills the curse predicted by the oracle by trying to avoid it. • The trip that was supposed to help Piper make up his mind to divorce his wife for his girlfriend, actually led to his girlfriend dumping him
  9. 9. Dramatic Irony • The reader/audience is aware of something that characters in the literary work don’t recognize. • Miss Brill’s reflections on the old people on the benches also describe the way the young people see her. • Jake thinks he is cool and free but the reader can see that he is on a dead end life path.
  10. 10. Dramatic Irony • The reader/audience is aware of something that characters in the literary work don’t recognize. • Miss Brill’s reflections on the old people on the benches also describe the way the young people see her. • Jake thinks he is cool and free but the reader can see that he is on a dead end life path.
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